Bombay sentence example

bombay
  • The Bombay Magazine was started in 1811 and lasted but a short time.
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  • The Indian Antiquary was started at Bombay in 1872 and still continues.
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  • From 1884 to 1898 the protectorate was attached for administrative purposes to Bombay, and was immediately dependent on Aden; in the last-named year it was transferred to the Foreign Office, and in 1905 passed under the control of the Colonial Office.
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  • The Parsees in and around Bombay hold by Zoroaster as their prophet and by the ancient religious usages, but their doctrine has reached the stage of a pure monotheism.
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  • In 1886 the duke went to India and commanded the Bombay army until 1890, when he returned home.
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  • Its total course through the Central Provinces and Gujarat amounts to about Boo m., and it falls into the sea in the Bombay district of Broach.
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  • A small community (about 130) in Bombay, known as the Prarthna (Prayer) Samaj, was founded in 1867 through Keshub Chunder's influence; they have a similar creed to that of the Brahma Samaj, but have broken less decisively with orthodox and ceremonial Hinduism.
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  • The temple is now in ruins, but the entire series of gorgeous pictures recording the expedition to "the balsam land of Punt," from its leaving to its returning to Thebes, still remains intact and undefaced.4 These are the only authenticated instances of the export of incense trees from the Somali country until Colonel Playfair, then political agent at Aden, in 1862-1864, collected and sent to Bombay the specimens from which Sir George Birdwood prepared his descriptions of them for the Linnean Society in 1868.
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  • On the 28th of November the British occupied Mandalay, and next day King Thibaw was sent down the river to Rangoon, whence he was afterwards transferred to Ratnagiri on the Bombay coast.
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  • The Bombay Quarterly Magazine (1851-1853) gave place to the Bombay Quarterly Review, issued in 1855.
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  • Mingling with Siamese and Chinese, who form the major part, may be seen persons of almost every race to be found between Bombay and Japan, while Europeans of different nationalities number over 1000.
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  • The Bombay mint was set up about the year 1671, but the coins were made by hammer and anvil until 1800.
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  • The council was reduced to four members with a governor-general, who were to exercise certain indefinite powers of control over the presidencies of Madras and Bombay.
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  • All the other members of the mission died, but he proceeded from Mokha to Bombay.
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  • Coming to Bombay, he fell under the influence of Dr John Wilson, principal of the Scottish College.
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  • Recently a mission has been sent to the Falashas of Abyssinia, and much interest has been felt in such outlying branches of the Jewish people as the Black Jews of Cochin and the Bene Israel community of Bombay.
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  • The English power was rising at Calcutta, Madras and Bombay.
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  • The first collision with the English occurred in 1775, arising from a disputed succession to the peshwaship. The English government at Bombay supported one of the claimants, and the affair became critical for the English as well as for the Mahrattas.
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  • It was at this conjuncture that Warren Hastings displayed his political genius and rendered signal service to his country, by succouring from Bengal the defeated Bombay army and negotiating a peace (in 1782) that restored the status quo.
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  • The ship to which he was appointed was ordered to China, and he found opportunities during the voyage for indulging his passion for exploration, making a journey from Rio de Janeiro to the base of the Andes, and another from Bombay through India to Ceylon.
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  • In 1803 he was knighted, and received the post of recorder at Bombay.
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  • At Hormuz he embarked for India, landing at Thana, near Bombay.
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  • It is now not only the headquarters of the English naval squadron in the Persian Gulf, and the land terminus of the Indo-European telegraph, but it also forms the chief station in the Gulf of the British India Steam Navigation Company, which runs its vessels weekly between Bombay and Basra.
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  • He fled from Persia and sought protection in British territory, preferring to settle down eventually in India, making Bombay his headquarters.
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  • This prince continued the traditions and work of his father in a manner that won the approbation of the local government, and earned for him the distinction of a knighthood of the Order of the Indian Empire and a seat in the legislative council of Bombay.
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  • The famine commissioners in 1867 reported it to be the best harbour on the coast of India from the Hugli to Bombay.
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  • In 1805 Penang was made a separate presidency, ranking with Bombay and Madras; and when in 1826 Singapore and Malacca were incorporated with it, Penang continued to be the seat of government.
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  • Playfairii, when shaken with water forms a slight but permanent lather, and on this account is used by the Somali women for cleansing their hair, and by the men to whiten their shields; it is known as meena h¢rma in Bombay, and was formerly used there for the expulsion of the guinea-worm.
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  • He is said to have induced his brother to employ a Parsee to purchase artillery and small arms from the Bombay government, and to enrol some thirty sailors of different European nations as gunners, and is thus credited with having been "the first Indian who formed a corps of sepoys armed with firelocks and bayonets, and who had a train of artillery served by Europeans."
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  • The result was the treaty of April 1769, providing for the mutual restitution of all conquests, and for mutual aid and alliance in defensive war; it was followed by a commercial treaty in 1770 with the authorities of Bombay.
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  • In a suit for libel brought against him in the High Court at Bombay in 1862, he won a victory on the main issue.
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  • Certified measures of the yard, foot and inch are kept by the Commissioners of Police at Calcutta, Madras and Bombay.
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  • The water of the first boiling becomes red and thick, and when this is inspissated after the removal of the nuts it forms a catechu of high astringency and dark colour called in Bombay "Kossa."
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  • Two great rivers, the Nerbudda and Sone, take their rise at the side of the Amarkantak hill in the north-west corner of the division, the Nerbudda flowing nearly due west to the Bombay coast, the Sone ultimately falling into the Ganges in Lower Bengal.
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  • This work was continued by his son Maharshi Devendranath, of whose seven sons, Dwijendranath, the eldest, devoted himself to the study of philosophy; Satyendranath, the second, was the first Indian to enter the covenanted civil service and served for 35 years in the Bombay Presidency; and Jyotirendranath, the third, was an accomplished musician.
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  • It has a station on the Bombay and Baroda railway, 309 m.
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  • The district is traversed by the Bombay and Baroda railway, and has two seaports, Dholera and Gogo, the former of which has given its name to a mark of raw cotton in the Liverpool market.
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  • On Lord Ripon's departure from India in November 1884 there were extraordinary manifestations in his favour on the part of the Hindu population of Bengal and Bombay, and more than a thousand addresses were presented to him.
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  • She was on her way to the East Indies, carrying the newly appointed lieutenant-governor of Bombay.
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  • Though deeply mortified at the loss of the command, Wellesley in his devotion to duty moved the troops on his own responsibility from Trincomalee to Bombay, from the conviction that, if they were to be of any use in Egypt, it was absolutely necessary that they should provision at Bombay without delay.
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  • But at Bombay Wellesley was attacked by fever, and prevented from going on.
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  • The licentious practices of this sect were exposed in a lawsuit before the high court at Bombay in 1862.
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  • It extended over the whole of Bombay into Hyderabad and affected the northern districts of Madras.
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  • The resulting reaction caused a regrettable loss of life in the Madras and Bombay famine of 1876-1878; and the Famine Commission of 1880, followed by those of 1898 and 1901, laid down the principle that every possible life must be saved, but that the wages on relief works must be so regulated in relation to the market rate of wages as not to undermine the independence of the people.
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  • It lies in Malwa, near the frontier of Bombay.
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  • The principal Indian markets are Calcutta, Bombay, Karachi and Madras.
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  • Bombay was the pioneer in the custom, followed now by Calcutta and Karachi, by which deliveries of goods from British merchants remained under the control of the banks until the native dealers took them up. Manchester business with India, China, &c., is done under various conditions, however, and a good many firms have branches abroad.
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  • Barsi is a flourishing centre of trade, exporting to Bombay large quantities of cotton and oil-seeds.
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  • On the 2gth of December, when off Bahia, he fell in with the British frigate "Java" (38), which was carrying General Hislop, the governor of Bombay, to India, and took her after a sharp action.
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  • Rev.George Macalister.mainly as medical mission governed by Scotland and was working under Synod of Bombay and directed by United Prysbetarian mission calcutta.
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  • Here is the junction of the great railway system which unites Bengal with Central India and Bombay, and is developing into a great centre of inland and export trade.
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  • It is, however, an important inlet, being the channel by which the valuable produce of central Gujarat and the British districts of Ahmedabad and Broach is exported; but the railway from Bombay to Baroda and Ahmedabad, near Cambay, has for some time past been attracting the trade to itself.
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  • This vast tract comprehends the chief provinces now distributed between the presidencies of Madras and Bombay, together with the native states of Hyderabad and Mysore, and those of Kolhapur, Sawantwari, Travancore, Cochin and the petty possessions of France and Portugal.
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  • Cochin is the only port south of Bombay in which large ships can be built.
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  • Elsewhere in the Bombay presidency, in the Deccan and Gujarat, there are fewer facilities for irrigation than in other parts of India.
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  • It was found that although some irrigation works (especially in the Bombay Deccan) would never yield a direct return of or 5%, still in a famine year they might be the means of producing a crop which would go far to do away with the necessity for spending enormous sums on famine relief.
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  • In the Sholapur district of Bombay, for instance, about three years' revenue was spent on relief during the famine of 1901.
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  • Francis Cabot Lowell's son, John Lowell (1799-1836), was born in Boston, travelled in India and the East Indies on business in 1816 and 1817, in 1832 set out on a trip around the world, and on the 4th of March 1836 died in Bombay.
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  • An army of 10,000 men under an English officer, Colonel William Hicks, formerly of the Bombay army, otherwise Hicks Pasha, had been sent to suppress the revolt, and had been annihilated in a great battle fought on the 5th of November 1883, near Obeid.
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  • It possesses a branch of the Bank of Bombay, and has the largest cotton mart, where an average of 80,593 bojas of cotton are bought and sold annually.
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  • Soon afterwards, in 1835 and 1837, the sees of Madras and Bombay were founded; whilst in 1836 Broughton himself was consecrated as first bishop of Australia.
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  • The bishop of Calcutta received letters patent as metropolitan of India when the sees of Madras and Bombay were founded; and fresh patents were issued to Bishop Broughton in 1847 and Bishop Gray in 1853, as metropolitans of Australia and South Africa respectively.
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  • The chief export is ghi or clarified butter, which is sent to Arabia, Bombay and Zanzibar.
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  • Much of the white wool is exported to Persia, and now largely to Europe by Bombay.
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  • The Western Ghats form the great sea-wall of the Bombay presidency, with only a narrow strip between them and the shore.
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  • The drainage has therefore to make its way across India to the eastwards, now turning sharply round projecting ranges, now tumbling down ravines, or rushing along the valleys, until the rain which the Bombay sea-breeze has dropped upon the Western Ghats finally falls into the Bay of Bengal.
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  • Calcutta, Bombay and Madras all possess the equable climate that is induced by proximity to the sea, but Calcutta enjoys a cold season which is not to be found in the other presidency towns, while the hot season is more unendurable there.
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  • The south-west monsoon currents usually set in during the first fortnight of June on the Bombay and Bengal coasts, and give more The or less general rain in every part of India during the next three months.
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  • The Bombay monsoon, after surmounting the Ghats, blows across the peninsula as a west and sometimes in places a north-west wind; but it leaves with very little rain a strip 100 to 200 m.
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  • A branch of the Bombay current blows pretty steadily through Rajputana to the Punjab, carrying some rain to the latter province.
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  • These thirteen provinces or local governments are Ajmer-Merwara, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, British Baluchistan, Bengal, Bombay, Burma, Central Provinces prescribing the conditions and degree of social intercourse permitted between the several castes.
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  • Bombay possesses three peculiar classes of Mussulmans, each of which is specially devoted to maritime trade - the Memons, chiefly in Sind; the Borahs, mainly in Gujarat; and the Khojahs, of whom half live in the island of Bombay.
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  • More than two-fifths of the Jains in India are found in Bombay and its native states, including Baroda.
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  • The Parsees, though influential and wealthy, are a very small community, numbering only 94,000, of whom all but 7000 are found in Bombay.
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  • At that time the three universities were founded at Calcutta, Madras and Bombay; English-teaching schools were established in every district; the benefit of grants-in-aid was extended to the lower vernacular institutions and to girls' schools; and public instruction was erected into a department of the administration in every province, under a director, with a staff of inspectors.
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  • The five universities of Calcutta, Madras, Bombay, Allahabad and Lahore, which were formerly merely examining bodies, had their senates reformed by the introduction of experts; while hostels or boarding-houses for the college students were founded, so as to approach more nearly to the English ideal of residential institutions.
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  • Several of these, such as the Rurki and Sibpur engineering colleges, the college of science at Poona, the Victoria Jubilee Institute at Bombay and some of the schools of art, have shown excellent results.
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  • First stand the two presidencies of Madras (officially Fort St George) and Bombay, each of which is administered by a governor and council appointed by the crown.
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  • Bengal (including Eastern Bengal and Assam), Madras, Bombay and the old North-Western Provinces each has a high court, established by charter under an act of parliament, with judges appointed by the crown.
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  • The large towns of Calcutta, Bombay and Madras have municipalities of this character, and there are large numbers of municipal committees and local boards all over the country.
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  • There are also Port Trusts in the great maritime cities of Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, Karachi and Rangoon.
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  • In the early days of British rule no system whatever prevailed throughout the Bombay presidency; and even at the present time there are tracts where something of the old confusion survives.
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  • The general conclusion of the Famine Commission of 1901 was that " except in Bombay, where it is full, the incidence of land revenue is low to moderate in ordinary years, and it should in no way per se be the cause of indebtedness."
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  • The salt administration is in the hands of (1) the Northern India Salt Department, which is directly under the government of India, and controls the salt resources of Rajputana and the Punjab, and (2) the salt revenue authorities of Madras and Bombay.
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  • Malwa opium is exported from Bombay, the duty having previously been levied on its passage into British territory.
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  • In the Bombay Deccan districts they cover generally upwards of 60% of the grain area, or an even larger proportion in years of drought.
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  • But the mangoes of Bombay, of Multan, and of Malda in Bengal, and the oranges of Nagpur and the Khasi hills, enjoy a high reputation; while the guavas of Madras are made into an excellent preserve.
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  • Spirit is also distilled from the palmyra, especially in the neighbourhood of Bombay and in the south-east of Madras.
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  • The large and handsome oxen of Gujarat in Bombay and of Hariana in the Punjab are excellently adapted for drawing heavy loads in a sandy soil.
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  • In 1844 and 1847 the subject was actively taken up by the governments of Bombay and Madras.
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  • It is also the most prevalent and valuable product of the forests at the foot of the Ghats in Bombay, and along the Satpura and Vindhya ranges, as far as the middle of the Central Provinces.
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  • Next to agriculture, weaving is the most important industry in the country, the cotton-mills of Bombay and the jute mills of Bengal having increased greatly of recent years.
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  • But now the larger part of the cotton goods used in India is manufactured in mills in that country or in England, and the handloom weavers' output is confined to the coarsest kinds of cloth, or to certain special kinds of goods, such as the turbans and " saris " of Bombay, or the muslins of Arni, Cuddapah, and Madura in Madras, and of Dacca in Bengal.
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  • The Bombay Presidency possessed 70% of the mills and much the same percentage of spindles and looms. The industry dates from 1851, when the first mill was started.
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  • At Bombay itself large quantities of imported copper are wrought up by native braziers.
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  • Coal of varying quality exists under a very extensive area in India, being found in almost every province and native state with the exception of Bombay and Mysore.
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  • In Bombay new cotton mills were erected, and old ones extended, high-speed machinery was widely introduced, and 12,000 new looms were set up. Similarly the jute trade far surpassed all records.
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  • In the interior of the Bombay presidency, business is mainly divided between two classes, the Bunniahs of Gujarat and the Marwaris from Rajputana.
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  • In the early days of railway enterprise the agency of private companies guaranteed by the state was exclusively employed, and nearly all the great trunk lines were made under this system, but the leases of the last three of these lines, the Great Indian Peninsula, the Bombay Baroda and Central India, and the Madras companies, fell in respectively in 'goo, 1905 and 1907.
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  • In Bombay and Madras almost all the irrigation systems, except in the deltas of the chief rivers, are dependent on reservoirs or " tanks," which collect the rainfall of the adjacent hills.
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  • The company had long fixed an eye on Bombay.
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  • In 1682 Sir Josiah Child at home and Sir John Child in India formed a combination, which recognized that in the struggle between the Mogul and the Mahrattas the English must meet force with force; and in 1687 Bombay supplanted Surat as the chief seat of the English in India.
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  • In especial, they dominated over the British settlement of Bombay on the western coast, which was the last of the three presidencies to feel the lust of territorial ambition.
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  • For more than a hundred years, from its acquisition in 1661 to the outbreak of the first IIahratti war in 1775, the British on the west coast possessed no territory outside the island of Bombay and their fortified factory at Surat.
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  • The Bombay government was naturally emulous to follow the example of Madras and Bengal, and to establish its influence at the court of Poona by placing its own nominee upon the throne.
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  • Warren Hastings, who in his capacity of governor-general claimed a right of control over the decisions of the Bombay government, strongly disapproved of the treaty of Surat, but, when war once broke out, he threw the whole force of the Bengal army into the scale.
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  • These brilliant successes atoned for the disgrace of the convention of Wargaon in 1779, when the Mahrattas dictated terms to a Bombay force, but the war was protracted until 1782.
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  • The system thus organized in Bengal was afterwards extended to Madras and Bombay, when those presidencies also acquired territorial sovereignty.
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  • Elphinstone, then resident at his court, foresaw what was coming and ordered up a European regiment from Bombay.
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  • The greater part of the peshwa's dominions was ultimately incorporated in the Bombay presidency, while the nucleus of the Central Provinces was formed out of territory taken from the peshwa and the raja of Nagpur.
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  • By the Indian Councils Act 1861 the governor-general's council and also the councils at Madras and Bombay were augmented by the addition of non-official members, either natives or Europeans, for legislative purposes only; and by another act passed in the same year high courts of judicature were constituted out of the existing supreme courts and company's courts at the presidency towns.
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  • Lord Ripon's good intentions and personal sympathy were recognized by the natives, and on leaving Bombay he received the greatest ovation ever accorded to an Indian viceroy.
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  • It further authorized the addition of two members to the executive councils at Madras and Bombay, and the creation cf an executive council in Bengal and also (subject to conditions) in other provinces under a lieutenantgovernor.
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  • In Bengal, Madras and Bombay Presidencies women do not wear a skirt, only a choli and sari.
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  • The young Parsi in Bombay has adopted European dress to a great extent, except as to head-gear.
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  • Arriving at Teheran in December 1800, he was successful in negotiating favourable treaties, both political and commercial, and returned to Bombay by way of Bagdad in May 1801.
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  • In 1821 he returned once more to England, where he remained until 1827, when he was appointed governor of Bombay.
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  • From Allahabad, Cawnpore and Agra trade finds an outlet to the sea at Bombay as well as at Calcutta.
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  • Their settlement in Bombay dates only from the British occupation of that island.
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  • In 1901 the total number of Parsees in all India was 94,000, of whom all but 7000 were found in the Bombay presidency and the adjoining state of Baroda, the rest being widely scattered as traders in the large towns.
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  • In Bombay these towers are erected in a beautiful garden on the highest point of Malabar Hill, amid trees swarming with vultures; they are constructed of stone, and rise some 25 ft.
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  • In recent years many have taken to the professions of law and medicine, and a Parsee barrister was appointed a judge of the High Court at Bombay in 1906.
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  • It did not fully gather way till 1896, when plague appeared in Bombay, but our modern knowledge of the disease dates from 1894, when it attacked Hong Kong and first presented itself to accurate observation.
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  • In 1896 plague appeared in the city of Bombay.
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  • The origin of the Bombay invasion is shrouded in obscurity.
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  • It is not even known when or in what part of the city it began (Condon, The Bombay Plague).
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  • In the second of these, which occurred in the Ahmedabad district of the Bombay Presidency in 1683-89, buboes ale distinctly described.
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  • It has gone on since 1899, and it has not been confined to Bombay, but has extended over the whole of India.
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  • The most striking figures, however, are those for Bombay and Bengal which are given below, as well as the total mortality in India.
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  • According to the Plague Research Committee of Bombay, the predisposing causes are " those leading to a lower state of vitality," of which insufficient food is probably the most important.
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  • The largest incidence in Bombay was on young adults; but then they are more numerous and more exposed to infection, because they go about more than the younger and the older.
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  • Incubation is generally from four to six days, but it has been observed as short as thirty-six hours and as long as ten days (Bombay Research Committee).
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  • During the first few weeks in Bombay it was calculated by Dr Viegas to be as high as 99%.
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  • In the Bombay hospitals it was about 70% among the former, and between 30 and 40% among the latter, which was much the same as in Oporto, Sydney and Cape Town.
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  • Again, a comparison between ratinfested and rat-free districts in Bombay showed a much higher incidence of plague in the latter.
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  • A campaign against rats in Bombay, by which 50,000 or 60,000 were killed in a short time, had no effect in checking the disease.
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  • Plague-rats have rarely been found in ships sailing from infected ports; and though millions of these animals must have been carried backwards and forwards from quay to quay betweenHong-Kong, Bombay and the great European ports, they have not brought the disease ashore.
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  • The seasonal variations have been well marked and extremely regular in Bombay.
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  • This has been very thoroughly carried out at Bombay with good results.
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  • They agreed that there was strong evidence to show that " the contamination took place when the bottle was opened at Malkowal, owing to the abolition by the plague authorities of the technique prescribed by the Bombay laboratory, and to the consequent failure to sterilize the forceps which were used in opening the bottle, and which during the process were dropped on the ground "; and they complained of the inadequacy of the inquiries made by the Indian government, and called for Mr Haffkine's exoneration.
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  • The term is used in Bombay, Madras and Bengal to denote a considerable number of castes of moderate respectability, the higher of whom are considered ` clean ' Sudras, while the precise status of the lower is a question which lends itself to endless controversy."In northern and north-western India, on the other hand," the grade next below the twice-born rank is occupied by a number of castes from whose hands Brahmans and members of the higher castes will take water and certain kinds of sweetmeats.
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  • In the final judgment of the famous libel case of the Bombay Maharajas, before the Supreme Court of Bombay, in January 1862, these improprieties were severely commented upon; and though so unsparing a critic of Indian sects as Jogendra Nath seems not to believe in actual immoral practices on the part of the Maharajas, still he admits that "the corrupting influence of a religion, that can make its female votaries address amorous songs to their spiritual guides, must be very great."
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  • It thus grew into the principal city of an extensive province of the same name, stretching westward to the sea, and comprehending nearly the whole of the territory now comprised within the northern division of the presidency of Bombay.
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  • The Indian National Congress (see 14.417), which held its first session at Bombay in 1885, owes its existence to his exertions.
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  • In June 1834 he was appointed governor of Bombay, and he died in India on the 9th of July 1838.
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  • Some of the larger craft, which are called baglah, and vary from 50 to 300 tons, carry merchandise to and from Bombay, the Malabal Coast, Zanzibar, &C.; while the smaller vessels, called Oagarah, and mostly under 20 tons, are employed in the coasting trade and the pearl-fisheries on the Arabian coast.
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  • Their interests are attended to by a delegate who is appointed by the Bombay Parsis and resides at Teheran.
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  • Five launches built in the Royal Indian Marine Docks, Bombay, in 1905, at a cost of 6o,ooo rupees each, of about 8o tons.
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  • But little by little it vanished from Iran, with the exception of a few remnants (chiefly in the oasis of Yezd), the faithful finding a refuge in India at Bombay.
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  • Hence arose the counter-mission of Sir Harford Jones from the British government, which, on arrival at Bombay in April 1808, found that it had been anticipated by a previously sent mission from the governor-general of India, under Malcolm again, then holding the rank of brigadier-general.
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  • He afterwards resided many years at Bombay, where, while maintaining among natives a quasi-spiritual character, he was better known among Europeans for his doings on the turf.
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  • On the 13th of January following the Bombay government orders notified the formation of a second division under Lieut.-General Sir James Outram.
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  • The rest are natives, in Bombay chiefly Mahommedans.
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  • The dowry to be paid by Portugal was fixed at £500,000 and the cession to Great Britain of Bombay and Tangier.
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  • The annual value of the exports and imports from and into Bander Lingah from 1890 to 1905 averaged about £800,000, but nearly half of that amount is represented by pearls which pass in transit from the fisheries on the Arab coast to Bombay.
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  • The state has been surveyed for land revenue on the Bombay system.
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  • It is shipped from Bombay to northern China, where nearly the whole of the exported Malwa opium is consumed.
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  • Dymock of Bombay, speaking of western India, concurs in Richards's opinion regarding the moderate use of the drug.
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  • Goldenthal (Paris, 1839); a more popular treatise on ethics, the Kimiya us-Sa'ada, published at Lucknow, Bombay and Constantinople, ed.
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  • Calcutta and Bombay have long contested the position of the premier city of India in population and trade; but during the decade 1891-1901 the prevalence of plague in Bombay gave a considerable advantage to Calcutta, which was comparatively free from that disease.
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  • Though Calcutta was called by Macaulay "the city of palaces," its modern public buildings cannot compare with those of Bombay.
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  • Under the new system modelled upon that of the Bombay municipality, this body, styled the corporation, remains comparatively unaltered; but a large portion of their powers is transferred to a general committee, composed of twelve members, of whom one-third are elected by the corporation, one-third by certain public bodies and one-third are nominated by the government.
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  • For three following years the totals were (1902-1903) 7284; (1903-1904) 8223; and (1904-1905) 4689; but these numbers compared very favourably with the condition of Bombay at the same time.
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  • It was not until 1854 that a separate head was appointed for Bengal, who, under the style of lieutenant-governor, exercises the same powers in civil matters as those vested in the governors in council of Madras or Bombay, although subject to closer supervision by the supreme government.
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  • Advancing from Bombay Sir Hugh Rose relieved Saugor on the 3rd of February, after it had been invested by the rebels for upwards of seven months.
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  • The presidency of Bengal, in contradistinction to those of Madras and Bombay, eventually included all the British territories north of the Central Provinces, from the mouths of the Ganges and Brahmaputra to the Himalayas and the Punjab.
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  • There is no executive council, as in Madras and Bombay; but there is a board of revenue, consisting of two members.
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  • Plague first appeared at Calcutta in a sporadic form in April 1898, but down to April of the following year the total number of deaths ascribed to plague throughout the province was less than 1000, compared with 191,000 for Bombay.
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  • Bombay is the second most populous city in the Indian empire, having fallen behind Calcutta at the census of 1901.
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  • The Bombay Island, or, as it ought to be more correctly called, the Bombay Peninsula, stands out from a coast ennobled by lofty hills, and its harbour is studded by rocky islands and precipices, whose peaks rise to a great height.
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  • On a slightly raised strip of land between the head of Back Bay and the harbour is situated the fort, the nucleus of the city of Bombay.
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  • To the left of Malabar hill lies Back Bay, with a promontory on its farther shore, which marks the site of the old Bombay Fort; its walls are demolished, and the area is chiefly devoted to mercantile buildings.
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  • No city in the world has a finer water-front than Bombay.
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  • The port of Bombay (including docks and warehouses) is managed by a port trust, the members of which are nominated by the government from among the commercial community.
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  • The municipal government of the city was framed by an act of the Bombay legislative council passed in 1888.
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  • The Bombay University was constituted in 1857 as an examining body, on the model of the university of London.
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  • The chief educational institutions in Bombay City are the government Elphinstone College, two missionary colleges (Wilson and St Xavier), the Grant medical college, the government law school, the Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy school of art, and the Victoria Jubilee technical institute.
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  • Bombay is the only important place near the sea in India where the rise of the tide is sufficient to permit docks on the largest scale.
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  • The milling industry is, next to the docks, the chief feature of Bombay's commercial success.
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  • Owing to its central position between East and West and to the diversity of races in India, no city in the world can show a greater variety of type than Bombay.
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  • Bombay is the great port and meeting-place of the Eastern world.
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  • The name of the island and city of Bombay is derived from Mumba (a form of Parvati), the goddess of the Kolis, a race of husbandmen and fishermen who were the earliest known inhabitants, having occupied the island probably about the beginning of the Christian era.
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  • In the Maurya and Chalukya period (450-750) the city of Puri on Elephanta Island was the principal place in Bombay harbour.
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  • The first town built on Bombay Island was Mahikavati (Mahim),founded byKing Bhima, probably a member of the house of the Yadavas of Deogiri, as a result of Ala-ud-din Khilji's raid into the Deccan in 1294.
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  • The English had, however, long recognized its value as a naval base, and it was for this reason that they fought the battle of Swally (1614-1615), attempted to capture the place in 1626, and that the Surat Council urged the purchase of Bombay from the Portuguese.
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  • At this time Bombay was threatened by the Mahrattas from inland, by the Malabar pirates and the Dutch from the sea, and was cut off from the mainland by the Portuguese, who still occupied the island of Salsette and had established a customs-barrier in the channel between Bombay and the shore.
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  • In 1672 Aungier transferred his headquarters to Bombay, and after frightening off an imposing Dutch fleet, which in 1670 attempted to surprise the island, set to work to organize the settlement anew.
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  • The result was that the population of Bombay increased rapidly; a special quarter was set apart for the banya, or capitalist, class of Hindus; while Parsees and Armenians flocked to a city where they were secure of freedom alike for their trade and their religion.
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  • During this period, however, the position of Bombay was sufficiently precarious.
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  • Even under Aungier the Siddi admirals of the Moguls had asserted their right to use Bombay harbour as winter quarters for their fleet, though they had failed to secure it as a base against the Mahrattas.
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  • Under his weak successor (Rolt, 1677-1682), the English waters, the value of which had now been proved, became the battle-ground between the rival navies, and for some years Bombay lay at the mercy of both.
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  • A mutiny at Bombay in 1674 had only been suppressed by the execution of the ringleader; and in 1683 a more formidable movement took place under Richard Keigwin, a naval officer who had been appointed governor of St Helena in reward for the part played by him in the capture of the island from the Dutch in 1673.
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  • Keigwin, elected governor of Bombay by popular vote, issued a proclamation in the king's name, citing the "intolerable extortions, oppressions and exactions" of the Company, and declaring his government under the immediate authority of the crown.
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  • But he failed to extend the rebellion beyond Bombay; and when a letter arrived, under the royal sign manual, ordering him to surrender the fort to Sir John Child, appointed admiral and captain-general of the Company's forces, he obeyed.'
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  • Meanwhile the Company had decided to consider Bombay as "an independent settlement, and the seat of the power and trade of the English in the East Indies."
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  • But a variety of causes set back the development of the city, notably the prevalence of plague and cholera due to the silting up of the creeks that divided its component islands; and it was not till after the amalgamation of the old and new companies in 1708 that the governor's seat was transferred from Surat to Bombay.
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  • During this period, too, the importance of Bombay as a naval base, long since recognized, was increased by the building of a dock (1750), a second being added in 1762.
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  • This was still further increased by the famine of 1803, which drove large numbers of people from Konkan and the Deccan to seek employment in Bombay.
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  • The British victory over the Mahrattas and the annexation of the Deccan opened a new period of unrestricted development for Bombay.
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  • Bombay, however, soon recovered herself, and in 1891 was more prosperous than ever before; but during the ensuing decade great havoc was played by plague (q.v.) with both her population and her trade.
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  • Leaving England in the middle of August 1865, via Bombay, Livingstone arrived at Zanzibar on the 28th of January 1866.
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  • His company consisted of thirteen sepoys, ten Johanna men, nine African boys from Nasik school, Bombay, and four boys from the Shire region, besides camels, buffaloes, mules and donkeys.
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  • In 1871 the late Professor Rankine, F.R.S., whose remarkable perception of the practical fitness or unfitness of purely theoretical deductions gives his writings exceptional value, received from Major Tulloch, R.E., on behalf of the municipality of Bombay, a request to consider the subject generally, and with special reference to very high dams, such as have since been constructed in India.
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  • These views naturally met with scanty acceptance among the Brahmans to whom he introduced them, and Dayanand turned to the masses and established Samajes in various parts of India, the first being at Bombay in 1875.
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  • Within these limits lie the Portuguese settlements of Diu, Damaun and Goa, and the native state of Baroda which has direct relations with the government of India; while politically Bombay includes the settlement of Aden.
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  • The native states under the supervision of the government of Bombay are divided, historically and geographically, into two main groups.
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  • The Bombay Presidency consists of a long strip of land along the Indian Ocean from the south of the Punjab to the north of Mysore.
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  • The coast is rock-bound and difficult of access; and though it contains several bays forming fairweather ports for vessels engaged in the coasting trade, Bombay, Karachi-in-Sind, Marmagoa and Karwar alone have harbours sufficiently land-locked to protect shipping during the prevalence of the south-west monsoon.
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  • The more level parts of Bombay consist of five well-demarcated tracts - Sind, Gujarat, the Konkan, the Deccan, and the Carnatic. Sind, or the lower valley of the Indus, is very flat, with but scanty vegetation, and depending for productive ness entirely on irrigation.
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  • South of Gujarat nearly the whole of Bombay is covered by the horizontal lava flows of the Deccan Trap series, and these flows spread over the greater part of the Kathiawar peninsula and extend into Cutch.
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  • Bombay Island itself, though in general cooled by the sea breeze, is oppressively hot during May and October.
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  • Bombay Presidency possesses two great classes of forests - those of the hills and those of the alluvial plains.
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  • Wheat, generally grown in the northern part of the Presidency, but specially in Sind and Gujarat, is exported to Europe in large quantities from Karachi, and on a smaller scale from Bombay.
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  • In Khandesh the indigenous plant from which one of the lowest classes of cotton in the Bombay market takes its name has been almost entirely superseded by the superior Hinganghat variety.
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  • The chief feature of the modern industrial life of Bombay is the great development in the growth and manufacture of cotton.
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  • Large steam mills have rapidly sprung up in Bombay City, Ahmedabad and Khandesh.
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  • The industry is centred in Bombay City and Island, which contains nearly two-thirds of the mills.
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  • Silk goods are manufactured in Ahmedabad, Surat, Yeola, Nasik, Thana and Bombay, the material being often decorated with printed or woven designs; but owing to the competition of European goods most branches of the industry are declining.
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  • The province is well supplied with railways, all of which, with one exception, concentrate at Bombay City.
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  • The other chief lines are the Great Indian Peninsula, Indian Midland, Bombay, Baroda & Central India, RajputanaMalwa & Southern Mahratta systems. In 1905 the total length of railway under the Bombay government open for traffic was 7980 m.
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  • With the exception of Sind, the water-supply of the Bombay Presidency does not lend itself to the construction of large irrigation works.
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  • Under Lord Kitchener's re-arrangement of the Indian army in 1904 the old Bombay command was abolished and its place was taken by the Western army corps under a lieutenant-general.
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  • The 5th division, with headquarters at Mhow, consists of three brigades, located at Nasirabad, Jubbulpore and Jhansi, and includes the previous Mhow, Deesa, Nagpur, Nerbudda and Bundelkhand districts, with the Bombay district north of the Tapti.
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  • The 6th division, with headquarters at Poona, consists of three brigades, located at Bombay, Ahmednagar and Aden.
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  • It comprises the previous Poona district, Bombay district south of the Tapti, Belgaum district north of the Tungabhadra, and Dharwar and Aurungabad districts.
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  • The university of Bombay, established in 1857, is a body corporate, consisting of a chancellor, vice-chancellor and fellows.
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  • The governor of Bombay is ex officio chancellor.
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  • The government of Bombay is administered by a governor in council consisting of the governor as president and two ordinary members.
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  • The administration of justice throughout the presidency is conducted by a high court at Bombay, consisting of a chief justice and seven puisne judges, along with district and assistant judges throughout the districts of the presidency.
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  • In Kathiawar a chief named Bhatarka, probably of foreign origin, had established himself at Valabhi (Wala) on the ruins of the Gupta power (c. 500), and founded a dynasty which lasted until it was overthrown by Arab invaders from Sind in 77 0.1 The northern Konkan was held by the Mauryas of Puri near Bombay, the southerly coast by the Kadambas of Vanavasi, while in the southern Deccan Chalukyas and Rashtrakutas struggled for the mastery.
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  • In the middle of the 14th century the weakness of the Delhi sovereigns tempted the governors of provinces to revolt against their distant master, and to form independent kingdoms. In this way the Bahmani kingdom was established in the Deccan, and embraced a part of the Bombay presidency.
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  • During the latter part of the 17th century the Mahrattas rose into power, and almost every part of the country now comprising the presidency of Bombay fell under their sway.
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  • They next took advantage of the decay of the kingdom of Gujarat to occupy Chaul (1531), Bassein with its dependencies, including Bombay (1534), Diu (1535) and Daman (1559) But the inherent vices of their intolerant system undermined their power, even before their Dutch and English rivals appeared on the scene.
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  • The first English settlement in the Bombay presidency was in '6'8, when the East India Company established a factory at Surat, protected by a charter obtained from the emperor Jahangir.
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  • In 1626 the Dutch and English made an unsuccessful attempt to gain possession of the island of Bombay, and in 1653 proposals were suggested for its purchase from the Portuguese.
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  • So lightly was the acquisition esteemed in England, and so unsuccessful was the administration of the crown officers, that in 1668 Bombay was transferred to the East India Company for an annual payment of X10.
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  • In 1687 Bombay was placed at the head of all the Company's possessions in India; but in 1753 the government of Bombay became subordinate to that of Calcutta.
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  • In 1803 the Bombay presidency included only Salsette, the islands of the harbour (since 1774), Surat and Bankot (since 1756); but between this date and 1827 the framework of the presidency took its present shape.
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  • The Gujarat districts were taken over by the Bombay government in 1805 and enlarged in 1818; and the first measures for the settlement of Kathiawar and Mahi Kantha were taken between 1807 and 1820.
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  • But the peasantry gained on the whole more than they lost, and the trade of Bombay was not permanently injured.
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  • Sir Bartle Frere encouraged the completion of the great trunk lines of railways, and with the funds obtained by the demolition of the town walls (1862) he began the magnificent series of public buildings that now adorn Bombay.
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  • During recent times the entire history of Bombay has been sadly affected by plague and famine.
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  • The great cities of Bombay, Karachi and Poona suffered most severely.
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  • At Bombay, in March 1898, a riot begun by Mahommedan weavers was not suppressed until several Europeans had been fatally injured.
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  • Bombay, like the Central Provinces, suffered from famine twice within three years.
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  • The Bombay government exhausted its balances in 1897, and was subsequently dependent on grants from the government of India.
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  • An English translation of these last was published first in the Indian Antiquary, and then separately at Bombay, 1893.
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  • Professor Bhandarkar gave an account of the contents of many later works in his Report on the Search for Sanskrit MSS., Bombay, 1883.
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  • The Jains themselves have now printed in Bombay a complete edition of their sacred books.
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  • Portions of the state are crossed by the Bombay & Baroda and the Rajputana railways.
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  • The city of Baroda is situated on the river Viswamitri, a station on the Bombay & Baroda railway, 245 m.
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  • Accordingly, on the 1st of October 1810, having seen his work at Cawnpore crowned on the previous day by the opening of a church, he left for Calcutta, whence he sailed on the 7th of January 1811, for Bombay, which he reached on his thirtieth birthday.
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  • From Bombay he set out for Bushire, bearing letters from Sir John Malcolm to men of position there, as also at Shiraz and Isfahan.
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  • The demand in China for cotton yarn, chiefly the produce of the Bombay mills, has been steadily on the increase.
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  • Situated as the district is in the neighbourhood of the great cotton market of Khamgaon, and nearer to Bombay than the other Berar districts, markets for its agricultural produce on favourable terms are easily found.
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  • Rice, the chief export, is sent to Bombay, Berar and northern India.
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  • The south-west monsoon sweeps up the Nerbudda valley from Bombay and crossing the tableland at Neemuch gives copious supplies to Malwa, Jhalawar and Kotah and the countries which lie in the course of the Chambal river.
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  • An explanation of the outrage being demanded by the Bombay government, the sultan undertook to make compensation for the plunder of the vessel, and also agreed to sell his town and port to the English.
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  • Thence, packed in sheepand goat-skins, in quantities of 20 to 40 lb, it is carried on camels to Berbera, for shipment either to Aden, Makalla and other Arabian ports, or directly to Bombay.'
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  • At Bombay, like gum-acacia, it is assorted, and is then packed for re-exportation to Europe, China and elsewhere.
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  • Rangoon, from being a comparatively insignificant place, has within less than half a century risen to be the third seaport in British India, being surpassed only by Calcutta and Bombay in the volume of its trade.
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  • Tilak was twice elected to the Bombay Legislature for triennial terms. Again indicted for sedition in June 1908, he was sentenced by a Parsi judge (Mr. Justice Davar) to six years' transportation, afterwards commuted on account of age and health to simple imprisonment at Mandalay.
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  • The Central Provinces, Bengal and Bombay are the chief centres of hemp cultivation in India, where the plant is of most use for narcotics.
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  • Bombay sapphire had.
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  • The OR command can be shortened to a vertical bar (| ), as in [outsourcing Bombay | mumbai] .
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  • My duck salad Bombay which, curiously, came without salad, was rather dry and the king prawn brochette tasteless.
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  • Not knowing the fate that was to come or our intended destination, the boat sailed from Bombay on the 19 th of January.
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  • The powerful Bombay proletariat, concentrated in the textile mills, staged a general strike.
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  • The family house in Bombay was near the burning ghats where the dead bodies were incinerated.
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  • Bombay Sapphire, the premium gin in the translucent blue glass bottle, is closely linked to design.
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  • My daughter was quite surprised to go to Bombay, people have got mobile ' phones, the western culture is really taking over.
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  • The party Center and printing press were in Bombay.
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  • Krishna uses his last few rupees to travel to a city, which by luck of the draw turns out to be Bombay.
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  • The heart of guy pitting on pays only for Bombay sapphire had.
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  • O Waly, Waly Oliver Cromwell Born in Bombay, Patricia Rozario is the foremost internationally acclaimed Indian soprano.
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  • She set out with 29 hands from Cardiff for Bombay with coals, initially being towed by two tugs.
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  • In the 1950s he was able to meet the violinist Yehudi Menuhin who was performing in Bombay at the time.
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  • In Asia the first line was that between Bombay and Tannah, opened in 1853, and in Australia Victoria began her railway system in 1854 (see also the articles on the various countries for further details about their railways).
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  • Singapore, where plague has several times been introduced, but never taken hold, is probably quite as dirty and insanitary as Hong-Kong, and it is pertinently remarked by the Bombay Research Committee that filth per se has but little influence, inasmuch as " there occurred in the House of Correction at Byculla, where cleanliness is brought as near to perfection as is attainable, an outbreak which exceeded in severity that in any of the filthy thaw's and tenements around."
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  • Bubonic plague, of a fatal and contagious nature, first broke out in Bombay City in September 1896, and, despite all the efforts of the government, quickly spread to the surrounding country.
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  • Took a rickshaw back to the hotel to find out they did n't get us a train ticket to Bombay.
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  • Producer Christian Colson and director Danny Boyle are also trying to get at the truth, stating they have friends in Bombay that have been trying to get in touch with Rubina's father.
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  • Bombay Kids offers kids' bedroom decor and furniture in a nice selection of themes and patterns.
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  • Bombay Kids has everything you need to create a one-of-a-kind space for your son or daughter.
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  • Featuring warm colors, luxurious textures, and elegant designs, Bombay Kids has become known for its high-quality home furnishings for children of all ages.
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  • Whether you're decorating a nursery for your newborn or trying to come up with a stylish new look for your preteen daughter's bedroom, you're guaranteed to find what you need at Bombay Kids.
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  • Bombay Kids makes it easy to put together an attractive nursery for your little bundle of joy!
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  • Whether your daughter prefers Bohemian chic or vintage glam, Bombay Kids has everything she needs to turn her bedroom into the hideaway fit for a princess.
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  • Although the selection for boys is somewhat smaller than one might hope, Bombay Kids still provides plenty of attractive looks for your son's bedroom.
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  • To finish off the look, pick up a few clever accessories like Bombay's dashboard alarm clock that looks like it came straight from a vintage automobile or a basketball hoop lamp that features a glowing glass basketball.
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  • The stories of Bombay differ greatly from those of American cinema as well.
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  • While many Americans demand realism from their films (and seldom get it, although they think they do), Bombay audiences want their movies to be as far removed from life as possible.
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  • According to the MPAA, in the year 2002, Bombay produced 1,013 movies compared to Hollywood's 739. 3.6 billion tickets were sold for Bollywood's movies compared to 2.6 billion in Hollywood.
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  • Yet American movie producers took in a staggering $51 billion that year while the Bombay moviemakers raked in only $1.3 billion.
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  • Dr. Bombay even put on an appearance to fully complete the homage to the original show about a witch with a twitch.
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  • She has gone on to appear in a Broadway production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Bombay Dreams.
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  • But the government of Bombay had hurried on a rupture with the Mahratta confederacy at a time when France was on the point of declaring war against England, and when the mother-country found herself unable to subdue her rebellious colonists in America.
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  • On the part of Bombay, the Mahratta war was conducted with procrastination and disgrace.
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  • In Dec. 1920 he went to India as the representative of King George in order to inaugurate the provincial legislative councils of Madras, Bengal, and Bombay, arriving at Madras Jan.
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  • Negotiations for the marriage began during the reign of Charles I., were renewed immediately after the Restoration, and on the 23rd of June, in spite of Spanish opposition, the marriage contract was signed, England securing Tangier and Bombay, with trading privileges in Brazil and the East Indies, religious and commercial freedom in Portugal and two million Portuguese crowns (about 300,000); while Portugal obtained military and naval support against Spain and liberty of worship for Catherine.
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  • In 1873 he became interested in a project for uniting Europe and Asia by a railway to Bombay, with a branch to Peking.
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  • At Bombay, which he reached in September 1807, he was the guest of Sir James Mackintosh, whose eldest daughter he married in January 1808, proceeding soon after to Bagdad as resident.
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  • The continuation of the valley west of I-Ioshangabad forms the northern portion of the district of Nimar, the farther limit of which touches the Khandesh district of the Bombay presidency.
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  • The trade of the Central Provinces is conducted mainly by rail with Bombay and with Calcutta.
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  • In 1638 Peter Minuit on hehalf of this company established a settlement at what is now Wilmington, naming it, in honour of the infant queen Christina, Christinaham, and naming the entire territory, bought by Minuit from the Minquas Indians and extending indefinitely westward from the Delaware river between Bombay Hook and the mouth of the Schuylkill river, " New Sweden."
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  • The Calcutta and Bombay mints are still in operation.
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  • In 1819 he was appointed lieutenant-governor of Bombay and held this post till 1827, his principal achievement being the compilation of the "Elphinstone code."
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  • His connexion with the Bombay presidency was appropriately commemorated in the endowment of the Elphinstone College by the native communities, and in the erection of a marble statue by the European inhabitants.
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  • In India the metropolitan of Calcutta and the bishops of Madras and Bombay have some very limited jurisdiction which is conferred by letters patent under the authority of the statutes 53 Geo.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Bombay discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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