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bivouac

bivouac

bivouac Sentence Examples

  • were settling down into bivouac; they were still but a short march from the decisive field.

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  • from bivouac long after dawn, he marched forward, via Walhain.

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  • from bivouac long after dawn, he marched forward, via Walhain.

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  • It seems scarcely to know fear, obtruding itself on the notice of any traveller who invades its haunts, and, should he halt, making itself at once a denizen of his bivouac. In confinement it speedily becomes friendly, but suitable food for it is not easily found.

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  • The square was again heavily attacked, but the Arabs could not get to close quarters and in the evening a bivouac was formed on the Nile.

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  • By evening it was expected that the whole would have crossed the Sambre, and would bivouac between the sundered allies.

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  • The Emperor without waiting for an answer turned away and said to one of the officers as he went: Have these gentlemen attended to and taken to my bivouac; let my doctor, Larrey, examine their wounds.

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  • The huge, endless bivouac that had previously resounded with the crackling of campfires and the voices of many men had grown quiet, the red campfires were growing paler and dying down.

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  • In the field, armies lived as a rule in camp (q.v.), and when the provision of canvas shelter was impossible in bivouac. At the present time, however, it is unusual, in Europe at any rate, for troops on active service to hamper themselves with the enormous trains of tent wagons that would be required, and cantonments or bivouacs, or a combination of the two have therefore taken the place, in modern warfare, of the old long rectilinear lines of tents that marked the restingplace and generally, too, the order of battle of an 18th-century army.

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  • He seemed unaware of the vital importance of the moment, crouched shivering over a bivouac fire, and finally rode back to Dresden, leaving no specific orders for the further pursuit.

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  • Denisov himself intended going with the esaul and Petya to the edge of the forest where it reached out to Shamshevo, to have a look at the part of the French bivouac they were to attack next day.

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  • The troops nearest the enemy, however, which have to be maintained in a state of constant readiness for battle, cannot as a rule afford the time either for dispersing into quarters or for rallying on an alarm, and in western Europe at any rate they are required to bivouac. In India, the term "cantonment" means more generally a military station or standing camp. The troops live, not in private houses, but in barracks, huts, forts or occasionally camps.

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  • In Franklin cemetery rest the remains of Daniel Boone and of Theodore O'Hara (1820-1867), a lawyer, soldier, journalist and poet, who served in the U.S. army in 1846-1848 during the Mexican War, took part in filibustering expeditions to Cuba, served in the Confederate army, and is best known as the author of "The Bivouac of the Dead," a poem written for the burial in Frankfort of some soldiers who had lost their lives at Buena Vista.

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  • It seems scarcely to know fear, obtruding itself on the notice of any traveller who invades its haunts, and, should he halt, making itself at once a denizen of his bivouac. In confinement it speedily becomes friendly, but suitable food for it is not easily found.

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  • The square was again heavily attacked, but the Arabs could not get to close quarters and in the evening a bivouac was formed on the Nile.

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  • In the field, armies lived as a rule in camp (q.v.), and when the provision of canvas shelter was impossible in bivouac. At the present time, however, it is unusual, in Europe at any rate, for troops on active service to hamper themselves with the enormous trains of tent wagons that would be required, and cantonments or bivouacs, or a combination of the two have therefore taken the place, in modern warfare, of the old long rectilinear lines of tents that marked the restingplace and generally, too, the order of battle of an 18th-century army.

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  • Before doing so, it is worth reflecting on why I would not build the traditional bivouac.

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  • After a forced bivouac on the ridge, they descended the next day before returning to Gangotri the day after.

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  • bivouac on the ridge.

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  • You will require two good days of fine weather to attempt the traverse including one overnight bivouac on the ridge.

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  • bivouac shelters on the ridge.

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  • bivouac area where, first of all, everyone had to marry up again.

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  • bivouac huts and firewood; others are more basic.

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  • bivouac bags if you don't want to bring a tent.

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  • bivouac tent.

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  • were settling down into bivouac; they were still but a short march from the decisive field.

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  • He seemed unaware of the vital importance of the moment, crouched shivering over a bivouac fire, and finally rode back to Dresden, leaving no specific orders for the further pursuit.

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  • By evening it was expected that the whole would have crossed the Sambre, and would bivouac between the sundered allies.

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  • The troops nearest the enemy, however, which have to be maintained in a state of constant readiness for battle, cannot as a rule afford the time either for dispersing into quarters or for rallying on an alarm, and in western Europe at any rate they are required to bivouac. In India, the term "cantonment" means more generally a military station or standing camp. The troops live, not in private houses, but in barracks, huts, forts or occasionally camps.

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  • bivouac gear including flashlight and/or candles, and a means for attracting attention such as a whistle and/or flares.

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