Bitterly sentence example

bitterly
  • She supplied bitterly as she rinsed the last dish and put it into the rack.

    373
    209
  • And again she began to sob, more bitterly than before.

    253
    169
  • You don't have to worry, he added bitterly.

    73
    29
  • He turned away from her and swore bitterly, driving his fist into the milk bucket.

    183
    153
  • A lengthy silence followed, and she bitterly considered how well he had betrayed her.

    145
    129
    Advertisement
  • He now bitterly regretted his temerity in braving the danger.

    75
    75
  • Never were men more bitterly disappointed.

    8
    8
  • He was bitterly disappointed that Becket, on whom he bestowed the primacy, left vacant by the death of Theobald (1162), at once became the champion of clerical privilege; he and the archbishop were no longer on speaking terms when the Constitutions of Clarendon came up for debate.

    1
    2
  • Its terms were bitterly assailed by the Whigs, and after the accession of George I.

    1
    2
  • Probably his long immunity was due in the main to the capacity of his strong-handed justiciar Geoffrey Fitz-Peter; the king hated him bitterly, but generally took his advice.

    1
    2
    Advertisement
  • After the fall of the Borgia he returned, but, being bitterly detested by his people, decided to sell his rights to the Venetians, who had long desired to possess Rimini, and who gave him in exchange the town of Cittadella, some ready money, and a pension for life.

    1
    2
  • Once this had cleared, there was no visual stimulation it's just wall-to-wall snow and bitterly cold.

    2
    2
  • This is the most bitterly criticized action in his career, but no one but the man on the spot can judge how it is necessary to handle a crowd; and in addition one of the princes, Abu Bukt, heir-apparent to the throne, had made himself notorious for cutting off the arms and legs of English children and pouring the blood into their mothers' mouths.

    3
    5
  • Even those who most bitterly attacked his measures admitted the purity and unselfishness of his motives.

    0
    2
  • Such wholesale criticism was bitterly resented, but indeed throughout his career Wellington, cold and punctilious, never secured to himself the affections of officers and men as Marlborough or Napoleon did.

    0
    2
    Advertisement
  • His lectures on art had dealt bitterly with the mode in which buildings and other works were produced.

    2
    4
  • For this Nobilior was bitterly attacked by Cato the Censor, on the ground that he had compromised his dignity as a Roman general.

    1
    3
  • In common with all enlightened opinion, he complained bitterly of the excessive multiplication of exemptions, of the exaggerated extension of appeals to Rome, of the luxury of the Roman court, of the venality of the cardinals, and of the injury done to the traditional hierarchy by the very extent of the papal power, which was calculated to turn the strongest head.

    0
    2
  • This step he was destined bitterly to repent.

    0
    2
  • His death was bitterly regretted by his father and by all who had known him.

    1
    3
    Advertisement
  • This danger became a reality when in the year 395 the able and valiant Theodosius died, leaving the empire to be divided between his imbecile sons Arcadius and Honorius, the former taking the eastern and the latter the western portion, and each under the control of a minister who bitterly hated the minister of the other.

    0
    2
  • During the remainder of that pontificate Della Rovere remained in France, nominally in support of the pope, for whom he negotiated the treaty of 1498 with Louis XII., but in reality bitterly hostile to him.

    0
    2
  • Garrison in 1831, had stirred the conscience of the North, and had had its influence even upon many who strongly deprecated its extreme radicalism; the Compromise of 1850 had failed to silence sectional controversy, and the Fugitive Slave Law, which was one of the compromise measures, had throughout the North been bitterly assailed and to a considerable extent had been nullified by state legislation; and finally in 1854 the slavery agitation was fomented by the passage of the KansasNebraska Act, which repealed the Missouri Compromise and gave legislative sanction to the principle of "popular sovereignty" - the principle that the inhabitants of each Territory as well as of each state were to be left free to decide for themselves whether or not slavery was to be permitted therein.

    0
    2
  • It was soon obvious that beneath all varieties of individual opinion there were two bitterly hostile tendenciesrepublican and constitutionalist.

    0
    2
  • It was bitterly opposed by the Liberals, especially by Bamberger; all essential features were altered by the Reichstag, and it was withdrawn by the government after it had passed the third reading.

    0
    2
    Advertisement
  • With the exception of the German Populists who felt that a German " Liberal " party could not well oppose an extension of popular rights, all the German Liberals were antagonistic, some bitterly, to the measure.

    0
    2
  • The pope bitterly felt this catastrophe as a double blow to Christendom and to Greek letters.

    0
    2
  • The people complain bitterly to Moses, who appeals to Yahweh and is assured by him of the future deliverance of Israel "by a strong hand."

    0
    2
  • Maria Theresa had never given up hope that she would recover Silesia; and as all the neighbouring sovereigns were bitterly jealous of Frederick, and somewhat afraid of him, she had no difficulty in inducing several of them to form a scheme for his ruin.

    0
    2
  • He spoke, indeed, bitterly of " the state of barbarism in which the country had been left by the traffic in men."

    0
    2
    Advertisement
  • Alexander, indeed, assisted Napoleon in the war of 1809, but he declared plainly that he would not allow Austria to be crushed out of existence; and Napoleon complained bitterly of the inactivity of the Russian troops during the campaign.

    0
    2
  • Accord ' This " manifesto," which was bitterly attacked in the North, was agreed upon (October 18, 1854) by the three ministers after several meetings at Ostend and at Aix-la-Chapelle, arranged in pursuance of instructions to them from President Pierce to " corn-, pare opinions, and to adopt measures for perfect concert of action in aid of the negotiations at Madrid " on the subject of reparations demanded from Spain by the United States for alleged injuries to American commerce with Cuba.

    0
    2
  • The composition introduced Carlyle to the " Dryasdust " rubbish heaps of which he here and ever afterwards bitterly complained.

    0
    2
  • Carlyle, as a wise man, should have yielded to his wife's wishes; unluckily, he was content to point out that her jealousy was unreasonable, and, upon that very insufficient ground, to disregard it and to continue his intimacy with the Ashburtons on the old terms. Mrs Carlyle bitterly resented his conduct.

    0
    2
  • He was in deep poverty, the Estates were chary of supplies, plotters in Scotland had been offering to Cecil to kidnap the king (1598), and his relations both with the English government and with his own subdued but struggling preachers were bitterly unfriendly.

    0
    2
    Advertisement
  • He left Wittenberg in bitterly cold weather on the 23rd of January 1546, and the journey was tedious and hazardous.

    0
    2
  • His parliamentary methods were bitterly attacked by his political enemies, who called him "Tsar Reed."

    0
    2
  • He believed in constitutional monarchy, as offering the best guarantees both for sovereign and people, and he was bitterly opposed to all forms of state socialism.

    0
    2
  • In Sicily the revolutionists were purely insular in their aspirations and bitterly hostile to the Neapolitans, and the attempts.

    0
    2
  • He bitterly attacked Cavour for his unitarian views, and for the cession of Nice and Savoy.

    2
    4
    Advertisement
  • He was bitterly attacked by Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony) in the senate on the ist of September for not being present there, and on the next day replied in his First Philippic. He then left Rome and devoted himself to the completion of the de Qfficiis, and to the composition of his famous Second Philippic, which was never delivered, but was circulated, at first privately, after Antony's departure from Rome to Cisalpine Gaul on the 28th of November.

    0
    2
  • The candidate in r808 of the Republican party, although bitterly opposed in the party by John Randolph and George Clinton, Madison was elected president, defeating C. C. Pinckney, the Federalist candidate, by 122 votes to 47.

    0
    2
  • Simson, bitterly disappointed at the outcome of his mission, resigned his seat in the Frankfort parliament, but in the summer of the same year was elected deputy for Konigsberg in the popular chamber of the Prussian Landtag.

    0
    2
  • Three years later, however, the world had more important things to think of than Leopold's ecclesiastical reforms. At first the French Revolution was by no means antiCatholic - though the Constituent Assembly remem- French bered too much of the quarrels about the Unigenitus not to be bitterly hostile to Rome - and its great aim ti"' was to turn the French Church into a purely national body.

    0
    2
  • In 1527 he had been declared a rebel by the Signoria on account of his well-known Medicean prejudices; and in 1530, deputed by Clement to punish the citizens after their revolt, he revenged himself with a cruelty and an avarice that were long and bitterly remembered.

    0
    2
    Advertisement
  • During the smallpox epidemic of 1721 he attempted in vain to have treatment by inoculation employed, for the first time in America; and for this he was bitterly attacked on all sides, and his life was at one time in danger; but, nevertheless, he used the treatment on his son, who recovered, and he wrote An Account of the Method and further Success of Inoculating for the Small Pox in London (r 721).

    0
    2
  • This action, which really broke the back of the rebellion, was bitterly denounced by some of his fellow conspirators, who even ascribed their misfortunes to his insane belief in his own superhuman powers.

    0
    2
  • The election of Balmaceda was bitterly opposed by the Conservatives and dissentient Liberals, but was finally successfully carried by the official influence exercised by President Santa Maria.

    0
    2
  • In 1607 Gaspar Scioppius, then in the service of the Jesuits, whom he afterwards so bitterly libelled, published his Scaliger hypobolimaeus (" The Supposititious Scaliger"), a quarto volume of more than four hundred pages, written with consummate ability, in an admirable and incisive style, with the entire disregard for truth which Scioppius always displayed, and with all the power of his accomplished sarcasm.

    0
    2
  • He was bitterly opposed, however, to the liberal practices that followed the Half-Way Covenant and (after 1677) in particular to "Stoddardeanism," the doctrine of Solomon Stoddard (1643-1729) that all "such Persons as have a good Conversation and a Competent Knowledge may come to the Lord's Supper," only those of openly immoral life being excluded.

    0
    2
    Advertisement
  • In 189 Glabrio was a candidate for the censorship, but was bitterly opposed by the nobles.

    0
    2
  • Founded on faulty experiments and reasoning, the views he expressed were either ignored or ridiculed; and it was long before he bitterly regretted the temerity with which he had published his hasty generalizations.

    0
    2
  • The award of the tribunal made in October 1 9 03 was arrived at by the favourable vote of the three commissioners of the United States and of Lord Alverstone, whose action was bitterly resented by the two Canadian commissioners; it sustained in the main the claims of the United States.

    0
    2
  • As presidential nominee of the Greenback and Anti-Monopolist parties, he polled 175,370 votes in 1884, when he had bitterly opposed the nomination by the Democratic party of Grover Cleveland, to defeat whom he tried to "throw" his own votes in Massachusetts and New York to the Republican candidate.

    0
    2
  • In 1289 he went to Montpellier, wrote his Ars veritatis inventiva, and removed to Genoa where he translated this treatise into Arabic. In 1291, after many timorous doubts and hesitations for which he bitterly blamed himself, Lull sailed for Tunis where he publicly preached Christianity for a year; he was finally imprisoned and expelled.

    0
    2
  • The Greeks had bitterly resented his attachment to the party which saw no difficulty in a reconciliation of the two churches.

    0
    2
  • It was on this occasion that Parnell, on Forster's charging him, not with directly planning or perpetrating outrages or murder, but with conniving at them, ejaculated "It's a lie"; and, replying on the next day, the Irish leader, instead of disproving Forster's charges, bitterly denounced his methods of administration.

    0
    2
  • The Kaffirs bitterly resented their loss of independence, and ever since the last war had been secretly preparing to renew the struggle.

    0
    2
  • But he was bitterly.

    2
    4
  • They fought long and bitterly, nor was this to be marvelled at, for Henry had a custom of executing as traitors all who withstood him, and those who had once defied him did well to fight to the last gasp, in order to avoid the block or the halter.

    0
    2
  • The evacuation of the French fortresses in Maine and elsewhere which Death of was the price paid for the suspension of arms, was flumphmy bitterly resented.

    0
    2
  • The deliberate harrying of the Midlands by Margarets northern levies was a new departure, and one bitterly resented.

    1
    3
  • Her last English partisans, attainted men who had lost their lands and lived with the shadow of the axe ever before them, fought bitterly enough.

    1
    3
  • He felt the ingratitude, of the king, whom he had made, so bitterly that he stooped crc long to intrigue ajebeiion.

    1
    3
  • The other was that the nation at this moment was chafing bitterly against a clerical minister, whom it (very unjustly) made responsible for the exorbitant taxation which it was enduring, in consequence of the kings useless and unsuccessful foreign wars.

    0
    2
  • At the Diet of 1825, when the motion for founding a Hungarian academy was made by PM Nagy, who bitterly reproached the Magyar nobles for so long neglecting their mother-tongue, Szechenyi offered to contribute a whole year's income (60,000 florins) towards it.

    0
    2
  • George Grenville, whom the Rockinghams had displaced, and who was bitterly incensed at their formal reversal of his policy, printed a pamphlet to demonstrate his own wisdom and statesmanship. Burke replied in his Observations on a late Publication on the Present State of the Nation (1769), in which he showed for the first time that he had not only as much knowledge of commerce and finance, and as firm a hand, in dealing with figures as Grenville himself, but also a broad, general and luminous way of conceiving and treating politics, in which neither then nor since has he had any rival among English publicists.

    0
    2
  • In February 1879 he was re-elected to the Senate to succeed Isaac P. Christiancy (1812-1890), and soon afterwards, in a speech concerning Mexican War pensions, bitterly denounced Jefferson Davis.

    0
    2
  • The work was bitterly attacked by Freeman, whose "extravagant Saxonism" Pearson had been unable to adopt.

    2
    4
  • Though bitterly disappoii_ted Balak still attempted to effect his purpose and took Balaam to the top of Pisgah, with the result that Israel received a second blessing.

    0
    2
  • The commissioners of the Convention plundered the Netherlands with so little remorse that the people became bitterly hostile.

    0
    2
  • The experiment failed, chiefly because of the opposition of the Croatians and Magyars, whom he bitterly offended by his celebrated saying that "Hungary could wait."

    0
    2
  • He attacked them not less bitterly for thinking that society could be changed off-hand by a readymade and complete scheme of reform.

    0
    2
  • The marriage, only accepted by Wilhelmina under threats from her father and with a view to lightening her brother's disgrace, proved at the outset a happy one, though it was clouded at first by narrow means, and afterwards by the infidelities of the future margrave with Dorothea von Marwitz, whose ascendancy at the court of Baireuth was bitterly resented by Frederick the Great, and caused an estrangement of some three years between Wilhelmina and the brother she so devotedly loved.

    0
    2
  • But the long expected heir failed to come, and Bianca realized that if her husband were to die before her she was lost, for his family, especially his brother Cardinal Ferdinand, hated her bitterly, as an adventuress and interloper.

    0
    2
  • Towards the end of 1397 he started for Rome, and Pope Boniface IX., at the urgent request of the king, translated him to the see of St Andrews, a step which the pope afterwards confessed he repented bitterly.

    0
    2
  • The pope's efforts failed, for in the 14th century several Cistercian abbeys excluded Irishmen, and as late as 1436 the monks of Abingdon complained bitterly that an Irish abbot had been imposed on them by lay violence.

    0
    2
  • Never has a statesman's personality been more bitterly associated by his political opponents with the developments they deplored.

    0
    2
  • He shared fully in the eccentric family pride; and boasted of his brother's genius even when bitterly opposing him.

    0
    2
  • After 1829 the relations became less friendly; and later, when the Armenians attracted the sympathies of the European powers after the war of 1877-78, they became bitterly hostile.

    0
    2
  • Identifying himself with Brahmanical orthodoxy he bitterly opposed social reforms. His violent condemnation in 1897 of the plague prevention regulations was followed by the assassination of the local plague commissioner (Mr. Rand) and a young British officer driving with him at the time.

    0
    2
  • As part of Nana's torment, in a bitterly ironic twist, former Eastender's star Hilda Braid has been taken to a nursing home with suspected dementia.

    0
    2
  • They split bitterly on the role of women's activism.

    0
    2
  • But right at this precise moment, he was most bitterly angry with himself.

    0
    2
  • Thus Protestant learners often become the unwitting confidantes of Catholic Irish speakers who bitterly resent the republican image of the Irish language.

    0
    2
  • It is more than interesting to recall that, when first published, the King James Version was bitterly denounced.

    0
    2
  • Geoffrey had been bitterly disappointed by his failure to capture a queen.

    0
    2
  • A long land track bringing easterly of north-easterly winds is hot in summer but bitterly cold in winter.

    0
    2
  • Had we gone the invasion route, the U.S. could still be an occupying power in a bitterly hostile land.

    0
    2
  • Winston Churchill led a number of MPs who bitterly opposed it.

    0
    2
  • Origen was deposed, excommunicated, and bitterly persecuted.

    0
    2
  • The Princess lay prone upon a couch, sobbing bitterly.

    0
    2
  • I still bitterly repent the time I spent in Satan's service.

    0
    2
  • The regime operates a bitterly resented system of universal conscription.

    0
    2
  • This would be bitterly resisted by both Sunnis and Kurds.

    0
    2
  • Although bitterly cold, there were near perfect weather conditions on with no wind and a slack tide.

    0
    2
  • The'space for free exchange ' the WSF saw itself as was inherently unequal and many sidelined people and even movements complained bitterly.

    0
    2
  • There can be no doubt that he hated the queen, and bitterly resented his long disgrace at court, and also that he sincerely wished for a thorough reform of the government and the establishment of some such constitution as that of England; and no doubt such friends as Adrien Duport and Choderlos de Laclos, for their own reasons, wished to see him king of France.

    0
    2
  • He greeted the treaty of San Stefano (3rd March 1878) with undisguised relief, and by the mouth of the king, congratulated Italy (7th March 1878) on having maintained with the powers friendly and cordial relations free from suspicious precautions, and upon having secured for herself that most precious of alliances, the alliance of the future a phrase of which the empty rhetoric was to be bitterly demonstrated by the Berlin Congress and the French occupation of Tunisia.

    0
    2
  • Turgot, on hearing of this, wrote an indignant letter to the king, in which he reproached him for refusing to see him, pointed out in strong terms the dangers of a weak ministry and a weak king, and complained bitterly of Ailaurepas's irresolution and subjection to court intrigues; this letter the king, though asked to treat it as confidential, is said to have shown to Maurepas, whose dislike for Turgot it still further embittered.

    0
    2
  • His dispositions of naval forces in the Irish Channel were bitterly resented by the Unionists, who accused him of being in a " plot " to provoke Ulster to armed resistance and then coerce her.

    0
    2
  • He had no sooner done so than he bitterly repented his weakness; and acting, as he himself says, on the principle that " to take an oath which never ought to have been taken is to estrange one's self from God, but to retract what one has wrongfully sworn to, is to return back to God," when he got safe again into France he attacked the transubstantiation theory more vehemently than ever.

    0
    2
  • Men like Thomas Murner, for instance, heartily denounced " the great Lutheran fool," but at the same time bitterly attacked monks and priests, and popularized the conception of the simple man with the hoe (Karsthans).

    0
    2
  • Even after the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748) the Iroquois complained bitterly of the fraudulent land speculators, and in 1753 the chiefs of the Mohawks threatened to declare the covenant chain broken.

    0
    2
  • Henceforth he was bitterly but unjustly accused of want of patriotism, and in 1738 was compelled at last to retire before the impetuous onslaught of the triumphant young Hat party.

    0
    2
  • The exiles had among them desperadoes who could slay; and, besides exciting the enmity of the Anglican clergy about the king, who bitterly resented the secularist spirit of his book, he had compromised himself with the French authorities by his elaborate attack on the papal system.

    0
    2
  • Their rival factions hated each other, but both, especially the faction of Michelangelo, turned bitterly against the veteran newcomer.

    0
    2
  • Had the overlords been more considerate incorporation with Edinburgh would not have been so bitterly resisted.

    0
    2
  • He led an army into the heart of Wales to punish the raids of King Griffith ap Llewelyn, and harried the Welsh so bitterly that they put their leader to death, and renewed their homage to the English crown (1063).

    0
    2
  • Then followed the revolt of Naples (see MASANIELLO) and of the Catalans, who were bitterly angered by the excesses of the troops sent to operate against the French in Roussillon.

    0
    2
  • After the definite refusal he had received, Petya went to his room and there locked himself in and wept bitterly.

    0
    2
  • In 1797, however, the two men quarreled bitterly over John 's choice of bride, and John set up a rival store.

    0
    2
  • We never met up for that beer, something I now deeply regret bitterly.

    0
    2
  • Bitterly did he blame himself and repent when repentance was of no avail.

    0
    2
  • In an ' exalted spirit ', she felt revulsion from the wounds she was tending [and] bitterly reproached herself.

    0
    2
  • The 'space for free exchange ' the WSF saw itself as was inherently unequal and many sidelined people and even movements complained bitterly.

    0
    2
  • Verse 3 tells us " he wept bitterly ".

    0
    2
  • Antarctica is a bitterly cold continent surrounded by ocean and has very few residents.

    0
    2
  • She left home, feeling bitterly betrayed by her family.

    0
    2
  • Too often in the past, veteran actors on AMC faced reduced air time to make room for younger, cheaper newcomers; a situation that is bitterly resented by most soap opera fans.

    0
    2
  • I can't even eat real food, she said bitterly.

    0
    3
  • Bennett, Roosevelt and the Republic (New York, 1908), is bitterly hostile.

    3
    6
  • He was bitterly disappointed at the triumph of the monarchical principle after the revolution of July 1830, in which he had taken part.

    0
    3
  • On June 9 1914 he became prime minister and Minister of Justice, but his Government was bitterly assailed by the Radical Socialists as well as other groups, and only lasted one day.

    0
    3
  • His uncle receives him with joy, but the barons of the court are bitterly jealous and plot his destruction.

    2
    5
  • In 1637, when the doubts of Scaliger and Heinsius as to the purity of the Greek of the New Testament prompted the rector of Hamburg to introduce the study of classical authors, any reflection on the style of the Greek Testament was bitterly resented.

    0
    3
  • During the South African crisis of 1899-1902 he was specially vehement in opposition to Mr Chamberlain, and took the "pro-Boer" side so bitterly that he was mobbed in Birmingham during the 1900 election when he attempted to address a meeting at the Town Hall.

    0
    3
  • William, who had always been bitterly opposed to the policy of abandoning the French alliance in order to gain better terms from Spain, did his utmost to prevent the ratification, but matters were too far advanced for his interposition to prevail in the face of the determination of the states of Holland to conclude a peace so advantageous to their trade interests.

    0
    3
  • Charles V.'s ambassador, Chapuys, hardly deigned to mention the fact that the king's amie had given birth to a daughter, and both her parents were bitterly disappointed with her sex.

    0
    3
  • On the other hand reflection on past events made clear to him not only the sufferings but the defects and follies of the national heroes, and from henceforth, for the first time, we notice a bitterly humorous vein in his writings.

    0
    3
  • Spengel, indeed, tries to bring the latest date in the book down to 330; but it is by absurdly supposing that the author could not have got the commonplace, " one ought to criticize not bitterly but gently," except from Demosthenes, De Corona (§ 265).

    0
    3
  • Next day the duke of Devonshire resigned, a step somewhat bitterly resented by Mr Balfour, who clearly thought that his sacrifices in order to conciliate the duke had now been made in vain.

    0
    3
  • Bitterly disillusioned, Calixtus died on the 14th of August 1458.

    1
    4
  • He returned to the National House of Representatives in 18J9 and bitterly criticized the vacillation of Buchanan's administration.

    2
    5
  • They created profound excitement among orthodox theologians, and evoked many replies, in which Lessing was bitterly condemned for having published writings of so dangerous a tendency.

    0
    3
  • His action gave rise to the Marprelate tracts, in which the bishops and clergy were bitterly attacked.

    0
    3
  • Those who maintain the impunity of the practice rely for their authority upon certain passages in the classical authors, which, while bitterly lamenting the frequency of this enormity, yet never allude to any laws by which it might be suppressed.

    0
    3
  • He was bitterly opposed to what he considered to be the medievalism and narrowness of the Oxford Tractarian Movement.

    0
    3
  • He vindicated himself somewhat bitterly in a parliament at Gloucester, but still avoiding a prominent part in the government, accepted the command on the Scottish border.

    0
    3
  • The most important and widespread tradition is that Peter came to Rome; and though this tradition has often been bitterly attacked, it seems to be probable that it is at least in outline quite historical.

    1
    4
  • In 1784 he bitterly attacked the establishment of the order of the Cincinnati on the ground that it was a dangerous menace to democratic institutions.

    0
    3
  • The Northern Abolitionists, to whom no contract or agreement was sacred that involved the continuance of slavery, regarded the clauses in the Federal Constitution which maintained the property rights of the slave-owners as treaties with evil, binding on no one, and bitterly attacked the slave-holders and the South generally.

    0
    3
  • Essex, though bitterly mortified, at once threw all his energies into the endeavour to procure for Bacon the solicitorship; but in this case also, his method of dealing, which was wholly opposed to Bacon's advice,' seemed to irritate the queen.

    0
    3
  • In many New England communities a majority in the churches of the standing order bitterly opposed the new evangelism, and those who came under its influence felt constrained to organize "Separate" or "New Light" churches.

    0
    3
  • Even as a temporary measure, the choice of an extra-Palestinian site for the Jewish state was bitterly opposed by many Zionists; others (with whom Herzl appears to have sympathized) thought that as Palestine was, at all events momentarily, inaccessible, it was expedient to form a settlement elsewhere.

    6
    11
  • He directs this spirit of revolt also against the sources of his own inspiration; he turns bitterly against Wagner, whose intimate friend and enthusiastic admirer he had been, and denounces him as the musician of decadent emotionalism; he rejects his "educator" Schopenhauer's pessimism, and transforms his will to live into a "Will to Power."

    5
    12
  • Mirabeau complained bitterly that Montmorin was "slack" (flasque) and a "poltroon" (gavache).

    6
    13
  • Mahmud bitterly contrasted the fair professions of England with the offers of effective help from Russia.

    5
    13
  • She agreed with their plan of an armed congress, and on this idea both she and Fersen insisted with all their might, Fersen leaving Brussels and going on a mission to the emperor to try and gain support and checkmate the émigrés, whose desertion the queen bitterly resented, and whose rashness threatened to frustrate her plans and endanger the lives of her family.

    18
    26
  • During the three or four years which followed the signing of the Augsburg Confession in 1530 and the formation of the Schmalkaldic League, England, while bitterly dep ouncing and burning Lutheran heretics in the name of the Holy Catholic Church, was herself engaged in severing the bonds which had for well-nigh a thousand of years bound her to the Apostolic See.

    31
    39
  • He was bitterly denounced by slaveholders and also by such non-slaveholders as disapproved of all antislavery agitation, and in January 1827 he was assaulted and seriously injured by a slave-trader, Austin Woolfolk, whom he had severely criticized in his paper.

    18
    27
  • The Jews, less bitterly opposed to Mahommedanism than the Christians were, caught fire more rapidly, and in some cases served as an intermediate link or channel of communication.

    5
    14
  • Flies and frogs were also complained of, and Sidonius, writing in the 5th century, complains bitterly of the "feculent gruel" (cloacalis puts) which filled the canals of the city, and gave forth fetid odours when stirred by the poles of the bargemen.

    10
    19
  • It is of interest to note that, although John Bunyan was bitterly opposed to Quakers, his friends, on hearing of the petition contemplated by them, requested them to insert his name on the list, and in this way he gained his freedom.

    18
    27
  • The latter bitterly offended the Londoners, who, finding that they could turn the scales to either side, named the Commune as the price of their support of John.

    6
    15
  • A misunderstanding as to the manner in which these should be dealt with was the immediate occasion of the publication by Hutchinson in 1724 of Moses's Principia, part i., in which Woodward's Natural History was bitterly ridiculed, his conduct with regard to the mineralogical specimens not obscurely characterized, and a refutation of the Newtonian doctrine of gravitation seriously attempted.

    2
    11
  • In a pathetic speech to his children on his deathbed, he bitterly lamented his youthful offence in opposing the prophet, although Mahomet had forgiven him and had frequently affirmed that "there was no Mussulman more sincere and steadfast in the faith than `Amr."

    11
    20
  • In 1592 he complained bitterly that Wood had destroyed forty pages of his MS., probably because of the dangerous freedom of Aubrey's pen.

    3
    13
  • Finocchiaro, La Rivoluzione siciliana del 1848-49 (Catania, 1906, with bibliography), in which Filangieri is bitterly attacked; see also under NAPLES; FERDINAND IV.; FRANCIS I.; FERDINAND II.; FRANCIS II.

    6
    16
  • This action was unconstitutional, and was bitterly resented by the vice-president Solar, who by right should have succeeded to the office.

    4
    14
  • He bitterly resented the concession of independence to Scotland by the treaty of Northampton of 1328, and the death of Robert Bruce in 1329 gave him a chance of retrieving his position.

    2
    12
  • When the fighting was over, at ro P.M., Ney wrote a short and somewhat one-sided account of the action to Soult On the other flank there had meanwhile been waged the bitterly fought battle of Ligny.

    5
    15
  • The loss of their independence was, however, felt bitterly by the broken out the Free State began to expel British subjects, and the very first act of war was committed by Free State Boers, who, on the 11th of October, seized a train upon the border belonging to Natal.

    6
    16
  • He had hoped there was more to Memon's reasoning, and realized bitterly there never could be with a man like this one!

    7
    18
  • They felt they must resist him to the death, and with the troops scattered throughout Italy, and the newly enfranchised Italians, to whom it was understood that Sulla was bitterly hostile, they counted confidently on success.

    8
    19
  • It was a noble effort to secure a lasting settlement of the slavery question, but he was bitterly denounced throughout the north as a renegade.

    2
    13
  • He had lost his hold upon Pennsylvania and his support in the house, while a cabal in the senate, bitterly and personally hostile to the treasury, crippled the administration and reduced every government measure to mere inanity.

    4
    15
  • In Bosnia the weather resembles that of the south Austrian highlands, generally mild, though apt to be bitterly cold in winter.

    2
    13
  • The losses in battle having been insignificant, there remain some 30,000 to account for - most of whom probably escaped individually by the help of the inhabitants, who were bitterly hostile to the French.

    10
    21
  • According to a later story, Achilles, after he had slain the Amazonian queen Penthesilea, bitterly lamented her death; for this he was reviled by Thersites, who even insulted the body of the dead queen.

    6
    17
  • But Frenchmen, always touchy on such a point, regarded Voltaire as something of a deserter; and it was not long before he bitterly repented his desertion, though his residence in Prussia lasted nearly three years.

    8
    19
  • James caused it to be burned by the common hangman, and forbade its perusal under the 'severest penalties, complaining bitterly at the same time to Philip III.

    2
    14
  • The original King's chapel (1688, present building 1749-1754) was the first Episcopal church of Boston, which bitterly resented the action of the royal governor in 1687 in using the Old South for the services of the Church of England.

    6
    18
  • During the Civil War it was held continuously by the Unionists, but local sentiment was bitterly divided.

    14
    27
  • Calhoun, bitterly hostile to the last, objected to the usual vote of thanks to the retiring vice-president, but withdrew his objection.

    7
    20
  • His perfect command of temper, his moderation of speech and action, in a bitterly personal age, never failed, and were his most effective weapons; but he made his power felt in other ways.

    6
    20
  • Bitterly discontented, they conspired at Lima and assassinated Francisco Pizarro on the 26th of June 1541.

    2
    16
  • Haji Loja, the native leader, was supported by a body of Albanians and mutinous Turkish troops, while the whole Moslem population bitterly resented the proposed change.

    7
    22
  • Much was hoped from the duma, but this body has proved bitterly opposed to the Jewish claim for liberty.

    11
    27
  • The French ambassador, de la Haye, had delayed bringing him the customary gifts, with the idea that he would, like his predecessors, speedily give place to a new grand vizier; Kuprili was bitterly offended, and, on pretext of an abuse of the immunities of diplomatic correspondence, bastinadoed the ambassador's son and cast him and the ambassador himself into prison.

    7
    23
  • Thus, towards the end of his reign, Louis found himself cut off from the Greek emperor, his sole ally in the Balkans, by a chain of bitterly hostile Greek-Orthodox states, extending from the Black Sea to the Adriatic. The 1 Knatchbull-Hugessen, i.

    6
    24
  • But I know I would regret it bitterly if I didn't marry you because of that.

    26
    46
  • Thereupon Pretorius, with those most bitterly opposed to British rule, retreated across the Vaal.

    29
    49
  • The imposition of these taxes was bitterly resented in the colonies, where it quickly crystallized public opinion round the principle of " No taxation without representation."

    4
    25
  • He was bitterly opposed to the war of 1812, and openly advocated the formation of a northern confederacy to escape the rule of the "Virginia dynasty."

    4
    25
  • Although bitterly opposed by the partisans of scholastic routine, Genovesi found influential patrons, amongst them Bartolomeo Intieri, a Florentine, who in 1754 founded the first Italian or European chair of political economy (commerce and mechanics), on condition that Genovesi should be the first professor, and that it should never be held by an ecclesiastic. The fruit of Genovesi's professorial labours was the Lezioni di Commercio, the first complete and systematic work in Italian on economics.

    21
    43
  • From Strido he went to Aquileia, where he formed some friendships among the monks of the large monastery, notably with Rufinus, with whom he was destined to quarrel bitterly over the question of Origen's orthodoxy and worth as a commentator; for Jerome was a man who always sacrificed a friend to an opinion, and when he changed sides in a controversy expected his acquaintances to follow him.

    6
    28
  • In the struggle, although he was bitterly accused of violating the written constitution, of arresting and destroying business prosperity and of attempting a radical departure from the accepted social system of the country, he was remarkably successful.

    7
    31