Benin sentence example

benin
  • Wari and Sapele are towns in the Benin district.
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  • south of Benin city.
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  • West of the Nun all the estuaries up to the Forcados seem to be true mouths of the great river, while the Benin river, though linked to the others by transverse channels, may be more properly regarded as an independent stream.
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  • Some trace of this earlier application remains in the name "Bight of Benin," still given to that part of the sea which washes the Slave Coast, whilst up to 1894 "Benin" was used to designate the French possessions on the coast now included in Dahomey.
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  • Bacon, Benin, the City of Blood (London, 1898), by a member of the punitive expedition of 1897; the annual Reports on Southern Nigeria, issued by the ' Colonial Office, London.
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  • He reached Benin, but was seized with dysentery at a village called Gwato, and died there on the 3rd of December 1823.
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  • Into the huge delta of the Niger several other rivers (the " Oil Rivers ") empty themselves; the chief being, on the west, the Benin, and on the east the Brass.
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  • inland from the mouth of the Benin river, and Bende, about 50 m.
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  • of Benin city, is an important trade centre for the Yoruba country, in which are the large cities of Abeokuta, Ibadan and Illorin, all separately noticed.
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  • The Benin influence does not seem to have reached east of the Forcados mouth of the Niger.
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  • The most serious military operations were against the Beni, a peaceful mission to the king of Benin having been massacred in the bush in January 1897.
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  • Illorin is a great trading centre, Hausa caravans bringing goods from central Africa, and merchandise from the coasts of the Mediterranean, which is distributed from Illorin to Dahomey, Benin and the Lagos hinterland, while from the Guinea coast the trade is in the hands of the Yoruba and comes chiefly through Lagos.
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  • BENIN, the name of a country, city and river of British West Africa, west of the main channel of the Niger, forming part of the protectorate of Southern Nigeria.
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  • In its restricted sense Benin is the country formerly ruled by the king of Benin city.
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  • The coast-line held by Benin had passed out of its sovereignty by the middle of the 19th century.
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  • In physical characteristics,my reccommend climate, flora and fauna, Benin in no way differs from the rest of the southern portion of Nigeria.
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  • Benin river (known also as the Jakri outlet), though linked to the Niger system by a network of creeks, is an independent stream.
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  • The general course of the Benin is westerly.
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  • The river is navigable by small steamers up to Sapele, a town on the south bank immediately below the junction of the head streams. The Ologi and Gwato creeks enter the Benin on the right or north bank, and on the same side (8 m.
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  • From the south or left bank of the Benin the Forcados mouth of the Niger can be reached by the Nana creek.
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  • Benin city is situated in a clearing of the forest, about 25 m.
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  • north-north-east of the mouth of the Benin river, has a special interest as the place where Giovanni Belzoni, the explorer of Egyptian antiquities, died in 1823 when starting on an expedition to Timbuktu.
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  • Benin was discovered by the Portuguese about the year 1485, and they carried on a brisk trade in slaves, who were taken to Elmina and sold to the natives of the Gold Coast.
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  • At that time and for more than two centuries afterwards, Benin seems to have been one of the most powerful states of West Africa.
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  • It was known to Europeans in the 17th century as the Great Benin.
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  • The towns of Lagos and Badagry were both founded by Benin colonists.
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  • Benin city was the seat of a theocracy of priests, in whose hands the oba or king, nominally supreme, appears to have often been a puppet.
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  • Many chiefs, in no way politically dependent on Benin, used to send annual presents to the juju.
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  • The Benin people do not appear to have indulged in wanton cruelty, and it is stated that they usually stupefied the victims before putting them to death.
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  • The first English expedition to Benin was in 1553; after that time a considerable trade grew up between England and that country, ivory, palm-oil and pepper being the chief commodities exported from Benin.
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  • In 1863 Sir Richard Burton, then British consul at Fernando Po, went to Benin to try and put a stop to human sacrifices, an attempt in which he did not succeed.
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  • At that time the decline in power of the kingdom of Benin was obvious, and the city was in a decaying condition.
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  • In 1885 the coast-line of Benin was placed under British protection, and steps were taken to enter into friendly relations with the king.
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  • Phillips, acting consul-general, and eight Europeans were brutally massacred on the road from Gwato to Benin city, whilst on a mission to the king.
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  • Phillips had persisted in starting for Benin despite the repeated request of the king.
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  • from the Benin river, was landed, organized, equipped and provided with transport.
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  • Five days later the city of Benin was taken, and in twelve days more the men were re-embarked, and the ships coaled and ready for any further service.
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  • On the 17th of February Benin was occupied after considerable fighting.
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  • Roth, Great Benin, its Customs, Art and Horrors (Halifax, 1903), a comprehensive and profusely illustrated work, with an annotated bibliography; C. H.
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  • Dalton, Antiquities from Benin.
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  • in the British Museum (1899); Pitt Rivers, Works of Art from Benin (1900) R.
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  • Gallwey, "Journeys in the Benin Country," Geog.
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  • Boisragon, The Benin Massacre (London, 1897); R.
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  • This week, Benin's top military officer accused Burkina Faso of launching an armed incursion into the Benin side of the area.
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  • However some, as in Benin, prefer white ivory.
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  • The gallery's key objects include: an Egyptian sarcophagus and funeral figures; Benin Bronzes; and Japanese netsuke.
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  • Missions:: Nile Delta, Benin, Ivory Coast, Gold Coast, Dahomey, Upper Niger.
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  • The Beni appear to have been the most powerful race at the time of the discovery of the coast by the Portuguese in the 15th century, and the kings of Benin in the 17th century ruled a large part of the south-western portion of the existing British protectorate (see Benin).
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  • The operations were completely successful and the Benin country was added to the protectorate (see Benin).
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  • (See Benin.) In this direction the largest mouth is the Forcados, a noble stream with a safe and relatively deep bar.
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  • Benin >>
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  • The bay formed by the configuration of the land between Cape St Paul and the Nun mouth of the Niger is known as the Bight of Benin, the name being that of the once powerful native state whose territory formerly extended over the whole district.
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  • Besides the people of Benin, the coast tribes include the Jekri, living on the lower part of the Benin river and akin to the Yoruba, the Ijos, living in the delta east of the main mouth of the Niger, and the Ibos, occupying a wide tract of country just above the delta and extending for loo m.
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  • Benin (q.v.), about 60 m.
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  • In 1826 Bussa was reached from Benin by Hugh Clapperton, and his servant Richard Lander.
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