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blame

blame

blame Sentence Examples

  • I can't really blame him.

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    74
  • You can't blame yourself for your father's death.

    125
    59
  • I think you're the one who is placing the blame on yourself.

    80
    41
  • You can blame your own big mouth.

    74
    35
  • You can blame your own big mouth.

    70
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  • How could she blame him?

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  • She wanted to strike out at someone - anyone, but there was no one to blame for this situation.

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  • I know I'm mostly to blame for last night, but I'm not here to entertain you.

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  • But you must not think I blame any one.

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    11
  • But I do not blame any one.

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    18
  • I don't blame you.

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  • At least he couldn't blame her for any lack of attention this time.

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  • Not that I blame her.

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  • Who could blame him?

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  • And I don't blame you for wanting to live on the ranch.

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  • For which you blame me, even though you destroyed her!

    19
    8
  • We'll just blame it on the rabbit.

    18
    9
  • We'll just blame it on the rabbit.

    17
    9
  • Who could blame Valorie for shrinking from Yancey's temper?

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  • You can blame Jule for that one.

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  • "Now you're going to blame my cooking," she said with burlesque severity that made him smile.

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  • How could she blame him for being irritable?

    12
    6
  • Looking back, she could hardly blame him for being suspicious.

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  • Can't blame her, she said.

    12
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  • She couldn't blame him for that.

    10
    7
  • And yet, how could she blame him for thinking that this was all she wanted?

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  • "If she knocked him off, next she'll be putting the blame on you," Fred said.

    8
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  • Don't blame her; I could see it all over her face.

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  • How could she blame him when she had offered no resistance?

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  • It's tough to blame him for that.

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    3
  • She was so ill that it was impossible for them to consider in how far she was to blame for what had happened.

    6
    3
  • How could she blame him for wanting to smile?

    6
    5
  • Considering the problems they presented, she could hardly blame him for that.

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    6
  • She placed no blame on Martha for remaining here.

    6
    6
  • It was easier to blame baseball.

    6
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  • His anger was unfounded, but she had to accept some of the blame for his method of approach.

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    4
  • Who can blame them?

    5
    5
  • I can't really blame the ones that step over the line once in a while.

    4
    2
  • Maybe, but trying to put the blame on you would be right up her alley.

    4
    3
  • Maybe, but trying to put the blame on you would be right up her alley.

    4
    3
  • How could she blame him if he wanted to call the marriage off?

    4
    4
  • I don't know why, but I really don't blame him!

    4
    4
  • Who is to blame for it?

    4
    4
  • Could she blame him?

    4
    5
  • I mean, he could invent some story—like, blame me!

    4
    5
  • And who was to blame for it?

    3
    1
  • He couldn't blame her for looking incredulous after hearing the tale.

    3
    3
  • Might have Shipton faked the accident in some sick attempt to place the blame on David Dean whom he obviously despised?

    2
    2
  • Vinnie was des­perate to place the blame for the missing dough on anyone but himself.

    2
    2
  • "No one is right and no one is to blame; so she too is not to blame," he thought.

    2
    2
  • "But in what am I to blame?" she asked herself.

    2
    2
  • Who's gonna blame you here?

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  • When did you start trying to blame the missing money on Byrne?

    2
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  • The ice climbers decided to get in a quick climb and blame their delay returning home on the cops.

    1
    1
  • Or did he do it himself to blame her?

    1
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  • He was ever ready to take blame on himself and bestow praise on others.

    1
    1
  • I'm not to blame that the conversation began in the presence of other officers.

    1
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  • But it is I, above all, who am to blame for everything.

    1
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  • "Only don't blame me!" the doctor shouted up after him.

    1
    1
  • No one's to blame," said Natasha--"It's my fault.

    1
    1
  • If there is any misunderstanding and discord between you and Mary, I can't blame her for it at all.

    1
    1
  • Mrs. Marsh glared at the papers, as if they were to blame for the situation.

    1
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  • Alex attacked his food as if it were to blame for the havoc he had created at the table.

    1
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  • And how was he to blame, with his dimple and blue eyes?

    1
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  • I am not to blame for being alive and wishing to live--nor you either.

    1
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  • "But in what was I to blame?" he asked.

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  • Could he be to blame toward her, or could her father, whom she knew loved her in spite of it all, be unjust?

    1
    3
  • You wanted a man who would wear the pants — so if anything went wrong the blame would be on him, not you.

    1
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  • It wasn't Alex who was to blame.

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  • Was she merely looking for someone to blame if the decision was wrong?

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  • I imagine they'll blame you Originals for this one as well.

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  • You still blame yourself for their deaths.

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  • I should blame myself, she said.

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  • She could hardly blame him.

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    0
  • If her answer had been no, he would have again put her in a position where she would be to blame for Jonathan's state of unhappiness.

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  • She couldn't blame him for being upset with her.

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  • I can't blame you.

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  • Still, she had to accept some of the blame.

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  • Well, she couldn't blame him.

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  • He couldn't blame her?

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  • I could hardly blame you.

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  • I shouldn't blame my rebellious moods on other people.

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  • He's annoyed that you didn't tell him where you were going and I can't blame him.

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  • And how could she blame him?

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  • Now he was angry, and who could blame him?

    0
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  • I hold men to blame.

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  • When I saw you with him in the hospital, I thought you two were an item again and I had only myself to blame.

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  • She didn't blame him for taking out his father's family.

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  • Personally he possessed the charming manners of a polished grand seigneur: debauched and cynical, but never rude or cruel, full of gentle consideration for all about him but selfish in his pursuit of pleasure, he has had to bear a heavy load of blame, but it is.

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  • But admiration of his talents must not blind us to his moral worthlessness, nor is it right to cast the blame for his excesses on the brutal and vicious society in which he lived.

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  • (Halle, 1899; London, 1902), apportion praise and blame more equally; J.

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  • Post-exilic revision has also hopelessly obscured the offence of Moses and Aaron, although there was already a tendency to place the blame upon the people (Deut.

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  • immediately, by an Italian occupation, lest Catholic an inion should lay the blame for this upon France.

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  • Thence he despatched telegrams to Italy throwing blame for the defeat upon his troops, a proceeding which sub- sequent evidence proved to be as unjustifiable as it was unsoldierlike.

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  • For this unfortunate combination Signor Sonnino himself was not altogether to blame; having lost many of his most faithful followers, who, weary of waiting for office, had gone over to the enemy, he had been forced to seek support among men who had professed hostility to the existing order of things and thus to secure at least the neutrality of the Extreme Left and make the public realize that the reddest of Socialists, Radicals and Republicans may be tamed and rendered harmless by the offer of cabinet appointments.

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  • From other points of view they may perhaps appear open to blame; but it is hoped they will throw light upon our present study.

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  • Sussex had tried in 1561 to procure Shane's assassination, and Shane now laid the whole blame for his lawless conduct on the lord deputy's repeated alleged attempts on his life.

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  • He was not content with laying the blame at the door of the effete War Office, but deplored the apathetic way in which the Tsar passed the time at headquarters, without any clear political plan, holding on supinely to formalism and routine, yielding to the spasmodic interference of the Empress.

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  • Palmerston, supported by Russell and well served by Lord Stratford de Redcliffe, British ambassador at Constantinople, favoured a more aggressive policy, and Aberdeen, unable to control Palmerston, and unwilling to let Russell go, cannot be exonerated from blame.

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  • The report of the Dardanelles commission, which was published in March '917, confirmed the view of the public that some of the blame for that mismanaged enterprise rightly attached to Mr. Churchill.

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  • It is difficult to decide whether to blame the legate or the emperor more for its failure.

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  • Some of them lay the blame on the papacy; and it is true that the papacy had contributed towards the decay of the Crusades when it had allowed its own particular interests to overbear the general welfare of Christianity, and had dignified with the name and the benefits of a Crusade its own political war against the Hohenstaufen.

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  • Other writers, again, blame the com mercial cupidity of the Italian towns; of what avail, they asked with no little justice, was the Crusade, when Venice and Genoa destroyed the naval bases necessary for its success by their internecine quarrels in the Levant (as in 1257), or - still worse - entered into commercial treaties with the common enemy against whom the Crusades were directed?

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  • But the king's diplomatic skill enabled him to satisfy the church without surrendering any rights of consequence (1106); and he skilfully threw the blame of his previous conduct upon his counsellor, Robert of Meulan.

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  • This acquitted them of blame, and Sir John Moore in the meantime after the departure of Dalrymple (Oct.

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  • Far more serious blame attaches to his all but total suppression in the body of the work - and the fault pervades the whole of his writings - of the names of his predecessors and contemporaries.

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  • Much of the blame falls upon the Supreme Council, which shrank from the only effective means of allaying friction - immediate Allied occupation of the disputed zone, pending the decision of the Peace Conference.

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  • After July the tactics of the Boer executive were simply directed towards putting off a crisis till the beginning of October, when the grass would be growing on the veld, and meanwhile towards doing all they could in their despatches to put the blame on Great Britain.

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  • If he is to be blamed in this particular matter, the blame must be chiefly confined to his imprudence in inviting Voltaire at the beginning and to the brutality of his conduct at the end.

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  • He was tried, but acquitted of all blame, and on the renewal of the war with the Turkish Empire in 1684 he was again appointed commanderin-chief, and after several brilliant victories he reconquered the Peloponnesus and Athens; on his return to Venice he was loaded with honours and given the title of "Peloponnesiaco."

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  • We know too little of the facts to allot blame to either of them.

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  • We are not so unreasonable as to blame him for failing to make his pages picturesque or thrilling; we do not want sunsets and stars and roses and ecstasy; but there is a certain standard for the most serious and abstract subjects.

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  • By way of revenge, Aeschines endeavoured to fix the blame for these disasters upon Demosthenes.

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  • During his diplomatic mission to France he had incurred blame for remaining at the opera while the Pretender was present,3 and according to the Mackintosh transcripts he had several secret interviews with him.

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  • The Spaniards, who were too thoroughly monarchical to blame the king, held his favourite responsible for the misfortunes of the country.

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  • It would certainly be most unjust to blame Olivares alone for the decadence of Spain, which was due to internal causes of long standing.

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  • But here Joab had taken the side of Adonijah against Solomon, and was put to death by Benaiah at Solomon's command, and it is possible that the charges are the fruit of a later tradition to remove all possible blame from Solomon (q.v.).

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  • Later, on the recommendation of Mercy and Vermond, she supported the nomination of Lomenie de Brienne in 1787, an appointment which, though widely approved at the time, was laid to the queen's blame when it ended in failure.

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  • For this Hegel was doubtless partly to blame.

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  • rescue impossible, (ii.) that Theramenes was to blame.

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  • On the other hand, the Poles were also to blame for the failure of constitutional government.

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  • The English reviews were at that time practically publishers' organs, the articles in which were written by hackwriters instructed to praise or blame according to the publishers' interests.

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  • The origin and the blame of evil are not in the body, but in the desires of the soul.

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  • The general's object may probably have been to accentuate the harshness with which the fathers had been treated, and so to increase public sympathy, 1 but the actual result of his policy was blame for the cruelty with which he enhanced their misfortunes, for the poverty of Corsica made even a bare subsistence scarcely procurable for them there.

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  • It is the work of the New Testament committee which has attracted most attention, whether for blame or praise.

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  • Bishops and deacons hold a subordinate place in this document; but the contemporary Epistle of Clement of Rome attests that these bishops " had offered the gifts without blame and holily."

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  • Considering the liability of corruption to breed corruption we can hardly blame him if he does not, and we may say that it is no derogation to his fides if he makes self-evident corrections.

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  • The author's own carelessness may be to blame, or, as in the case of Virgil and Lucan, he may not have been allowed to put the finishing touches to his work.

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  • For this he is himself in no small measure to blame.

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  • Long had been the trial, and greatly had Mazarin been to blame in allowing the Frondes to come into existence, but he had retrieved his position by founding that great royal party which steadily grew until Louis XIV.

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  • He had specially prepared himself, as he thought, for "teaching imaginative men, and political men, and legal men, and scientific men who bear the world in hand"; and he did not attempt to win their attention to abstract and worn-out theological arguments, but discussed the opinions, the poetry, the politics, the manners and customs of the time, and this not with philosophical comprehensiveness, not in terms of warm eulogy or measured blame, but of severe satire varied by fierce denunciation, and with a specific minuteness which was concerned primarily with individuals.

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  • forsooth ye are to blame."

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  • At first he went to Jena, but Zinzendorf at once sought to secure him as a fellow labourer, though the count wished to obtain from him a declaration which would remove from the Pietists of Halle all blame with regard to the disruption.

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  • Against the wishes of the justiciar he planned and carried out an expedition to the west of France (1230); when it failed he laid the blame upon his minister.

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  • His first wife, Catherine, daughter of Magnus I., duke of Saxe-Lauenburg, bore him in 1 533 his eldest son Eric. This union was neither long nor happy, but the blame for its infelicity is generally attributed to the lady, whose abnormal character was reflected and accentuated in her unhappy son.

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  • On the 13th and 14th of September he was tried with Ballard and five others by a special commission, when he confessed his guilt, but strove to place all the blame upon Ballard.

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  • It can scarcely be doubted that the favour which was at once accorded to the views of Malthus in certain circles was due in part to an impression, very welcome to the higher ranks of society, that they tended to relieve the rich and powerful of responsibility for the condition of the working classes, by showing that the latter had chiefly themselves to blame, and not either the negligence of their superiors or the institutions of the country.

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  • It is difficult, indeed, to blame the burghers for resisting the dubious reforming efforts of Hermann of Wied, archbishop from 1515 to 1546, inspired mainly by secular ambitions; but the expulsion of the Jews in 1414, and still more the exclusion, under Jesuit influence, of Protestants from the right to acquire citizenship, and from the magistracy, dealt severe blows at the prosperity of the place.

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  • The total Federal loss (including the garrisons at Winchester and Martinsburg) amounted to 44 killed (the commander was mortally wounded), 12,520 prisoners, and 13,000 small arms. For this terrible loss to the Union army the responsibility seems to have been General Halleck's, though the blame was officially put on Colonel Miles, who died immediately after the surrender.

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  • Considering his want of experience of such rivers as the Nile, and the great difficulties he had to contend with under a succession of ignorant Turkish rulers, it would be unfair to blame him because, until it fell into the hands of British engineers in 1884, the work was condemned as a hopeless failure.

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  • A writer who was guilty of such improprieties had little right to blame the poet who made Hector quote Aristotle, and represented Julio Romano as flourishing in the days of the Oracle of Delphi.

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  • There was, indeed, much just and much unjust censure; but even those who were loudest in blame were attracted by the book in spite of themselves.

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  • He was ever ready to take blame on himself and bestow praise on others.

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  • He soon, however, returned to literary interests, moved towards them by the sudden success of Tennyson; and in 1844 he published a small volume of Poems, which was not without individuality, but marred by inequalities of workmanship. It was widely criticized, both in praise and blame; and Patmore, distressed at its reception, bought up the remainder of the edition and caused it to be destroyed.

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  • The news supplied was meagre and inappropriate, and it did not take long for mischievous results to accrue, and the official mind was at first disposed to blame the Press for what was wrong in the " publicity " of the moment.

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  • If this is inaccurate or incomplete, the Government cannot blame the newspapers.

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  • The suffering Commons now began to blame Beaton.

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  • For this result the European Powers signatories of the Brussels Act of 1892 are to blame for lack of foresight and to some extent of goodwill.

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  • For this unfortunate issue Louis was not without blame; for from the very first, owing to an exaggerated idealism and love of antiquity, he had totally misunderstood the national character of the Greeks and the problems involved in the attempts to govern them by bureaucratic methods.

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  • The actors are never characterized; their actions are simply noted down; there is no praise and no blame.

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  • 2 If they deserve any blame it is for the pride, natural to their rank and their generation, which prevented them from charging an entrance fee, an expedient which would not only have made it possible for them to give access to the house and collections, but would have enabled them to save the fabric from falling into the lamentable state of disrepair in which it was found after their death.

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  • Even the Protestant churches are not exempt from blame in the matter; a small tomb near the Damascus Gate of Jerusalem has been fixed upon by a number of English enthusiasts as the true " Holy Sepulchre," an identification for which there is nothing to be said.

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  • the Socratics) dialectic; (3) that the differences between the different groups of sophists were not inconsiderable, and that in particular the teaching of the rhetoricians was distinct in origin, and, in so far as its aim was success in a special walk of life, distinct in character, from the more general teaching of the sophists of culture, the eristics, and the dialecticians, while the teaching of the dialecticians was discriminated from that of the rest, in so far as the aim of the dialecticians was truth, or at least the bettering of opinion; and, consequently, (4) that, in awarding praise and blame to sophistry and its representatives, the distinctive characteristics of the groups above enumerated must be studiously kept in view.

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  • Hence, even if we demur to the judgment of Grote that " Athens at the close of the Peloponnesian War was not more corrupt than Athens in the days of Miltiades and Aristeides," we shall not " consider the sophists as the corrupters of Athenian morality," but rather with Plato lay the blame upon society itself, which, " in popular meetings, law courts, theatres, armies and other great gatherings, with uproarious censure and clamorous applause " (Rep. vi.

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  • Though Lord Cornwallis carried the scheme into execution, all praise or blame, so far as details are concerned, must belong to Sir John Shore, afterwards Lord Teignmouth, whose knowledge of the country was unsurpassed by that of any civilian of his time.

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  • As regards his execution of the former part of his duties, it is sufficient to say that he preserved his equanimity undisturbed in the darkest hours of peril, and that the strict impartiality of his conduct incurred alternate praise and blame from the fanatics on either side.

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  • We have unfolded to us the monstrous system by which the governor could fix upon a remote place for the delivery of corn, and so compel the farmer to compound by a payment in money which the orator does not blame, on the ground that it is only proper to allow magistrates to receive corn wherever they wish (ib.

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  • Attention has been concentrated on rats, and some observers seem disposed to lay upon them the whole blame for the propagation and spread of plague, which is held to be essentially a rat-borne disease.

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  • Flexner and C. Hunter Stewart, pointing out that the evidence, so far from showing that Mr Haffkine's laboratory was to blame, made it clear to those acquainted with bacteriological work that it could have had nothing to do with the occurrence.

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  • The blame of Clement's downfall did not rest with him; for it was merely his duty to attend the camp, and keep his master informed of the proceedings of the generals (see the Correspondence, Op. tined.

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  • Keble came forward at the time, desirous to share the responsibility and the blame, if there was any; for he had seen the tract before it was published, and approved it.

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  • In 1763 there was a great debate in the assembly on the progress of schism, in which the Popular party laid the whole blame at the door of the Moderates, while the Moderates rejoined that patronage and Moderatism had made the church the dignified and powerful institution she had come to be.

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  • Those who blame Bacon must acquit Essex of all wrong-doing.

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  • If any blame attaches to him, it must arise either from his endeavour to force Coke to a favourable decision, in which he was in all probability prompted by a feeling, not uncommon with him, that a matter of state policy was in danger of being sacrificed to some senseless legal quibble or precedent, or from his advice to the king that a rumour should be set afloat which was not strictly true.

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  • The twenty-eighth and last, that of negligence in looking after his servants, though it did him much harm, may fairly be said to imply no moral blame.

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  • It has been asserted that " the writings of recent Jewish critics have tended on the whole to confirm the Gospel picture of external Jewish life, and where there is discrepancy these critics tend to prove that the blame lies not with the New Testament originals, but with their interpreters."

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  • Where she deserves blame is in her use of her power for personal patronage, as in compassing the promotions of Chamillart and Villeroi, and the frequent assistance given to her brother Comte Charles d'Aubigne.

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  • The Kaffirs had suffered much injustice, especially from the commando-reprisal system, but they had also committed many injustices, and for the disturbed state of the border the vacillating policy of the Cape government was largely to blame.

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  • When parliament again met in 1371, the blame was laid on the clerical ministers, under the influence of Wycliffe.

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  • The severity of the penalty, aided by a not unjust suspicion that the ministry sought to cover themselves by throwing all the blame on the admiral, led in after time to a reaction in favour ofByng.

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  • In the spring of 1535 the authorities of the Lyons hospital, considering that Rabelais had twice absented himself without leave, elected Pierre de Castel in his room; but the documents which exist do not seem to infer that any blame was thought due to him, and the appointment of his successor was once definitely postponed in case he should return.

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  • But she at once joined her friends, and was with the northern army which defeated Warwick at St Albans on the 17th of February 1461; for the executions which followed she must bear the blame.

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  • He must sometimes praise enemies and blame friends.

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  • The want of harmony between the facts and the statements about them is patent to all scholars, and it is the knowledge of this, unacknowledged to themselves, which has made the literati labour with an astonishing amount of fruitless ingenuity and learning to find in individual words, and the turn of every sentence, some mysterious indication of praise or blame.

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  • Historical criticism may regard this tradition, in many of its features, as mere fiction, or as a perversion of facts made for the purpose of transferring the blame for the loss of a sacred literature to other persons than those actually responsible for it.

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  • of France; but the numerous outbreaks of overt or secret hostility between the Franks and the Greeks on their line of march, for which both sides were to blame, nearly precipitated a conflict between Manuel and his guests.

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  • The existence of famine and cholera added to the difficulties of the government, and in March 1867 the Lower House, by a majority of three, passed the laconic resolution, " The chamber inflicts a vote of blame on the government.

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  • The central situation, which so greatly shocked Voltaire and indeed all French critics from the date of the piece, 'does not seem to blame.

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  • And if in truth he knew it before you, he ought not to blame any but himself for having taken no more care to secure a discovery, which he puts so much value on.

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  • It mattered little to Henry that the cardinal was arrogant, tactless and ostentatious; indeed it suited his purpose that Wolsey should be saddled by public opinion with all the blame that ought to have been laid on his own shoulders.

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  • Fortunately for the king his subjects laid all the blame upon his mouthpiece the cardinal, instead of placing it where it was due.

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  • The cardinal bore the blame, because he and Buckingham had notoriously disliked each other; but the deed had really been of the kings own contriving.

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  • The share taken by Great Britain in all this, for which Castlercagh pre-eminently must take the praise or blame, is outlined in the article on the history of Europe (q.v.).

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  • There was a great deal too (though little to his blame) in Lord Malmesbury's observation that he was not only disliked in the House of Commons for his mysterious manner, but prejudiced by a pronounced foreign air and aspect.

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  • For this Locke himself is partly to blame.

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  • Some clamour was raised by a publication in which blame for harsh dealings was freely imputed to Newton, but W.

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  • The aggregate of such rules he conceives as the law of God, carefully distinguishing it, not only from civil law, but from the law of opinion or reputation, the varying moral standard by which men actually distribute praise and blame; as being divine it is necessarily sanctioned by adequate rewards and punishments.

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  • 3 Hume remarks that in some cases, by " association of ideas," the rule by which we praise and blame is extended beyond the principle of utility from which it arises; but he allows much less scope to this explanation in his second treatise than in his first.

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  • or through the predominance in their minds of impartial sympathy, or because their conscience acts in harmony with utilitarian principles, or for any combination of these or any other reasons; or (2) it may be offered as a code to be obeyed not absolutely, but only so far as the coincidence of private and general interest may in any case be judged to extend; or again (3) it may be proposed as a standard by which men may reasonably agree to praise and blame the conduct of others, even though they may not always think fit to act on it.

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  • An irresistible motive, it is forcibly said, palliates or takes away guilt; no one can blame himself for yielding to necessity, and no one can properly be punished for what he could not have prevented.

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  • The settlement of .European land claims, and the measures taken for the protection of native institutions, caused lively dissatisfaction among the colonists, who laid the blame of the commercial depression at the door of the government; but with returning prosperity this feeling began to disappear.

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  • In reviewing the Irish government of Elizabeth we shall find much to blame, a want of truth in her dealings and of steadiness in her policy.

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  • Polish historians, dazzled by his genius and valour, are apt to overlook his quasi-treasonable conduct and blame Sigismund III.

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  • It implies blame.

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  • Benedetti was severely attacked in his own country for his conduct as ambassador, and the duc de Gramont attempted to throw upon him the blame for the failures of French diplomacy.

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  • Still, he couldn't blame her if she backed out now.

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  • Maybe he was to blame for her inability to move forward.

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  • That stung a little, but it was such a personal thing that she could hardly blame him.

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  • How could she blame him?

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  • At least he couldn't blame her for any lack of attention this time.

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  • Considering the problems they presented, she could hardly blame him for that.

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  • I can't really blame him.

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  • How could she blame him for wanting to smile?

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  • Who could blame Valorie for shrinking from Yancey's temper?

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  • I know I'm mostly to blame for last night, but I'm not here to entertain you.

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  • How could she blame him if he wanted to call the marriage off?

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  • Mrs. Marsh glared at the papers, as if they were to blame for the situation.

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  • Could she blame him?

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  • I think you're the one who is placing the blame on yourself.

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  • And I don't blame you for wanting to live on the ranch.

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  • She couldn't blame the Indian girl any more than she could blame the saloon girl who ran off with her father.

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  • Not that I blame her.

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  • His anger was unfounded, but she had to accept some of the blame for his method of approach.

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  • How could she blame him when she had offered no resistance?

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  • She placed no blame on Martha for remaining here.

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  • She said I shouldn't blame myself and my mother was wrong for hating me over what I did.

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  • Bianca cringed as she had earlier that day when her mother and Jonny's mother screamed blame at each other until the nursing staff kicked them out of the room.

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  • You can't blame yourself for your father's death.

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  • "Can't exactly blame this one on contaminated water, boss," Speck said a little uncertainly.

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  • You could blame the explosions and shit down here on the hurricane.

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  • "You can blame the Wild Things, D," Han said.

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  • You can blame Jule for that one.

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  • … to torture and blame her death on Jilian.

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  • It was easier to blame baseball.

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  • You can't blame him after he spent scads of money on a tux and flowers and gourmet dinner.

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  • He couldn't blame her for looking incredulous after hearing the tale.

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  • "If she knocked him off, next she'll be putting the blame on you," Fred said.

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  • I mean, he could invent some story—like, blame me!

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  • No matter who assured him the woman he fell for was okay, he couldn't help but blame himself for all that happened to her.

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  • And yet, how could she blame him for thinking that this was all she wanted?

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  • You.re too quick to blame everyone else!

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  • After all, Kris hadn.t died in the attack, and Jade could blame it all on Sasha.

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  • Can't blame her, she said.

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  • I don't know why, but I really don't blame him!

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  • For which you blame me, even though you destroyed her!

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  • "Now you're going to blame my cooking," she said with burlesque severity that made him smile.

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  • The shrinks seemed to think young Donnie might feel he's to blame for what happened and that's why he lost his ability to speak, but Shipton disagrees.

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  • Sister Claire bitched at the weatherman and anyone else she could blame for 'this horrible stuff ' while shooting daggers at Jerome Shipton and pretending Fred O'Connor hadn't been born.

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  • I can't really blame the ones that step over the line once in a while.

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  • Who's gonna blame you here?

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  • I suppose if she were mad enough at him, she might kill him but I could visualize her whacking him over the head with a library book more than sneaking up to the ice park and cutting his rope—and then going to the trouble to blame it on me.

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  • The ice climbers decided to get in a quick climb and blame their delay returning home on the cops.

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  • Might have Shipton faked the accident in some sick attempt to place the blame on David Dean whom he obviously despised?

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  • Or did he do it himself to blame her?

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  • He wanted to curse Elisabeth and blame her for the whole mess, though he knew it was entirely his fault.

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  • Don't blame her; I could see it all over her face.

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  • Alex attacked his food as if it were to blame for the havoc he had created at the table.

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  • Maybe if you'd try a trusting someone a little, you wouldn't have to blame another man for the fact that you can't hold a woman.

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  • She wanted to strike out at someone - anyone, but there was no one to blame for this situation.

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  • I don't blame you.

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  • Vinnie was des­perate to place the blame for the missing dough on anyone but himself.

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  • When did you start trying to blame the missing money on Byrne?

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  • It's tough to blame him for that.

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  • Who could blame him?

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  • How could she blame him for being irritable?

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  • She couldn't blame him for that.

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  • Looking back, she could hardly blame him for being suspicious.

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  • You wanted a man who would wear the pants — so if anything went wrong the blame would be on him, not you.

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  • It wasn't Alex who was to blame.

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  • Was she merely looking for someone to blame if the decision was wrong?

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  • I imagine they'll blame you Originals for this one as well.

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  • You still blame yourself for their deaths.

    0
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  • I should blame myself, she said.

    0
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  • She could hardly blame him.

    0
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  • If her answer had been no, he would have again put her in a position where she would be to blame for Jonathan's state of unhappiness.

    0
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  • She couldn't blame him for being upset with her.

    0
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  • I can't blame you.

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  • Still, she had to accept some of the blame.

    0
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  • Well, she couldn't blame him.

    0
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  • He couldn't blame her?

    0
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  • I could hardly blame you.

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  • I shouldn't blame my rebellious moods on other people.

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  • He's annoyed that you didn't tell him where you were going and I can't blame him.

    0
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  • And how could she blame him?

    0
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  • Now he was angry, and who could blame him?

    0
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  • I hold men to blame.

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  • When I saw you with him in the hospital, I thought you two were an item again and I had only myself to blame.

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  • She didn't blame him for taking out his father's family.

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  • To absolve a company of blame for shipping bogus code is wrong.

    0
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  • He was absolved of any blame in the matter.

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  • The team was absolved from blame on the first half goal.

    0
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  • To attribute blame for some past disaster is rarely useful.

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  • Some put the increase down to the current "blame culture" which is becoming ever more prevalent.

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  • accuse blame culture the accusing finger was immediately pointed at the social workers involved.

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  • He was honorably acquitted of blame by a court martial.

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  • acquitted of blame by a court martial.

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  • The youngest will be verbally aggressive if I suggest anything regarding getting some gainful employment, and will blame me for all his misfortunes.

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  • I can't say I blame Mike for still feeling a little aggrieved.

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  • They all suffer from respiratory ailments which they blame on air pollution.

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  • If ye hae lost it, itâs yeir ain blame.

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  • The leading low-cost airline believes it is " irrational " for environmentalists to solely blame airlines for climate change.

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  • apportion blame, which is all mine, by the way.

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  • In reality this is part of ensuring that the ' blame ', should anything go wrong, can be clearly apportioned.

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  • apportioning of blame and attempts to remedy the problem.

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  • bedeviled by weather, and you can't blame airlines for that.

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  • Who can blame you; dirt bike racing is an increasingly popular choice for many thrill seekers.

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  • blame the badger by implication rather than by fact.

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  • blame anyone for what had happened.

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  • He had no interest in apportioning blame or proving that anyone was at fault.

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  • Genesis 3 will lay the blame for evil at the door of the human race.

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  • Or, could he have been trying to deflect blame for 7/7?

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  • There is no point in trying to pin the blame on an innocent MLRO who is only trying to do his or her job.

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  • Scapegoats The story shows how ready some people are to shift the blame for their own actions onto someone else.

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  • If we are still working on assigning blame and legitimacy, it will not get us any further ahead in understanding the period better.

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  • blame for the mess!

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  • blame for the defeat.

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  • blame for the accident.

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  • blame culture by the sack load.

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  • Features ' i blame Elizabeth David ' He may have won OFM readers ' hearts with the peerless breakfasts at his Carluccio's Caff?

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  • brunt of the blame must be borne, of course, by the leadership of the Comintern.

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  • They believe the blame for allowing this lies with upper tiers of NHS bureaucrats.

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  • The blame lies partly on those Indian-Americans who convinced their reps to join the caucus but never held them accountable for not being active.

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  • I blame this film for my eating much more cheesecake than reasonable, out of boredom.

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  • I blame the strangely compelling Rockstar Mommy I AM: here, now.

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  • compensated where someone else is to blame.

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  • Today we import American blame culture by the sack load.

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  • The blame for the massive cutbacks lies with the Deputy Prime Minister's office, which has devised new criteria to award grants.

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  • Yet, these professional cynics are getting things wrong again in attributing blame.

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  • deflect blame by blaming others, eg doctors.

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  • Both have a history of debt and poverty for which the countries ' dictators and western creditors share the blame.

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  • doddering old man) is to blame for gun violence.

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  • A prolonged downturn in sales is to blame for the reduced working hours at the Banner Lane factory.

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  • We all know who is to blame: the overpaid hospital managers who are bleeding the system dry.

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  • The ruling dynasty must take a great deal of the blame.

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  • For the sluggish Irish stock market: blame the euro.

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  • The weak euro is to blame, but UK interest rates at twice those of Euroland don't help.

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  • exonerated of all blame.

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  • exonerated from all blame in case of disaster occurring at Chichester during his absence.

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  • Thus, it may be too facile to blame the ' increase ' on a greater popularity of smoking among women.

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  • Labels blame the precipitous falloff on piracy and online file-sharing, while some consumers point to lousy music offerings.

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  • Conservatives have laid the blame for the latest tax credits fiasco firmly at the door of Chancellor Gordon Brown.

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  • finger of blame at the black woman.

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  • The harsh fact is that both MPs find it easier to blame foreigners than motivate at home.

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  • freewill defense is not adequate to absolve God of blame for creating beings who commit evil.

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  • gluttony of blame (Pyth.

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  • It's bad enough suffering all your own hang-ups, I think, without taking the blame for other people's!

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  • But just you wait until you find out who's to blame for this whole hoo-ha.

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  • Could a hormonal imbalance be to blame for your symptoms?

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  • It seems likely that some kind of abnormal immune response is to blame.

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  • inadequacyinue to blame others unjustly for your own inadequacies.

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  • incalculable suffering to the animals - is directly to blame.

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  • keg of gunpowder within me, I am not to blame the match if there comes an explosion.

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  • lay the blame for evil at the door of the human race.

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  • The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has a litany of evils they blame on TV in particular.

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  • You can't just lop someone's head off and blame it on the Vikings.

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  • I blame the public schools who bred these ego maniacs.

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  • Stage Four - Strategies Agreed Shared Responsibility No blame is attributed but instead the group are asked to help alleviate the misery.

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  • much to blame.

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  • oestrogenlame your husband, blame estrogen dominance, says another reader.

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  • Many foreigners were accused, Dutch Protestants as well as French papists, showing there is nothing new about a culture of blame.

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  • The scenarios have also been interpreted in terms of a ' blame matrix ' for human exposure to secondary particulates.

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  • Instead others, even child pedestrians, get the blame.

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  • For Mrs Evans, ' Philip was the classic victim of the blame culture that now pervades our society ' .

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  • pin the blame on an innocent MLRO who is only trying to do his or her job.

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  • Who can blame you; dirt bike racing is an increasingly popular choice for many thrill seekers.

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  • For what the judgment of men considers praiseworthy is often worthy of blame in My sight.

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  • The Government is also now seeking to blame our problems on the behavior of extremist preachers in our midst.

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  • pretended nothing was going on - I was to blame for everything.

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  • UK: cannabis prohibition - who's really to blame?

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  • quick to blame others for things you do not like.

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  • Whoever misses out can always blame the poor referees who all were given top marks in round 9 despite Duffield losing to Edgbaston.

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  • These people today are even worse off and we blame a tyrant ruler and a corrupt regime.

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  • They simply wanted to find a scapegoat to blame for the recycling blunder.

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  • To escape from the consequences of their actions it suits them fine to shift blame onto the victim - and to create the scapegoat.

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  • Especially the ones who blame Prescott who appears to have got away with things scott who appears to have got away with things scot free.

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  • They blame a recent drop in theater attendances on the impression that the West End has become seedy in recent years.

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  • shift the blame for their own actions onto someone else.

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  • High heels are not to blame, says research Fears that wearing high-heeled shoes could lead to knee arthritis are unfounded, say researchers.

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  • simplistic to blame media for product failures.

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  • Duncan Fletcher just can't wipe the smile off his face, and who can blame him?

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  • snort a line; who's to blame?

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  • Techies are also to blame with CVs being liberally splattered with teh agile word without any actual experience.

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  • Personal Injury Apportioning Blame 29 October 2004 Who can an injured sportsman sue?

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  • In reality it was a bitter family squabble, with all sides equally to blame.

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  • squabbles over the blame as our economy slides.

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  • stock market: blame the euro.

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  • structuralist approach, to blame the destiny of peoples on the imperfections of the international system.

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  • theatrical trailer. * Production Notes - Some highly unreadable (blame the font) text-based notes.

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  • thoughtful lyrics " The Rich blame the Poor man for his plight.

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  • Surely, sabre-tooth tigers and triceratops witnessed the same things then that we blame on gods today.

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  • tragedyreport is published to help prevent further tragedies, not to blame.

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  • Why blame the men for measures, even tyrannical, in self-defence?

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  • unfair to blame car users for this.

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  • wisdom of hindsight it's easy to look back and point a finger of blame, but at whom?

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  • The pair went off and found their way eventually to Paris, leaving Musset in Italy, deeply wounded in his affections, but, to do him justice, taking all the blame for the rupture on himself.

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  • No blame attaches to the Roman general, Marcellus, since he had given orders to his men to spare the house and person of the sage; and in the midst of his triumph he lamented the death of so illustrious a person, directed an honourable burial to be given him, and befriended his surviving relatives.

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  • Personally he possessed the charming manners of a polished grand seigneur: debauched and cynical, but never rude or cruel, full of gentle consideration for all about him but selfish in his pursuit of pleasure, he has had to bear a heavy load of blame, but it is.

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  • But admiration of his talents must not blind us to his moral worthlessness, nor is it right to cast the blame for his excesses on the brutal and vicious society in which he lived.

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  • (Halle, 1899; London, 1902), apportion praise and blame more equally; J.

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  • Post-exilic revision has also hopelessly obscured the offence of Moses and Aaron, although there was already a tendency to place the blame upon the people (Deut.

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  • We cannot wholly acquit the Italians of their share of blame.

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  • immediately, by an Italian occupation, lest Catholic an inion should lay the blame for this upon France.

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  • Thence he despatched telegrams to Italy throwing blame for the defeat upon his troops, a proceeding which sub- sequent evidence proved to be as unjustifiable as it was unsoldierlike.

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  • For this unfortunate combination Signor Sonnino himself was not altogether to blame; having lost many of his most faithful followers, who, weary of waiting for office, had gone over to the enemy, he had been forced to seek support among men who had professed hostility to the existing order of things and thus to secure at least the neutrality of the Extreme Left and make the public realize that the reddest of Socialists, Radicals and Republicans may be tamed and rendered harmless by the offer of cabinet appointments.

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  • The grand vizier nevertheless laid the blame of the failure on Thokbly, who thereupon hastened to Adrianople to defend himself before the sultan.

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  • From other points of view they may perhaps appear open to blame; but it is hoped they will throw light upon our present study.

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  • Then the hide was stuffed with grass and yoked to a plough; the participants were charged with ox murder and each laid the blame on the other; finally the axe was thrown into the sea.

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  • Sussex had tried in 1561 to procure Shane's assassination, and Shane now laid the whole blame for his lawless conduct on the lord deputy's repeated alleged attempts on his life.

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  • He was not content with laying the blame at the door of the effete War Office, but deplored the apathetic way in which the Tsar passed the time at headquarters, without any clear political plan, holding on supinely to formalism and routine, yielding to the spasmodic interference of the Empress.

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  • Palmerston, supported by Russell and well served by Lord Stratford de Redcliffe, British ambassador at Constantinople, favoured a more aggressive policy, and Aberdeen, unable to control Palmerston, and unwilling to let Russell go, cannot be exonerated from blame.

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  • The report of the Dardanelles commission, which was published in March '917, confirmed the view of the public that some of the blame for that mismanaged enterprise rightly attached to Mr. Churchill.

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  • It is difficult to decide whether to blame the legate or the emperor more for its failure.

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  • Some of them lay the blame on the papacy; and it is true that the papacy had contributed towards the decay of the Crusades when it had allowed its own particular interests to overbear the general welfare of Christianity, and had dignified with the name and the benefits of a Crusade its own political war against the Hohenstaufen.

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  • Other writers, again, blame the com mercial cupidity of the Italian towns; of what avail, they asked with no little justice, was the Crusade, when Venice and Genoa destroyed the naval bases necessary for its success by their internecine quarrels in the Levant (as in 1257), or - still worse - entered into commercial treaties with the common enemy against whom the Crusades were directed?

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  • He has sometimes on this plea been exonerated from all censure; but, though entitled to honour for the zeal which he showed on behalf of the natives, he must bear the blame for his violation or neglect of moral principle.

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  • But the king's diplomatic skill enabled him to satisfy the church without surrendering any rights of consequence (1106); and he skilfully threw the blame of his previous conduct upon his counsellor, Robert of Meulan.

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  • This acquitted them of blame, and Sir John Moore in the meantime after the departure of Dalrymple (Oct.

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  • Far more serious blame attaches to his all but total suppression in the body of the work - and the fault pervades the whole of his writings - of the names of his predecessors and contemporaries.

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  • Much of the blame falls upon the Supreme Council, which shrank from the only effective means of allaying friction - immediate Allied occupation of the disputed zone, pending the decision of the Peace Conference.

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  • After July the tactics of the Boer executive were simply directed towards putting off a crisis till the beginning of October, when the grass would be growing on the veld, and meanwhile towards doing all they could in their despatches to put the blame on Great Britain.

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  • For the hardships and sufferings of the English soldiers in the terrible Crimean winter before Sevastopol, owing to failure in the commissariat, both as regards food and clothing, Lord Raglan and his staff were at the time severely censured by the press and the government; but, while Lord Raglan was possibly to blame in representing matters in a too sanguine light, it afterwards appeared that the chief neglect rested with the home authorities.

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  • If he is to be blamed in this particular matter, the blame must be chiefly confined to his imprudence in inviting Voltaire at the beginning and to the brutality of his conduct at the end.

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  • He was tried, but acquitted of all blame, and on the renewal of the war with the Turkish Empire in 1684 he was again appointed commanderin-chief, and after several brilliant victories he reconquered the Peloponnesus and Athens; on his return to Venice he was loaded with honours and given the title of "Peloponnesiaco."

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  • We know too little of the facts to allot blame to either of them.

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  • We are not so unreasonable as to blame him for failing to make his pages picturesque or thrilling; we do not want sunsets and stars and roses and ecstasy; but there is a certain standard for the most serious and abstract subjects.

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  • Some observers lay the blame at th door of Buddhism, a creed which promotes pessimism by beget ting the anchorite, the ascetic and the shuddering believer ii seven hells.

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  • By way of revenge, Aeschines endeavoured to fix the blame for these disasters upon Demosthenes.

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  • During his diplomatic mission to France he had incurred blame for remaining at the opera while the Pretender was present,3 and according to the Mackintosh transcripts he had several secret interviews with him.

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  • The Spaniards, who were too thoroughly monarchical to blame the king, held his favourite responsible for the misfortunes of the country.

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  • It would certainly be most unjust to blame Olivares alone for the decadence of Spain, which was due to internal causes of long standing.

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  • But here Joab had taken the side of Adonijah against Solomon, and was put to death by Benaiah at Solomon's command, and it is possible that the charges are the fruit of a later tradition to remove all possible blame from Solomon (q.v.).

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  • Later, on the recommendation of Mercy and Vermond, she supported the nomination of Lomenie de Brienne in 1787, an appointment which, though widely approved at the time, was laid to the queen's blame when it ended in failure.

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  • For this Hegel was doubtless partly to blame.

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  • rescue impossible, (ii.) that Theramenes was to blame.

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  • For this miserable crime Church has, by some historians, been held responsible by default; it is clear, however, from his own account that no blame rests upon him (see his MS. Narrative, vol.

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  • On the other hand, the Poles were also to blame for the failure of constitutional government.

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  • The English reviews were at that time practically publishers' organs, the articles in which were written by hackwriters instructed to praise or blame according to the publishers' interests.

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  • The origin and the blame of evil are not in the body, but in the desires of the soul.

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  • The general's object may probably have been to accentuate the harshness with which the fathers had been treated, and so to increase public sympathy, 1 but the actual result of his policy was blame for the cruelty with which he enhanced their misfortunes, for the poverty of Corsica made even a bare subsistence scarcely procurable for them there.

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  • It is the work of the New Testament committee which has attracted most attention, whether for blame or praise.

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  • Bishops and deacons hold a subordinate place in this document; but the contemporary Epistle of Clement of Rome attests that these bishops " had offered the gifts without blame and holily."

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  • Considering the liability of corruption to breed corruption we can hardly blame him if he does not, and we may say that it is no derogation to his fides if he makes self-evident corrections.

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  • The author's own carelessness may be to blame, or, as in the case of Virgil and Lucan, he may not have been allowed to put the finishing touches to his work.

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  • For this he is himself in no small measure to blame.

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  • Long had been the trial, and greatly had Mazarin been to blame in allowing the Frondes to come into existence, but he had retrieved his position by founding that great royal party which steadily grew until Louis XIV.

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  • He had specially prepared himself, as he thought, for "teaching imaginative men, and political men, and legal men, and scientific men who bear the world in hand"; and he did not attempt to win their attention to abstract and worn-out theological arguments, but discussed the opinions, the poetry, the politics, the manners and customs of the time, and this not with philosophical comprehensiveness, not in terms of warm eulogy or measured blame, but of severe satire varied by fierce denunciation, and with a specific minuteness which was concerned primarily with individuals.

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  • forsooth ye are to blame."

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  • At first he went to Jena, but Zinzendorf at once sought to secure him as a fellow labourer, though the count wished to obtain from him a declaration which would remove from the Pietists of Halle all blame with regard to the disruption.

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  • Against the wishes of the justiciar he planned and carried out an expedition to the west of France (1230); when it failed he laid the blame upon his minister.

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  • His first wife, Catherine, daughter of Magnus I., duke of Saxe-Lauenburg, bore him in 1 533 his eldest son Eric. This union was neither long nor happy, but the blame for its infelicity is generally attributed to the lady, whose abnormal character was reflected and accentuated in her unhappy son.

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  • On the 13th and 14th of September he was tried with Ballard and five others by a special commission, when he confessed his guilt, but strove to place all the blame upon Ballard.

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  • It can scarcely be doubted that the favour which was at once accorded to the views of Malthus in certain circles was due in part to an impression, very welcome to the higher ranks of society, that they tended to relieve the rich and powerful of responsibility for the condition of the working classes, by showing that the latter had chiefly themselves to blame, and not either the negligence of their superiors or the institutions of the country.

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  • It is difficult, indeed, to blame the burghers for resisting the dubious reforming efforts of Hermann of Wied, archbishop from 1515 to 1546, inspired mainly by secular ambitions; but the expulsion of the Jews in 1414, and still more the exclusion, under Jesuit influence, of Protestants from the right to acquire citizenship, and from the magistracy, dealt severe blows at the prosperity of the place.

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  • The total Federal loss (including the garrisons at Winchester and Martinsburg) amounted to 44 killed (the commander was mortally wounded), 12,520 prisoners, and 13,000 small arms. For this terrible loss to the Union army the responsibility seems to have been General Halleck's, though the blame was officially put on Colonel Miles, who died immediately after the surrender.

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  • Considering his want of experience of such rivers as the Nile, and the great difficulties he had to contend with under a succession of ignorant Turkish rulers, it would be unfair to blame him because, until it fell into the hands of British engineers in 1884, the work was condemned as a hopeless failure.

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  • A writer who was guilty of such improprieties had little right to blame the poet who made Hector quote Aristotle, and represented Julio Romano as flourishing in the days of the Oracle of Delphi.

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  • There was, indeed, much just and much unjust censure; but even those who were loudest in blame were attracted by the book in spite of themselves.

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  • He soon, however, returned to literary interests, moved towards them by the sudden success of Tennyson; and in 1844 he published a small volume of Poems, which was not without individuality, but marred by inequalities of workmanship. It was widely criticized, both in praise and blame; and Patmore, distressed at its reception, bought up the remainder of the edition and caused it to be destroyed.

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  • The news supplied was meagre and inappropriate, and it did not take long for mischievous results to accrue, and the official mind was at first disposed to blame the Press for what was wrong in the " publicity " of the moment.

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  • If this is inaccurate or incomplete, the Government cannot blame the newspapers.

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  • The suffering Commons now began to blame Beaton.

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  • For this result the European Powers signatories of the Brussels Act of 1892 are to blame for lack of foresight and to some extent of goodwill.

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  • For this unfortunate issue Louis was not without blame; for from the very first, owing to an exaggerated idealism and love of antiquity, he had totally misunderstood the national character of the Greeks and the problems involved in the attempts to govern them by bureaucratic methods.

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  • The actors are never characterized; their actions are simply noted down; there is no praise and no blame.

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  • 2 If they deserve any blame it is for the pride, natural to their rank and their generation, which prevented them from charging an entrance fee, an expedient which would not only have made it possible for them to give access to the house and collections, but would have enabled them to save the fabric from falling into the lamentable state of disrepair in which it was found after their death.

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  • Even the Protestant churches are not exempt from blame in the matter; a small tomb near the Damascus Gate of Jerusalem has been fixed upon by a number of English enthusiasts as the true " Holy Sepulchre," an identification for which there is nothing to be said.

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  • the Socratics) dialectic; (3) that the differences between the different groups of sophists were not inconsiderable, and that in particular the teaching of the rhetoricians was distinct in origin, and, in so far as its aim was success in a special walk of life, distinct in character, from the more general teaching of the sophists of culture, the eristics, and the dialecticians, while the teaching of the dialecticians was discriminated from that of the rest, in so far as the aim of the dialecticians was truth, or at least the bettering of opinion; and, consequently, (4) that, in awarding praise and blame to sophistry and its representatives, the distinctive characteristics of the groups above enumerated must be studiously kept in view.

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  • Hence, even if we demur to the judgment of Grote that " Athens at the close of the Peloponnesian War was not more corrupt than Athens in the days of Miltiades and Aristeides," we shall not " consider the sophists as the corrupters of Athenian morality," but rather with Plato lay the blame upon society itself, which, " in popular meetings, law courts, theatres, armies and other great gatherings, with uproarious censure and clamorous applause " (Rep. vi.

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  • Though Lord Cornwallis carried the scheme into execution, all praise or blame, so far as details are concerned, must belong to Sir John Shore, afterwards Lord Teignmouth, whose knowledge of the country was unsurpassed by that of any civilian of his time.

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  • As regards his execution of the former part of his duties, it is sufficient to say that he preserved his equanimity undisturbed in the darkest hours of peril, and that the strict impartiality of his conduct incurred alternate praise and blame from the fanatics on either side.

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  • We have unfolded to us the monstrous system by which the governor could fix upon a remote place for the delivery of corn, and so compel the farmer to compound by a payment in money which the orator does not blame, on the ground that it is only proper to allow magistrates to receive corn wherever they wish (ib.

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  • Attention has been concentrated on rats, and some observers seem disposed to lay upon them the whole blame for the propagation and spread of plague, which is held to be essentially a rat-borne disease.

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  • Flexner and C. Hunter Stewart, pointing out that the evidence, so far from showing that Mr Haffkine's laboratory was to blame, made it clear to those acquainted with bacteriological work that it could have had nothing to do with the occurrence.

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  • The blame of Clement's downfall did not rest with him; for it was merely his duty to attend the camp, and keep his master informed of the proceedings of the generals (see the Correspondence, Op. tined.

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  • Keble came forward at the time, desirous to share the responsibility and the blame, if there was any; for he had seen the tract before it was published, and approved it.

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  • In 1763 there was a great debate in the assembly on the progress of schism, in which the Popular party laid the whole blame at the door of the Moderates, while the Moderates rejoined that patronage and Moderatism had made the church the dignified and powerful institution she had come to be.

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  • Those who blame Bacon must acquit Essex of all wrong-doing.

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  • If any blame attaches to him, it must arise either from his endeavour to force Coke to a favourable decision, in which he was in all probability prompted by a feeling, not uncommon with him, that a matter of state policy was in danger of being sacrificed to some senseless legal quibble or precedent, or from his advice to the king that a rumour should be set afloat which was not strictly true.

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  • The twenty-eighth and last, that of negligence in looking after his servants, though it did him much harm, may fairly be said to imply no moral blame.

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  • It has been asserted that " the writings of recent Jewish critics have tended on the whole to confirm the Gospel picture of external Jewish life, and where there is discrepancy these critics tend to prove that the blame lies not with the New Testament originals, but with their interpreters."

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  • Accordingly, when the persecutions ceased and the reaction set in, much of the blame was laid upon him; the influence of Judge Samuel Sewall, after he had come to think his part in the Salem delusion a great mistake, was turned against the Mathers; and the liberal leaders of Congregationalism in Boston, notably the Brattles, found this a vulnerable point in Cotton Mather's armour and used their knowledge to much effect, notably by assisting Robert Calef (d.

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  • Where she deserves blame is in her use of her power for personal patronage, as in compassing the promotions of Chamillart and Villeroi, and the frequent assistance given to her brother Comte Charles d'Aubigne.

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  • The Kaffirs had suffered much injustice, especially from the commando-reprisal system, but they had also committed many injustices, and for the disturbed state of the border the vacillating policy of the Cape government was largely to blame.

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  • The treacherous vizier, however, made our too credulous political officers believe that Mehrab Khan was to blame; his object being to bring his master to ruin and to obtain for himself all power in the state, knowing that Mehrab's successor was only a child.

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  • When parliament again met in 1371, the blame was laid on the clerical ministers, under the influence of Wycliffe.

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  • The severity of the penalty, aided by a not unjust suspicion that the ministry sought to cover themselves by throwing all the blame on the admiral, led in after time to a reaction in favour ofByng.

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  • In the spring of 1535 the authorities of the Lyons hospital, considering that Rabelais had twice absented himself without leave, elected Pierre de Castel in his room; but the documents which exist do not seem to infer that any blame was thought due to him, and the appointment of his successor was once definitely postponed in case he should return.

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  • But she at once joined her friends, and was with the northern army which defeated Warwick at St Albans on the 17th of February 1461; for the executions which followed she must bear the blame.

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  • He must sometimes praise enemies and blame friends.

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  • The want of harmony between the facts and the statements about them is patent to all scholars, and it is the knowledge of this, unacknowledged to themselves, which has made the literati labour with an astonishing amount of fruitless ingenuity and learning to find in individual words, and the turn of every sentence, some mysterious indication of praise or blame.

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  • Historical criticism may regard this tradition, in many of its features, as mere fiction, or as a perversion of facts made for the purpose of transferring the blame for the loss of a sacred literature to other persons than those actually responsible for it.

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  • of France; but the numerous outbreaks of overt or secret hostility between the Franks and the Greeks on their line of march, for which both sides were to blame, nearly precipitated a conflict between Manuel and his guests.

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  • The existence of famine and cholera added to the difficulties of the government, and in March 1867 the Lower House, by a majority of three, passed the laconic resolution, " The chamber inflicts a vote of blame on the government.

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  • The central situation, which so greatly shocked Voltaire and indeed all French critics from the date of the piece, 'does not seem to blame.

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  • And if in truth he knew it before you, he ought not to blame any but himself for having taken no more care to secure a discovery, which he puts so much value on.

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  • It mattered little to Henry that the cardinal was arrogant, tactless and ostentatious; indeed it suited his purpose that Wolsey should be saddled by public opinion with all the blame that ought to have been laid on his own shoulders.

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  • Fortunately for the king his subjects laid all the blame upon his mouthpiece the cardinal, instead of placing it where it was due.

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  • The cardinal bore the blame, because he and Buckingham had notoriously disliked each other; but the deed had really been of the kings own contriving.

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  • The share taken by Great Britain in all this, for which Castlercagh pre-eminently must take the praise or blame, is outlined in the article on the history of Europe (q.v.).

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  • There was a great deal too (though little to his blame) in Lord Malmesbury's observation that he was not only disliked in the House of Commons for his mysterious manner, but prejudiced by a pronounced foreign air and aspect.

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  • For this Locke himself is partly to blame.

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  • Some clamour was raised by a publication in which blame for harsh dealings was freely imputed to Newton, but W.

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  • The aggregate of such rules he conceives as the law of God, carefully distinguishing it, not only from civil law, but from the law of opinion or reputation, the varying moral standard by which men actually distribute praise and blame; as being divine it is necessarily sanctioned by adequate rewards and punishments.

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  • Hume admits the difficulty that arises, especially in the case of the " artificial " virtues, such as justice, &c., from the undeniable fact that we praise them and blame their opposites without consciously reflecting on useful or pernicious consequences; but considers that this maybe explained as an effect of " education and acquired habits."

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  • 3 Hume remarks that in some cases, by " association of ideas," the rule by which we praise and blame is extended beyond the principle of utility from which it arises; but he allows much less scope to this explanation in his second treatise than in his first.

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  • or through the predominance in their minds of impartial sympathy, or because their conscience acts in harmony with utilitarian principles, or for any combination of these or any other reasons; or (2) it may be offered as a code to be obeyed not absolutely, but only so far as the coincidence of private and general interest may in any case be judged to extend; or again (3) it may be proposed as a standard by which men may reasonably agree to praise and blame the conduct of others, even though they may not always think fit to act on it.

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  • An irresistible motive, it is forcibly said, palliates or takes away guilt; no one can blame himself for yielding to necessity, and no one can properly be punished for what he could not have prevented.

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  • The settlement of .European land claims, and the measures taken for the protection of native institutions, caused lively dissatisfaction among the colonists, who laid the blame of the commercial depression at the door of the government; but with returning prosperity this feeling began to disappear.

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