How to use Berber in a sentence

berber
  • After a time Abd-ar-rahman found that his life was threatened, and he fled farther west, taking refuge among the Berber tribes of Mauritania.

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  • But from the fact that the bulk of the Tunisian population belongs to the Iberian section of the Berbers, and to this being no doubt the fundamental stock of most Italian peoples, the intermixture of the Italianized Berber with his African brother has not much affected the physique of the people, though it may have slightly tinged their mental characteristics.

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  • In its collective industry the Berber race is far superior to the Arab.

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  • Vacuuming is the best way to maintain a Berber carpet, but if the carpet gets a stain, use a carpet stain remover.

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  • Installing Berber carpet tiles is as easy as installing vinyl tiles.

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  • Berber tiles can be easily cut to size and shape using a standard utility knife.

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  • Berber is very durable but it can snag on things like high heel shoes.

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  • If your Berber tile carpet has a snag or it is unraveling in a spot, you have a number of options available.

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  • Having the ability to simply pull up a damaged tile and replace it with a new one is one of the prime advantages of having a Berber tile carpet in the home.

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  • To get to the kernel, the Berber women use a sharp stone to crack the shell.

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  • Although it is a bit costly, the profits go to a good cause of supporting Berber women and allowing them a means to make a decent living under good working conditions.

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  • Stay warm in comfort and style in this grooved berber fleece jacket from All American Comfort featuring a zippered closure, drawstring hem and deep soft pockets.

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  • Choose from all-weather rubber and even Berber mats!

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  • The selection of floor mats here is extensive including catch-all mats, Berber, and other types of carpeted mats.

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  • Its Arabic title is Kitab ul'Ibar, wa diwan el Mubtada wa'l Khabar, fi ayyamul`Arab wa'l`Ajam wa'l Berber; that is, "The Book of Examples and the Collection of Origins and Information respecting the History of the Arabs, Foreigners and Berbers."

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  • Their slopes enclose well-watered valleys of great fertility, in which the Berber tribes cultivate tiny irrigated fields, their houses clinging to the hill-sides.

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  • From time immemorial the Atlas have been the home of Berber races, and those living in the least accessible regions have retained a measure of independence throughout their recorded history.

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  • The Berber tribes, whose racial unity is attested by their common spoken language and by the comparatively numerous Berber inscriptions that have come down to us, bore in ancient times the generic names of Numidians, Gaetulians and Moors or Maurusiani.

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  • The inhabitants are of two distinct tribes, one, the Aduan, of Berber stock, the other a branch of the Sha'ambah Arabs.

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  • Such remains as there are of their language, a few expressions and the proper names of ancient chieftains still borne by certain families, connect it with the Berber dialects.

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  • The natives of Tunisia at the present day belong mainly to two stocks, which may be roughly classified as the Berber and the Arab (q.v.), about two-thirds being of Berber and the remaining third of Arab descent.

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  • The extreme south of Tunis is ranged over by Berber Tawareq2 or Tamasheq.

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  • Berber dialects are still spoken in Tunisia in the island of Jerba, in the Matmata country, and in the Tunisian Sahara.

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  • Elsewhere to a remarkable degree the Arabic language has extinguished the Berber tongue, though no doubt in vulgar Tunisian a good many Berber words remain.

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  • Arab and Berber have mingled to some extent, though no considerable fusion of the two elements has taken place.

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  • It is considered that these nomads will be gently pushed back towards the Sahara, leaving cultivable Tunisia to the settled Berber stock, a stock fundamentally one with the peoples of Mediterranean Europe.

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  • Almost all the towns of Tunisia were originally Roman or romanized Berber settlements; consequently the remains of Roman buildings form a large part of the material of which their existing structures are composed.

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  • The empire of the Fatimites (q.v.) rested on Berber support, and from that time forth till the advent of the Turks the dynasties of North Africa were really native, even when they claimed descent from some illustrious Arab stock.

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  • The Hafsites (so called from Abu IIafs, the ancestor of Abu Zakariya, a Berber chieftain who had been one of the intimate disciples of the Almohade mandi) assumed the title of Prince of the Faithful, a dignity which was acknowledged even at Mecca, when in the days of Mostansir, the second Hafsite, the fall of Bagdad left Islam without a titular head.

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  • The site was purchased from the Zenata Berbers, in the 8th century, by Idris-bin-Abdallah, who began the building of a new city named Agadir (Berber, the fortress).

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  • The incessant conflicts among the Berber princes of northern Africa gave him employment as a mercenary, which he varied by piratical raids on the trade of the Christians.

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  • Berber derived its importance from being the starting-point of the caravan route, 242 m.

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  • Berber thus lost the Red Sea trade.

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  • Berber, or El Mekerif, is a town of considerable antiquity.

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  • His fervent faith in the doctrines of Islam was unquestioned, and his ultimate failure was due in considerable measure to the refusal of the Kabyles, Berber mountain tribes whose Mahommedanism is somewhat loosely held, to make common cause with the Arabs against the French.

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  • El Golea was originally a settlement of the Zenata Berbers, by whom it was known as Taorert, and there is still a considerable Berber element in its population.

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  • Near Frenda (2063), which has largely preserved its old Berber character, are numerous dolmens and prehistoric rock sculptures.

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  • Abd-ul-Qasim gained the confidence of the townsmen by organizing a successful resistance to the Berber soldiers of fortune who were grasping at the fragments of the caliphate.

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  • He had made his family the recognized leaders of the Mahommedans of Arab and native Spanish descent against the Berber element, whose chief was the king of Granada.

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  • On one occasion he trapped a number of his enemies, the Berber chiefs of the Ronda, into visiting him, and got rid of them by smothering them in the hot room of a bath.

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  • When these operations were begun a project for linking Suakin to Berber by railway, first proposed during Ismail's viceroyalty, was revived and a few miles of rails were laid in 1884.

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  • They then came in contact with the Berghwata, a Berber people of central Morocco, who followed a heresy founded by Salah ibn Tarif 300 years previously.

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  • In common with the Semitic languages, the Berber languages of North Africa, and the Cushite languages of North-East Africa, Egyptian of all periods possesses grammatical gender,- expressing masculine and feminine.

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  • The characteristic triliteral roots of all the Semitic languages seemed to separate them widely from others; but certain traits have caused the Egyptian, Berber and Cushite groups to be classed together as three subfamilies of a Hamitic group, remotely related to the Semitic. The biliteral character of Coptic, and the biliteralism which was believed to exist in Egyptian, led philologists to suspect that Egyptian might be a surviving witness to that far-off stage of the Semitic languages when triliteral roots had not yet been formed from presumed original biliterals; Sethes investigations, however, prove that the Coptic biliterals are themselves derived from Old Egyptian triliterals, and that the triliteral roots enormously preponderated in Egyptian of the earliest known form; that view is, therefore, no longer tenable.

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  • Moreover, to restore tranquillity in the Sudan, the first step necessary was the construction of a railway from Suakin to Berber, or what, perhaps, would be more advisable, to Shendi, on the Nile.

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  • General Gordon, questioned on the point, telegraphed from Khartum, on tl,e 7th of March, that he might be cut off by a rising at Shendi, adding, I think it, therefore, most important to follow up the success near Suakin by sending a small force to Berber.

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  • At the same time he suggested an appeal to the millionaires of America and England to subscribe money for the cost of 2000 or 3000 nizamS (Turkish regulars) to be sent to Berber.

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  • On the I3th of March Lord Granville gave full power to General Gordon to evacuate Khartum and save that garrison by conducting it himself to Berber without delay, and expressed a hope that he would not resign his commission.

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  • The second entailed a desert march of about 250 m., of which one section, Obak-Bir Mahoba (52 m.), was waterless, and the rest had an indifferent water supply (except at Ariab, about half-way to Berber), capable, however, of considerable development.

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  • From Berber the Nile is followed (210 m.) to Khartum.

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  • The memorandum of the adjutant-general above referred to was based on the hypothesis that Khartum could not hold out beyond the 15th of November, and that the expedition should reach Berber by the 20th of October.

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  • I have from first endeavoured to impress on government that I am strong enough to relieve Khartum, and believe in being able to send a force, when returning by way of Berber, to Suakin, to open road and crush Osman Digna.

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  • On the 8th of February Lord Wolseley telegraphed, The sooner you can now deal with Osman Digna the better, and recommended the despatch of Indian troops to Suakin, to co-operate with me in keeping road to Berber open.

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  • Graham was placed in command of this force, with orders to break down the power of Osman Digna and to press the construction of the railway towards Berber.

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  • A great native movement could now have been organized, which would have kept the route to Berber and enabled the, railway to be rapidly pushed forward.

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  • Meanwhile many communications had passed between the war office and Lord Wolseley, who at first believed that Berber could be taken before the summer.

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  • Berber was found to be deserted, and occupied by Hunter on the 5th of September, and in the following month a large force was entrenched there.

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  • In the 23rd of October Hunter, with a flying column lightly equipped, left Berber for Adarama, which he burned on the 2nd of November, and after reconnoitring for 40 m.

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  • The railway reached Abu Hamed on the 4th of November, and was pushed rapidly forward along the right bank of the Nile towards Berber.

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  • On his return from Kassala to Berber the sirdar received information of an intended advance of the khalifa northward.

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  • But at the end of February, Mahmud crossed the Nile to Shendi with some 12,000 fighting men, and with Osman Digna advanced along the right bank of the Nile to Ahab, where he struck across the desert to Nakheila, on the Atbara, intending to turn Kitcheners left flank at Berber.

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  • Preparations were now made for the attack on the khalifas force at Omdurman; and in the meantime the troops were camped in the neighborhood of Berber, and the railway carried on to the Atbara.

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  • Berber for Adarama, which he burned on the 2nd of November, and after reconnoitring for 40 m.

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  • Wetzstein derives it from mahir, a corruption of Amasir with its plurals Imazir and Masir, archaic forms of the Berber native name Amazigh, the free.

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  • The tribes known to the Romans by that name were undoubtedly of Berber stock (see Berbers).

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  • The subsequent conquest of Spain was effected chiefly by Berber tribes, but the Moslems in the peninsula - known to the Christian nations as Moors - always had a strong strain of Arab blood and in most respects became Arabized.

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  • The race was also influenced considerably by intermarriage with the natives of Spain, and when the Moors were finally expelled from that country they had become almost entirely distinct from their Berber kinsfolk, to whom they were known as Andalusians.

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  • While the mountainous parts of Morocco continued to be occupied by pure Berber people, the Shluh or Shilluh, the Andalusian Moors flocked to 5 Proc. Zool.

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  • The Moors are ethnically a very hybrid race with more Arab than Berber blood.

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  • They are of Berber stock.

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  • Many of its inhabitants, who are of Berber race, are Senussites.

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  • To the Egyptians they were known as " Lebu," " Mashuasha," " Tamahu," " Tehennu " and " Kahaka "; a long list of names is found in Herodotus, and the Romans called them Numidae, Gaetuli and Mauri, terms which have been derived respectively from the Greek voµaSes (nomads), the name Gued'oula, of a great Berber tribe, and the Hebrew mahur (western).

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  • But the problem of the actual origin of the Berber race has not yet been solved.

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  • In spite of a history of foreign conquest - Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Vandal, Arab and French - the Berber physical type and the Berber temperament and nationality have persisted since the stone age.

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  • The invaders who have most affected the Berber race are the Arabs, but the two races, with a common religion, often a common government, with the same tribal groupings, have failed to amalgamate to any great extent.

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  • The Arab is a herdsman and a nomad; the Berber is an agriculturist and a townsman.

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  • The Arab has built his social structure on the Koran, which inculcates absolutism, aristocracy, theocracy; the Berber, despite his nominal Mahommedanism, is a democrat, with his Jemda or " Witangemot " and his Kanum or unwritten code, the Magna Carta of the individual's liberty as opposed to the community's good.

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  • The Arab, transported to a soil which does not always suit him, so far from thriving, tends to disappear, whereas the Berber becomes more and more aggressive, and yearly increases in numbers.

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  • The Berber, on the other hand, is straightforward, honest, by no means averse to money-making, but not unscrupulous in the methods which he employs to this end, intelligent in a degree to which the ordinary Arab never approaches, and trustworthy as no Arab can be."

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  • The Berber's village is his state, and the government is vested in an assembly, the Jemda, formed of all males old enough to observe the fast of Ramadan.

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  • The poorest Berber has as great a voice in affairs as the richest.

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  • A Berber woman has in many ways a better position than her Arab sister.

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  • But most characteristic of her social position is the Berber woman's right to enter into a sacred bond or agreement, represented by the giving of the anaya.

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  • Female saints, too, are held in high honour; and the Berber pays his wife the compliment of monogamy.

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  • Among many Berber tribes the law of inheritance is such that the eldest daughter's son succeeds.

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  • South of Morocco proper, Gerhard Rohlfs, who travelled extensively in the region (c. 1861-1867), states that a Berber religious corporation, the Savia Karlas, was ruled over by a woman, the chief's wife.

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  • Berber women are intelligent and hard-working, and, when young, very pretty and graceful.

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  • Though Arabic has to a considerable extent displaced the Berber language, the latter is still spoken by millions of people from Egypt to the Atlantic and from the Mediterranean to the Sudan.

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  • Although the Berber tongue shows a certain affinity with Semitic in the construction both of its words and sentences Berber is quite distinct from the Semitic languages; and a remarkable fact is that in spite of the enormous space over which the dialects are spread and the thousands of years that some of the Berber peoples have been isolated from the rest, these dialects show but slight differences from the long-extinct Hamitic speech from which all are derived.

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  • Whatever these dialects be called, the Kabyle, the Shilha, the Zenati, the Tuareg or Tamashek, the Berber language is still essentially one, and the similarity between the forms current in Morocco, Algeria, the Sahara and the far-distant oasis of Siwa is much more marked than between the Norse and English in the sub-Aryan Teutonic group. The Berbers have, moreover, a writing of their own, peculiar and little used or known, the antiquity of which is proved by monuments and inscriptions ranging over the whole of North Africa.

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  • The Tawahhid (The Unity of God), said to have been written in Moroccan Berber and believed to be the oldest African work in existence, except Egyptian and Ethiopic, was the work of the Muwahhadi leader, Ibn Tumart the Mandi, at a time when the officials of the Kairawan mosque were dismissed because they could not speak Berber.

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  • As might be expected the Berber tongue is most common in Morocco and the western Sahara - the regions where Arab dominion was least exercised.

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  • Berber is the real language of Morocco, Arabic that of its creed and government.

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  • In 1900 the oasis of Atar, on the western borders of the territory, was reached by Paul Blanchet, previously known for his researches on ancient Berber remains in Algeria.

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  • Atar is inhabited by Arab and Berber tribes, and is described as a wretched spot.

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  • One of them was the Greek exarch of Tangier, Julian, who, supported by the powerful Berber tribe of Ghomera, had long resisted and even asked for aid from Spain, but had been compelled to surrender and was left governor of Ceuta.

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  • Ka`b, the mother of Abu Ja`far was a Berber slave-girl.

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  • In Alemtejo, and still more in Algarve, Arab and Berber types are common; and the influence of these races can everywhere be discerned in the architecture, handicrafts and speech of the peasantry.

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  • Biskra is the capital of the Ziban (plural of Zab), a race of mixed Berber and Arab origin, whose villages extend from the southern slopes of the Aures to the Shat Melrir.

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  • In this work he endeavoured to show, by an examination of geographical names, that a race or races speaking dialects allied to modern Basque once extended through the whole of Spain, the southern coast of France and the Balearic Islands, and suggested that these people, whom he identified with the Iberians of classical writers, had come from northern Africa, where the name of Berber still perhaps perpetuates their old designation.

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  • From the date of its occupation by the Arabs the town had a stormy history, being repeatedly captured by rival Berber and Spanish-Moorish dynasties.

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  • They were formerly a large and powerful confederation, and took a prominent part in the history of the Berber race.

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  • Their language is almost exclusively Shilhah, a dialect of Berber.

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  • It seems to be certain that Julian, the imperial count or governor of Ceuta, acting in concert with the family and faction of Witiza, who sought his help against Roderic, provided vessels to transport the Berber Tank (Tariq) across the straits.

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  • They looked down on the Syrian, they thought the Berber a lout and a plebeian, they scorned the renegade, and called him a slave and son of a slave.

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  • In the earliest times their most pressing foe was not the Arab or Berber so much as the Carolingian.

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  • Under the influence of orthodox Berber teachers their fanaticism was turned against the amir himself.

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  • Under the stimulus of Berber fanaticism the toleration first shown to the Christians was turned to persecution.

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  • This marked type of the Leonese of modern times represents a Berber colony cut off among the Christians, and christianized at an early date, who went on using Arab and Berber names long after their conversion.

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  • In places, as between Suakin and Berber and above Roseires on the Blue Nile, the mountains approach close to the river.

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  • In the region south of Berber and Suakin are the Hadendoa.

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  • The camels are bred in the desert north of Berber, between the Nile and Red Sea, in southern Dongola, in the Hadendoa country and in northern Kordofan.

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  • Ismail remained in the Dongola province till February 1821, when he crossed the Bayuda Desert and received the submission of the meks (kings) of Berber, Shendi and Halfaya, nominal vassals of the king of Sennar.

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  • The Mandist movement now swept northward and on the 20th of May Berber was captured by the dervishes and Khartum isolated.

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  • Under the influence of Berber and Arab tribes, who embraced Mahommedanism, the Hausa advanced in civilization; founded large cities, and developed a considerable trade, not only with the neighbouring countries, but, via the Sahara, with the Barbary states.

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  • In the course of the 14th century, when the native Berber dynasties were in decadence, piracy became particularly flagrant.

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  • After a short stay in Cairo, Gordon proceeded to Khartum by way of Suakin and Berber, a route which he ever afterwards regarded as the best mode of access to the Sudan.

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  • The relief of the Egyptian garrisons was successfully accomplished, and Gordon visited the provinces of Berber and Dongola, whence he had again to return to the Abyssinian frontier to treat with King John.

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  • Travelling by Korosko and Berber, he arrived at Khartum on the 18th of February, and was well received by the inhabitants, who believed that he had come to save the country from the rebels.

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  • Gordon telegraphed to Sir Evelyn Baring urging that the road from Suakin to Berber should be opened by a small force.

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  • The garrison of Berber, seeing that there was no chance of relief, surrendered a month later and Khartum was completely isolated.

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  • The impotent Sulayman is forced to hand out provincial governorships to the Berber chiefs.

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  • As the name suggests you will pass many kasbahs which were once the fortified houses of Berber warlords.

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  • Berber muleteers are willing assistants with setting up camp and various chores.

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  • During the race you will stay in shared army green, open ended Berber tents provided by the organizers, in restricted areas.

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  • He even went so far as to assault the sister of the Murabti (Almoravide) amir`Ali III., in the streets of Fez, because she was going about unveiled after the manner of Berber women.

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  • It is highly probable that his influence would not have outlived him, if he had not found a lieutenant in `Abd-el-Mumin el Kumi, another Berber, from Algeria, who was undoubtedly a soldier and statesman of a high order.

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  • Though many of them have adopted Arabic a Berber idiom is commonly spoken.

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  • The Berber diet largely consists of cucumbers, gourds, water-melons and onions, and a small artichoke (Cynara humilis) which grows wild.

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  • Among the peculiar grammatical features of Berber may be mentioned two numbers (no dual), two genders and six cases, and verbs with one, two, three and four radicals, and imperative and aorist tense only.

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  • The mudirias are Haifa, Red Sea, Dongola and Berber in the north (these include practically all the region known as Nubia); Khartum, Blue Nile and White Nile in the centre; Kassala and Sennar in the east; Kordofan in the west; and Bahrel-Ghazal, Upper Nile (formerly Fashoda) and Mongalla in the south.

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  • Carpets with loops are typically made from olefin, such as Berber.

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  • Berber is a carpet made up of tightly aligned loops, giving it a tight, uniform appearance.

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  • The smaller the loops, the better it will look after daily wear.Cut Pile Berber combines the multi-colored look that's common in Berber with the look of plush carpet (there are no loops).

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  • You can get Berber, textured, and Frieze carpeting as well as commercial carpeting and indoor or outdoor carpeting.

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  • There's heavy-duty, Berber, shag, and low-pile to name a few, but there are some key tips to help you choose the perfect carpet type for your home or office.

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  • Lay a Berber rug wall-to-wall and cover it with an antique Oriental rug.

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  • If you're looking for a durable, easy-to-install flooring option for your home, Berber carpet tiles may just be what you're looking for.

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  • Manufactured in a loop design, Berber is an excellent choice for those who have pets, especially cats, as the pile is very tightly woven and resistant to unraveling.

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  • Berber carpet is named after a tribe in Northwestern Africa.

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  • The Berber tribe constructed their fabrics, usually made out of camel hair or wool, with tightly woven loops.

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  • The term Berber is not a name brand but rather a specific type of weave.

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  • It's also used to describe the color of many carpets, with Berber being applied to mostly light colored fabrics like off-white and tan.

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  • Berber carpet, including carpet tiles, is typically made from one of three materials - wool, nylon or olefin.

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  • Because wool carpet is so expensive, most consumer-grade Berber is made from either nylon or olefin.

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  • How you clean your Berber tiles depends on what material it is made out of.

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  • There are specific products available for cleaning wool Berber carpets.

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  • Nylon and olefin Berber are much more durable and easier to clean.

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  • Tiaret (Berber for "station") was a town of note at the time of the Arab invasion of North Africa in the 7th century and is stated by Ibn Khaldun to have offered a stubborn resistance to Sidi-Okba.

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  • It originated with Mahommed ibn Tumart, a member of the Masmuda, a Berber tribe of the Atlas.

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