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berwick

berwick

berwick Sentence Examples

  • stands an obelisk commemorating the battle fought here on the 25th of April 1707, in which the French under the duke of Berwick, a natural son of James II.

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  • There are in England fourteen congregations in connexion with the Church of Scotland, six of them in London and the remainder in Berwick, Northumberland, Carlisle and Lancashire.

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  • and after a campaign in the neighbourhood of Edinburgh which proved unsuccessful in drawing out the Scots from their fortresses, he retreated to Dunbar to await reinforcements from Berwick.

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  • The Scots under Leslie followed him, occupied Doon Hill commanding the town, and seized the passes between Dunbar and Berwick which Cromwell had omitted to secure.

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  • In 1706, in the War of the Spanish Succession, it was occupied by Sir John Leake; and in the next year it was retaken by the duke of Berwick.

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  • The chief bridge, which carries the high road from Edinburgh to Berwick, was built by John Rennie in 1807.

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  • Murray's influence, however, being now supreme, he embarked in December for France, but was driven by storms on to Holy Island, where he was detained, and was subsequently, on the 18th of January 1564, seized at Berwick and sent by Elizabeth to the Tower, whence he was soon liberated and proceeded to France.

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  • War broke out with England, but James, made a prisoner by his nobles, was unable to prevent Albany and his ally, Richard, duke of Gloucester (afterwards Richard III.), from taking Berwick and marching to Edinburgh.

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  • at Berwick, but in breach of this oath, which had been renewed.

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  • Previous to these two latter successes the king had made two raids into the north of England; after which Buittle, Dalswinton and Dumfries were reduced, and Berwick was threatened.

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  • By the close of 1313 Berwick, Stirling and Bothwell alone remained English.

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  • With the whole available feudal levy of England, and a contingent from Ireland, he advanced from Berwick to Falkirk, which he reached on the 22nd of June 1314.

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  • As a result of Bannockburn, Bruce's queen was restored to her husband; Stirling was delivered up to the Scots; the north of England was ravaged, and Carlisle and Berwick were besieged.

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  • On his return Bruce addressed himself to the siege of Berwick, a standing menace to Scotland.

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  • Another attempt by Adam Newton, guardian of the Friars Minorite at Berwick, had a more ignominious result.

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  • Bruce admitted Newton to his presence at Aldcamus or Old Cambus, and informed him that he would not receive the bulls until his title was acknowledged and he had taken Berwick.

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  • In March 1318 the town and soon afterwards the castle of Berwick capitulated, and Bruce wasted the English border as far as Ripon.

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  • Some of his chief nobles - Thomas, earl of Lancaster, in 1321, and Sir Andrew Harclay, earl of Carlisle, in 1322 - entered into correspondence with the Scots, and, though Harclay's treason was detected and punished by his death, Edward was forced to make a truce of thirteen years at Newcastle on the 30th of May 1323, which Bruce ratified at Berwick.

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  • Joanna, Edward's sister, was to be given in marriage to David, the infant son of Bruce, born subsequent to the settlement of 1318 and now recognized as heir to the crown, and the ceremony was celebrated at Berwick on the 12th of July 1328.

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  • After a severe siege, Fuenterrabia surrendered to the duke of Berwick and his French troops in 1719; and in 1794 it again fell into the hands of the French, who so dismantled it that it has never since been reckoned by the Spaniards among their fortified places.

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  • During his residence in Berwick, Henry commenced his History of Great Britain, written on a new plan; but, owing to the difficulty of consulting the original authorities, he did not make much progress with the work until his removal to Edinburgh in 1768.

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  • There were various minor skirmishes in 1862 and 1863 (including the capture of the Federal camp at Berwick Bay in June 1863).

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  • In July 1639, after the signature of the treaty of Berwick, Montrose was one of the Covenanting leaders who visited Charles.

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  • The other three royal burghs associated with Edinburgh were Stirling, Roxburgh and Berwick; and their enactments form the earliest existing collected body of Scots law.

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  • He saw active service when he was fourteen at the siege of Berwick.

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  • gave the charge of the West March to Northumberland, while Henry Percy received the castles of Bamburgh, Roxburgh and Berwick, and the wardenship of the East March, with a salary of 3000 in peace time and L12,000 in war.

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  • In 1689 Newry was set on fire by the duke of Berwick when in retreat before Schomberg.

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  • At the same time he spoke of the treachery of Marlborough and Berwick, and of one other, presumably Oxford, whom he refused to name, all of whom were in communication with Hanover.'

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  • 500; Berwick's Mem.

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  • wide, through the middle of which the main road from Dunbar to Berwick runs.

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  • Cromwell, after a war of manoeuvre near Edinburgh, had been compelled by want of supplies to withdraw to Dunbar; Leslie pursued and took up a position on Doon Hill, commanding the English line of retreat on Berwick.

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  • The artillery was posted on the Dunbar side of the burn, directly opposite and north of Doon, the infantry and cavalry crossed where they could, and formed up gradually in a line south of and roughly parallel to the Berwick road, the extreme left of horse and foot, acting as a reserve, crossed at Brocksmouth House on the outer flank.

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  • NORTH BERWICK, a royal and police burgh of Haddingtonshire, Scotland.

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  • Immediately to the south rises the fine cone of North Berwick Law (612 ft.), which was utilized as a signal point at the period of the Napoleonic scare.

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  • of North Berwick is Dirleton, with a castle dating from the 12th century.

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  • He had many "calls" to other churches, but chose to remain at Berwick.

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  • James Fitzjames, Duke Of Berwick >>

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  • He studied law in Portsmouth, N.H., and practised at Berwick, Maine, and at Durham, N.H.

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  • Its author declared later that it procured him an honorary membership of the patriotic societies of Carlisle, Berwick and Newcastle.

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  • The second volume, published in 1810, gives an account of the seven southeastern counties of Scotland - Roxburgh, Berwick, Haddington, Edinburgh, Linlithgow, Peebles and Selkirk - each of them being treated of as regards name, situation and extent, natural objects, antiquities, establishment as shires, civil history, agriculture, manufactures and trade, and ecclesiastical history.

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  • In 1690 the chief portion of the town was burned by the Enniskilleners under General Wolseley, when they routed a body of James II.'s troops under the duke of Berwick.

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  • JAMES FITZJAMES BERWICK, DUKE OF (1670-1734), marshal of France, was the natural son of James, duke of York,.

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  • He then returned to England, was made a colonel of the 8th Foot, and in 1687 created duke of Berwick, earl of Teignmouth and Baron Bosworth.

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  • Berwick was made a peer of France by Louis XIV., and duke of Liria and of Xereca and lieutenant of Aragon by Philip. Thenceforward Berwick was recognized as one of the greatest generals of his time, and successively commanded in nearly all the theatres of war.

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  • The last great event of the War of the Spanish Succession was the storming of Barcelona by Berwick, after a long siege, on the 11th of September 1714.

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  • In 1718 he found himself under the necessity of once more entering Spain with an army; and this time he had to fight against Philip V., the king who owed chiefly to Berwick's courage and skill the safety of his throne.

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  • Many years of peace followed this campaign, and Marshal Berwick was not again called to serve in the field till 1733.

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  • The Memoires of Marshal Berwick, revised, annotated and continued by the Abbe Hooke, were published by the marshal's grandson in 1778.

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  • Eventually, in October 1357, after several interruptions, a treaty was signed at Berwick by which the Scottish estates undertook to pay ioo,000 marks as a ransom for their king.

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  • In 1734 his cousin, the duke of Liria, afterwards duke of Berwick, who was proceeding to join Don Carlos in his struggle for the crown of Naples, passed through Rome.

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  • The Scots, however, crossed by a ford, and continued the pursuit of the enemy as far as Berwick.

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  • In 1810 the combined population of Llanelly, with its four subsidiary hamlets of Berwick, Glyn, Hencoed and Westowe, only amounted to 2972; in 1840 the inhabitants of the borough hamlet alone had risen to 4173.

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  • BERWICK - UPON-TWEED, a market town, seaport, municipal borough and county in itself, of England, at the mouth of the Tweed on the north bank, 339 m.

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  • The liberties of the borough, commonly called Berwick Bounds, include the towns of Spittal, at the mouth, and Tweedmouth immediately above it, on the south bank of the river.

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  • Very little is known of the history of Berwick before the Conquest.

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  • It was not until the Tweed became the boundary between England and Scotland in the 12th century that Berwick as the chief town on that boundary became really important.

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  • Until the beginning of the 14th century Berwick was one of the four royal boroughs of Scotland, and although it possesses no charter granted before that time, an inquisition taken in Edward III.'s reign shows that it was governed by a mayor and bailiffs in the reign of Alexander III., who granted the town to the said mayor and the commonalty for an annual rent.

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  • had conquered Berwick in 1302 he gave the burgesses another charter, no longer existing but quoted in several confirmations, by which the town was made a free borough with a gild merchant.

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  • While the war with Scotland dragged on through the early years of the reign of Edward II., the fortification of Berwick was a matter of importance, and in 1317 the mayor and bailiffs undertook to defend it for the yearly sum of 6000 marks; but in the following year, "owing to their default," the Scots entered and occupied it in spite of a truce between the two kingdoms. After Edward III.

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  • had recovered Berwick the inhabitants petitioned for the recovery of their prison called the Beffroi or Bell-tower, the symbol of their independence, which their predecessors had built before the time of Alexander III., and which had been granted to William de Keythorpe when Edward I.

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  • granted the incorporation charter in 1604; but on his accession to the English throne, Berwick of course lost its importance as a frontier town.

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  • Berwick was at first represented in the court of the four boroughs and in 1326 in Robert Bruce's parliament.

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  • No manufactures are mentioned as having been carried on in Berwick, but its trade, chiefly in the produce of the surrounding country, was important in the 12th century.

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  • There was a bridge over the Tweed at Berwick in the time of Alexander and John, kings of Scotland, but it was broken down in the time of the latter and not rebuilt until the end of the 14th century.

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  • with his court and army rested here on the way to raise the siege of Berwick.

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  • Representation was extended to Wales, Cheshire, Berwick and Calais; and parliamentary authority was enhanced, largely that it might deal with the church, until men began to complain of this new parliamentary infallibility.

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  • It is separated from England by the Solway Firth, the Sark, Scotsdyke (an old embankment in 55°3' N., connecting the Sark with the Esk), the Esk (for one mile), the Liddel, the Kershope, the Cheviot Hills, the Tweed and a small area known as the " liberties " of Berwick.

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  • Most of the hills and crags in the Carboniferous area are volcanic, and many of them - such as the castle rocks of Edinburgh and Stirling, Binny Craig in Linlithgowshire, North Berwick Law and the Bass Rock - mark the sites of actual events of eruption.

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  • In the northern, north-western and southern divisions the population declined during the decade, the fifteen counties thus affected being, in the order of decrease, beginning with the shire in which it was smallest, Inverness, Banff, Argyll, Kirkcudbright, Shetland, Sutherland, Dumfries, Ross and Cromarty, Clackmannan, Berwick, Orkney, Roxburgh, Caithness, Wigtown and Selkirk.

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  • Edward took homage from all, including burgesses even, at Perth; his decision on the claims was deferred to the 2nd of June 1292 at Berwick.

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  • Edward ordered Baliol's English property to be confiscated; Baliol renounced his fealty, and English merchants were massacred at Berwick.

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  • The Comyns failed in an attack on Carlisle, and (30th of March 1296) Edward took Berwick, seized William Douglas (father of the Good Lord James), and massacred the male populace.

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  • The nobles who had submitted made delays in providing hostages, and Warenne marched from Berwick against Wallace, who, by September 1297, was north of Tay.

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  • Cressingham was slain, and Warenne fled to Berwick.

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  • Edward had not yet alienated the country by cruelty, save in the case of Wallace and the massacre of Berwick.

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  • The castles of Carlisle and Berwick, however, repelled the assailants, but Perth was surprised, in January 1313, Bruce himself leading the advance.

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  • The Bannockburn was choked with the fallen, and it was only by hard spurring that Edward and his guards reached Dunbar, whence he sailed to Berwick.

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  • He took and held Berwick, and (14th of October 1322) defeated Edward with heavy loss near Byland Abbey in Yorkshire, where the highlanders scaled a cliff and drove the English from a formidable position.

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  • as his liege lord and promised to surrender Berwick and large lands in southern Scotland.

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  • The struggle was now (1333) for Berwick, which was besieged by Edward III.

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  • Scotland was never again to hold Berwick for any length of time: meanwhile a few castles stood out, but the child king was sent over to France for safe keeping.

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  • Negotiations were interrupted by the arrival of French reinforcements in men and gold: Berwick was recaptured, only to be recovered by England in 1356.

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  • The duke of Gloucester (later Richard III.) marched north and took Berwick, while the earl of Angus, with other nobles, hanged Cochrane and other favourites of James over Lauder bridge.

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  • Mary was now in France, the destined bride of the Dauphin; while Knox, released from the galleys, preached his doctrines in Berwick and Newcastle, and was a chaplain of Edward VI., till the crowning of Mary Tudor drove him to France and Switzerland.

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  • In February 1560 a league was made at Berwick between Elizabeth and " the Congregation."

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  • Randolph was dismissed for supplying Murray with English gold; from Berwick he and Bedford reported to Cecil the progress of the conspiracy.

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  • Knox himself fled to Kyle, though there is no evidence that he was privy to a deed which he calls " worthy of all praise," and Morton and Ruthven spurred to Berwick, while Lethington skulked in Atholl.

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  • The " navy was so augmented as it is a thing almost incredible," but none the less £ioo sterling was worth as much, Drury wrote from Berwick, as £1000 Scots.

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  • Berwick and Bolingbroke were his ministers, but Berwick would not accompany him to Scotland, and Bolingbroke did not provide the necessary munitions of war.

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  • After some successes of the French marshal, the duke of Berwick, in Spain, and of the imperial troops in Sicily, Philip V.

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  • of Dover, and opposite the town of Berwick, Maine, industrially a part of Somersworth.

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  • This achievement, which is said by the duke of Berwick to have turned Sarsfield's head, made him the popular hero of the war with the Irish.

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  • His widow married the duke of Berwick.

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  • The latter record, containing the various acts of homage and fealty extorted by Edward from Baliol and others in the course of his progress through Scotland in the summer of 1296 and in August at the parliament of Berwick, was published by Prynne from the copy in the Tower and now in the Record Office.

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  • In 1711 the Princess Palatine wrote to the Electress Sophia of Hanover, and suggested that he was an English nobleman who had taken part in a plot of the duke of Berwick against William III.

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  • Released at last (apparently through the influence of the young English king, Edward VI.), Knox was appointed one of the licensed preachers of the new faith for England, and stationed in the great garrison of Berwick, and afterwards at Newcastle.

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  • From Mary of Gelderland, the queen regent, she purchased the promise of help at the price of surrendering Berwick.

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  • She landed in Northumberland in October, and achieved some slight success; but when on the way to seek further help from Scotland the fleet was overwhelmed in a storm, and Margaret herself barely escaped in an open boat to Berwick.

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  • JOHN MAJOR (or MAIR) (1470-1550), Scottish theological and historical writer, was born at the village of Gleghornie, near North Berwick, Scotland, in the year 1470.

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  • from the South Foreland to Berwick, a distance of 348 m., or, following the coast, 640 m.

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  • Connecting with the Great Northern between Doncaster and York, and with the North British at Berwick, it forms part of the " East Coast " route to Scotland.

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  • Serving all ports and coast stations from Hull to Berwick, also Carlisle, &c. Owning extensive docks at Hull, Middlesbrough, South Shields, the Hartlepools, Blyth, &c.

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  • The Rhine campaigns were entirely unimportant, and are remembered only for the last appearance in the field of Prince Eugene and Marshal Berwick - the latter was killed at the siege of Philippsburg - and the baptism of fire of the young crown prince of Prussia, afterwards Frederick the Great.

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  • 1436), governor of Berwick, burned it about 1417, and in 1562 the regent Moray had to suppress the lawless with a strong hand.

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  • - connecting with Jamison City in the extreme northern part of the county); and is connected with Berwick, Catawissa and Danville by electric lines.

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  • In summer there are frequent excursions to the Bass Rock and the Isle of May, North Berwick, Elie, Aberdour, Alloa and Stirling.

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  • Berwick was Invasion stormed, the Scottish army was routed at Dunbar ~cotJand (April si), Edinburgh and Stirling were easily captured, and at last John Baliol, deserted by most of his adherents, surrendered at Brechin.

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  • He then summoned a parliament at Berwick, and announced to the assembled Scots that he had determined to depose King John, and to assume the crown himself.

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  • Warenne retired to Berwick and besought his master for aid.

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  • The Scots swept everything before them, ravaging the north at their will, and capturing Berwick.

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  • Edward was allowed to raise an army for the siege of Berwick, and was lying before its walls, when the Scots, turning his flank, made a fierce foray into Yorkshire, and routed the shire-levy under Archbishop Melton at the battle of Myton.

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  • Edward won the battle of Halidon Hill (July 19, 1333)Where he displayed considerable tactical skillcaptured Berwick, and reconquered a considerable portion of Scotland for his vassal.

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  • David Bruce was to cede Roxburgh sion of and Berwick, but to keep the rest of his dominions on David of condition of paying a ransom of 100,000 marks.

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  • He promised the Scottish king Berwick and 50,000 crowns in return for the aid of an army.

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  • of Berwick, and, after running a short distance W.

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  • m., consisting of the tract north of the Tweed which is not included in Scotland, forms the "bounds" or "liberties" of Berwick, or the country of the borough and town of Berwick-on-Tweed.

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  • The English Border counties are Northumberland and Cumberland, the Scottish Berwick, Roxburgh and Dumfries; though historically, and still by usage, the Scottish shires of Selkirk and Peebles have always been classed as Border shires.

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  • Railway communication is supplied by the east coast route to Berwick, the Waverley route through Liddesdale, the London & North-Western by Carlisle, the North British branch from Berwick to St Boswells, and the North Eastern lines from Berwick to Kelso, Alnwick to Coldstream, and Newcastle to Carlisle.

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  • Berwick and Carlisle were repeatedly assailed, and battles took place at Halidon Hill (1333), Otterburn (1388), Nisbet (1402), Homildon (1402), Piperden (1435), Hedgeley Moor (1464),(1464), Flodden (1513), Solway Moss (1542), and Ancrum Moor (1544), in addition to many fights arising out of family feuds and raids fomented by the Armstrongs, Eliots, Grahams, Johnstones, Maxwells and other families, of which the most serious were the encounters at Arkenholme (Langholm) in 1455, the Raid of Reidswire (1575), and the bloody combat at Dryfe Sands (1593).

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  • of England attended service in Berwick church (March 27, 1603) "to return thanks for his peaceful entry into his new dominions."

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  • See Life by Cornelius Nepos; Berwick, Lives of Messalla Corvinus and T.P.A.

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  • The capture of Berwick by the Scots, however, in April 1318 led to a second reconciliation with Edward.

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  • A formal treaty, made in the following August, having been ratified by parliament, the king and earl opened the siege of Berwick; but there was no cohesion between their troops, and the undertaking was quickly abandoned.

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  • Whilst the Spanish fleet was destroyed before Syracuse by Admiral Byng, the intrigue of the Spanish ambassador Cellamare with the duke of Maine to exclude the family of Orleans from the succession on Louis XV.s death was discovered and repressed; and Marshal Berwick burned the dockyards at Pasajes in Spain.

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  • and hastened to replace Marshals Berwick and Villars by diplomatists.

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  • In his reign, according to the Stud-Book, the Stradling or Lister Turk was brought into England by the duke of Berwick from the siege of Buda.

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  • south-west of Berwick by the North Eastern railway.

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  • Owing to its position on the Border and also as the first ford of any consequence above Berwick, the town played a prominent part in Scottish history during many centuries.

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  • arson attacks ensued, in November 1830 the big barn at Berwick Court Farm burned.

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  • From Berwick the trail meanders along beaches of golden sand to the tidal causeway linking Holy Island with the mainland.

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  • covenanter troops occupy Berwick.

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  • dedicated telephone helpline to encourage innovation within Berwick.

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  • dignitarynot uncommon for visiting dignitaries, enjoying a holiday in North Berwick, to be asked to perform various duties.

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  • The Coastguard had reported a stranded dolphin in Berwick on Tweed, right on the Scottish boarder.

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  • In 1954, checkpoints ranged from the farthest north in Berwick, Scotland, to the farthest north in Berwick, Scotland, to the farthest south, in Plymouth.

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  • In 1954, checkpoints ranged from the farthest north in Berwick, Scotland, to the farthest south, in Plymouth.

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  • Comments: Hi, I am having difficulty finding my gg grandfather William Hogarth, born in Lauder, Berwick 1853.

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  • His father Thomas Anderson was also born in North Berwick and by 1885 was employed on the West Links as head greenkeeper and starter.

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  • In the north of the county, Berwick is planning its own business incubation center to be opened in 2006.

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  • Drive or take the train to the festival city of Edinburgh, walled town of Berwick or shopping Mecca in Newcastle.

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  • She later damaged another merchantman and scored four hits on the Kent Class cruiser HMS Berwick before withdrawing.

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  • Gareth Hutchison and Kevin McLeish have been scoring freely and Berwick's sole setback was 3-0 at Aberdeen in the CIS Cup last midweek.

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  • Charles signed the pacification of Berwick on the 19th of June, 1639 and broke it the next year.

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  • ransacking the town of Berwick in 1296 and killing everyone he found.

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  • Yesterday was Bamburgh beach and Berwick on Tweed, tomorrow the otter sanctuary in the North Pennines.

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  • Berwick Crescent - 3 The bankside vegetation in this area includes hawthorn, willow and alder.

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  • stands an obelisk commemorating the battle fought here on the 25th of April 1707, in which the French under the duke of Berwick, a natural son of James II.

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  • There are in England fourteen congregations in connexion with the Church of Scotland, six of them in London and the remainder in Berwick, Northumberland, Carlisle and Lancashire.

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  • and after a campaign in the neighbourhood of Edinburgh which proved unsuccessful in drawing out the Scots from their fortresses, he retreated to Dunbar to await reinforcements from Berwick.

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  • The Scots under Leslie followed him, occupied Doon Hill commanding the town, and seized the passes between Dunbar and Berwick which Cromwell had omitted to secure.

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  • In 1706, in the War of the Spanish Succession, it was occupied by Sir John Leake; and in the next year it was retaken by the duke of Berwick.

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  • The chief bridge, which carries the high road from Edinburgh to Berwick, was built by John Rennie in 1807.

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  • Murray's influence, however, being now supreme, he embarked in December for France, but was driven by storms on to Holy Island, where he was detained, and was subsequently, on the 18th of January 1564, seized at Berwick and sent by Elizabeth to the Tower, whence he was soon liberated and proceeded to France.

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  • War broke out with England, but James, made a prisoner by his nobles, was unable to prevent Albany and his ally, Richard, duke of Gloucester (afterwards Richard III.), from taking Berwick and marching to Edinburgh.

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  • at Berwick, but in breach of this oath, which had been renewed.

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  • Previous to these two latter successes the king had made two raids into the north of England; after which Buittle, Dalswinton and Dumfries were reduced, and Berwick was threatened.

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  • By the close of 1313 Berwick, Stirling and Bothwell alone remained English.

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  • With the whole available feudal levy of England, and a contingent from Ireland, he advanced from Berwick to Falkirk, which he reached on the 22nd of June 1314.

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  • As a result of Bannockburn, Bruce's queen was restored to her husband; Stirling was delivered up to the Scots; the north of England was ravaged, and Carlisle and Berwick were besieged.

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  • On his return Bruce addressed himself to the siege of Berwick, a standing menace to Scotland.

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  • Another attempt by Adam Newton, guardian of the Friars Minorite at Berwick, had a more ignominious result.

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  • Bruce admitted Newton to his presence at Aldcamus or Old Cambus, and informed him that he would not receive the bulls until his title was acknowledged and he had taken Berwick.

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  • In March 1318 the town and soon afterwards the castle of Berwick capitulated, and Bruce wasted the English border as far as Ripon.

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  • In September 1319 an attempt to recover Berwick was repelled by Walter the steward, and Bruce took occasion of a visit to compliment his son-in-law and raise the walls 10 ft.

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  • Some of his chief nobles - Thomas, earl of Lancaster, in 1321, and Sir Andrew Harclay, earl of Carlisle, in 1322 - entered into correspondence with the Scots, and, though Harclay's treason was detected and punished by his death, Edward was forced to make a truce of thirteen years at Newcastle on the 30th of May 1323, which Bruce ratified at Berwick.

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  • Joanna, Edward's sister, was to be given in marriage to David, the infant son of Bruce, born subsequent to the settlement of 1318 and now recognized as heir to the crown, and the ceremony was celebrated at Berwick on the 12th of July 1328.

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  • After a severe siege, Fuenterrabia surrendered to the duke of Berwick and his French troops in 1719; and in 1794 it again fell into the hands of the French, who so dismantled it that it has never since been reckoned by the Spaniards among their fortified places.

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  • During his residence in Berwick, Henry commenced his History of Great Britain, written on a new plan; but, owing to the difficulty of consulting the original authorities, he did not make much progress with the work until his removal to Edinburgh in 1768.

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  • There were various minor skirmishes in 1862 and 1863 (including the capture of the Federal camp at Berwick Bay in June 1863).

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  • In July 1639, after the signature of the treaty of Berwick, Montrose was one of the Covenanting leaders who visited Charles.

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  • The other three royal burghs associated with Edinburgh were Stirling, Roxburgh and Berwick; and their enactments form the earliest existing collected body of Scots law.

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  • By one mistress, Arabella Churchill (1648-1730), he had two sons, James, duke of Berwick, and Henry (1673-1702), titular duke of Albemarle and grand prior of France, and a daughter, Henrietta (1667-1730), who married Sir Henry Waldegrave, afterwards Baron Waldegrave; and by another, Catherine Sedley, countess of Dorchester (1657-1717), a daughter, Catherine (d.

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  • He saw active service when he was fourteen at the siege of Berwick.

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  • gave the charge of the West March to Northumberland, while Henry Percy received the castles of Bamburgh, Roxburgh and Berwick, and the wardenship of the East March, with a salary of 3000 in peace time and L12,000 in war.

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  • In 1689 Newry was set on fire by the duke of Berwick when in retreat before Schomberg.

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  • Nevertheless, whatever his chief motive may have been, whether to displace Oxford as leader of the party, to strengthen his position and that of the faction in order to dictate terms to the future king, or to reinstate James, Bolingbroke, yielding to his more impetuous and adventurous disposition, went much further 1 Berwick's Mem.

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  • At the same time he spoke of the treachery of Marlborough and Berwick, and of one other, presumably Oxford, whom he refused to name, all of whom were in communication with Hanover.'

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  • 500; Berwick's Mem.

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  • wide, through the middle of which the main road from Dunbar to Berwick runs.

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  • Cromwell, after a war of manoeuvre near Edinburgh, had been compelled by want of supplies to withdraw to Dunbar; Leslie pursued and took up a position on Doon Hill, commanding the English line of retreat on Berwick.

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  • The artillery was posted on the Dunbar side of the burn, directly opposite and north of Doon, the infantry and cavalry crossed where they could, and formed up gradually in a line south of and roughly parallel to the Berwick road, the extreme left of horse and foot, acting as a reserve, crossed at Brocksmouth House on the outer flank.

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  • NORTH BERWICK, a royal and police burgh of Haddingtonshire, Scotland.

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  • Immediately to the south rises the fine cone of North Berwick Law (612 ft.), which was utilized as a signal point at the period of the Napoleonic scare.

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  • of North Berwick is Dirleton, with a castle dating from the 12th century.

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  • He had many "calls" to other churches, but chose to remain at Berwick.

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  • James Fitzjames, Duke Of Berwick >>

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  • He studied law in Portsmouth, N.H., and practised at Berwick, Maine, and at Durham, N.H.

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  • C. Amory, General John Sullivan, A Vindication of his Character as a Soldier and a Patriot (Morrisania, N.Y., 1867); John Scales, "Master John Sullivan of Somersworth and Berwick and his Family," in the Proceedings of the New Hampshire Historical Society, vol.

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  • Its author declared later that it procured him an honorary membership of the patriotic societies of Carlisle, Berwick and Newcastle.

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  • The second volume, published in 1810, gives an account of the seven southeastern counties of Scotland - Roxburgh, Berwick, Haddington, Edinburgh, Linlithgow, Peebles and Selkirk - each of them being treated of as regards name, situation and extent, natural objects, antiquities, establishment as shires, civil history, agriculture, manufactures and trade, and ecclesiastical history.

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  • in 1291 appointed John de Berwick custodian of the abbey so that he might pay their debts from the issues of their estates, allowing them enough for their maintenance, and Edward II.

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  • In 1690 the chief portion of the town was burned by the Enniskilleners under General Wolseley, when they routed a body of James II.'s troops under the duke of Berwick.

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  • JAMES FITZJAMES BERWICK, DUKE OF (1670-1734), marshal of France, was the natural son of James, duke of York,.

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  • He then returned to England, was made a colonel of the 8th Foot, and in 1687 created duke of Berwick, earl of Teignmouth and Baron Bosworth.

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  • Berwick was made a peer of France by Louis XIV., and duke of Liria and of Xereca and lieutenant of Aragon by Philip. Thenceforward Berwick was recognized as one of the greatest generals of his time, and successively commanded in nearly all the theatres of war.

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  • The last great event of the War of the Spanish Succession was the storming of Barcelona by Berwick, after a long siege, on the 11th of September 1714.

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  • In 1718 he found himself under the necessity of once more entering Spain with an army; and this time he had to fight against Philip V., the king who owed chiefly to Berwick's courage and skill the safety of his throne.

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  • Many years of peace followed this campaign, and Marshal Berwick was not again called to serve in the field till 1733.

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  • Cool, self-possessed and cautious as a general, Marshal Berwick was at the same time not wanting in audacity and swiftness of action.

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  • The Memoires of Marshal Berwick, revised, annotated and continued by the Abbe Hooke, were published by the marshal's grandson in 1778.

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  • In 1714 it was taken after an obstinate resistance by the duke of Berwick in the interests of Philip V., and at the close of the war was reluctantly reconciled to the Bourbon dynasty.

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  • Eventually, in October 1357, after several interruptions, a treaty was signed at Berwick by which the Scottish estates undertook to pay ioo,000 marks as a ransom for their king.

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  • In 1734 his cousin, the duke of Liria, afterwards duke of Berwick, who was proceeding to join Don Carlos in his struggle for the crown of Naples, passed through Rome.

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  • The Scots, however, crossed by a ford, and continued the pursuit of the enemy as far as Berwick.

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  • In 1810 the combined population of Llanelly, with its four subsidiary hamlets of Berwick, Glyn, Hencoed and Westowe, only amounted to 2972; in 1840 the inhabitants of the borough hamlet alone had risen to 4173.

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  • BERWICK - UPON-TWEED, a market town, seaport, municipal borough and county in itself, of England, at the mouth of the Tweed on the north bank, 339 m.

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  • The liberties of the borough, commonly called Berwick Bounds, include the towns of Spittal, at the mouth, and Tweedmouth immediately above it, on the south bank of the river.

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  • Very little is known of the history of Berwick before the Conquest.

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  • It was not until the Tweed became the boundary between England and Scotland in the 12th century that Berwick as the chief town on that boundary became really important.

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  • Until the beginning of the 14th century Berwick was one of the four royal boroughs of Scotland, and although it possesses no charter granted before that time, an inquisition taken in Edward III.'s reign shows that it was governed by a mayor and bailiffs in the reign of Alexander III., who granted the town to the said mayor and the commonalty for an annual rent.

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  • had conquered Berwick in 1302 he gave the burgesses another charter, no longer existing but quoted in several confirmations, by which the town was made a free borough with a gild merchant.

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  • While the war with Scotland dragged on through the early years of the reign of Edward II., the fortification of Berwick was a matter of importance, and in 1317 the mayor and bailiffs undertook to defend it for the yearly sum of 6000 marks; but in the following year, "owing to their default," the Scots entered and occupied it in spite of a truce between the two kingdoms. After Edward III.

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  • had recovered Berwick the inhabitants petitioned for the recovery of their prison called the Beffroi or Bell-tower, the symbol of their independence, which their predecessors had built before the time of Alexander III., and which had been granted to William de Keythorpe when Edward I.

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  • granted the incorporation charter in 1604; but on his accession to the English throne, Berwick of course lost its importance as a frontier town.

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  • Berwick was at first represented in the court of the four boroughs and in 1326 in Robert Bruce's parliament.

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  • No manufactures are mentioned as having been carried on in Berwick, but its trade, chiefly in the produce of the surrounding country, was important in the 12th century.

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  • There was a bridge over the Tweed at Berwick in the time of Alexander and John, kings of Scotland, but it was broken down in the time of the latter and not rebuilt until the end of the 14th century.

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  • with his court and army rested here on the way to raise the siege of Berwick.

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  • Representation was extended to Wales, Cheshire, Berwick and Calais; and parliamentary authority was enhanced, largely that it might deal with the church, until men began to complain of this new parliamentary infallibility.

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  • It is separated from England by the Solway Firth, the Sark, Scotsdyke (an old embankment in 55°3' N., connecting the Sark with the Esk), the Esk (for one mile), the Liddel, the Kershope, the Cheviot Hills, the Tweed and a small area known as the " liberties " of Berwick.

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  • Most of the hills and crags in the Carboniferous area are volcanic, and many of them - such as the castle rocks of Edinburgh and Stirling, Binny Craig in Linlithgowshire, North Berwick Law and the Bass Rock - mark the sites of actual events of eruption.

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  • In the northern, north-western and southern divisions the population declined during the decade, the fifteen counties thus affected being, in the order of decrease, beginning with the shire in which it was smallest, Inverness, Banff, Argyll, Kirkcudbright, Shetland, Sutherland, Dumfries, Ross and Cromarty, Clackmannan, Berwick, Orkney, Roxburgh, Caithness, Wigtown and Selkirk.

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  • Edward took homage from all, including burgesses even, at Perth; his decision on the claims was deferred to the 2nd of June 1292 at Berwick.

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  • Edward ordered Baliol's English property to be confiscated; Baliol renounced his fealty, and English merchants were massacred at Berwick.

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  • The Comyns failed in an attack on Carlisle, and (30th of March 1296) Edward took Berwick, seized William Douglas (father of the Good Lord James), and massacred the male populace.

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  • The nobles who had submitted made delays in providing hostages, and Warenne marched from Berwick against Wallace, who, by September 1297, was north of Tay.

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  • Cressingham was slain, and Warenne fled to Berwick.

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  • Edward had not yet alienated the country by cruelty, save in the case of Wallace and the massacre of Berwick.

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  • The castles of Carlisle and Berwick, however, repelled the assailants, but Perth was surprised, in January 1313, Bruce himself leading the advance.

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  • The Bannockburn was choked with the fallen, and it was only by hard spurring that Edward and his guards reached Dunbar, whence he sailed to Berwick.

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  • He took and held Berwick, and (14th of October 1322) defeated Edward with heavy loss near Byland Abbey in Yorkshire, where the highlanders scaled a cliff and drove the English from a formidable position.

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  • as his liege lord and promised to surrender Berwick and large lands in southern Scotland.

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  • The struggle was now (1333) for Berwick, which was besieged by Edward III.

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  • Scotland was never again to hold Berwick for any length of time: meanwhile a few castles stood out, but the child king was sent over to France for safe keeping.

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  • Negotiations were interrupted by the arrival of French reinforcements in men and gold: Berwick was recaptured, only to be recovered by England in 1356.

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  • The duke of Gloucester (later Richard III.) marched north and took Berwick, while the earl of Angus, with other nobles, hanged Cochrane and other favourites of James over Lauder bridge.

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  • Mary was now in France, the destined bride of the Dauphin; while Knox, released from the galleys, preached his doctrines in Berwick and Newcastle, and was a chaplain of Edward VI., till the crowning of Mary Tudor drove him to France and Switzerland.

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  • In February 1560 a league was made at Berwick between Elizabeth and " the Congregation."

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  • Randolph was dismissed for supplying Murray with English gold; from Berwick he and Bedford reported to Cecil the progress of the conspiracy.

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  • Knox himself fled to Kyle, though there is no evidence that he was privy to a deed which he calls " worthy of all praise," and Morton and Ruthven spurred to Berwick, while Lethington skulked in Atholl.

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  • The " navy was so augmented as it is a thing almost incredible," but none the less £ioo sterling was worth as much, Drury wrote from Berwick, as £1000 Scots.

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  • Berwick and Bolingbroke were his ministers, but Berwick would not accompany him to Scotland, and Bolingbroke did not provide the necessary munitions of war.

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  • After some successes of the French marshal, the duke of Berwick, in Spain, and of the imperial troops in Sicily, Philip V.

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  • of Dover, and opposite the town of Berwick, Maine, industrially a part of Somersworth.

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  • This achievement, which is said by the duke of Berwick to have turned Sarsfield's head, made him the popular hero of the war with the Irish.

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  • His widow married the duke of Berwick.

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  • The latter record, containing the various acts of homage and fealty extorted by Edward from Baliol and others in the course of his progress through Scotland in the summer of 1296 and in August at the parliament of Berwick, was published by Prynne from the copy in the Tower and now in the Record Office.

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  • In 1711 the Princess Palatine wrote to the Electress Sophia of Hanover, and suggested that he was an English nobleman who had taken part in a plot of the duke of Berwick against William III.

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  • Released at last (apparently through the influence of the young English king, Edward VI.), Knox was appointed one of the licensed preachers of the new faith for England, and stationed in the great garrison of Berwick, and afterwards at Newcastle.

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  • From Mary of Gelderland, the queen regent, she purchased the promise of help at the price of surrendering Berwick.

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  • She landed in Northumberland in October, and achieved some slight success; but when on the way to seek further help from Scotland the fleet was overwhelmed in a storm, and Margaret herself barely escaped in an open boat to Berwick.

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  • JOHN MAJOR (or MAIR) (1470-1550), Scottish theological and historical writer, was born at the village of Gleghornie, near North Berwick, Scotland, in the year 1470.

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  • from the South Foreland to Berwick, a distance of 348 m., or, following the coast, 640 m.

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  • Connecting with the Great Northern between Doncaster and York, and with the North British at Berwick, it forms part of the " East Coast " route to Scotland.

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  • Serving all ports and coast stations from Hull to Berwick, also Carlisle, &c. Owning extensive docks at Hull, Middlesbrough, South Shields, the Hartlepools, Blyth, &c.

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  • The Rhine campaigns were entirely unimportant, and are remembered only for the last appearance in the field of Prince Eugene and Marshal Berwick - the latter was killed at the siege of Philippsburg - and the baptism of fire of the young crown prince of Prussia, afterwards Frederick the Great.

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  • 1436), governor of Berwick, burned it about 1417, and in 1562 the regent Moray had to suppress the lawless with a strong hand.

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  • - connecting with Jamison City in the extreme northern part of the county); and is connected with Berwick, Catawissa and Danville by electric lines.

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  • In summer there are frequent excursions to the Bass Rock and the Isle of May, North Berwick, Elie, Aberdour, Alloa and Stirling.

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  • Berwick was Invasion stormed, the Scottish army was routed at Dunbar ~cotJand (April si), Edinburgh and Stirling were easily captured, and at last John Baliol, deserted by most of his adherents, surrendered at Brechin.

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  • He then summoned a parliament at Berwick, and announced to the assembled Scots that he had determined to depose King John, and to assume the crown himself.

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  • Warenne retired to Berwick and besought his master for aid.

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  • The Scots swept everything before them, ravaging the north at their will, and capturing Berwick.

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  • Edward was allowed to raise an army for the siege of Berwick, and was lying before its walls, when the Scots, turning his flank, made a fierce foray into Yorkshire, and routed the shire-levy under Archbishop Melton at the battle of Myton.

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  • Edward won the battle of Halidon Hill (July 19, 1333)Where he displayed considerable tactical skillcaptured Berwick, and reconquered a considerable portion of Scotland for his vassal.

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  • David Bruce was to cede Roxburgh sion of and Berwick, but to keep the rest of his dominions on David of condition of paying a ransom of 100,000 marks.

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  • He promised the Scottish king Berwick and 50,000 crowns in return for the aid of an army.

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  • of Berwick, and, after running a short distance W.

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  • m., consisting of the tract north of the Tweed which is not included in Scotland, forms the "bounds" or "liberties" of Berwick, or the country of the borough and town of Berwick-on-Tweed.

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  • The English Border counties are Northumberland and Cumberland, the Scottish Berwick, Roxburgh and Dumfries; though historically, and still by usage, the Scottish shires of Selkirk and Peebles have always been classed as Border shires.

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  • Railway communication is supplied by the east coast route to Berwick, the Waverley route through Liddesdale, the London & North-Western by Carlisle, the North British branch from Berwick to St Boswells, and the North Eastern lines from Berwick to Kelso, Alnwick to Coldstream, and Newcastle to Carlisle.

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  • Berwick and Carlisle were repeatedly assailed, and battles took place at Halidon Hill (1333), Otterburn (1388), Nisbet (1402), Homildon (1402), Piperden (1435), Hedgeley Moor (1464),(1464), Flodden (1513), Solway Moss (1542), and Ancrum Moor (1544), in addition to many fights arising out of family feuds and raids fomented by the Armstrongs, Eliots, Grahams, Johnstones, Maxwells and other families, of which the most serious were the encounters at Arkenholme (Langholm) in 1455, the Raid of Reidswire (1575), and the bloody combat at Dryfe Sands (1593).

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  • of England attended service in Berwick church (March 27, 1603) "to return thanks for his peaceful entry into his new dominions."

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  • See Life by Cornelius Nepos; Berwick, Lives of Messalla Corvinus and T.P.A.

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  • The capture of Berwick by the Scots, however, in April 1318 led to a second reconciliation with Edward.

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  • A formal treaty, made in the following August, having been ratified by parliament, the king and earl opened the siege of Berwick; but there was no cohesion between their troops, and the undertaking was quickly abandoned.

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  • Whilst the Spanish fleet was destroyed before Syracuse by Admiral Byng, the intrigue of the Spanish ambassador Cellamare with the duke of Maine to exclude the family of Orleans from the succession on Louis XV.s death was discovered and repressed; and Marshal Berwick burned the dockyards at Pasajes in Spain.

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  • and hastened to replace Marshals Berwick and Villars by diplomatists.

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  • In his reign, according to the Stud-Book, the Stradling or Lister Turk was brought into England by the duke of Berwick from the siege of Buda.

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  • south-west of Berwick by the North Eastern railway.

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  • Owing to its position on the Border and also as the first ford of any consequence above Berwick, the town played a prominent part in Scottish history during many centuries.

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  • Edward was furious and exacted his revenge by ransacking the town of Berwick in 1296 and killing everyone he found.

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  • Yesterday was Bamburgh beach and Berwick on Tweed, tomorrow the otter sanctuary in the North Pennines.

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  • In March 1870, North Berwick was the first town in the county to have telegraphic communications.

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  • Berwick Crescent - 3 The bankside vegetation in this area includes hawthorn, willow and alder.

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  • in 1291 appointed John de Berwick custodian of the abbey so that he might pay their debts from the issues of their estates, allowing them enough for their maintenance, and Edward II.

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