How to use Blow in a sentence

blow
  • We gonna blow something up?

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  • It was Cynthia's turn to blow up.

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  • This place is gonna blow soon.

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  • All her plans were about to blow up – all this because she had allowed herself to be drawn into a relationship.

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  • It was the final blow.

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  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.

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  • We can blow half the place up and send in a team to finish off the rest.

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  • You're not going to blow any whistle.

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  • I'd probably blow my foot off.

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  • I didn't mean for him to blow his brains out either!

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  • But his friend Narses so insisted on the blow to the reputation of the imperial arms which would be produced by the surrender of Rimini that he carried the council of war with him, and Belisarius had to plan a brilliant march across the mountains, in conjunction with a movement by the fleet, whereby Rimini was relieved while Osimo was still untaken.

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  • For days in succession when it storms along the Southern California coasts and dense rain clouds blow landwards to the mountains, leaving snow or rain on their summits, it has been observed that within a few miles beyond the ridge the contact of the desert air dissipates the remaining moisture of the clouds into light misty masses, like a steam escape in cold air.

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  • Look. The guy can hardly remember to blow his nose!

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  • But why did they not blow up the bridge, if it was mined?

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  • After a slight hesitation the door burst open with a cracking blow.

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  • Now you blow four times that on one meal!

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  • The last Austrian blow was struck on June 18, south of Monte Lemerle, in vain, when already the first move of the Italian counter-attack had taken place.

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  • On the 17th of January 1711, in spite of Marlborough's efforts to ward off the blow, the duchess was compelled to give up her key of office.

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  • Did anyone try to blow you up today?

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  • The enemy received their final blow at Palap, but not before three officers were killed, three wounded, and 102 sepoys and followers killed and wounded.

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  • He saw the frightened and then infuriated face of the dragoon who dealt the blow, the look of silent, timid reproach that boy in the fur-lined coat had turned upon him.

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  • I could never be sure the old boy wouldn't have a change of heart some night and blow me away just to prove his masculinity, or send some of his Philadelphia clients around to work me over.

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  • If now the vertical movement of the walking-beam be 24 in., when 'it starts on the up-stroke the sinker-bar rises 4 in., and the cross-heads come together with a smart blow, then the auger-stem is picked up and lifted 20 in.

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  • The establishment of a kingdom in Jerusalem in i ioo was a blow, not only to the Church but to the Normans of Antioch.

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  • At this point another French adventurer, who had already made himself somewhat of a name in Antioch, gave the final blow to the kingdom.

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  • From this point of vantage he began depredations on the Red Sea (1182), building a fleet, and seeking to attack Medina and Mecca - a policy which may be interpreted either as mere buccaneering, or as a calculated attempt to deal a blow at Mahommedanism in its very centre.

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  • Damietta was taken without a blow, and the march for Cairo was begun, as it had been begun by the legate Pelagius in 1221.

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  • The blow was a fatal one to the aged and war-worn Campeador, who died of anger and grief in July 1099.

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  • The temperature is moderated by the north-east trade winds, which, somewhat modified by local conditions, blow throughout the year, briskly during the day and more mildly during the night.

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  • Blow, he established in St Louis the first permanent public-school kindergarten in America.

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  • In 1741 Ratanpur had surrendered to the Mahratta leader Bhaskar Pant without a blow, and the ancient Rajput dynasty came to an end.

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  • The removal of the capital was a serious blow, as the city has no industries to support its population and no trade of importance.

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  • The khedive Ismail in 1869 appointed Sir Samuel Baker to the command of a large force with which he was " to strike a direct blow at the slave trade in its distant nest."

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  • Mahommed now endeavoured to strike a blow at Rhodes, the stronghold of the Knights of St John, preparatory to carrying out his long-cherished plan of conquering Italy.

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  • Turkey's severity in repressing the Bulgarian insurrection had raised up in England a storm of public opinion against her, of which the Liberal opposition had taken the fullest advantage; moreover the suspension of payments on the Ottoman debt had dealt Turkey's popularity a blow from which it had never recovered.

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  • They The struck their first blow on the 22nd of July 1908, when Niazi Bey and his troops raised the standard of 1908.

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  • For that blow he had determined to make his own army the anvil.

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  • Thus if the French movement momentarily ended in a blow in the air, it was indirectly the cause of their ultimate salvation.

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  • The death of Toledo in 1567 threatened a fatal blow at the satisfactory completion of the enterprise, but a worthy successor was found in Juan Herrera, Toledo's favourite pupil, who adhered in the main to his master's designs.

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  • This latter match, though unpopular in England and Normandy, was a fatal blow to the designs of Louis VI., and prepared the way for the expansion of English power beyond the Loire.

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  • But these were soon changed, and he now took the important resolution of striking a blow for Spain, and for the defenders of Madrid, by attacking Napoleon's communications with France.

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  • The Dutch were almost without striking a blow expelled from the country, the strongly fortified seaport of Antwerp alone remaining in their hands.

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  • The slag and matte formed float upon the lead in the crucible and are tapped, usually together, at intervals into slag-pots, where the heavy matter settles on the bottom and the light slag on the top. When cold they are readily separated by a blow from a hammer.

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  • In 1199 the institution of a foreign podestd (a form of government which became permanent in 1212) gave a severe blow to the consular magistracy, which was soon extinguished; and in 1233 the people again rose against the nobles in the hope of ousting them entirely from office.

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  • The first blow was struck at this trade by the discovery of the Cape route to India; the second by the opening of a land route through Egypt to the Red Sea; the third and final one by the making of the Suez Canal.

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  • The climate of Sydney is mild and equable; in summer sea breezes blow from the north-east, which, while they temper the heat, make the air exceedingly humid; in winter the winds blow from the west and the climate is dry and bracing.

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  • These winds, which blow on an average twenty-five days in the year, seldom reach the coast and are generally followed by rain.

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  • The first blow fell in 1521, when Sultan Suleiman appeared before the southern fortresses of Sabac and Belgrade, both of which fell into his hands during the course of the year.

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  • The Austrian commander-in-chief, Count Haynau, was to attack Hungary from the west, the Russian, Prince Paskevich, from the north, gradually environing the kingdom, and then advancing to end the business by one decisive blow in the mid-Theissian counties.

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  • To the great alarm of the inhabitants a body of about 1400 men disembarked, but it quickly capitulated, practically without striking a blow, to a combined force of the local militias under Sir Richard Philipps, Lord Milford and John Campbell, Lord Cawdor; the French frigates meanwhile sailing away towards Ireland.

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  • When quite dry guncotton is easily detonated by a blow on an anvil or hard surface.

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  • As the quantity of contained water increases it becomes difficult or even impossible to detonate by an ordinary blow.

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  • When the Athenian fleet under Nicias, Alcibiades and Lamachus was at Rhegium in Italy, after the discovery of the trick that had been played by the Segestans, the question for the commanders was whether they should seek to strengthen themselves by fresh alliances on the spot or strike the blow at once.

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  • Marcellus, therefore, struck his first blow at Leontini, which was quickly stormed; and the tale of the horrors of the sack was at once carried to Syracuse and roused; the anger of its population, who could not but sympathize with their near neighbours, Greeks like themselves.

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  • By his eminent labours in cellular pathology, Virchow, and Metchnikoff later, gave the last blow to the mere humoral pathology which, after an almost unchallenged prevalence for some two thousand years, now finds a resting-place only in our nurseries.

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  • The sinking of the " Princess Alice " in 1878 was a serious blow to the London Steamboat Company, which collapsed, and was succeeded by the River Thames Steamboat Navigation Company, which went into liquidation in 1887.

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  • They pass through a viscous stage in cooling from a state of fluidity; they develop effects of colour when the glass mixtures are fused with certain metallic oxides; they are, when cold, bad conductors both of electricity and heat, they are easily fractured by a blow or shock and show a conchoidal fracture; they are but slightly affected by ordinary solvents, but are readily attacked by hydrofluoric acid.

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  • The wire gives the glass great advantages in the event of fracture from a blow or from fire, but owing to the difference in thermal expansion between wire and glass, there is a strong tendency for such " wired glass " to crack spontaneously.

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  • Croesus found them centred at Pteria in the 6th century and dealt them a final blow.

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  • The final blow to any political pretensions of Medina was dealt by the caliph when he had his son Yazid declared as his successor, thus taking away any claim on the part of the citizens of Medina to elect to the caliphate.

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  • From this blow the emperor never recovered; and when on the 13th of December 1250 he died Innocent greeted the news by quoting from Psalm xcvi.

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  • And, as a crowning disaster, the death of Frederick in 1250 proved a mortal blow to the Italian Ghibelline cause.

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  • The city did not easily recover from this blow, and Padua was still weak when the Franks succeeded the Eombards as masters of north Italy.

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  • The death of Mirabeau in April 1791 was a severe blow to Montmorin, the difficulty of whose position was enormously increased after the flight of the royal family to Varennes, to which he was not privy.

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  • This severe blow left General Grant penniless, just at the time when he was beginning to suffer acutely from the disease which finally caused his death.

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  • This blow probably decided his career; but he endured two years of misery and mental conflict before resolving to abandon his medical studies and become a monk.

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  • This would account for its transitory effects, and the speedy recovery of the Romans from the blow.

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  • Despite the straitened circumstances of Israel, an army is mustered, a sudden blow is struck at the Philistines, and, as before, supernatural assistance is at hand.

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  • It was well that its publication was completed before the blow fell upon Tennyson which took for a while all the light out of him.

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  • The Spanish occupation of Oran (1509) struck a fatal blow at the European commerce of the town.

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  • In winter, for example, when the northern monsoon begins to blow, numbers of denizens of the Sea of Okhotsk swim southward to the more genial waters of north Japan; and in summer the Indian Ocean and the Malayan archipelago send to her southern coasts a crowd of emigrants which turn homeward again at the approach of winter.

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  • Thus, for a diamond-petal diaper the chisel is carried across the face of the metal horizontally, tracing a number of parallel bands divided at fixed intervals by ribs which are obtained by merely straightening the chisel and striking it a heavy blow.

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  • The newspaper tax enforced in 1712 dealt a hard blow at these.

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  • The peace of Antalcidas or the King's Peace (see ANTALcIDAS; Sparta) in 386 was a blow to Athens in the interests of Persia and Sparta.

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  • In 366 Athens lost Oropus, a blow which she endeavoured to repair by forming an alliance with Arcadia and by an attack on Corinth.

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  • The victory of the Venetians off Chios (May 2, 1657) was a severe blow to the Turkish seapower, which Kuprili set himself energetically to repair.

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  • The security of the kingdom was sensibly promoted by the erection of a cordon of fortresses on its north-eastern borders, and a blow was given to foreign interference when Casimir succeeded in gaining dominant influence over the independent Polish principality of Masovia, which had hitherto gravitated between Bohemia and the Teutonic Order.

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  • Pleasant north-east winds blow for an average of 150 days a year, cool northerly winds for 31 days, east winds 70 days, west for 34 days.

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  • He might, however, had he been so minded, have struck with his whole army - nearly three times this force, and, judging from the course events actually took, we can have little doubt as to the result of such a blow.

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  • The French artillery had already evaded the coming blow, and had changed position, "right back," to cover the flank of the rest of the army, and the Prussian and Saxon artillery trotting forward conformed to this new front, their shells sweeping the ground for 2000 yds.

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  • The decisive blow was delivered by the Dutch marshal, Overkirk, who was sent by Marlborough with a large force (the last reserve of the Allies) to make a wide turning movement round the extreme right of the French, and at the proper time attacked them in rear.

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  • Mangrove swamps surround the town and epidemics of cholera, yellow fever and other tropical diseases have been frequent; but the unhealthiness of the climate is mitigated to some extent by the high tides which cover the marshes, and the invigorating breezes which blow in from the sea.

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  • Bolivar therefore resolved, if possible, to strike a decisive blow; and this accordingly he did at Carabobo, where, encountering Torre, he so completely routed the Spaniards that the shattered remains of their army were forced to take refuge in Puerto Cabello, where two years after they surrendered to Paez.

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  • In 774 the little settlement was taken and burnt by the Saxons; but it evidently soon recovered from the blow.

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  • It was not only that she lost many thousands of her best citizens, but this blow against Protestantism deprived her of those Protestant alliances in Europe which had been in the past her great diplomatic support.

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  • The publication in 1889 of Lux Mundi, a series of essays attempting to harmonize Anglican Catholic doctrine with modern thought, was a severe blow to him, for it showed that even at the Pusey House, established as the citadel of Puseyism at Oxford, the principles of Pusey were being departed from.

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  • His wife Sibilla indeed maintained a regency for her second son William III., but on Henry's final descent, Naples surrendered almost without a blow in May 1194, and the rest of the Regno followed.

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  • Houston now assumed active command and retreated before Santa Anna until he reached the San Jacinto river, where he dealt the enemy a crushing blow and brought the war to an end; nearly all of Santa Anna's army were killed, wounded or taken prisoners, and even Santa Anna himself was captured the next day, while the Texans lost only two killed and twenty-three wounded.

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  • With the more critical and exciting events of the 19th of Brumaire at St Cloud Talleyrand had no direct connexion; but he had made all his preparations for flight in case the blow failed.

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  • In the Arctic and Pacific coast provinces, about Lake Superior, in Virginia and North Carolina, as well as in ruder parts of Mexico and South America, metals were cold-hammered into plates, weapons, rods and wire, ground and polished, fashioned into carved blocks of hard, tenacious stone by pressure or blow, overlaid, cold-welded and plated.

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  • In 1522 Zwingli produced his first considerable writing, the Architeles, " the beginning and the end," in which he sought by a single blow to win his spiritual freedom from the control of the bishops, and in a sermon of that year he contended that only the Holy Spirit is requisite to make the Word intelligible, and that there is no need of Church, council, or pope in the matter.

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  • The greatest blow struck against heresy was the transference of the duty of inquiry into heresy from the bishops to Dominican inquisitors.

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  • One blow was usually insufficient, and the method was similar to that still used in striking medals in high relief, except that the blank is now allowed to cool before being struck.

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  • In retaliation a punitive expedition under Generals John Sullivan and James Clinton in 1779 destroyed the Iroquois towns, and dealt the Indian confederacy a blow from which it never recovered.

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  • The desire of New Zealanders to strike a blow for the mother-country took the practical shape of despatching to South Africa ten successive contingents.

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  • It was, moreover, unpopular in Ireland, and a blow to English literature; yet the course of events soon proved it to have been most fortunate.

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  • Along the coast the prevailing winds blow from the west or south; in the Puget Sound Basin from the south, and in eastern Washington from the south-west, except in the Yakima and Wenatchee valleys, where they are north-west.

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  • During summer the winds are very moderate in western Washington, but during winter they occasionally blow with great violence.

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  • The origin of the name Vaygach is as dubious as its orthography; it has been held to be Dutch (waaien, to blow, and gat, a strait, hence "windy strait") or Russian, in which case it is probably a surname.

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  • We may easily satisfy ourselves that, in every instance in which the sensation of sound is excited, the body whence the sound proceeds must have been thrown, by a blow or other means, into a state of agitation or tremor, implying the existence of a vibratory motion, or motion to and fro, of the particles of which it consists.

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  • If we watch a man breaking stones by the roadside some distance away, we can see the hammer fall before we hear the blow.

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  • His policy of gaining time had received a severe blow in the failure of his executive officer to realize it, and that officer, though his unpursued troops quickly regained their moral, had himself completely lost confidence.

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  • Kuropatkin having already drawn in his line of defence on the south side towards Liao-Yang, the 2nd and 4th Japanese Armies delivered what was practically a blow in the air.

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  • He wished to inflict a severe blow before the enemy could be reinforced by the late besiegers of Port Arthur, and sent Grippenberg with seven divisions against Oku's two on the Japanese left.

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  • In ground which is of the nature of quicksand, piles will often slowly rise to their original position after each blow.

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  • In Vienna especially they lost every seat at one blow, by which means Weisskirchuer found himself deprived of all parliamentary support.

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  • At the beginning of 1892 a heavy blow fell upon the queen in the death of the prince of Wales's eldest son Albert Victor, duke of Clarence and Avondale.

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  • The discovery of coal in the northern counties dealt the final blow to its prosperity.

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  • Wellington's victory at Salamanca (July 22, 1812) compelled Joseph to leave his capital; and despite the retirement of the British in the autumn of that year, Joseph's authority never fully recovered from that blow.

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  • In order to soften the blow, Napoleon appointed him ambassador to the court of Madrid (November 1800).

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  • On the 5th of December Ibrahim again set sail, and reached Suda without striking a blow.

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  • He struck a blow at both, when, in 1462-1463, he induced his sonin-law, Louis XI.

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  • The High Priest at such a moment seemed to embody all the glory of the nation, as the kings had done of old, and when the time came to strike a successful blow for freedom it was a priestly house that led the nation to the victory which united in one person the functions of High Priest and prince.

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  • But the excessive caution of Jagiello gave the Knights time to recover from the blow; the Polish levies proved unruly and incompetent; Witowt was suddenly recalled to Lithuania by a Tatar invasion, and thus it came about that, when peace was concluded at Thorn, on the 1st of February 1411, Samogitia (which was to revert to the Order on the death of Jagiello and Witowt), Dobrzyn, and a war indemnity of 10o,000 marks payable in four instalments, were the best terms Poland could obtain from the Knights, whose territory practically remained intact.

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  • Her husband's execution in 1649 was a terrible blow.

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  • Then the long continued unrest both in the mother country and in the province seems to have encouraged Josias Fendall, the proprietor's own appointee as governor, to strike a blow against the proprietary government and attempt to set up a commonwealth in its place; but this revolt was easily suppressed and order was generally preserved in the province from the English Restoration of 1660 to the English Revolution of 1688.

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  • In Kentucky the Unionist victory was secured almost without a blow, and, even at the end of 1861, the Confederate outposts west of the Alleghenies lay no farther north than the line Columbus - Bowling Green - Cumberland Gap, though southern Missouri was still a contested ground.

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  • Jackson's first blow fell on part of Fremont's corps, which was sharply attacked and driven into the mountains (McDowell, May 8).

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  • In summer the east wind brings dense and sudden fogs; while in winter the northerly gales blow straight into the mouths of the harbours.

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  • This was a serious blow for the amir, whose determination to continue the contest was, however, as strong as ever.

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  • The first serious blow to this view came from the study of textual criticism.

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  • Beyond the tropical high-pressure belt, the winds of the North Pacific are under the control of an area of low pressure, which, however, attains neither the size nor the intensity of the " Iceland " depression in the north Atlantic. The result is that north-westerly winds, which in winter are exceedingly dry and cold, blow over the western or Asiatic area; westerly winds prevail in the centre, and south-westerly and southerly winds off the American coast.

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  • McClellan lingered north of Richmond, despite President Lincoln's constant demand that he should "strike a blow" with the force he had organized and taken to the Yorktown peninsula in April, until General Lee had concentrated 73,000 infantry in his front; then the Federal commander, fearing to await the issue of a decisive battle, ended his campaign of invasion in the endeavour to "save his army"; and he so far succeeded that on July 3 he had established himself on the north bank of the James in a position to which reinforcements and supplies could be brought from the north by water without fear of molestation by the enemy.

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  • Both canons were innovations, designed to strike a fatal blow at prophecy and the church organization re-established by the prophets in Asia - the bishops not being quite prepared to declare boldly that the Church had no further need of prophets.

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  • The blow fell suddenly, a few weeks after his appointment as justiciar of Ireland.

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  • The climate of Melbourne is exceptionally fine; occasionally hot winds blow from the north for two or three days at a time, but the proportion of days when the sky is clear and the air dry and mild is large.

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  • The most characteristic weapon of the Mexicans was the maquahuitl or " handwood," a club set with two rows of large sharp obsidian flakes, a well-directed blow with which would cut down man or horse.

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  • Ever dreading a blow, he was always eager to strike the first; and alive to the perils of peace, he was blind to the dangers of war.

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  • This was the heaviest blow to the Americans throughout the war in the north.

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  • The revolution of July in the same year was a terrible blow to him, and filled him with the most dismal anticipations of the future of Europe.

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  • Nothing remained for Otho but to strike a bold blow.

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  • It was not till 1748, when a decisive blow was struck at the power of the chiefs by the abolition of heritable jurisdictions, and the appointment of sheriffs in the different districts, that the arts of peace and social improvement made way in these remote regions.

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  • The warmed air of summer produces an area of low pressure in the west-central United States, which interrupts the belt of high pressure that planetary conditions alone would form around the earth about latitude 30; hence there is a tendency of the summer winds to blow inward from the northern Pacific over the Cordilleras toward the continental centre, and from the trades of the torrid Atlantic up the Mississippi Valley; conversely in winter time, the cold air over the lands produces a large area of high pressure from which the winds tend to flow outward; thus repelling the westerly winds of the northern Pacific and greatly intensifying the outflow southward to the Gulf of Mexico and eastward to the Atlantic. As a result of these seasonal alternations of temperature and pressure there is something of a monsoon tendency developed in the winds of the Mississippi Valley, southerly infiowing winds prevailing in summer and northerly outfiowing winds in winter; but the general tendency to inflow and outflow is greatly modified by the relief of the lands, to which we next turn.

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  • Since, further, according to him the fulfilment of prophecy is the only valid proof of Christianity, he thus secretly aims a blow at Christianity as a revelation.

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  • His death in 1886 was a great blow to the work, but his name has been perpetuated in the foundation of the Morley College for working men and women, which developed from the lectures given at the " Old Vic."

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  • A story is told that de Courci when imprisoned in the Tower volunteered to act as champion for King John in single combat against a knight representing Philip Augustus of France; that when he appeared in the lists his French opponent fled in panic; whereupon de Courci, to gratify the French king's desire to witness his prowess, "cleft a massive helmet in twain at a single blow," a feat for which he was rewarded by a grant of the privilege for himself and his heirs to remain covered in the presence of the king and all future sovereigns of England.

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  • The first blow towards its gradual contraction was struck when Napoleon ordered 22,000 oaks to be cut down in it to build the celebrated Boulogne flotilla for the invasion of England.

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  • But a graver blow, ending in the complete overthrow of the administration, was soon to fall as the result of the election.

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  • This he did with safety in the face of a large and threatening crowd, and thus dealt the mutineers a heavy blow.

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  • He had just arrived on the spot and met a man going to fetch powder to blow in a door; instead Hodson, with his usual recklessness, rushed into the doorway and was shot.

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  • The departure of Lightfoot to the see of Durham in 1879 was a great blow to Westcott.

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  • He was held responsible not only for the occupation itself, but for every untoward incident to which it gave rise; even Blucher's attempt to blow up the Pont de Jena, which he had prevented, was laid to his charge.

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  • The revolution of 1830 had just inflicted a severe blow on the ecclesiastical party in France, and almost the first act of the new government there was to seize Ancona, thus throwing all Italy, and particularly the Papal States, into an excited condition which seemed to demand strongly repressive measures.

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  • In spring the prevailing winds blow from the N.E.

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  • The death of Valens, followed by the succession and the early conversion to Catholicism of Theodosius, dealt a fatal blow to the Arian party within the empire.

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  • But he was prevented from carrying out this policy by an unforeseen blow, the Sicilian Vespers (March 1282), an event important both in itself and in its results.

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  • At the beginning of the struggle Julius had to endure many a hard blow; but his courage never failed - or, at most, but for a moment - even after the French victory at Ravenna, on Easter Sunday 1512.

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  • The AustroGerman-Italian triple alliance was a dire blow to his expectations, and Crispi's policy with its irritating and galling pin-pricks caused the cup to overflow.

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  • He took a leading part in Absalom's revolt, and his defection was a severe blow to the king, who prayed that God would bring his counsel to "foolishness."

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  • He accompanied the Norman army to England in 1066, and obtained permission from William to strike the first blow at the battle of Hastings.

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  • So when the hot sandstorms blow in the lower steppe the scorching heat is carried right up to the foot of the mountains.

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  • From April till October hot southerly winds blow by day; at night the heat is tempered by seabreezes.

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  • In 1585 a severe blow was struck at the prosperity of Antwerp when Parma captured it after a long siege and sent all its Protestant citizens into exile.

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  • For the time Tyre lost its political existence, while the foundation of Alexandria presently changed the lines of trade, and dealt a blow even more fatal to the Phoenician cities.

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  • The sawdust adapts it self to the rough shape of the concrete, and deadens the blow to some extent.

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  • The final blow to his fortunes came when he was decisively defeated by the French at Bouvines in July 1214.

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  • The " accolade " may etymologically refer to the embrace, accompanied by a blow with the hand, characteristic of the longer form of knighting.

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  • Dickinson, but the storming parties were too close to permit of the sheds being blown up, and an attempt to blow up the destroyers was beaten back.

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  • She was under heavy fire, and as she appeared to be sinking, the order was given to abandon ship and blow the charges; they detonated and the ship sank.

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  • The greatest losses were in the Channel where the Flanders flotilla worked, and the blow they would have received by the blocking of Zeebrugge and Ostend was well worth the risk.

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  • The blow fell upon his son Psammetichus III., whom the Persian deprived of his kingdom after a reign of only six months.

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  • The loss in ships of the line, in transports, and in lives was a crushing blow to the hopes of Charles, who remained in France for over a year in a retirement which he keenly felt.

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  • The north-east and south-west winds, on the other hand, being laden with the moisture of the sea, bring rain if they blow for any length of time.

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  • The naval power of Spain never in fact recovered from the blow.

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  • When war broke out Dutch commerce was destroyed, and the Dutch colonies were at the mercy of the English fleet without the possibility of a blow being struck in their defence.

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  • The delay which this test causes is so unwelcome that in all other countries the blower continues the blow until decarburization is nearly complete, because of the very great accuracy with which he can then read the indications of the flame, an accuracy which leaves little to be desired.

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  • The oxidation of manganese is capable of generating a very high temperature, but it has the very serious disadvantage of causing such thick clouds of smoky oxide of manganese as to hide the flame from the blower, and prevent him from recognizing the moment when the blow should be ended.

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  • The slag, in order that it may have such an excess of base that this will retain the phosphoric acid as fast as it is formed by the oxidation of the phosphorus of the pig iron, and prevent it from being re-deoxidized and re-absorbed by the iron, should, according to von Ehrenwerth's rule which is generally followed, contain enough lime to form approximately a tetra-calcic silicate, 4CaO,S10 2 with the silica which results from the oxidation of the silicon of the pig iron and tri-calcic phosphate, 3CaO,P205, with the phosphoric acid which forms. The danger of this " rephosphorization " is greatest at the end of the blow, when the recarburizing additions are made.

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  • Thanks to the glass-hardness of this face, the projectile is arrested so abruptly that it is shattered, and its energy is delivered piecemeal by its fragments; but as the face is integrally united with the unhardened, ductile and slightly yielding interior and back, the plate, even if it is locally bent backwards somewhat by the blow, neither cracks nor flakes.

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  • The first cost of a hammer of moderate size is much less than that of a hydraulic press of like capacity, as is readily understood when we stop to reflect what powerful pressure, if gradually applied, would be needed to drive the nail which a light blow from our hand hammer forces easily into the woodwork.

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  • Moreover, the effect of the sharp blow of the hammer is relatively superficial, and does not penetrate to the interior of a large piece as the slowly applied pressure of the hydraulic press does.

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  • The prevailing winds blow from the north or south.

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  • The first blow to this industry was the discovery of the Brazilian mines in Minas Geraes and Bahia.

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  • The exile of his son Henry in 1398 was a blow from which he did not recover.

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  • Buddhism in Magadha never recovered from this blow; it lingered in obscurity for a while and then vanished.

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  • In the west no chain of hills intercepts the warmer and moister winds which blow from the Atlantic, and these accordingly influence at times even the eastern regions of Germany.

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  • The news of this crushing blow cast a gloom over Germany, which was again suffering from the attacks of her unruly neighbors.

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  • In Germany Conrad did not definitely decree that fiefs should pass from father to son, but he encouraged and took advantage of the tendency in this direction, a tendency which was, obviously, a serious blow at the pow-er of the great lords over their vassals.

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  • But Louis was perhaps still more indebted for his victory to the memorable conflict between the Swiss and the Habsburgs, the defeat of Leopold of Austria at Morgarten in 1315 striking a heavy blow at his position.

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  • A blow was struck at the cities, which were forbidden to form leagues or to receive Pfahlburger.

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  • The war was continued by Austria, but her power was so effectually shattered by blow after blow that in 1797 she was forced to conclude the peace of Campo Formio.

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  • It was desirable in such circumstances that a younger and more vigorous statesman than Prince Hohenlohe should be placed at the head of affairs before the Reichstag met; and on the 17th of October he resigned, and was succeeded as chancellor by Herr von Blow, the f,oreign secretary.

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  • The contest was from the first hopeless, and, but for the personal request of the emperor that he would pilot the Finance Bill through the House in some shape or other, Prince Blow would have resigned early in the year.

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  • The terrible blow to Athens quickened the energies of an anti-Athenian faction at Thurii.

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  • His failure, followed by the arrival of Gustavus Adolphus in Germany in 1630, proved the death blow of Austrian hopes.

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  • Though, however, Austria by her diplomatic attitude had secured, without striking a blow, the settlement in her sense of the Eastern Question, she emerged from the contest without allies and without friends.

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  • A still greater blow to the Federalists was the passing of a new electoral law in 1873.

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  • Any interference with the use of German would be a serious blow to the cause of those who hoped to Germanize the whole empire.

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  • This would probably have been fatal to the coalition, but the final blow was given by a matter of very small importance arising from the disputes on nationality.

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  • This was not only the worst disaster which befell any powerful state up to the peace of Nicias (as Thucydides says), but was a serious blow to Corinth, whose trade on the West was, as we have seen, one of the chief causes of the war.

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  • The scheme, which probably originated with the atticizing party in Thebes, resulted in the severe defeat of Hippocrates at Delium by the Boeotians under Pagondas, and was a final blow to the policy of an Athenian land empire.

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  • The death of Heinrich Brugsch in 1895 was a very severe blow to demotie studies; but it must be admitted that his brilliant gifts lay in other directions than exact grammatical analysis.

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  • Manetho says that the Hyksos (q.v.) gained Egypt without a blow.

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  • Rameses led out his army and fleet against them and struck them so decisive a blow that the migrating swarm submitted to his rule and paid him tribute.

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  • But the opportunity of a decisive blow against Persia was lost.

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  • The turning of attention towards the knee interferes with the jerk; hence the device of directing the person to perform vigorously some movement, which does not involve the muscles of the lower limb, at the moment when the light blow is dealt upon the tendon.

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  • The pope bitterly felt this catastrophe as a double blow to Christendom and to Greek letters.

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  • Yahweh then causes a strong east wind to blow all that night, which drives back the waters from the shallows, and so renders it possible for the host of Israel to cross over.

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  • The year after Luther's death, when the battle of Miihlberg (1547) had given a seemingly crushing blow to the Protestant cause, an attempt was made to weld together the evangelical and the papal doctrines, which resulted in the compilation by Pflug, Sidonius and Agricola of the Augsburg "Interim."

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  • The whole town, with the exception of the cathedral, and about 140 houses, was burned to the ground, and the greater part of its 36,000 inhabitants were butchered without regard to age or sex, but it recovered from this deadly blow with wonderful rapidity.

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  • His conquest was not achieved at a blow, but his language, Gaelic, prevailed.

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  • In May came the letter and ring of the French queen ordering James, as her knight, to strike a blow on English ground.

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  • The fatal duel in which Hamilton was slain by Mohun, when on the eve of going as ambassador to France, with the interests of James in his eye, was a blow to the Jacobites; as were the death of Anne, the fall of Bolingbroke and the unopposed succession of George I.

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  • The marriage was unhappy; James was eternally occupied with the business of his cause and the feuds of his adherents; Clementina lost her gaiety and became causelessly jealous; and her retreat to a convent in 1725 was a greater blow to the cause than the failure of Atterbury's plot (1720), the alleged treason of Mar and the splits in the Jacobite party.

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  • He lost his wife in the spring of 1876, a blow from which he never entirely recovered.

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  • The cession of Cyprus to Great Britain was at first denounced by the French newspapers as a great blow to his diplomacy, but he obtained, in a conversation with Lord Salisbury, a promise that Great Britain in return would allow France a free hand in Tunis.

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  • In 1890 the General Act of the Brussels Conference struck a blow at the arms trade in Africa and diverted it to the Persian Gulf, which was not subject to the Brussels Act.

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  • It was a bitter blow to him when in Sept.

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  • The revolution of 1830 was a great blow to him, and the prospect of democratic advances almost made him ill.

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  • Mr. Livingstone was killed by a blow from an axe and decapitated in the presence of his wife.

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  • The Germans ringed him round, and, with their hands raised high in the fashion of a landsknecht who had struck a successful blow, passed out into the street and escorted him to his lodgings.

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  • The rains, however, are prolonged some three or four weeks later than in tracts to the north of the Satpuras, since they are also brought by the easterly winds which blow from the Bay of Bengal in October and the early part of November, when the recurved southerly wind ceases to blow up the Gangetic valley, and sets towards the south-east coast.

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  • The industry suffered depression owing to the indigo riots of 1860 and the emancipation of the peasantry by the Land Act of 1859; but in the closing decade of the century it received a much more disastrous blow from the invention of the German chemists.

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  • In 1635 they occupied Formosa; in 1641 they took Malacca, a blow from which the Portuguese never recovered; in 1652 they founded a colony at the Cape of Good Hope, as a half-way station to the East; in 1658 they captured Jaffna, the last stronghold of the Portuguese in Ceylon; by 1664 they had wrested from the Portuguese all their earlier settlements on the pepper-bearing coast of Malabar.

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  • Madras surrendered almost without a blow, and the only settlement left to the British was Fort St David, a few miles south of Pondicherry, where Clive and a few other fugitives sought shelter.

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  • But Clive in person marched to the rescue, with an army of only 450 Europeans and 2500 sepoys, and the Mogul army dispersed without striking a blow.

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  • One of his favourite officers, General Goddard, marched across the peninsula, and conquered the rich province of Gujarat almost without a blow.

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  • Oudh was thus annexed without a blow; but it may be doubted whether the one measure of Lord Dalhousie upon which he looked back himself with the clearest conscience was not the very one that most alarmed native public opinion.

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  • Regnault never recovered from the double blow, and, although he lived until the, 9th of January 1878, his scientific labours ended in 1872.

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  • The revocation of the edict of Nantes struck a severe blow at the cloth and iron industries, which had previously been a source of prosperity to the town.

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  • The French under Melac burnt the city almost entirely in 1689, and it has only fully recovered from this blow in recent years.

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  • The mean annual rainfall in this city is about 76 in., and nearly three-fourths of it is from the middle of June to the middle of October, when the winds blow from the south-west.

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  • On the Pacific coast of Luzon, Samar, Leyte and Mindanao the rainy season is from November to May, when the winds blow from the east or the north-east.

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  • The death of the former in 1809 was a severe blow to his father, and was the immediate cause of his retirement from the active duties of his chair.

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  • Princess Alice nursed her father during his short illness with the utmost care, and after his death devoted herself to comforting her mother under this terrible blow.

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  • The skilful Tahir succeeded in creating divisions among the troops of his adversaries, and obtained possession, without striking a blow, of the city of Holwan, an advantage which opened the way to the very gates of Bagdad.

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  • The climate shows great extremes of heat in summer and of cold in winter, when fierce north and north-west winds blow across the plains.

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  • Cadorna was convinced that he had to stand on the defensive, the more so as he was uncertain in which sector of the Julian front the chief blow would fall, but his instructions naturally included and recommended vigorous local counter-attacks.

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  • In this idea he had the support of more than one of his corps commanders, but Cadorna thought, and it is difficult to meet his reasoning, that he could not throw in the forces necessary for such an attack when he was uncertain as to the direction of the forthcoming blow.

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  • Even after the severe reverses which he experienced in Italy, his position in Germany was never seriously weakened; and in 1181, when, almost without striking a blow, he deprived Henry the Lion of his duchy, he seemed stronger than ever.

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  • This blow preyed upon the king's mind, and on the 14th of December he died at Falkland, having just heard of the birth of his daughter.

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  • This feeling was intensified by the conviction that every blow struck against the bull was a blow against the Jesuits, its authors.

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  • A year after Benedict's death the first blow fell.

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  • Of more enduring value have been the researches of the historical school, founded by John Adam Mohler (1796-1838), whose famous Symbolik (1832) was perhaps the heaviest literary blow ever dealt at the Reformation.

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  • The first blow to its prosperity was the discovery of the sea-route to India in 1497; and the second was inflicted by the Thirty Years' War, during which Gustavus Adolphus was besieged here in an entrenched camp by Wallenstein.

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  • This defeat proved a great mortification to Lord Chatham, and in his irritation against Townshend for this blow, as well as for some acts of insubordination, he meditated the removal of his showy colleague.

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  • He aimed a further blow at Fustel's system by showing that the Frankish kings had never borne the Roman title of vir inluster, and that they could not therefore be considered as being in the first place Roman magistrates; and that in the royal diplomas the king issued his commands as rex Francorum and addressed his functionaries as viri inlustres.

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  • Supported by the young king, Louis XIV., he aimed the first blow at the greatest of the extortioners - the bold and powerful superintendent, Fouquet; whose fall, in addition, secured his own advancement.

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  • Broken down as much by the blow as by ill-health the cardinal died at Lambeth on the 17th of November 1558, twelve hours after Mary's death and under the unmerited disgrace of the papacy in defence of which he had spent his life.

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  • His sensitiveness received a second blow in an unsuccessful love affair, which, however, he bore with fortitude.

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  • The quantity of air consumed in a converter which will blow up about 35 tons of matte per day is about 3000 cub.

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  • The first blow occupies about 25 minutes, and oxidizes all but a small quantity of the iron and some of the sulphur, raising the product to white metal.

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  • During the second blow the sulphur is rapidly oxidized, and the charge reduced to metal of 99% in from 30 to 40 minutes.

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  • That from the first blow contains between 1% and 2% of copper, and is usually poured from ladles operated by an electric crane into a reverberatory, or into the settling well of the cupola.

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  • The word is sometimes written gilliflower or gilloflower, and is reputedly a corruption of July-flower, "so called from the month they blow in."

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  • The dispositions previously made by Osterman enabled him, however, to counter the blow, and all danger from Sweden was over when, early in September, Field-Marshal Lacy routed the Swedish general Wrangel under the walls of the frontier-fortress of Villmanstrand, which was carried by assault.

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  • The first blow was not struck till six months after the declaration of war; and it was struck by the enemy, who routed the Swedes at Villmanstrand and captured that frontier fortress.

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  • The wali of Arabia commenced the battle by attacking the left wing of the Afghans with great fury, routing it, and plundering their camp. The prime minister immediately afterwards attacked the enemys right wing, but was routed, and the Afghans, taking advantage of the confusion, captured the Persian guns and turned them on the Persian centre, who fled in confusion without striking a blow.

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  • The chief of Talysh struck the first blow, and drove the enemy from Lenkoran.

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  • The decision of the Bulgarian tsar Michael to submit the new Bulgarian Church to the jurisdiction of Constantinople was a great blow to Rome, who had hoped to secure it for herself.

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  • They were largely influenced by an important section of the Dutch community in western Cape Colony, which carried on a campaign against annexation, seeing in it a blow to the ideal they had begun to entertain of a united South Africa of a Dutch republican type.

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  • Gustavus thereupon resolved to strike the decisive blow without waiting for the arrival of Sprengtporten.

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  • The death of King Diniz proved a severe blow to troubadour verse, and the reign of his successor Alphonso IV.

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  • The revulsion of feeling after the witchcraft delusion undermined his authority greatly, and Robert's Calef's More Wonders of the Spiritual World (1700) was a personal blow to him as well as to his son.

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  • When by means of a tube we blow air into the inside of the bubble we increase its volume and therefore its surface, and at the same time we do work in forcing air into it, and thus increase the energy of the bubble.

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  • The scheme, therefore, was to begin with a succession of outpost affrays along the whole line (which could be represented as a provocation suffered), and then to strike vigorous offensive blows (a) from Seres towards Salonika, (b) from Strumitsa and Radovishta against the Vardar at Krivolak and Gevgeli (Gyevgheli), (the link between the Serbian and Greek armies); and (c) a blow from the region of Kochana towards Egri Palanka.

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  • Thus a heavy blow was dealt to the cause of Catiline, who, in the beginning of 62, saw his legions, only partially armed and diminished by desertion, shut in between those of Metellus Celer and C. Antonius.

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  • On the arrival of a second urgent summons shortly afterwards he obeyed, and was then at a house at Lambeth, probably in January 1604, initiated by Catesby together with John Wright into the plot to blow up the parliament house.

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  • Cavaignac failed perhaps to appreciate the political exigencies of the moment; as a soldier he would not strike his blow until his plans were matured and his forces sufficiently prepared.

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  • A small safety-valve placed in the steam pipe had been adjusted so as to blow off slightly at 310 lb and with a strong blast at 320 lb.

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  • The signal being given to let go, the machine darted forward at a terrific pace, and the safety-valve ceased to blow.

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  • Navigation, which is practicable for only one hundred and eighty days in the year, is rather difficult owing to fogs and gales, which are often accompanied, even in April and September, with snow-storms. The prevailing winds blow from N.W.

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  • The winds are variable; at no season of the year is it usual for them to blow from the same direction for many days in succession.

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  • The embargo and non-intercourse laws from 1807 to 1812 were a severe blow to Maine's shipping, and in the War of 1812 Eastport, Castine, Hampden, Bangor and Machias fell into the hands of the British.

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  • What the blow exactly was is disputed, but it is certain that Jeremiah saw the gathering storm and anticipated its result, while the statesmen were still wrapped in a false security.

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  • There is a general agreement that if a man like Gillespie or Nicholson had been in command of the station, the strong force at his disposal would have enabled him to strike such a deadly blow at the fleeing mutineers as might have stamped out the Mutiny.

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  • Canning and Lawrence, at opposite ends of the disaffected districts, alike perceived that Delhi was the centre of peril, and that all other considerations must be subordinated to striking a decisive blow at that historic city.

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  • It affords good anchorage, with nearly 7 fathoms of water, and is well sheltered, except from winds which blow from points between south-east and south-west.

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  • At least two pieces are taken from each melt or blow at the mill, and are stamped or marked, and all the various sections rolled from the melt or blow are required to bear a similar stamp or mark for identification.

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  • He maintained an attitude of defiance and of "Roman resolution," smiled scornfully at his questioners, making no secret of his intentions, replied to the king, who asked why he would kill him, that the pope had excommunicated him, that "dangerous diseases require a desperate remedy," adding fiercely to the Scottish courtiers who surrounded him that "one of his objects was to blow back the Scots into Scotland."

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  • This threw the responsibility of payment on Rumania, and was a severe blow to the prince, 'For biographical details, see Charles, king of Rumania; and Elizabeth, queen of Rumania.

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  • This decision was regarded by the Greeks as a blow to their own interests, and Greek revolutionary bands were accused of persecuting the Kutzo-Vlachs.

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  • The south-east winds blow from the arid lands and carry rising temperatures across the state; and the winter anti-cyclones from the north-west carry low temperatures even to the southern border.

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  • He could not, he said, bear even to let the wind blow on her; and now she must suffer cold and hunger; she must beg; she must be beaten; "yet," he added, "I must, I must do it."

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  • This was a sad blow to Livingstone, seeming to have rendered all his efforts to establish a mission futile.

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  • Brooks (1819-1857), a congressman from South Carolina, suddenly confronted Sumner as he sat writing at his desk in the Senate chamber, denounced his speech as a libel upon his state and upon Butler, his relative, and before Sumner, pinioned by his desk, could make the slightest resistance, rained blow after blow upon his head, till his victim sank bleeding and unconscious upon the floor.

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  • In any,case it was a cruel blow to a man already broken by racking illness and domestic sorrows.

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  • The direction of the long sandbanks at the river mouths, which project with remarkable uniformity from west to east, shows that the prevailing winds blow from the west and north-west.

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  • Such was the condition of things when the news of the Anglo-French Agreement of 1904 came as a blow to Abd-el-Aziz, who had relied on England for support and protection against the inroads of France.

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  • John Brown wished to deal a blow against slavery, but did nothing to aid any conservative political organization to that end.

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  • The Norman barons had refused to strike a blow for John, and the cities had shown but a very passive and precarious loyalty to him.

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  • Almost the only reconquest made was that of the city of Limoges, which was stormed in September 1370 by the troops of the Black Prince, who rose from his sick-bed to strike his last blow at the rebels.

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  • The fatal blow was administered by Philip of Burgundy, who, tired of maintaining a failing cause, consented at last to forget his fathers murder, and to be reconciled to Charles VII.

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  • The final blow came when a small of army of relief sent over from England was absolutely mandy.

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  • Their acquittal by a jury was the first serious blow to the system adopted by the king.

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  • But before a blow was struck William was thrown from his horse.

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  • Prince Eugene relieved Turin from a French siege, and followed up the blow by driving the besiegers out of Italy.

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  • The war was continued for some years with varying results; but in 1781 the capitulation of a second British army under Cornwallis at Yorktown was a decisive blow, which brought home to the minds of the dullest the assurance that the conquest of America was an impossibility.

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  • A French diversion on the coast of Pembroke was even less successful; a force of 1500 men, under Colonel Tate, an American adventurer, landed in Cardigan Bay on the 22nd of February 1797, but was at once surrounded by the local militia and surrendered without a blow.

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  • The finding of the court, however, was reversed by the privy council, and its judgment dealt a new blow at the Tractarian party.

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  • In deciding on war the British government relied on the capacity of its fleet, which was entrusted to the command of Sir Charles Napier, to strike a great blow in the Baltic. The fleet was despatched with extraordinary rejoicings, and amidst loud and confident expressions of its certain triumph.

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  • At the beginning of 1866 Lord Russells government thought itself compelled to suspend the Habeas Corpus Act In Ireland; and in 1867 Lord Derbys government was confronted in the spring by a plot to seize Chester Castle, and in the autumn by an attack on a prison van at Manchester containing Fenian prisoners, and by an atrocious attempt to blow up Clerkenwell prison.

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  • General Gordons death inflicted a fatal blow on the Liberal government.

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  • In the summer of 1794 Burke was struck to the ground by a blow to his deepest affection in life, and he never recovered from it.

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  • Under these conditions producer gas ceases to exist as a by-product, and the gases of the blow consist merely of the incombustible products of com plete combustion, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, the result being that more than three times / the heat is developed for the combustion of the same amount of fuel, and nearly double the quantity of water gas can be made per pound of fuel than was before possible.

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  • The winds from the north and those from the south are at constant feud, and blow cold or hot in the most capricious manner, often in the course of the same day.

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  • He took the blow with composure, and sank easily into a comparative retirement.

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  • It was resolved to strike the decisive blow on the 10th of August.

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  • The objects which the advocates of a new calendar had in view were to strike a blow at the clergy and to divorce all calculations of time from the Christian associations with which they were loaded, in short, to abolish the Christian year; and enthusiasts were already speaking of "the first year of liberty" and "the first year of the republic" when the national convention took up the matter in 1793.

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  • The death of Mirabeau, to whose fortunes he had attached himself, was a great blow to him; but, promoted to the rank of lieutenant-general and commandant of Nantes, his opportunity came after the flight to Varennes, when he attracted attention by offering to march to the assistance of the Assembly.

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  • When the Reformation shook the traditional authority in one department, the blow was necessarily felt in the other.

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  • By command of Zeus (or Aeolus) the winds ceased to blow during their brooding-time, for seven days before and after the shortest day, that their eggs might not be carried away by the sea.

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  • The bulb is evidence of a direct blow, probably intentionally made, and is a point of some importance to archaeologists investigating Palaeolithic implements.

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  • The death of the duke of Orleans in 1842 was a blow to Barrot's party, which sought to substitute the regency of the duchess of Orleans for that of the duke of Nemours in the event of the succession of the count of Paris.

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  • The same year he lost his only son - a blow which, he said, "drove the nails into his own coffin."

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  • In 1333, William de Burgh, the young earl of Ulster, was murdered by the Mandevilles and others; in this case signal vengeance was taken, but the feudal dominion never recovered the blow, and on the north-east coast the English laws and language were soon confined to Drogheda and Dundalk.

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  • In February 1884 there was a plot to blow up four London railway stations by means of clockwork infernal machines containing dynamite, brought from America.

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  • She looked with much suspicion upon 1 R P P the ideas then gaining power among many of her people, and determined to strike a decisive blow at the new teaching.

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  • The final blow was struck by King Cleomenes I., who maimed for many years to come the Argive power and left Sparta without a rival in the Peloponnese.

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  • The wide heated plains of the Sahara, and in a lesser degree the corresponding zone of the Kalahari in the south, have an exceedingly scanty rainfall, the winds which blow over them from the ocean losing part of their moisture as they pass over the outer highlands, and becoming constantly drier owing to the heating effects of the burning soil of the interior; while the scarcity of mountain ranges in the more central parts likewise tends to prevent condensation.

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  • Similar dry winds blow from the Kalahari in the south.

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  • The Mayoralty of the Palace aimed a third and more serious blow at the royal authority.

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  • Saint-Pol, Nemours, Charles the Bold, his brother the duke of Berry, old Ren of Anjou and his nephew the count of Maine, heir to the riches of Provence and to rights over Naplesthe skeleton hand mowed down all his adversaries as though it too were in his pay; until the day when at Plessisles-Tours it struck a final blow, claimed its just dues from Louis XL, and carried him off despite all his relics on the 3oth of August 1483.

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  • It had, it is true, dealt a blow to Calvinism just when, owing to the reforms of the council of Trent, the religious ground had been crumbling beneath it.

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  • Moreover, the proceedings of the 2nd of June, when the Commune of Paris had triumphed, bad dealt him a mortal blow.

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  • In 1858, when the Supreme Court, after the vote of Kansas against the Lecompton constitution, had decided that Kansas was a " slave " territory, thus quashing Douglas's theory of " popular sovereignty," he engaged in Illinois in a close and very exciting contest for the senatorship with Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate, whom he met in a series of debates (at Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy and Alton), in one of which, that at Freeport, Douglas was led to declare that any territory, by " unfriendly 1 Her death in 1853 was a great blow to him and embittered him.

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  • The Army of the Cumberland was, after all, to strike the decisive blow.

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  • The electorate was soon completely in the possession of Ernest, and the defeat of Gebhard was a serious blow to Protestantism, and marks a stage in the history of the Reformation.

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  • The expulsion of the latter people in many places inflicted upon agriculture a blow from which it has not recovered to this day.

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  • The loss of all her possessions on the American mainland in the early part of the 19th century dealt a severe blow to the foreign commerce of Spain, from which it only recovered about 1850, when imports and exports began to increase.

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  • A single blow delivered as much by Christian as by Moslem hands, sufficed to cut the bond which seemed to hold the kingdom together, and to scatter its fragments all over the soil of the Peninsula.

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  • In that year Portugal fell away without needing to strike a blow.

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  • Indeed, in his zeal against the Jansenists the pope condemned various practices in no way peculiar to their party; thus, for instance, many orthodox Catholics were exasperated at the heavy blow he dealt at popular Bible reading.

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  • No one thing in the world is ever abruptly separated, as by the blow of an axe, from the rest of things.

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  • Many of the pioneers of Nashville were slain by the Creek and Cherokee Indians, and at times the settlement was saved from destruction only by the heroism of Robertson, but in 1794 the savages were dealt a crushing blow at Nickojack on the lower Tennessee and much more peaceful relations were established.

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  • He was convinced that the presence of an independent American army would be a serious blow to German moral.

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  • Half the realm of creative art, that of statuary, was thus suppressed at a blow; and the other half, painting, forfeited all the grace and freedom, all the capacity of new themes, forms and colours, all the development which we see in the Latin Church.

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  • During the long absence of heirs to Louis XVI., " Monsieur," as heir to the throne, courted popularity and took an active part in politics, but the birth of a dauphin (1781) was a blow to his ambitions.

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  • This step was taken with the approval of the pope, who was anxious to strike a blow at Otto IV.

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  • The states party was crushed without a blow being struck.

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  • He was gladly received by the king of Poland, and other neighbouring princes, welcomed by a large number of the people, and in 1348 invested with the margraviate by King Charles IV., who eagerly seized this opportunity to deal a blow at his enemy.

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  • The warm, moisture-bearing winds blow low from the south or south-west with a free sweep across the state in a direction nearly parallel with the trend of the mountains.

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  • I don't want the kids thinking that just because we have money they can blow it on every whim.

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