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blubber

blubber

blubber Sentence Examples

  • 75° S.), the party subsisting mainly on seal meat cooked over blubber lamps devised with much ingenuity.

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  • Drift whales were utilized in the earliest years of the colony, and shore boating for the baleen (or " right ") whale - rich in bone and in blubber yielding common oil - was an industry already regulated by various towns before 1650; but the pursuit of the sperm whale did not begin until about 1713.

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  • It resembles the sperm-whale in possessing a large store of oil in the upper part of the head, which yields spermaceti when refined; on this account, and also for the sake of the blubber, which supplies an oil almost indistinguishable from sperm-oil, this whale became the object of a regular chase in the latter half of the 19th century.

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  • Fish and blubber oils are principally produced in Dundee, London and Greenock.

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  • Horn, hoof-parings, woollen rags, fish, blubber and blood, after treatment with sulphuric acid, are all good manures, and should be utilized if readily obtainable.

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  • Fish and blubber oils are principally produced in Dundee, London and Greenock.

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  • (c) Blubber oils.

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  • (c) Blubber oils.

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  • After being purchased at the auction sales they are washed, then stretched upon a hoop, when all blubber and unnecessary flesh is removed, and the pelt is reduced to an equal thickness, but not so thin as it is finally rendered.

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  • The liquid waxes occur in the blubber of the sperm whale, and in the head cavities of those whales which yield spermaceti; this latter is obtained by cooling the crude oil obtained from the head cavities.

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  • Canada is likely to outstrip the United States in the trade of fish and blubber oils, and in tie near future Japan bids fair to become a very serious competitor in the supply of these oils.

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  • A few of the blubber oils, like dolphin jaw and porpoise jaw oils (used for lubricating typewriting machines), have exceedingly high saponification values ` owing to their containing volatile fatty acids with a small number of carbon atoms. Notable also are coco-nut and palm-nut oils, the saponification numbers of which vary from 240 to 260, and especially butter-fat, which has a saponification value of about 227.

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  • Whale-oil varies in colour from a bright honey yellow to a dark brown, according to the condition of the blubber from which it has been extracted.

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  • "Train-oil" proper is the northern whale-oil, but this term has been applied to all blubber oils, and in Germany, to all marine animal oils - fish-oils, liver oils, and blubber oils.

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  • The whaling industry came into importance towards the close of the 19th century, and stations for the extraction of the oil and whalebone have been established at several points, under careful regulations designed to mitigate the pollution of water, the danger to livestock from eating the blubber, &c. The finner whale is the species most commonly taken.

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  • by melting the blubber over a free fire, the process of rendering is fast becoming obsolete, the modern practice being to deliver the blubber in as fresh a state as possible to the "whaling establishments," where the oil is rendered by methods closely resembling those worked in the enormous rendering establishments (for tallow, lard, bone fat) in the United States and in South America.

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  • WHALE-OIL, the oil obtained from the blubber of various species of the genus Balaena, as B.

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  • The oil contained in cells in this cavity, when refined, yields spermaceti, and the thick covering of blubber, which everywhere envelopes the body, produces the valuable sperm-oil of commerce.

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  • In former times it was a common article of food in England and France, but is now rarely if ever eaten, being valuable only for the oil obtained from its blubber.

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  • Its function in the hairless Cetacea is discharged by the specially modified and thickened layer of fatty tissue beneath the skin known as " blubber."

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  • She continued to blubber but when she saw me draw the knife closer, she blurted out, Their tips aren't just after something happened; they're a day or two later.

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  • You need not in imagination adopt the hairy garments, or smear yourself with oil, or eat raw blubber.

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  • Adult seals have a thick layer of fat, called blubber, under their skin.

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  • But I'm glad we didn't see 007 blubber away with abandon I agree.

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  • It took the blubber from three sealions to make a barrel of oil.

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  • blubber thickness taken.

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  • blubber stove.

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  • blubber samples.

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  • I now feel so welsh that on a recent trip to Japan I had to think twice when asked to eat to whale blubber.

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  • The skins of the seals and the caribou were used for clothing and tents, while seal blubber was used for fuel and light.

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  • For the big yellow mass of quivering bleary cross eyed blubber bulged from the crab pot in a manner totally inhuman.

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  • In former times it was a common article of food in England and France, but is now rarely if ever eaten, being valuable only for the oil obtained from its blubber.

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  • From the Eskimo hunting and fishing stations blubber is the chief article received, and is forwarded in casks to the coloni, where it is boiled into oil, and prepared for being despatched to Copenhagen by means of the government ships which arrive and leave between May and November.

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  • Drift whales were utilized in the earliest years of the colony, and shore boating for the baleen (or " right ") whale - rich in bone and in blubber yielding common oil - was an industry already regulated by various towns before 1650; but the pursuit of the sperm whale did not begin until about 1713.

    0
    0
  • It resembles the sperm-whale in possessing a large store of oil in the upper part of the head, which yields spermaceti when refined; on this account, and also for the sake of the blubber, which supplies an oil almost indistinguishable from sperm-oil, this whale became the object of a regular chase in the latter half of the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • Horn, hoof-parings, woollen rags, fish, blubber and blood, after treatment with sulphuric acid, are all good manures, and should be utilized if readily obtainable.

    0
    0
  • After being purchased at the auction sales they are washed, then stretched upon a hoop, when all blubber and unnecessary flesh is removed, and the pelt is reduced to an equal thickness, but not so thin as it is finally rendered.

    0
    0
  • 75° S.), the party subsisting mainly on seal meat cooked over blubber lamps devised with much ingenuity.

    0
    0
  • The oil contained in cells in this cavity, when refined, yields spermaceti, and the thick covering of blubber, which everywhere envelopes the body, produces the valuable sperm-oil of commerce.

    0
    0
  • WHALE-OIL, the oil obtained from the blubber of various species of the genus Balaena, as B.

    0
    0
  • "Train-oil" proper is the northern whale-oil, but this term has been applied to all blubber oils, and in Germany, to all marine animal oils - fish-oils, liver oils, and blubber oils.

    0
    0
  • Whale-oil varies in colour from a bright honey yellow to a dark brown, according to the condition of the blubber from which it has been extracted.

    0
    0
  • Its function in the hairless Cetacea is discharged by the specially modified and thickened layer of fatty tissue beneath the skin known as " blubber."

    0
    0
  • The whaling industry came into importance towards the close of the 19th century, and stations for the extraction of the oil and whalebone have been established at several points, under careful regulations designed to mitigate the pollution of water, the danger to livestock from eating the blubber, &c. The finner whale is the species most commonly taken.

    0
    0
  • by melting the blubber over a free fire, the process of rendering is fast becoming obsolete, the modern practice being to deliver the blubber in as fresh a state as possible to the "whaling establishments," where the oil is rendered by methods closely resembling those worked in the enormous rendering establishments (for tallow, lard, bone fat) in the United States and in South America.

    0
    0
  • A few of the blubber oils, like dolphin jaw and porpoise jaw oils (used for lubricating typewriting machines), have exceedingly high saponification values ` owing to their containing volatile fatty acids with a small number of carbon atoms. Notable also are coco-nut and palm-nut oils, the saponification numbers of which vary from 240 to 260, and especially butter-fat, which has a saponification value of about 227.

    0
    0
  • Canada is likely to outstrip the United States in the trade of fish and blubber oils, and in tie near future Japan bids fair to become a very serious competitor in the supply of these oils.

    0
    0
  • The liquid waxes occur in the blubber of the sperm whale, and in the head cavities of those whales which yield spermaceti; this latter is obtained by cooling the crude oil obtained from the head cavities.

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  • The sperm oils are generally sold in the same markets as the fish and blubber oils (see above).

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  • I started to blubber, I sat there for about five minutes and wept like fuckin baby.

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  • The key to revealing a toned tummy is to burn off the blubber burying your 6 pack.

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