Black-cohosh sentence example

black-cohosh
  • Three of four studies show that black cohosh does not affect LH or FSH.
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  • The fourth study, which found an effect of black cohosh on LH levels, was a trial in 110 women with menopausal symptoms.
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  • If you're an expectant mother nearing or past your due date, you may begin to wonder about inducing labor naturally using black cohosh.
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  • When talking to your healthcare provider about this natural remedy, it can be helpful to understand the basics about this herb and how much black cohosh women take to induce labor.
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  • Practitioners prescribe black cohosh to control the symptoms of menopause and assist with menstrual cramps and water retention related to menstruation.
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  • Midwives and natural health practitioners sometimes recommend black cohosh to induce labor in women who are near or past their due dates.
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  • Some practitioners believe that black cohosh ripens the cervix and strengthens contractions, leading to the onset of labor.
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  • Always talk to your doctor or midwife before taking black cohosh or any other medication.
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  • If you're considering taking black cohosh to induce labor, check with your midwife or labor and delivery health care provider before following the dosages listed below.
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  • There are risks involved with self-prescribing any herb, vitamin or medicine during pregnancy, so it is important that you take black cohosh only under the advisement of your health care provider.
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  • Health care practitioners recommend adding five drops of black cohosh tincture to a cup of water or tea, and ingesting it once or twice a day.
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  • Beginning in the 38th week, one 500 mg capsule of black cohosh taken three times per day is the recommended dosage.
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  • When your midwife or health care provider has determined it is safe to induce your labor, place 15 drops of black cohosh tincture under your tongue every hour.
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  • The effectiveness and safety of using black cohosh as described above have not been studied.
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  • Using black cohosh before week 37 of pregnancy may result in premature birth, which can be detrimental to your baby.
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  • Never use black cohosh without supervision of your health care provider.
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  • Large doses of black cohosh can induce seizure, irregular heartbeat and visual disturbance.
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  • Liver damage has been associated with black cohosh use.
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  • Neurological complications in the baby may occur if black cohosh is combined with blue cohosh.
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  • While black cohosh may, indeed, induce labor, it is essential to the safety and health of both you and your baby that you only use black cohosh under careful supervision.
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  • The safety and efficacy of black cohosh have not been proven nor studied.
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  • Learning more about the risks and benefits of natural methods such as black cohosh will help you to make the best decision possible for you and for your baby.
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  • When using any herbal remedy, care must be taken because of side effects and black cohosh side effects are no exception.
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  • The Native Americans used black cohosh to treat sore throats, snakebites, and female complaints such as menstrual cramps and hot flashes.
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  • Herbalists have long believed that black cohosh has analgesic (pain relieving) properties as well as anti-inflammatory and anti spasmodic properties.
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  • Today, black cohosh is most often recommended to address the symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes.
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  • And while folklore places another uses for black cohosh as an herb to induce labor, it should never be used for this purpose except under the supervision of an herbalist, nurse midwife, or skilled naturopathic physician.
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  • Like any other supplement or herb, black cohosh may produce side effects.
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  • According to the National Institute of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, patients in clinical trials using black cohosh report a low incidence of black cohosh side effects.
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  • Among reported side effects, the four listed above are the least severe and typically went away as soon as use of black cohosh was discontinued.
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  • If you experience any of these side effects, stop using black cohosh immediately.
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  • More serious side effects, however, have been reported, particularly among women who used black cohosh over long periods of time.
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  • Another very serious side effect of using black cohosh can be seizures.
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  • If you suspect that you may have had a seizure, see a doctor immediately and discontinue use of black cohosh supplements.
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  • Women who have had liver disease or liver problems of any kind should not use black cohosh.
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  • Avoid taking black cohosh or other herbal supplements while pregnant or breast feeding.
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  • If any black cohosh side effects are suspected, and if you notice your eye whites or skin looking yellow after taking black cohosh, see a physician immediately.
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  • While Black Cohosh is generally safe to use you should be aware that it is a blood thinner as well.
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  • You should not take Black Cohosh if you are on blood thinners or aspirin therapy.
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  • Herbs: Herbs like black cohosh are said to help minimize symptoms; however, the herbal approach can also bring about a new range of symptoms.
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  • For instance, black cohosh may bring about nausea and gastric discomfort while reducing hot flashes.
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  • Additionally, many supplements can be found that contain black cohosh (Cimicifugaracemosa) or dong quai (Angelica sinensis), which are herbs high in phytoestrogens.
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  • Herbs used to treat amenorrhea include dong quai (Angelica sinensis), black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), and chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus).
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  • Herbs used to treat oligomenorrhea include dong quai (Angelica sinensis), black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), and chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus).
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  • Black cohosh: Approved in Germany to treat menstrual symptoms and other complications among women, black cohosh is thought to have few side effects, though it may not be safe for pregnant women.
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