Boils sentence example

boils
  • It all boils down to a matter of minutes, he'd heard his masters saying.
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  • It is a colourless oil, which boils at 247° C. (745 mm.), and when pure is almost odourless.
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  • It boils at 162.6° and is decomposed violently by water.
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  • Nicoteine is a liquid which boils at 267° C. It is separated from the other alkaloids of the group by distilling off the nicotine and nicotimine in steam and then fractionating the residue.
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  • Bunsen), it melts at 310-320° C. and boils between 763-772° C. (T.
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  • At 150° C. it melts, and on the continued application of heat boils, giving off its water of crystallization.
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  • Acetamide,, CH 3 �Conh 2j is a white deliquescent crystalline solid, which melts at 82-83° C. and boils at 222° C. It is usually prepared.
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  • It is a dark-coloured crystalline solid which melts at 194° C. and boils at 268° C. It fumes in moist air and deliquesces gradually.
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  • It is a colourless pleasant-smelling liquid which boils at 154.3° C. Phenetol, phenyl ethyl ether, C 6 H 5.
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  • It boils at 139° C. and is solid at - 80° C. It is soluble in carbon bisulphide and in benzene.
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  • It is a colourless fuming liquid which boils at 152-153° C. When heated under pressure it decomposes, forming sulphuric acid, sulphuryl chloride, &c. (Ruff, Ber., 1901, 34, p. 35 0 9).
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  • Methyl Salicylate, C,H 4 (OH) CO 2 CH 31 found in oil of wintergreen, in the oil of Viola tricolor and in the root of varieties of Polygala, is a pleasant-smelling liquid which boils at 222° C. On passing dry ammonia into the boiling ester, it gives salicylamide and dimethylamine.
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  • It is a pleasantsmelling liquid which boils at 233° C. It is practically unchanged when boiled with aniline.
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  • It boils at 83-85° C. and burns with a green coloured flame.
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  • It melts at 35° C. and boils at 117° C. (14 mm.).
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  • When boiled for some time with caustic soda, it is converted into the oily a-oxime, which boils at 83-84° C. (9 mm.).
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  • It may be liquefied, its critical temperature being -93, 5°, and the liquid boils at -153.6° C. It is not a supporter of combustion, unless the sustance introduced is at a sufficiently high temperature to decompose the gas, when combustion will continue at the expense of the liberated oxygen.
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  • The liquid boils at -5° C. and the solid melts at -65° C. It forms double compounds with many metallic chlorides, and finds considerable application as a means of separating various members of the terpene group of compounds.
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  • It is a gas at ordinary temperature; when liquefied it boils at -63.5° C. and on solidification melts at -139° C. Water decomposes it into nitric and hydrofluoric acids.
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  • It boils at 52.4° C. and is soluble in water.
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  • It is a colourless aromatic-smelling oily liquid, which boils at 247° C. and readily oxidizes on exposure.
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  • Nitromethane, CH 3 NO 2, is a colourless oil which boils at 101° C. Fuming sulphuric acid decomposes it into carbon monoxide and hydroxylamine.
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  • It boils at 112°.
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  • The orthocompound melts at Io 5° C. and boils at 218° C., the para-compound melts at 54° C. and boils at 230° C. Meta-nitrotoluene (melting at 16° C.) is obtained by nitrating acetparatoluidide and then replacing the amino group by hydrogen.
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  • It is a colourless oily liquid which boils at 225°-227° C., is somewhat soluble in water, and does not give a coloration with ferric chloride.
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  • Tin fuses at about 230° C.; at a red heat it begins to volatilize slowly; at 1600° to 1800° C. it boils.
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  • It is a white solid, fusing at 250° C. to an oily liquid which boils at 606°, and volatilizing at a red heat in nitrogen, a vacuum or hydrochloric acid, without decomposition.
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  • It is a colourless fuming liquid of specific gravity 2.269 at o°; it freezes at - 33° C., and boils at I13.9°.
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  • These are passed through a vessel surrounded by a freezing mixture and on fractionating the product the hydride distils over as a colourless liquid which boils at 52° C. It is also obtained by the decomposition of lithium silicide with concentrated hydrochloric acid.
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  • It is a very stable colourless liquid which boils at 58° C. Oxygen only attacks it at very high temperatures.
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  • It is a colourless fuming liquid which boils at 146-148° C. It is decomposed by water, and also when heated between 350° and 1000° C., but it is stable both below and above these temperatures.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 210° C. Water decomposes it with the formation of silico-mesoxalic acid, HOOSi Si(OH) 2 SiOOH.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 33° C. It fumes in air and burns with a green flame.
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  • It is a colourless, strongly refracting liquid, which boils at about 220° C., slight decomposition setting in above 150° C. Water decomposes it with production of leucone.
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  • Dimethylcarbonate, CO(OCH 3) 2, is a colourless liquid, which boils at 90.6° C., and is prepared by heating the methyl ester of chlorcarbonic acid with lead oxide.
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  • It is an etherealsmelling liquid, which boils at 158-159° C., and has a specific gravity of 0.925.
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  • It boils at 93.1° C., and has a specific gravity of 1.144 (15° C.).
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  • In the oxyhydrogen flame silver boils, forming a blue vapour, while platinum volatilizes slowly, and osmium, though infusible, very readily.
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  • It may be solidified to rhombic crystals which melt at 5.4° C. (Mansfield obtained perfectly pure benzene by freezing a carefully fractionated sample.) It boils at 80 4°, and the vapour is highly inflammable, the flame being extremely smoky.
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  • The heat at which the syrup boils in the clarifiers, 220° F., has the property of separating a great deal of the gum still remaining in it, and thus cleansing the solution of sugar and water for crystallization in the vacuum pans; and if after skimming the syrup is run into separators or subsiders of any description, and allowed to settle down and cool before being drawn into the vacuum pan for crystallization, this cleansing process will be more thorough and the quality of the final product will be improved.
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  • The wholesale jam manufacturers of the present day use this sugar; they boil the jam in vacuo and secure a product that will last a long time without deteriorating, but it lacks the delicacy and distinctive flavour of fruit preserved by a careful housekeeper, who boils it in an open pan with cane sugar to a less density, though exposed for a short time to a greater heat.
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  • It is a clear, strongly refractive liquid, which has a pleasant odour; it boils at 144° and has a specific gravity of o 925 at o°.
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  • It is fairly soluble in water; too parts at o° dissolving 13.3 parts of the salt, and about 30 parts at 20°; the most saturated solution contains 327.4 parts of the salt in too of water; this solution boils at 114.1°.
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  • It fuses at 415° C. and under ordinary atmospheric pressure boils at 1040° C. Its vapour density shows that it is monatomic. The molten metal on cooling deposits crystals belonging to the hexagonal system, and freezes into a compact crystalline solid, which may be brittle or ductile according to circumstances.
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  • It is a crystalline solid, which melts at 30° C. and boils at 190 8° C. Fusion with alkalis converts it into salicylic acid.
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  • It solidifies in a freezing mixture, on the addition of a crystal of phenol, and then melts at 3 0 -4° C. It boils at 202° 8 C. Its aqueous solution is coloured bluish-violet by ferric chloride.
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  • It melts at 213° C. and boils at 351° C. It is insoluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol and ether, but readily soluble in hot benzene.
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  • At ordinary temperatures it is a gas, but may be condensed to a liquid which boils at - 6° C. It has a strong ammoniacal smell, burns readily and is exceedingly soluble in water.
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  • Trimethylamine, (CH3)3N, is very similar to dimethylamine, and condenses to a liquid which boils at 3.2-3.8° C. It is usually obtained from "vinasses," the residue obtained from the distillation of beet sugar alcohol, and is used in the manufacture of potassium bicarbonate by the Solvay process, since its hydrochloride is much more soluble than potassium carbonate.
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  • It is an alkaline liquid, which when anhydrous boils at 116.5° C. Nitrous acid converts it into ethylene oxide.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 135-136° C., and is readily soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform and benzene.
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  • Cadaverine is a syrup at ordinary temperatures, and boils at 178-179° C. It is readily soluble in water and alcohol, but only slightly soluble in ether.
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  • It is a liquid, which boils at 183° C., and is miscible in all proportions with water, alcohol and ether.
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  • In boiling liquids its formation may be prevented by adding paraffin wax; the wax melts and forms a ring on the surface of the liquid, which boils tranquilly in the centre.
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  • - The general observation that under a constant pressure a pure substance boils at a constant temperature leads to the conclusion that the distillate which comes over while the thermometer records only a small variation is of practically constant composition.
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  • A liquid boils when its vapor pressure equals the superincumbent pressure; consequently any process which diminishes the external pressure must also lower the boiling-point.
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  • Thus nitric acid, boiling-point 68°, forms a mixture with water, boiling point loo°, which boils at a constant temperature of 126°, and contains 68% of acid.
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  • Hydrochloric acid forms a similar mixture which boils at I 10° and contains 20.2% of acid.
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  • It boils at 78.3° C. (760 mm.); at - 90° C. it is a thick liquid, and at - 130° it solidifies to a white mass.
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  • Methyl bromide is a liquid, specific gravity I 73, boiling point 13°; methyl iodide has a specific gravity of 2.19, and boils at 43°.
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  • It is easily liquefied and the liquid boils at-33-7° C., and solidifies at - 75° C. to a mass of white crystals.
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  • The anhydrous acid boils at 19 0.5 C. (H Moissan), and on cooling, sets to a solid mass at - 102°.
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  • Again, pure sodium chloride melts at about 775° C., while sodium boils at 877° C., so that the margin of safety is but small if loss by vaporization is to be prevented.
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  • On heating it melts at 95.6° (Bunsen) to a liquid resembling mercury, and boils at 877.5° (Ruff and Johannsen, Ber., 1905, 38, p. 3601), yielding a vapour, colourless in thin layers but a peculiar purple, with a greenish fluorescence, when viewed through thick layers.
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  • It may be condensed to a liquid, which boils at 8° C. It is readily soluble in benzene, glacial acetic acid, and in many hydrocarbons.
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  • It fuses at 62.5°C. (Bunsen) and boils at 667°, emitting an intensely green vapour.
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  • The most saturated solution contains 205 parts of the salt to 100 of water and boils at 135°.
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  • It boils at 118°, giving a vapour of abnormal specific gravity.
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  • The free acid is a colourless liquid with a smell resembling bitter almonds; it boils at 26.1° C., and may be solidified, in which condition it melts at -14° C. It burns with a blue flame,.
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  • Acetonitrile boils at 81.6° C., and is readily miscible with water.
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  • Propionitrile boils at 97° C.; it is somewhat easily soluble in water, but is thrown out of solution by calcium chloride.
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  • Allyl cyanide boils at 119° C. Benzonitrile boils at 190.6° C. When solidified it melts att7° C. It is easily soluble in alcohol and ether.
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  • Formic acid is a colourless, sharp-smelling liquid, which crystallizes at 0° C., melts at 8.6° C. and boils at 100.8° C. Its specific gravity is 1.22 (20°/4°).
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  • It is a liquid which boils in vacuo at 150°, but at 192-195° C. under ordinary atmospheric pressure, with partial decomposition into carbon monoxide and ammonia.
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  • It is a yellow oil which boils at 59° C. (12 mm.), and possesses a stupefying odour.
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  • Benzene-azo-methane, C 6 H 5 N 2 CH 3, is a yellow oil which boils at 150° C. and is readily volatile in steam.
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  • Benzene-azoethane, C 6 H 5 N 2 C 2 H 5, is a yellow oil which boils at about 180 C. with more or less decomposition.
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  • It boils at 171.9° C., with partial conversion into crotonic acid; the transformation is complete when the acid is heated to 170-180° C. in a sealed tube.
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  • Its specific gravity is 1.0636 (-8° C.), and it boils at 179 1° C. (751 3mm).
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  • The acid solidifies when strongly cooled, the solid melting at - 47° C. Concentrated nitric acid forms with water a constant boiling mixture which boils at 120.5° C., contains 68% of acid and possesses a specific gravity of 1.414 (15.5° C.).
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  • The oil which exudes is mixed with water and heated till the water boils, and the mucilaginous matter in the oil separates as a scum.
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  • Chloroform solidifies in the cold and then melts at - 62° C.; it boils at 61.2° C., and has a specific gravity I.
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  • It is a colourless solid, which melts at 80° C., and boils at 218° C. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system; it is to be noted that aand 0-naphthol assume almost identical forms, so that these three compounds have been called isomorphous.
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  • It boils at 59° C. (12 mm.), and explodes when heated.
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  • It is a yellowish oil which melts at - 24° C.; it boils at 143-144° C., but cannot be distilled safely as it decomposes violently, giving nitrogen and ethyl fumarate.
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  • It may be condensed to a liquid, which boils at about o° C. It is a powerful methylating agent, reacting with water to form methyl alcohol, and converting acetic acid into methylacetate, hydrochloric acid into methyl chloride, hydrocyanic acid into acetonitrile, and phenol into anisol, nitrogen being eliminated in each case.
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  • Berthelot, Comptes rendus, 1878, 86, P. 71) The anhydrous hydrogen peroxide obtained by Wolffenstein boils at 84-85°C. (68 mm.); its specific gravity is 1.4996 (I.
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  • According to the above formula the critical temperature is given by 8aA/54b, and as the critical temperature is approximately proportional to the boiling-point, both being estimated on the absolute scale of temperature, we may conclude that the larger value of b corresponds to the lower boilingpoint, and indeed the isomer corresponding to the left-hand formula boils at 74°, the other at 114°.
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  • Ethyl formate, H CO 2 C 2 H 5, boils at 55° C. and has been used in the artificial preparation of rum.
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  • Ethyl acetate (acetic ether), CH3.002C2H5, boils at 75° C. Isoamylisovalerate, C4H9 C02C5Hn, boils at 196° C. and has an odour of apples.
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  • Ethyl butyrate, C3H7 C02C2H5, boils at 121° C. and has an odour of pineapple.
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  • Dimethyl sulphate, (CH3)2S04, is a colourless liquid which boils at 187 °-188° C., with partial decomposition.
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  • Ethyl nitrate, C2H5.0N02, is a colourless liquid which boils at 86.3° C. It is prepared by the action of nitric acid on ethyl alcohol (some urea being added to the nitric acid, in order to destroy any nitrous acid that might be produced in secondary reactions and which, if not removed, would cause explosive decomposition of the ethyl nitrate).
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  • The natives all carry somewhere on their face, neck, hands, arms or feet the scars of these boils which they have had as children.
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  • European children born in the country are apt to be seriously disfigured, as in their case the boils almost invariably appear on the face, and whereas native children have as a rule but one boil, those born of European parents will have several.
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  • The boils last for about a year, after which there is no more likelihood of a recurrence of the trouble than in the case of smallpox.
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  • The remaining isomer, pivalic or trimethylacetic acid, (CH3)3C C02H, melts at 35° and boils at 163°.
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  • It is a colourless liquid, with a faint aromatic smell, and boils at 206° C. On oxidation with nitric acid it is converted into benzaldehyde, whilst chromic acid oxidizes it to benzoic acid.
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  • The acid is an oily liquid of unpleasant smell, and solidifies at - 19° C.; it boils at 162.3° C., and has a specific gravity of o 9746 (o° C.).
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  • 15b-19), and are themselves smitten with boils (ix.
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  • It fuses at 290° C.; at a white heat it boils and can be distilled in hydrogen gas.
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  • It is a colourless liquid of very unpleasant smell, which boils at 198° C., and solidifies in a freezing mixture, the crystals obtained melting at -1° C. It shows all the characteristic properties of an acid chloride.
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  • It is a pleasant-smelling gas, which burns when ignited, and may be condensed to a liquid which boils at 23.6° C. It is somewhat soluble in water and readily soluble in alcohol, and concentrated sulphuric acid.
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  • It boils at 43° C. (751 mm.), and sets at -25° C. to a mass of crystalline needles.
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  • It melts at 248° and boils at 275.6°; the vapour density corresponds to the above formula.
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  • It melts at 275° and boils at 34 6.7° (759.5 mm.).
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  • It melts at 210.4° and boils at 227.5° forming a red vapour.
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  • Boils and carbuncles are rare.
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  • Succinyl chloride, obtained by the action of phosphorus pentachloride on succinic acid, is a colourless liquid which boils at 190° C. In many respects it behaves as though it were dichlorbutyro-lactone, /CC12 C 2 He >O; e.g.
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  • The substance is best prepared by drying ethyl acetate over calcium chloride and treating it with sodium wire, which is best introduced in one operation; the liquid boils and is then heated on a water bath for some hours, until the sodium all dissolves.
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  • The trihydrate melts at 114.5°, and boils at 170 0, giving off nitric acid, and leaving the basic salt Cu(NO 3) 2.3Cu(OH) 2.
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  • Diphenyl ketene, (C6H5)2C :CO, obtained by the action of zinc on diphenyl-chloracetyl chloride, is an orangered liquid which boils at 146° C. (12 mm.).
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  • It boils at 306.1° C., under a pressure of 760.32 mm.
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  • It boils at 114.5° C., and is miscible with water in all proportions.
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  • It is a crystalline solid which melts at 56° C. and boils at 204° C. It can only be diazotized in the presence of concentrated sulphuric acid, and even then the free diazonium sulphate is not stable, readily passing in the presence of water to a-oxypyridine.
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  • It melts at 64° C. and boils at 250-252° C. The aminopyridines are readily soluble in water, and resemble the aliphatic amines in their general chemical properties.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 105-106° C., and possesses an ammoniacal smell.
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  • It boils at about 100° C., attacks glass readily, is decomposed by water, and dissolves iodine.
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  • It melts at 28° and boils at 250°.
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  • Young, bromine, when dried over sulphuric acid, boils at 57.65° C., and when dried over phosphorus pentoxide, boils at 58.85° C. (under a pressure of 755.8 mm.), forming a deep red vapour, which exerts an irritating and directly poisonous action on the respiratory organs.
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  • It can be condensed to a liquid, which boils at - 64.9°C. (under a pressure of 738.2 mm.), and, by still further cooling, gives colourless crystals which melt at - 88.5° C. It is readily soluble in water, forming the aqueous acid, which when saturated at 0° C. has a specific gravity of 1.78.
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  • As phosphorus boils at 2 9 0°C. (554° F.), it is produced in the form of vapour, which, mingled with carbon monoxide, passes to the condenser, where it is condensed.
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  • It boils at 290°, forming a colourless vapour which just about the boiling-point corresponds in density to tetratomic molecules, P4; at 1500° to 1700°, however, Biltz and Meyer detected dissociation into P2 molecules.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 57°-58° C. It is insoluble in water, but soluble in alcohol and ether.
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  • It is a colourless, non-fuming gas, which gives a colourless, mobile liquid at -10° and 20 atmospheres; the liquid boils at -95° and solidifies at -160° (Moissan, Comptes rendus, 1904, 138, p. 789).
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  • Pyrophosphoryl chloride, P 2 0 3 C1 4, corresponding to pyrophosphoric acid, was obtained by Geuther and Michaelis (Ber., 1871, 4, P. 766) in the oxidation of phosphorus trichloride with nitrogen peroxide at low temperature; it is a colourless fuming liquid which boils at about 212° with some decomposition.
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  • It boils at 139°, melts at - 54°, and has a specific gravity of o 8812.
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  • It boils at 138°, melts at 15°, and has a specific gravity of o 8801 at 0°.
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  • It boils at 238° C. and is very hygroscopic. It is a tertiary base and forms well-defined salts.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 247° C. The -CH 3 group is very reactive, condensing readily with aldehydes and with phthalic anhydride.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 255° C. Chromic acid oxidizes it to cinchoninic acid (see below), whilst potassium permanganate oxidizes it to lepidinic acid (y-methylquinolinic acid) and cinchomeronic acid (see Pyridine).
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  • It melts at 22-23° C. and boils at 240° C., and behaves in most respects similarly to quinoline.
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  • It boils at 338°, and at about 400 the vapour dissociates into sulphur trioxide and water; at a red heat further decomposition ensues, the sulphur trioxide dissociating into the dioxide and water.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 11 -12° C., and its vapour burns with a luminous flame.
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  • Cyclo-pentene, C 5 H 8, a liquid obtained by the action of alcoholic potash on iodo-cyclo-pentane, boils at 45° C. Cyclopentadiene, C. 1 H 6, is found in the first runnings from crude benzene distillations.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 41° C. It rapidly polymerizes to di-cyclo-pentadiene.
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  • It boils at 80-81 ° C. Nitric acid oxidizes it to adipic acid.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 82° C. Hypochlorous acid converts it into 2-chlor-cyclo-hexanol-I, whilst potassium permanganate oxidizes it to cyclo-hexandi-ol.
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  • The 1.4 compound also boils at 81-82° C. and on oxidation gives succinic and malonic acids.
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  • Dihydro Anhydride with acetic anhydride Sodium amalgam in faintly alkaline solution Sodium amalgam (hot) .1 Hydrobromide on reduction Remove H Br from 1.3 Dihydro dibromide Cyclo-heptane Group. Cyclo-heptane (suberane), C 7 H 14, obtained by the reduction of suberyl iodide, is a liquid which boils at 117° C. On treatment with bromine in the presence of aluminium bromide it gives chiefly pentabromtoluene.
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  • It boils at 90-91° C. (23 mm.) and is readily oxidized by potassium permanganate to oxysuberic acid.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 146.3-148° C. and possesses a strong camphor odour.
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  • It is an unstable liquid which boils at 33.5° C., and on heating rapidly polymerizes to dipentene, the same change being effected by hydrochloric acid.
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  • It forms white needles (from alcohol), melts at 95° and boils at 278°.
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  • Arsenic trichloride, AsCl3, is prepared by distilling white arsenic with concentrated sulphuric acid and common salt, or by the direct union of arsenic with chlorine, or from the action of phosphorus pentachloride on white arsenic. It is a colourless oily heavy liquid of specific gravity 2.205 (o° C.), which, when pure and free from chlorine, solidifies at - 18°C., and boils at 132 °C. It is very poisonous and decomposes in moist air with evolution of white fumes.
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  • The liquid is spontaneously inflammable owing to the presence of free cacodyl, As2(CH3)4, which is also obtained by heating the oxide with zinc clippings in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide; it is a liquid of overpowering odour, and boils at 170° C. Cacodyl oxide boils at 150° C., and on exposure to air takes up oxygen and water and passes over into the crystalline cacodylic acid, thus: [(CH3)2As]2O + H2O + O2 = 2(CH3)2AsOOH.
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  • Phthalyl chloride, C 6 H 4 (COC1) 2 or C 6 H 4 (CCl2)(CO)0, formed by heating the anhydride with phosphorus chloride, is an oil which solidifies at 0° and boils at 275°.
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  • Ethyl mercaptan, C 2 H 5 .SH, is a colourless liquid which boils at 36.2° C. It is used commercially in the preparation of sulphonal.
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  • Monomethyl aniline boils at 193-195'; dimethyl aniline at 192°.
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  • In the East frankincense has been found efficacious as an external application in carbuncles, blind boils and gangrenous sores, and as an internal agent is given in gonorrhoea.
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  • Staphylococci - impetigo, ecthyma, boils, carbuncles and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome.
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  • The dress code is ' casual elegance ', which boils down to no shorts, jeans or T-shirts in the evenings.
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  • In addition, Sweaty did not think Miss Raymond would be feeling too forgiving about the mess his boils had made of her clothes.
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  • Without complicating matters at all, it boils down to a couple of basic factors.
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  • Outcomes Children identify some illnesses eg rubella, chicken pox and some conditions eg boils, tooth decay caused by microorganisms.
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  • She has come clean after a mystery illness covered her skin in boils and made her constantly nauseous and tired.
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  • Once the novelty of powering up your team has worn off, the game boils down to a great deal of rather repetitive combat.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 93° C. and with caustic alkalis polymerizes to diacetyldicyanide.
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  • Acetamide,, CH 3 �Conh 2j is a white deliquescent crystalline solid, which melts at 82-83° C. and boils at 222° C. It is usually prepared.
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  • It is a white crystalline solid of melting point 43° C.; it boils at 210° C., and it can be distilled without decomposition.
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  • It is a colourless oil, which boils at 247° C. (745 mm.), and when pure is almost odourless.
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  • Nicotimine is a colourless liquid which boils at 250 0 -255° C. Its aqueous solution is alkaline.
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  • Nicoteine is a liquid which boils at 267° C. It is separated from the other alkaloids of the group by distilling off the nicotine and nicotimine in steam and then fractionating the residue.
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  • Bunsen), it melts at 310-320° C. and boils between 763-772° C. (T.
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  • It is a dark-coloured crystalline solid which melts at 194° C. and boils at 268° C. It fumes in moist air and deliquesces gradually.
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  • It is a colourless pleasant-smelling liquid which boils at 154.3° C. Phenetol, phenyl ethyl ether, C 6 H 5.
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  • It boils at 139° C. and is solid at - 80° C. It is soluble in carbon bisulphide and in benzene.
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  • It boils at 162.6° and is decomposed violently by water.
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  • It is a colourless fuming liquid which boils at 152-153° C. When heated under pressure it decomposes, forming sulphuric acid, sulphuryl chloride, &c. (Ruff, Ber., 1901, 34, p. 35 0 9).
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  • Precipitated sulphur is also useful in the treatment of acne, but sulphurated lime is more powerful in acne pustulosa and in the appearance of crops of boils.
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  • It is a crystalline solid, which melts at 29 0 -30 0 C. and boils at 218°-219° C., and is readily soluble in alcohol and ether.
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  • At 150° C. it melts, and on the continued application of heat boils, giving off its water of crystallization.
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  • It is a feebly basic, colourless liquid which boils at 130° C., and possesses a smell resembling that of chloroform.
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  • Zinc dust and hydrochloric acid reduce pyrrol to pyrrolin (dihydropyrrol), C 4 H 6 NH, a liquid which boils at 90° C. (748 mm.); it is soluble in water and has strongly basic properties and an alkaline reaction.
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  • Methyl Salicylate, C,H 4 (OH) CO 2 CH 31 found in oil of wintergreen, in the oil of Viola tricolor and in the root of varieties of Polygala, is a pleasant-smelling liquid which boils at 222° C. On passing dry ammonia into the boiling ester, it gives salicylamide and dimethylamine.
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  • It is a pleasantsmelling liquid which boils at 233° C. It is practically unchanged when boiled with aniline.
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  • It boils at 83-85° C. and burns with a green coloured flame.
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  • It melts at 35° C. and boils at 117° C. (14 mm.).
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  • When boiled for some time with caustic soda, it is converted into the oily a-oxime, which boils at 83-84° C. (9 mm.).
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  • It may be liquefied, its critical temperature being -93, 5°, and the liquid boils at -153.6° C. It is not a supporter of combustion, unless the sustance introduced is at a sufficiently high temperature to decompose the gas, when combustion will continue at the expense of the liberated oxygen.
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  • It crystallizes in large prisms which melt at 29-30° C. to a yellowish liquid, which boils at 45-50° C. with rapid decomposition.
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  • The liquid boils at -5° C. and the solid melts at -65° C. It forms double compounds with many metallic chlorides, and finds considerable application as a means of separating various members of the terpene group of compounds.
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  • It is a gas at ordinary temperature; when liquefied it boils at -63.5° C. and on solidification melts at -139° C. Water decomposes it into nitric and hydrofluoric acids.
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  • It boils at 52.4° C. and is soluble in water.
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  • It is a colourless aromatic-smelling oily liquid, which boils at 247° C. and readily oxidizes on exposure.
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  • Nitromethane, CH 3 NO 2, is a colourless oil which boils at 101° C. Fuming sulphuric acid decomposes it into carbon monoxide and hydroxylamine.
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  • It boils at 112°.
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  • The orthocompound melts at Io 5° C. and boils at 218° C., the para-compound melts at 54° C. and boils at 230° C. Meta-nitrotoluene (melting at 16° C.) is obtained by nitrating acetparatoluidide and then replacing the amino group by hydrogen.
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  • It is a colourless oily liquid which boils at 225°-227° C., is somewhat soluble in water, and does not give a coloration with ferric chloride.
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  • Tin fuses at about 230° C.; at a red heat it begins to volatilize slowly; at 1600° to 1800° C. it boils.
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  • It is a white solid, fusing at 250° C. to an oily liquid which boils at 606°, and volatilizing at a red heat in nitrogen, a vacuum or hydrochloric acid, without decomposition.
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  • It is a colourless fuming liquid of specific gravity 2.269 at o°; it freezes at - 33° C., and boils at I13.9°.
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  • These are passed through a vessel surrounded by a freezing mixture and on fractionating the product the hydride distils over as a colourless liquid which boils at 52° C. It is also obtained by the decomposition of lithium silicide with concentrated hydrochloric acid.
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  • It is a very stable colourless liquid which boils at 58° C. Oxygen only attacks it at very high temperatures.
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  • It is a colourless fuming liquid which boils at 146-148° C. It is decomposed by water, and also when heated between 350° and 1000° C., but it is stable both below and above these temperatures.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 210° C. Water decomposes it with the formation of silico-mesoxalic acid, HOOSi Si(OH) 2 SiOOH.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 33° C. It fumes in air and burns with a green flame.
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  • It is a colourless, strongly refracting liquid, which boils at about 220° C., slight decomposition setting in above 150° C. Water decomposes it with production of leucone.
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  • Dimethylcarbonate, CO(OCH 3) 2, is a colourless liquid, which boils at 90.6° C., and is prepared by heating the methyl ester of chlorcarbonic acid with lead oxide.
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  • It is an etherealsmelling liquid, which boils at 158-159° C., and has a specific gravity of 0.925.
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  • It boils at 93.1° C., and has a specific gravity of 1.144 (15° C.).
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  • It may be solidified to rhombic crystals which melt at 5.4° C. (Mansfield obtained perfectly pure benzene by freezing a carefully fractionated sample.) It boils at 80 4°, and the vapour is highly inflammable, the flame being extremely smoky.
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  • The heat at which the syrup boils in the clarifiers, 220° F., has the property of separating a great deal of the gum still remaining in it, and thus cleansing the solution of sugar and water for crystallization in the vacuum pans; and if after skimming the syrup is run into separators or subsiders of any description, and allowed to settle down and cool before being drawn into the vacuum pan for crystallization, this cleansing process will be more thorough and the quality of the final product will be improved.
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  • It is a clear, strongly refractive liquid, which has a pleasant odour; it boils at 144° and has a specific gravity of o 925 at o°.
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  • It is fairly soluble in water; too parts at o° dissolving 13.3 parts of the salt, and about 30 parts at 20°; the most saturated solution contains 327.4 parts of the salt in too of water; this solution boils at 114.1°.
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  • It fuses at 415° C. and under ordinary atmospheric pressure boils at 1040° C. Its vapour density shows that it is monatomic. The molten metal on cooling deposits crystals belonging to the hexagonal system, and freezes into a compact crystalline solid, which may be brittle or ductile according to circumstances.
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  • It is a crystalline solid, which melts at 30° C. and boils at 190 8° C. Fusion with alkalis converts it into salicylic acid.
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  • It solidifies in a freezing mixture, on the addition of a crystal of phenol, and then melts at 3 0 -4° C. It boils at 202° 8 C. Its aqueous solution is coloured bluish-violet by ferric chloride.
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  • It melts at 213° C. and boils at 351° C. It is insoluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol and ether, but readily soluble in hot benzene.
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  • At ordinary temperatures it is a gas, but may be condensed to a liquid which boils at - 6° C. It has a strong ammoniacal smell, burns readily and is exceedingly soluble in water.
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  • Trimethylamine, (CH3)3N, is very similar to dimethylamine, and condenses to a liquid which boils at 3.2-3.8° C. It is usually obtained from "vinasses," the residue obtained from the distillation of beet sugar alcohol, and is used in the manufacture of potassium bicarbonate by the Solvay process, since its hydrochloride is much more soluble than potassium carbonate.
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  • It is an alkaline liquid, which when anhydrous boils at 116.5° C. Nitrous acid converts it into ethylene oxide.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 135-136° C., and is readily soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform and benzene.
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  • Cadaverine is a syrup at ordinary temperatures, and boils at 178-179° C. It is readily soluble in water and alcohol, but only slightly soluble in ether.
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  • It is a liquid, which boils at 183° C., and is miscible in all proportions with water, alcohol and ether.
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  • A liquid boils when its vapour pressure equals the superincumbent pressure (see Vaporization); consequently any process which diminishes the external pressure must also lower the boiling-point.
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  • Thus nitric acid, boiling-point 68°, forms a mixture with water, boiling point loo°, which boils at a constant temperature of 126°, and contains 68% of acid.
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  • Hydrochloric acid forms a similar mixture which boils at I 10° and contains 20.2% of acid.
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  • It boils at 78.3° C. (760 mm.); at - 90° C. it is a thick liquid, and at - 130° it solidifies to a white mass.
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  • Methyl bromide is a liquid, specific gravity I 73, boiling point 13°; methyl iodide has a specific gravity of 2.19, and boils at 43°.
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  • It is easily liquefied and the liquid boils at-33-7° C., and solidifies at - 75° C. to a mass of white crystals.
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  • The anhydrous acid boils at 19 0.5 C. (H Moissan), and on cooling, sets to a solid mass at - 102°.
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  • Again, pure sodium chloride melts at about 775° C., while sodium boils at 877° C., so that the margin of safety is but small if loss by vaporization is to be prevented.
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  • On heating it melts at 95.6° (Bunsen) to a liquid resembling mercury, and boils at 877.5° (Ruff and Johannsen, Ber., 1905, 38, p. 3601), yielding a vapour, colourless in thin layers but a peculiar purple, with a greenish fluorescence, when viewed through thick layers.
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  • The liquid boils at - 78.2° C. (1 atmo.), and by rapid evaporation can be made to solidify to a snow-white solid which melts at - 65° C. (see Liquid Gases).
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  • It may be condensed to a liquid, which boils at 8° C. It is readily soluble in benzene, glacial acetic acid, and in many hydrocarbons.
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  • It fuses at 62.5°C. (Bunsen) and boils at 667°, emitting an intensely green vapour.
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  • The most saturated solution contains 205 parts of the salt to 100 of water and boils at 135°.
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  • It boils at 118°, giving a vapour of abnormal specific gravity.
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  • The free acid is a colourless liquid with a smell resembling bitter almonds; it boils at 26.1° C., and may be solidified, in which condition it melts at -14° C. It burns with a blue flame,.
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  • Acetonitrile boils at 81.6° C., and is readily miscible with water.
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  • Propionitrile boils at 97° C.; it is somewhat easily soluble in water, but is thrown out of solution by calcium chloride.
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  • Allyl cyanide boils at 119° C. Benzonitrile boils at 190.6° C. When solidified it melts att7° C. It is easily soluble in alcohol and ether.
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  • Formic acid is a colourless, sharp-smelling liquid, which crystallizes at 0° C., melts at 8.6° C. and boils at 100.8° C. Its specific gravity is 1.22 (20°/4°).
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  • It is a liquid which boils in vacuo at 150°, but at 192-195° C. under ordinary atmospheric pressure, with partial decomposition into carbon monoxide and ammonia.
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  • It is a yellow oil which boils at 59° C. (12 mm.), and possesses a stupefying odour.
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  • Benzene-azo-methane, C 6 H 5 N 2 CH 3, is a yellow oil which boils at 150° C. and is readily volatile in steam.
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  • It boils at 171.9° C., with partial conversion into crotonic acid; the transformation is complete when the acid is heated to 170-180° C. in a sealed tube.
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  • Its specific gravity is 1.0636 (-8° C.), and it boils at 179 1° C. (751 3mm).
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  • The acid solidifies when strongly cooled, the solid melting at - 47° C. Concentrated nitric acid forms with water a constant boiling mixture which boils at 120.5° C., contains 68% of acid and possesses a specific gravity of 1.414 (15.5° C.).
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  • Chloroform solidifies in the cold and then melts at - 62° C.; it boils at 61.2° C., and has a specific gravity I.
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  • It is a colourless solid, which melts at 80° C., and boils at 218° C. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system; it is to be noted that aand 0-naphthol assume almost identical forms, so that these three compounds have been called isomorphous.
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  • It boils at 59° C. (12 mm.), and explodes when heated.
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  • It is a yellowish oil which melts at - 24° C.; it boils at 143-144° C., but cannot be distilled safely as it decomposes violently, giving nitrogen and ethyl fumarate.
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  • It may be condensed to a liquid, which boils at about o° C. It is a powerful methylating agent, reacting with water to form methyl alcohol, and converting acetic acid into methylacetate, hydrochloric acid into methyl chloride, hydrocyanic acid into acetonitrile, and phenol into anisol, nitrogen being eliminated in each case.
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  • Berthelot, Comptes rendus, 1878, 86, P. 71) The anhydrous hydrogen peroxide obtained by Wolffenstein boils at 84-85°C. (68 mm.); its specific gravity is 1.4996 (I.
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  • According to the above formula the critical temperature is given by 8aA/54b, and as the critical temperature is approximately proportional to the boiling-point, both being estimated on the absolute scale of temperature, we may conclude that the larger value of b corresponds to the lower boilingpoint, and indeed the isomer corresponding to the left-hand formula boils at 74°, the other at 114°.
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  • Ethyl formate, H CO 2 C 2 H 5, boils at 55° C. and has been used in the artificial preparation of rum.
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  • Ethyl acetate (acetic ether), CH3.002C2H5, boils at 75° C. Isoamylisovalerate, C4H9 C02C5Hn, boils at 196° C. and has an odour of apples.
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  • Ethyl butyrate, C3H7 C02C2H5, boils at 121° C. and has an odour of pineapple.
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  • Dimethyl sulphate, (CH3)2S04, is a colourless liquid which boils at 187 °-188° C., with partial decomposition.
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  • Ethyl nitrate, C2H5.0N02, is a colourless liquid which boils at 86.3° C. It is prepared by the action of nitric acid on ethyl alcohol (some urea being added to the nitric acid, in order to destroy any nitrous acid that might be produced in secondary reactions and which, if not removed, would cause explosive decomposition of the ethyl nitrate).
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  • The remaining isomer, pivalic or trimethylacetic acid, (CH3)3C C02H, melts at 35° and boils at 163°.
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  • It is a colourless liquid, with a faint aromatic smell, and boils at 206° C. On oxidation with nitric acid it is converted into benzaldehyde, whilst chromic acid oxidizes it to benzoic acid.
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  • The acid is an oily liquid of unpleasant smell, and solidifies at - 19° C.; it boils at 162.3° C., and has a specific gravity of o 9746 (o° C.).
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  • It fuses at 290° C.; at a white heat it boils and can be distilled in hydrogen gas.
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  • It is a colourless liquid of very unpleasant smell, which boils at 198° C., and solidifies in a freezing mixture, the crystals obtained melting at -1° C. It shows all the characteristic properties of an acid chloride.
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  • It is a pleasant-smelling gas, which burns when ignited, and may be condensed to a liquid which boils at 23.6° C. It is somewhat soluble in water and readily soluble in alcohol, and concentrated sulphuric acid.
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  • It boils at 43° C. (751 mm.), and sets at -25° C. to a mass of crystalline needles.
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  • It melts at 248° and boils at 275.6°; the vapour density corresponds to the above formula.
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  • It melts at 275° and boils at 34 6.7° (759.5 mm.).
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  • It melts at 210.4° and boils at 227.5° forming a red vapour.
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  • Succinyl chloride, obtained by the action of phosphorus pentachloride on succinic acid, is a colourless liquid which boils at 190° C. In many respects it behaves as though it were dichlorbutyro-lactone, /CC12 C 2 He >O; e.g.
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  • The trihydrate melts at 114.5°, and boils at 170 0, giving off nitric acid, and leaving the basic salt Cu(NO 3) 2.3Cu(OH) 2.
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  • Diphenyl ketene, (C6H5)2C :CO, obtained by the action of zinc on diphenyl-chloracetyl chloride, is an orangered liquid which boils at 146° C. (12 mm.).
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  • It boils at 306.1° C., under a pressure of 760.32 mm.
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  • Generally, if a solid be heated to a certain temperature, it melts or fuses, assuming the liquid condition (see Fusion); if the heating be continued the liquid boils and becomes a vapour (see Vaporization).
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  • It boils at 114.5° C., and is miscible with water in all proportions.
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  • It is a crystalline solid which melts at 56° C. and boils at 204° C. It can only be diazotized in the presence of concentrated sulphuric acid, and even then the free diazonium sulphate is not stable, readily passing in the presence of water to a-oxypyridine.
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  • It melts at 64° C. and boils at 250-252° C. The aminopyridines are readily soluble in water, and resemble the aliphatic amines in their general chemical properties.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 105-106° C., and possesses an ammoniacal smell.
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  • It boils at about 100° C., attacks glass readily, is decomposed by water, and dissolves iodine.
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  • It melts at 28° and boils at 250°.
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  • Young, bromine, when dried over sulphuric acid, boils at 57.65° C., and when dried over phosphorus pentoxide, boils at 58.85° C. (under a pressure of 755.8 mm.), forming a deep red vapour, which exerts an irritating and directly poisonous action on the respiratory organs.
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  • It can be condensed to a liquid, which boils at - 64.9°C. (under a pressure of 738.2 mm.), and, by still further cooling, gives colourless crystals which melt at - 88.5° C. It is readily soluble in water, forming the aqueous acid, which when saturated at 0° C. has a specific gravity of 1.78.
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  • As phosphorus boils at 2 9 0°C. (554° F.), it is produced in the form of vapour, which, mingled with carbon monoxide, passes to the condenser, where it is condensed.
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  • It boils at 290°, forming a colourless vapour which just about the boiling-point corresponds in density to tetratomic molecules, P4; at 1500° to 1700°, however, Biltz and Meyer detected dissociation into P2 molecules.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 57°-58° C. It is insoluble in water, but soluble in alcohol and ether.
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  • It is a colourless, non-fuming gas, which gives a colourless, mobile liquid at -10° and 20 atmospheres; the liquid boils at -95° and solidifies at -160° (Moissan, Comptes rendus, 1904, 138, p. 789).
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  • Pyrophosphoryl chloride, P 2 0 3 C1 4, corresponding to pyrophosphoric acid, was obtained by Geuther and Michaelis (Ber., 1871, 4, P. 766) in the oxidation of phosphorus trichloride with nitrogen peroxide at low temperature; it is a colourless fuming liquid which boils at about 212° with some decomposition.
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  • It boils at 139°, melts at - 54°, and has a specific gravity of o 8812.
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  • It boils at 138°, melts at 15°, and has a specific gravity of o 8801 at 0°.
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  • It boils at 238° C. and is very hygroscopic. It is a tertiary base and forms well-defined salts.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 247° C. The -CH 3 group is very reactive, condensing readily with aldehydes and with phthalic anhydride.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 255° C. Chromic acid oxidizes it to cinchoninic acid (see below), whilst potassium permanganate oxidizes it to lepidinic acid (y-methylquinolinic acid) and cinchomeronic acid (see Pyridine).
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  • It melts at 22-23° C. and boils at 240° C., and behaves in most respects similarly to quinoline.
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  • It boils at 338°, and at about 400 the vapour dissociates into sulphur trioxide and water; at a red heat further decomposition ensues, the sulphur trioxide dissociating into the dioxide and water.
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  • It is a colourless liquid which boils at 11 -12° C., and its vapour burns with a luminous flame.
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  • Cyclo-pentene, C 5 H 8, a liquid obtained by the action of alcoholic potash on iodo-cyclo-pentane, boils at 45° C. Cyclopentadiene, C. 1 H 6, is found in the first runnings from crude benzene distillations.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 41° C. It rapidly polymerizes to di-cyclo-pentadiene.
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  • It boils at 80-81 ° C. Nitric acid oxidizes it to adipic acid.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 82° C. Hypochlorous acid converts it into 2-chlor-cyclo-hexanol-I, whilst potassium permanganate oxidizes it to cyclo-hexandi-ol.
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  • The 1.4 compound also boils at 81-82° C. and on oxidation gives succinic and malonic acids.
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  • Dihydro Anhydride with acetic anhydride Sodium amalgam in faintly alkaline solution Sodium amalgam (hot) .1 Hydrobromide on reduction Remove H Br from 1.3 Dihydro dibromide Cyclo-heptane Group. Cyclo-heptane (suberane), C 7 H 14, obtained by the reduction of suberyl iodide, is a liquid which boils at 117° C. On treatment with bromine in the presence of aluminium bromide it gives chiefly pentabromtoluene.
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  • It boils at 90-91° C. (23 mm.) and is readily oxidized by potassium permanganate to oxysuberic acid.
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  • It is a liquid which boils at 146.3-148° C. and possesses a strong camphor odour.
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  • It is an unstable liquid which boils at 33.5° C., and on heating rapidly polymerizes to dipentene, the same change being effected by hydrochloric acid.
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  • It forms white needles (from alcohol), melts at 95° and boils at 278°.
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  • Arsenic trichloride, AsCl3, is prepared by distilling white arsenic with concentrated sulphuric acid and common salt, or by the direct union of arsenic with chlorine, or from the action of phosphorus pentachloride on white arsenic. It is a colourless oily heavy liquid of specific gravity 2.205 (o° C.), which, when pure and free from chlorine, solidifies at - 18°C., and boils at 132 °C. It is very poisonous and decomposes in moist air with evolution of white fumes.
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  • The liquid is spontaneously inflammable owing to the presence of free cacodyl, As2(CH3)4, which is also obtained by heating the oxide with zinc clippings in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide; it is a liquid of overpowering odour, and boils at 170° C. Cacodyl oxide boils at 150° C., and on exposure to air takes up oxygen and water and passes over into the crystalline cacodylic acid, thus: [(CH3)2As]2O + H2O + O2 = 2(CH3)2AsOOH.
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  • Phthalyl chloride, C 6 H 4 (COC1) 2 or C 6 H 4 (CCl2)(CO)0, formed by heating the anhydride with phosphorus chloride, is an oil which solidifies at 0° and boils at 275°.
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  • (See Sulphonal.) Methyl mercaptan, CH,.SH, is a liquid which boils at 5.8° C. (752 mm.), and forms a crystalline hydrate with water.
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  • Ethyl mercaptan, C 2 H 5 .SH, is a colourless liquid which boils at 36.2° C. It is used commercially in the preparation of sulphonal.
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  • Monomethyl aniline boils at 193-195'; dimethyl aniline at 192°.
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  • The U.S. and British proposal boils down to a further toughening of sanctions against Baghdad.
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  • Finances. Sometimes, the swaying factor in your argument for adoption boils down to money.
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  • The difference between daytime and nighttime potty training basically boils down to a learned action versus a physiological development.
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  • How you approach the potty training issue really boils down to your choice, and it doesn't have to be an either/or approach.
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  • In many cases, once you've checked for safety issues, your decision boils down to how well a high chair matches your decor and how much space you have at your table and in your kitchen or dining area.
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  • It all boils down to the numbers: the bigger the debt, the more attention it requires.
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  • No matter how it is phrased, renewable energy all boils down as a way to harvest electricity and fuel to power our lives without causing destructive damage to the environment.
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  • Please see a medical professional for repeated infections or boils that don't respond to treatment.
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  • Whether you're seeking a salve to cure boils, draw out splinters, or soothe a wasp sting, ichthammol salve provides natural relief.
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  • Using salves to treat boils is a time-tested natural cure.
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  • Boils, or staphylococcus infections of the hair follicle, frequently occur in the groin, neck, and armpit area.
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  • It's useful when treating boils, cuts and scrapes.
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  • Boils are caused by a bacterial infection under the skin which leads to a surface inflammation.
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  • Skin problems such as boils, burns, or ulcers may benefit from a slippery elm poultice or tinctures when used several times per day.
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  • Ultimately, the answer to the question, "What is the definition of freelance work?" boils down to how the Internet has defined freelancing today.
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  • Whether you'll be plowing through three feet of powder or careening over a sheet of glare ice boils down to one thing: the water content of the snow.
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  • The key to having great hair boils down to two essential factors: shininess and depth.
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  • It boils down to big bucks for the photographers who do the dirty work.
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  • If you're going to have at least one of the dogs spayed/neutered to prevent a breeding, it really boils down to how well they get along.
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  • This breed is also known to suffer from eyelid problems, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), boils on the lip and tumors.
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  • When the mixture boils, reduce heat to simmer.
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  • Whatever the reason, it all boils down to one thing: Physical appearance does play a major role in certain aspects of your life.
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  • It all boils down to lights in a 3D grid.
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  • Lens color often boils down to personal preference and the conditions under which you frequently drive.
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  • Recruiting boils down to using the local police's blacklist you get.
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  • The ultimate showdown between good and evil boils down to this title here, and as Ed Boon said in an interview with IGN.com, "We really want to close this chapter of Mortal Kombat."
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  • It takes the best aspects of Civilization and other turn-based strategy games and boils it down to its most simple parts.
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  • There are a plethora of books out there and so many that it really boils down to going to the store and perusing through a few that seem to be up your alley.
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  • Although there are a variety of reasons it boils down to how desirable the cookie jar is to other collectors.
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  • It will always be a matter of debate as to who makes the best smartphones, since much of the decision boils down to personal preference.
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  • In this way, it largely boils down to a matter of personal preference.
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  • Again, this boils down to personal preference.
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  • A doctor should be consulted if the rash is solid, bright red, causes fever, or the skin develops blisters, boils, or pus.
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  • Boils and inflammation of the skin surrounding a hair shaft (folliculitis) are the most common.
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  • Wounds, sores, rashes, and boils are all lesions.
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  • While there are plenty of hair products that claim they will beautify your hair, hair health really boils down to daily maintenance and proper nutrition.
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  • Choosing between a waxing kit that comes with cloth strips and one that doesn't mostly boils down to personal preference.
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  • It all boils down to the hormones included in the pill.
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  • When it all boils down, sling bikinis are designed to attract attention and get a reaction, and this they do very well.
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  • Swimsuit controversy is everywhere, whether it involves showing too much or when it boils down to swimsuit designs in the Olympics.
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  • When it comes to mishaps, it typically boils down to one thing: unintended exposure.
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  • A warm mist humidifier boils the water and emits a stream of steam into the air.
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  • The general consensus among women in terms of what makes effective flirting boils down to two things: confidence and authenticity.
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  • Choosing Apple laptop carrying bags really boils down to two details: size and style.
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  • Ultimately, what you believe about reincarnation boils down to your own spirituality and whether or not the idea of multiple lives makes sense to you and your place in the universe.
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  • Which kind of Sidi cycling shoes you should purchase boils down to the type of riding you'll be doing, and if you're male or female.
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  • High ratings equate to big bucks for the network via advertising revenue, which is essentially what it all boils down to.
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  • When it comes to saving money on your spring break travel, it all boils down to smart booking and even smarter planning.
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  • This boils down to whether you consider any theft to be wrong.
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  • In the end, the question of why is exercise good for us boils down to physical activity helps your body function optimally.
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  • As soon as the cream boils, remove it from the heat and pour it into the bowl over the top of the chopped chocolate pieces.
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  • Heat releases histamines within the body, so applying direct heat to a rash will help relieve the itch while drying out any rash boils or pustules.
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