Binomial sentence examples

binomial
  • Determinants composed of binomial coefficients have been studied by V.

  • Relation of Binomial Coefficients to Summation of Series.

  • This is the binomial theorem for a positive integral index.

  • (v.) Permutations and Combinations may be regarded as arithmetical recreations; they become important algebraically in reference to the binomial theroem (�� 41, 44)� (vi.) Surds and Approximate Logarithms. - From the arithmetical point of view, surds present a greater difficulty than negative quantities and fractional numbers.

  • There are extensions of the binomial theorem, by means of which approximate calculations can be made of fractions, surds, and powers of fractions and of surds; the main difference being that the number of terms which can be taken into account is unlimited, so that, although we may approach nearer and nearer to the true value, we never attain it exactly.

  • This accounts for the fact that the same table of binomial coefficients serves for the expansions of positive powers of i+x and of negative powers of i - x.

  • - For the history of the binomial theorem, see John Collins, Commercium Epistolicum (1712); S.

  • With Descartes the use of exponents as now employed for denoting the powers of a quantity becomes systematic; and without some such step by which the homogeneity of successive powers is at once recognized, the binomial theorem could scarcely have been detected.

  • Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus.

  • (0B) = (e), &c. The binomial coefficients appear, in fact, as symmetric functions, and this is frequently of importance.

  • It has been mentioned in � 41 (ix.) that the binomial theorem can be used for obtaining an approximate value for a power of a number; the most important terms only being taken into account.

  • These ideas are further developed in various papers in the Bulletin and in his L'Anthropometrie, ou mesure des differentes facultes de l'homme (18'ji), in which he lays great stress on the universal applicability of the binomial law, - according to which the number of cases in which, for instance, a certain height occurs among a large number of individuals is represented by an ordinate of a curve (the binomial) symmetrically situated with regard to the ordinate representing the mean result (average height).

  • This property enables us to establish, by simple reasoning, certain relations between binomial coefficients.

  • More generally, if we have obtained a as an approximate value for the pth root of N, the binomial theorem gives as an approximate formula p,IN =a+6, where N = a P + pap - 19.

  • (ix.) The extension of n (r), and therefore of n [r ], to negative and fractional values of n, enables us to extend the applicability of the binomial coefficients to the summation of series (� 46 (ii.)).

  • - It is obvious that the Linnaean binomial terminology and its subsequent trinomial refinement for species, sub-species, and varieties was adapted to express the differences between animals as they exist to-day, distributed contemporaneously over the surface of the earth, and that it is wholly inadapted to express either the minute gradations of successive generic series or the branchings of a genetically connected chain of life.

  • Gmelin availed himself of every publication he could, but he perhaps found his richest booty in the labours of Latham, neatly condensing his English descriptions into Latin diagnoses, and bestowing on them binomial names.

  • Other forms are n-1 n-2 2 ax +nbx x +n(n-i)cx x +..., 1121 2 the binomial coefficients C) being replaced by s!(e), and n 1, n-1 1 n-2 2 ax 1 +l i ox l 'x 2 + L ?cx 1 'x2+..., the special convenience of which will appear later.

  • (Avenarius, 1863.) (General type.) (Becquerel, 1863.) (Tait, 1870.) (Barus, 1889.) (Holborn and Wien, 1892.) (Paschen, 3893.) (Steele, 1894.) (Holman, 3896.) (Stanfield, 1898.) (Holborn and Day, 1899.) See sec. 15.) For moderate ranges of temperature the binomial formula of M.

  • Algebraic Forms; Binomial; Combinatorial Analysis; Determin Ants; Equation; Continued Fraction; Function; Theory of groups; Logarithm; Number; Probability; Series.

  • 2 3 4 The binomial theorem was thus discovered as a development of John Wallis's investigations in the method of interpolation.

  • It is to be noticed that each number is the sum of the numbers immediately 35 above and to the left of it; and 35 that the numbers along a line, termed a base, which cuts off an equal number of units along the top row and column are the co efficients in the binomial expansion of (I+x) r - 1, where r represents the number of units cut off.

  • Linnaeus by his binomial system made it possible to write and speak with accuracy of any given species of plant or animal.

  • This is important when we come to the binomial theorem (� 41, and cf.

  • Binomial Theorem 11.2.3 116.

  • - The numbers denoted by n (r) in � 41 are the binomial coefficients shown in the table in � 40; n (r) being the (r+ i) th number in the (n+ i) th row.

  • The binomial theorem for positive integral index may then be written (x + y) n = -iyi +.

  • r!) = (n + r)(r) = (n+r)(n) (17)� (iv.) By means of (17) the relations between the binomial coefficients in the form p (4) may be replaced by others with the The most important relations are n[r] = n[r-i]+(n - I)(r) (r8); O[r] = 0 (19); n[r]-(n-s)[r] =n[r-i]+(n- I) [r-1]+...+ (n-s+I)[r-1] (20); n[r] =n[r-1]+(n-I)[r-1]+...+I[r-1] (21).

  • He introduced the sign (=) for equality, and the terms binomial and residual.

  • 43� Binomial Coefficients.

  • Comparison with the table of binomial coefficients in � 43 suggests that, if m is any positive integer, (I +x)-m =Sr+Rr (25), where Sr=I -m[1]x+m[2]x2...+(-)rm[r]xr (26), Rr_(_)r+1xr+11m[r] (1Fx) - 1+(m - I[r](I+x) m) (27).

  • A multinomial consisting of two or of three terms is a binomial or a trinomial.

  • If we represent this expression by f (x), the expression obtained by changing x into x-+-h is f(x+h); and each term of this may be expanded by the binomial theorem.

  • The binomial theorem may, for instance, be stated for (x+a)n alone; the formula for (x-a)" being obtained by writing it as {x+(-)a} n or Ix+(- a) } n, so that (x-a) n =x"- 1)xn-laF...+(-)rn(r)xn-rar+..., where + (-) r means - or + according as r is odd or even.

  • cumulative probabilities, and mean and variance of the binomial distribution.

  • Linnaeus' invention of binomial nomenclature for designating species served systematic biology admirably, but at the same time, by attaching preponderating importance to a particular grade in classification, crystallized the doctrine of fixity.

  • Immediately on the completion of his Regne Animale in 1756, Brisson set about his Ornithologie, and it is only in the last two volumes of the latter that any reference is made to the tenth edition of the Systema Naturae, in which the binomial method was introduced.

  • (v.) It should be mentioned that the notation of the binomial 'coefficients, and of the continued products such as n(n -1).

  • Application of Binomial Theorem to Rational Integral Functions.

  • Powers of a Binomial.

  • Binomial >>

  • A converted name is a name established under the PhyloCode and derived from a preexisting Linnaean binomial.

  • Converted species names are based on the accepted binomial under the preexisting code.

  • As these indices represent discontinuous data, it would be preferable to use the negative binomial or the Poisson distribution.

  • Living below the special service delivery a negative binomial.

  • The second part of the Latin binomial, acris, completes the unique scientific name of this species.

  • Statistics and Probability Mean and standard deviation, regression and correlation, curve fitting, laws of probability distributions, e.g. binomial and Poisson.

  • binomial theorem enables one to obtain the probability of an event or a number of events.

  • binomial coefficients.

  • binomial distribution with p = 1/3.

  • binomial probabilities for you.

  • binomial expansion of.

  • binomial equation?

  • This study focuses negative binomial distribution but business groups.

  • If we make large enough to expand the numerator using the binomial theorem (so that behaves as ), then as.

  • Also, you will need to know very basic combinatorial concepts, in particular binomial coefficients.

  • monte carlo simulation and binomial models.

  • preexisting Linnaean binomial.

  • probabilityr pupils are calculating binomial probabilities almost without realizing it.

  • Example 1.. 15 Use the binomial theorem to expand (x + y) 5.

  • 1112 which Cayley denotes by (a, b, c, ...)(xi, x2)n (i),(2)��� being a notation for the successive binomial coefficients n, 2n (n-I),....

  • Now the symbolic expression of the seminvariant can be expanded by the binomial theorem so as to be exhibited as a sum of products of seminvariants, of lower degrees if alai 0-2a2 +...+crea0 can be broken up into any two portions (alai -1-0-2a2-1-��� +asas) +(as+1as +1 +o-8+2as+2+��� +ooae), such that Q1 +a2+...

  • (v.) Permutations and Combinations may be regarded as arithmetical recreations; they become important algebraically in reference to the binomial theroem (�� 41, 44)� (vi.) Surds and Approximate Logarithms. - From the arithmetical point of view, surds present a greater difficulty than negative quantities and fractional numbers.

  • This is important when we come to the binomial theorem (� 41, and cf.

  • 43� Binomial Coefficients.

  • - The numbers denoted by n (r) in � 41 are the binomial coefficients shown in the table in � 40; n (r) being the (r+ i) th number in the (n+ i) th row.

  • r!) = (n + r)(r) = (n+r)(n) (17)� (iv.) By means of (17) the relations between the binomial coefficients in the form p (4) may be replaced by others with the The most important relations are n[r] = n[r-i]+(n - I)(r) (r8); O[r] = 0 (19); n[r]-(n-s)[r] =n[r-i]+(n- I) [r-1]+...+ (n-s+I)[r-1] (20); n[r] =n[r-1]+(n-I)[r-1]+...+I[r-1] (21).

  • The use of negative coefficients leads to a difference between arithmetical division and algebraical division (by a multinomial), in that the latter may give rise to a quotient containing subtractive terms. The most important case is division by a binomial, as illustrated by the following examples: - 2.10+1) 6.100+5.10+ 1(3.10+I 2.10+I) 6.100+I.10 - I (3.10 - I 6.100+3.10 6.100+3.10 2.10+ I - 2.10 - I 2.10 +I - 2.10 - I In (1) the division is both arithmetical and algebraical, while in (2) it is algebraical, the quotient for arithmetical division being 2.10+9.

  • It has been mentioned in � 41 (ix.) that the binomial theorem can be used for obtaining an approximate value for a power of a number; the most important terms only being taken into account.

  • Comparison with the table of binomial coefficients in � 43 suggests that, if m is any positive integer, (I +x)-m =Sr+Rr (25), where Sr=I -m[1]x+m[2]x2...+(-)rm[r]xr (26), Rr_(_)r+1xr+11m[r] (1Fx) - 1+(m - I[r](I+x) m) (27).

  • (iv.) To assimilate this to the binomial theorem, we extend the definition of n (r) in (I) of � 41 (i.) so as to cover negative integral values of n; and we then have (-m)(r)- iI m- = (-) rm [T] (28), so that, if n=--- -m, Sr1 +n(ox+n(2)x2+...

  • (ix.) The extension of n (r), and therefore of n [r ], to negative and fractional values of n, enables us to extend the applicability of the binomial coefficients to the summation of series (� 46 (ii.)).

  • Consideration of the binomial theorem for fractional index, or of the continued fraction representing a surd, or of theorems such as Wallis's theorem (� 64), shows that a sequence, every term of which is rational, may have as its limit an irrational number, i.e.

  • Continued fractions, one of the earliest examples of which is Lord Brouncker's expression for the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle (see Circle), were elaborately discussed by John Wallis and Leonhard Euler; the convergency of series treated by Newton, Euler and the Bernoullis; the binomial theorem, due originally to Newton and subsequently expanded by Euler and others, was used by Joseph Louis Lagrange as the basis of his Calcul des Fonctions.

  • BINOMIAL (from the Lat.

  • (1) Ile /3 c Tou irvpiov, On the Burning-Glass, where the focal properties of the parabola probably found a place; (2) Hepi On the Cylindrical Helix (mentioned by Proclus); (3) a comparison of the dodecahedron and the icosahedron inscribed in the same sphere; (4) `H Ka06Xov lrpa-yµareta, perhaps a work on the general principles of mathematics in which were included Apollonius' criticisms and suggestions for the improvement of Euclid's Elements; (5) ' (quick bringing-to-birth), in which, according to Eutocius, he showed how to find closer limits for the value of 7r than the 37 and 3,4-A of Archimedes; (6) an arithmetical work (as to which see Pappus) on a system of expressing large numbers in language closer to that of common life than that of Archimedes' Sand-reckoner, and showing how to multiply such large numbers; (7) a great extension of the theory of irrationals expounded in Euclid, Book x., from binomial to multinomial and from ordered to unordered irrationals (see extracts from Pappus' comm.

  • Consideration of the binomial theorem for fractional index, or of the continued fraction representing a surd, or of theorems such as Wallis's theorem (� 64), shows that a sequence, every term of which is rational, may have as its limit an irrational number, i.e.

  • The binomial theorem is a celebrated theorem, originally due to Sir Isaac Newton, by which any power of a binomial can be expressed as a series.

  • Now the symbolic expression of the seminvariant can be expanded by the binomial theorem so as to be exhibited as a sum of products of seminvariants, of lower degrees if alai 0-2a2 +...+crea0 can be broken up into any two portions (alai -1-0-2a2-1-��� +asas) +(as+1as +1 +o-8+2as+2+��� +ooae), such that Q1 +a2+...

  • The binomial theorem gives a formula for writing down the coefficient of any stated term in the expansion of any stated power of a given binomial.

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