How to use Bill of rights in a sentence

bill of rights
  • When he first read that instrument he was very much opposed to the consolidated government which it provided, but was induced to befriend it by resolutions which were passed at a mass meeting of Boston mechanics or "tradesmen" - his own firmest supporters - and by the suggestion that its ratification should be accompanied by a recommendation of amendments designed chiefly to supply the omission of a bill of rights.

    1
    2
  • Even in the Bill of Rights the phrase "Protestant religion" occurs, but not "Protestant Church," and it was reserved for the Liberal government, in the original draft (afterwards changed) of the Accession Declaration Bill introduced in 1910, to suggest "Protestant Reformed Church of England" as a new title for the Established Church.

    3
    4
  • His only essential objection to the constitution - the absence of a bill of rights - was soon met, at least partially, by amendments.

    1
    2
  • The absence of a Bill of Rights from the constitution as first adopted had been the point on which the opposition had made common cause, and the adoption of this now greatly weakened the same opposition.

    1
    2
  • On the 24th of July 1689, however, the birth of a son, William, created duke of Gloucester, who survived his infancy, gave hopes that heirs to the throne under the Bill of Rights might be forthcoming.

    2
    3
    Advertisement
  • The effect of the act was to impose upon the judges under severe sanction the duty of protecting personal liberty in the case of criminal charges and of securing speedy trial upon such charges when legally framed; and the improvement of their tenure of office at the revolution, coupled with the veto put by the Bill of Rights on excessive bail, gave the judicature the independence and authority necessary to enable them to keep the executive within the law and to restrain administrative development of the scope or penalties of the criminal law; and this power of the judiciary to control the executive, coupled with the limitations on the right to set up "act of state" as an excuse for infringing individual liberty is the special characteristic of English constitutional law.

    1
    2
  • The individualistic was the strongest element of opposition; the necessity, or at least the desirability, of a bill of rights was almost universally felt.

    1
    2
  • Special legislation of various kinds is expressly prohibited, and in the bill of rights it is declared that " all powers not herein delegated remain with the people."

    1
    2
  • The declaration was subsequently enacted with some additions in the form of the Bill of Rights 1688.

    1
    1
  • Line items within the legislation do away with previously sacrosanct personal freedoms outlined within the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • In the House of Commons the Tories imposed a three-line whip to refuse the Bill of Rights a first reading.

    1
    1
  • Failing in this he suggested amendments, the substance of several of which was afterwards embodied in the present Bill of Rights.

    0
    1
  • Later, even after the restoration of the monarchy, parliament re-asserted its authority in the Bill of Rights of 1689.

    0
    1
  • You know that The Bill of Rights 1689 is still the statute law of this country.

    0
    1
  • This legislation was often informally called the Cardholder's Bill of Rights.

    1
    2
    Advertisement
  • One important variation, however, was a clause in the bill of rights providing for the abolition of slavery, Vermont being the first state in America to take such action.

    0
    2
  • He was one of the three members of the sub-committee which actually drafted that instrument; and although John Adams is generally credited with having performed the principal part of that task, Samuel Adams was probably the author of most of the bill of rights.

    0
    2
  • Limiting in the Bill of Rights the powers assumed by the crown, the Commons declared that the king could not keep a standing army in time of peace without consent of parliament; and they made that consent effectual, as far as legislation could go, by passing a Mutiny Act year by year for twelve months only, so as to prevent the crown from exercising military discipline without their authority.

    0
    2
  • In this discussion, which was continued for nine days, the document was most strongly opposed because it contained no bill of rights and on the ground that it would provide for such a strong central government that the state governments would ultimately be sacrificed.

    0
    3
  • At the conclusion of the debate the convention by a vote of 184 to 84 declared itself unwilling to ratify the constitution until a bill of rights had been added and it had been amended in several other particulars so as to guarantee certain powers to the states.

    0
    3
    Advertisement
  • But, since by the Bill of Rights no dispensation by non obstante is allowed, general words contrary to the statute of Richard II.

    0
    3
  • Meetings of the Bill of Rights Society took place fortnightly at the London Tavern.

    0
    3
  • Furthermore, we are urging legislators to incorporate the International Bill of Rights into domestic law.

    0
    3