Benedictine sentence example

benedictine
  • The Benedictine work follows the old monastic tradition of the direct intercourse of the soul with God.

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  • Some of the buildings of the Benedictine abbey, to which this church belonged, remain.

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  • There was a Benedictine nunnery here in the 13th century.

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  • Etienne (16th century) and the Benedictine liqueur distillery,' a modern building which also contains a museum, are of some interest.

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  • The chief exports are oil-cake, flint, cod and Benedictine liqueur.

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  • At the same period he founded the abbey of Fulda, as a centre for German monastic culture, placing it under the Bavarian Sturm, whose biography gives us so many picturesque glimpses of the time, and making its rule stricter than the Benedictine.

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  • The original convent was destroyed by the Northmen, but was re-established by Duke William Longsword as a house of canons regular, which shortly afterwards was converted into a Benedictine monastery.

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  • It has an imposing Benedictine abbey, once a castle, but converted into a religious house in 1322, when Ottakar I.

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  • The Hessians were converted to Christianity mainly through the efforts of St Boniface; their land was included in the archbishopric of Mainz; and religion and culture were kept alive among them largely owing to the foundation of the Benedictine abbeys of Fulda and Hersfeld.

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  • He became a monk at St Albans, where he appears to have passed the whole of his monastic life except the six years between 1 394 and 1400 during which he was prior of another Benedictine house at Wymondham, Norfolk.

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  • At Bonneval the lunatic asylum occupies the r8th-century buildings of a former Benedictine abbey.

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  • The third is the age of the plena spiritus libertas, the age of contemplation, the monastic age par excellence, the age of a monachism wholly directed towards ecstasy, more Oriental than Benedictine.

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  • S., where (in a former mansion) some of the conspirators in the Gunpowder Plot defied search for eight days (1605); and Westwood, a fine hall of Elizabethan and Carolean date on the site of a Benedictine nunnery, a mile west of Droitwich, which offered a retreat to many Royalist cavaliers and churchmen during the Commonwealth.

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  • The chief source of information about him is the Liber contra Auxentium in the Benedictine edition of the works of Hilary.

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  • In 1823 he entered the Benedictine monastery of Downside, near Bath, taking the vows in 1825.

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  • It is mainly Early English, but the original church, attached to a Benedictine priory, was founded in 1095 on the site of a convent established by Eanswith, daughter of Eadbald, king of Kent in 630.

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  • He was educated in the Benedictine monastery at Winchester under lEthelwold, who was bishop there from 963 to 984.

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  • At Davington, close to Faversham, there are remains, incorporated in a residence, of the cloisters and other parts of a Benedictine priory founded in 1153.

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  • The popularity of Caelius is evidenced by the fact that in the 6th century an abridgment of his larger work was recommended by Cassiodorus to the Benedictine monks for the study of medicine.

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  • It is known that Salerno, a Roman colony, in a situation noted in ancient times for its salubrity, was in the 6th century at least the seat of a bishopric, and at the end of the 7th century of a Benedictine monastery, and that some of the prelates and higher clergy were distinguished for learning, and even for medical acquirements.

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  • In course of time there was a widespread desire in Europe for a stricter rule among the monks, and reforms of the Benedictine rule were instituted at Cluni (910), Chartreuse (about 1080) and Citeaux (1098).

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  • The Benedictine monks preferred secluded sites; the Augustinians did not cultivate seclusion so strictly; but the friars chose the interior of towns by preference.

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  • Kitzingen possessed a Benedictine abbey in the 8th century, and later belonged to the bishopric of Wiirzburg.

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  • Educated at Meung and at Angers, he entered the Benedictine abbey of Bourgueil, and in 1079 became abbot of this place, but his time was devoted to literary pursuits rather than to his official duties.

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  • Not far from these ancient monuments is the new Raetian Museum, which contains a great collection of objects relating to Raetia (including the geological collections of the Benedictine monk of Disentis, Placidus a Spescha (1752-1833), who explored the high snowy regions around the sources of the Rhine).

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  • He describes an experiment made by a Benedictine monk and architect, Dom Papnutio or Panuce, of the same kind as Leonardo's but without the demonstration.

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  • So late as the 16th century, Bossuet delivered a panegyric upon her, and it was the action of Dom Deforis, the Benedictine editor of his works, in criticizing the accuracy of the data on which this was based, that first discredited the legend.

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  • The great church movement of his time - the reformation of English monasticism on Benedictine lines - found in him a sympathizer, but in no sense an active participant.

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  • In the vicinity are some interesting Slavonic remains and the former Benedictine monastery of Ullesheim.

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  • Whether he belonged to the Benedictine order is uncertain.

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  • Between the two towns is Buckfast Abbey, said to have been, before the Conquest, a Benedictine house, and refounded for Cistercians in 1137.

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  • It was restored to use in 1882 by a French Benedictine community, the fine Perpendicular abbot's tower remaining, while other parts have been rebuilt on the original lines.

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  • As early as 732 Bonif ace, the apostle of Germany, established the church of St Peter and a small Benedictine monastery at Frideslar, "the quiet home" or "abode of peace."

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  • He became a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, where he made the acquaintance of Anselm, at that time visiting England as abbot of Bec. The intimacy was renewed when Anselm became archbishop of Canterbury in 1093; thenceforward Eadmer was not only his disciple and follower, but his friend and director, being formally appointed to this position by Pope Urban II.

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  • In this parish was formerly situated the famous Benedictine convent of Oostbroek, founded in the beginning of the 12th century.

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  • In the 10th century Count Bernard of Armagnac founded the Benedictine abbey of St Orens, the monks of which, till 1308, shared the jurisdiction over Auch with the archbishops - an arrangement which gave rise to constant strife.

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  • It is now commonly recognized by scholars that when Gregory the Great became a monk and turned his palace on the Caelian Hill into a monastery, the monastic life there carried out was fundamentally based on the Benedictine Rule.

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  • From this monastery went forth St Augustine and his companions on their mission to England in 59 6, carrying their monachism with them; thus England was the first country out of Italy in which Benedictine life was firmly planted.

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  • In the course of the 7th century Benedictine life was gradually introduced in Gaul,and in the 8th it was carried into the Germanic lands from England.

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  • It is doubtful whether in Spain there were Benedictine monasteries, properly so called, until a later period.

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  • In many parts the Benedictine Rule met the much stricter Irish Rule of Columbanus, introduced by the Irish missionaries on the continent, and after brief periods, first of conflict and then of fusion, it gradually absorbed and supplanted it; thus during the 8th century it became, out of Ireland and other purely Celtic lands, the only rule and form of monastic life throughout western Europe, - so completely that Charlemagne once asked if there ever had been any other monastic rule.

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  • What may be called the inner side of Benedictine life and history is treated in the article Monasticism; here it is possible to deal only with the broad facts of the external history.

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  • The tendency of modern historical scholarship justifies the maintenance of the tradition that St Augustine and his forty companions were the first great Benedictine apostles and missioners.

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  • As the result of their missionary enterprises the Benedictines penetrated into all these lands and established monasteries, so that by the 10th or 1 1th century Benedictine houses existed in great numbers throughout the whole of Latin Christendom except Ireland.

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  • Boys were educated in Benedictine houses from the beginning, but at first they were destined to be monks.

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  • The monasteries, however, played a great part in the educational side of the Carolingian revival; and certainly from that date schools for boys destined to live and work in the world were commonly attached to Benedictine monasteries.

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  • This side of Benedictine life is most typically represented by the Venerable Bede, the gentle and learned scholar of the early middle ages.

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  • Failures there have been many, and scandals not a few in Benedictine history; but it may be said with truth that there does not appear to have been ever a period of widespread or universal corruption, however much at times and in places primitive love may have waxed cold.

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  • And when such declensions occurred, they soon called forth efforts at reform and revival; indeed these constantly recurring reformmovements are one of the most striking features of Benedictine history, and the great proof of the vitality of the institute throughout the ages.

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  • Though forming a distinct and separate organism Cluny claimed to be, and was recognized as, a body of Benedictine houses; but from that time onwards arose a number of independent bodies, or "orders," which took the Benedictine Rule as the basis of their life.

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  • The general tendency of these Benedictine offshoots was in the direction of greater austerity of life than was practised by the Black Monks or contemplated by St Benedict's Rule - some of them were semi-eremitical; the most important by far were the Cistercians, whose ground-idea was to reproduce exactly the life of St Benedict's own monastery.

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  • For the first four or five centuries of Benedictine history there was no organic bond between any of the monasteries; each house formed an independent autonomous family, managing its own affairs and subject to no external authority or control except that of the bishop of the diocese.

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  • But in the year 1215, at the fourth Lateran council, were made regulations destined profoundly to modify Benedictine polity and history.

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  • It was decreed that the Benedictine houses of each ecclesiastical province should henceforth be federated for the purposes of mutual help and the maintenance of discipline, and that for these ends the abbots should every third year meet in a provincial chapter (or synod), in order to pass laws binding on all and to appoint visitors who, in addition to the bishops, should canonically visit the monasteries and report on their condition in spirituals and temporals to the ensuing chapter.

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  • The organization of the Benedictine houses into provinces or chapters under this legislation interfered in the least possible degree with the Benedictine tradition of mutual independence of the houses; the provinces were loose federations of autonomous houses, the legislative power of the chapter and the canonical visitations being the only forms of external interference.

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  • The English Benedictines never advanced farther along the path of centralization; up to their destruction this polity remained in operation among them, and proved itself by its results to be well adapted to the conditions of the Benedictine Rule and life.

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  • In other lands things did not on the whole go so well, and many causes at work during the later middle ages tended to bring about relaxation in the Benedictine houses; above all the vicious system of commendatory abbots, rife everywhere except in England.

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  • During this century the Benedictine houses in many parts of Catholic Europe united themselves into congregations, usually characterized by an austerity that was due to the Tridentine reform movement.

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  • By this act the old English Benedictine line was perpetuated; and in 1619 a number of English monks professed in Spain were aggregated by pontifical act to these representatives of the old English Benedictines, and thus was constituted the present English Benedictine congregation.

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  • Each congregation has its president, who is merely a president, with limited powers, and not a general superior like the Provincials of other orders; so that the primitive Benedictine principle of each monastery being self-contained and autonomous is preserved.

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  • Thus the Benedictine polity may be described as a number of autonomous federations of autonomous monasteries.

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  • In conclusion a word must be said on the Benedictine nuns.

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  • From the beginning the number of women living the Benedictine life has not fallen far short of that of the men.

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  • St Gregory describes St Benedict's sister Scholastica as a nun (sanctimonialis), and she is looked upon as the foundress of Benedictine nuns.

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  • As the institute spread to other lands nunneries arose on all sides, and nowhere were the Benedictine nuns more numerous or more remarkable than in England, from Saxon times to the Reformation.

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  • A strong type of womanhood is revealed in the correspondence of St Boniface with various Saxon Benedictine nuns, some in England and some who accompanied him to the continent and there established great convents.

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  • It has to be said that in the course of the middle ages, especially the later middle ages, grave disorders arose in many convents; and this doubtless led, in the reform movements initiated by the councils of Constance and Basel, and later of Trent, to the introduction of strict enclosure in Benedictine convents, which now is the almost universal practice.

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  • At the present day there are of Black Benedictine nuns 262 convents with 7000 nuns, the large majority being directly subject to the diocesan bishops; if the Cistercians and others be included, there are 387 convents with nearly Ii,000 nuns.

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  • In England there are a dozen Benedictine nunneries.

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  • The chief general authority for Benedictine history up to the middle of the 12th century is Mabillon's Annales, in 6 vols.

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  • On Benedictine nuns much will be found in the above-mentioned authorities, and also in Lina Eckenstein, Woman in Monasticism (1896).

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  • In the middle ages it had six churches and four monastic establishments, the oldest a Benedictine nunnery (1170).

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  • At his first appearance in history Guido was a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Pomposa, and it was there that he taught singing and invented his educational method, by means of which, according to his own statement, a pupil might learn within five months what formerly it would have taken him ten years to acquire.

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  • The documents discovered by Dom Germain Morin, the Belgian Benedictine, about 1888, point to the conclusion that Guido was a Frenchman and lived from his youth upwards in the Benedictine monastery of St Maur des Fosses where he invented his novel system of notation and taught the brothers to sing by it.

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  • Bonifacius erected a chapel to St Martin, and founded a Benedictine monastery.

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  • Hardly any remains are left of a great Benedictine abbey, whose buildings at one time included an area of 4 acres.

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  • The first religious settlement in Surrey, a Benedictine abbey, was founded in 666 at Chertsey (Cerotesei, Certesey), the manor of which belonged to the abbot until 1539, since when it has been a possession of the crown.

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  • In 966 Richard I., duke of Normandy, founded in place of the oratory a Benedictine monastery, which in the succeeding century received a considerable share of the spoils of the conquest of England.

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  • In 1622 the Benedictine monks of Mont St Michel were replaced by monks of the Congregation of St Maur.

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  • Other Saxon foundations were the nunneries at Folkestone (630), Lyminge (633; nunnery and monastery), Reculver (669), Minster-in-Thanet (670), Minster-in-Sheppey (675), and the priory of St Martin at Dover (696), all belonging to the Benedictine order.

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  • Some of these were refounded, and the principal monastic remains now existing are those of the Benedictine priories at Rochester (1089), Folkestone (1095), Dover (1140); the Benedictine nunneries at Malling (time of William Rufus),Minster-in-Sheppey (1130), Higham (founded by King Stephen), and Davington (I 153); the Cistercian Abbey at Boxley (1146); the Cluniac abbey at Faversham (1147) and priory at Monks Horton (time of Henry II.), the preceptory of Knights Templars at Swingfield (time of Henry II.); the Premonstratensian abbey of St Radigund's, near Dover (1191); the first house of Dominicans in England at Canterbury (1221); the first Carmelite house in England, at Aylesford (1240); and the priory of Augustinian nuns at Dartford (1355).

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  • Among the natives of Arezzo the most famous are the Benedictine monk Guido of Arezzo, the inventor of the modern system of musical notation (died c. 1050), the poet Petrarch, Pietro Aretino, the satirist (1492-1556), and Vasari, famous for his lives of Italian painters.

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  • The Benedictine abbey of St Blasius was founded in 1063 and dissolved at the Reformation.

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  • More than ten years before Cassiodorus founded his monasteries in the south of Italy, Benedict of Nursia (480-543) had rendered a more permanent service to the cause of scholarship by building, amid the ruins of the temple of Apollo on the crest of Monte Cassino, the earliest of those homes of learning that have lent an undying distinction to the Benedictine order.

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  • Its history is not clear, but a house was founded here by Edward the elder (c. 910), and became a Benedictine nunnery.

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  • Near it are the remains of the old Benedictine monastery of Homburg or Hohenburg, where the emperor Henry IV.

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  • It was attached to a Benedictine priory, founded about the beginning of the 12th century as a cell of St Albans abbey by William de Albini.

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  • The Schloss, built in 1 7571 759 by the abbots of Fulda on the site of a Benedictine monastery founded in 1090, was bestowed, in 1807, by Napoleon upon Marshal Kellermann.

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  • Close by, on an eminence above the river, lies the castle of Oranienstein, formerly a Benedictine nunnery and now a cadet school, with beautiful gardens.

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  • It is an old town still partly surrounded by medieval walls, and its most noteworthy buildings are the Roman Catholic parish church (12th and 13th centuries); the Carmelite church (1318), the former castle, now used for administrative offices; the Evangelical church (1851, enlarged in 1887); and the former Benedictine monastery of the Marienberg, founded 1123 and since 1839 a hydropathic establishment, crowning a hill Too ft.

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  • In the garden of the château are two ancient towers, probably the remains of the Benedictine convent, but ascribed by local tradition to the knight Kolostuj, the legendary discoverer of the springs.

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  • He subsequently founded, near the castle, the Benedictine priory of St John, which he endowed and constituted a cell of Battle Abbey.

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  • The town, which for long was a mere village, owed its origin to the founding of a large Benedictine monastery, with its church, the seat of the metropolitan archbishop of Sicily.'

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  • Few great towns in Italy were without their Benedictine convent, and they quickly rose in all the great centres of population in England, France and Spain.

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  • We have no existing examples of the earlier monasteries of the Benedictine order.

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  • As elucidated by Professor Willis,' it exhibits the plan of a great Benedictine monastery in the 12th century, and enables us to compare it with that of the 9th as seen at St Gall.

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  • We see in both the same general principles of arrangement, which indeed belong to all Benedictine monasteries, enabling us to determine with precision the disposition of the various buildings, when little more than fragments of the walls exist.

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  • Westminster Abbey is another example of a great Benedictine abbey, identical in its general arrangements, so far as they can be traced, with those described above.

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  • St Mary's Abbey, York, of which the ground-plan is annexed, exhibits the usual Benedictine arrangements.

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  • Some Benedictine houses display exceptional arrangements, dependent upon local circumstances, e.g.

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  • Its rigid rule was adopted by a vast number of the old Benedictine abbeys, who placed themselves in affiliation to the mother society, while new foundations sprang up in large numbers, all owing allegiance to the "archabbot," established at Cluny.

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  • They show several departures from the Benedictine arrangement.

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  • The rigid self-abnegation, which was the ruling principle of this reformed congregation of the Benedictine order, extended itself to the churches and other buildings erected by them.

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  • The position of the refectory is usually a marked point of difference between Benedictine and Cistercian abbeys.

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  • On the south side of the cloister we have the remains of the old refectory (II), running, as in Benedictine houses, from east to west, and the new refectory (12), which, with the increase of the inmates of the house, superseded it, stretching, as is usual in Cistercian houses, from north to south.

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  • The annexed plan of the Abbey of St Augustine's at Bristol, now the cathedral church of that city, shows the arrangement of the buildings, which departs very little from the ordinary Benedictine type.

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  • It was enriched by Charles the Bald with two castles, and a Benedictine abbey dedicated to Saint Corneille, the monks of which retained down to the 18th century the privilege of acting for three days as lords of Compiegne, with full power to release prisoners, condemn the guilty, and even inflict sentence of death.

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  • The town owes its origin to a Benedictine abbey, which was founded in the 7th century, and at one time it was a free city of the empire.

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  • The church of St Mary and St Aldhelm, standing high, is a majestic fragment consisting of the greater part of the nave (with aisles) of a Benedictine abbey church.

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  • The Benedictine rule was taken as the basis of the life, but was supplemented by regulations notably increasing the austerities practised.

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  • At the age of fourteen he received the Benedictine habit in the monastery of Liessies in Hainaut, of which he became abbot in 1530.

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  • To the three original volumes of the Latin Glossarium, three supplementary volumes were added by the Benedictines of St Maur (Paris, 1733-1736), and a further addition of four volumes (Paris, 1766), by a Benedictine, Pierre Carpentier (1697-1767).

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  • The basis of the life was the Benedictine rule, but the observance of abstinence and silence went beyond it in stringency.

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  • Learning his letters first from the parish priest, he was sent at an early age to the claustral school at Evesham and thence, in his eighteenth year, to Gloucester Hall, Oxford, as a Benedictine student.

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  • Among ecclesiastical buildings are remains of two monastic foundations - the priory of St Botolph, founded early in the 12th century for Augustinian canons, of which part of the fine Norman west front (in which Roman bricks occur), and of the nave arcades remain; and the restored gateway of the Benedictine monastery of St John, founded by Eudo, steward to William II.

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  • Soon he entered a monastery on the lake of Como, and before 782 he had become an inmate of the great Benedictine house of Monte Cassino, where he made the acquaintance of Charlemagne.

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  • As an example, we may refer to the small religious house of St Mary Magdalene's, a cell of the great Benedictine house of St Mary's, York, in the valley of the Witham, to the south-east of the city of Lincoln.

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  • These Cluniac obedientiae differed from the ordinary Benedictine cells in being also places of punishment, to which monks who had been guilty of any grave infringement of the rules were relegated as to a kind of penitentiary.

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  • St Canute's cathedral, formerly connected with the great Benedictine monastery of the same name, is one of the largest and finest buildings of its kind in Denmark.

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  • It has two Evangelical churches, of which the Nikolai-kirche, dating in its present form from 1485, is a handsome edifice; a medieval town hall, a former Benedictine nunnery and a monument to Luther.

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  • In 1177 they were confirmed as a religious order of knighthood under Benedictine rule by Pope Alexander III.

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  • Herford owes its origin to a Benedictine nunnery which is said to have been founded in 832, and was confirmed by the emperor Louis the Pious in 839.

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  • Hersfeld owes its existence to the Benedictine abbey (see below).

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  • The Benedictine abbey of Hersfeld was founded by Lullus, afterwards archbishop of Mainz, about 769.

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  • Andreas Gordon (1712-1751) of Erfurt, a Scotch Benedictine monk, first used a glass cylinder in place of a sphere.

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  • In 1140 a Benedictine monastery was founded here by Ralph Boteler of Oversley, and received the name of the Church of Our Lady of the Isle, owing to its insulation by a moat meeting the river Arrow.

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  • It has to be emphasized at the outset that the monasteries in which the Benedictine rule was the basis of the life did not form a body or group apart within the great " monastic order," which embraced all monasteries of whatever rule; nor had Benedictine monks any special work or object beyond that common to all monks - viz.

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  • The steps in the propagation of the Benedictine rule are traced in the article Benedictines.

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  • The Benedictine rule supplanted the Irish so inevitably that the personnel ceased to be Irish, that even in St Columban's own monastery of Luxeuil his rule was no longer observed, and by Charlemagne's time all remembrance of any other monastic rule than the Benedictine had died out.

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  • During the 7th and 8th centuries the Benedictine houses were the chief instrument in the christianizing, civilizing and educating of the Teutonic races.

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  • In spite of the frequent pillage and destruction of monasteries by Northmen, Saracens, Arabs and other invaders; in spite of the existence of even widespread local abuses, St Benedict's institute went on progressing and consolidating; and on the whole it may be said that throughout the early middle ages the general run of Benedictine houses continued to perform with substantial fidelity the religious and social functions for which they were created.

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  • The Benedictine houses never coalesced in this manner; even when, later on, a system of national congregations was introduced, they were but loose federations of autonomous abbeys; so that to this day, though the convenient expression " Benedictine order " is frequently used, the Benedictines do not form an order in the proper sense of the word.

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  • The first order was that of Cluny, founded in 910; in rule and manner of life it continued purely Benedictine, and it wielded extraordinary power and religious influence up to the middle of the 12th century.

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  • The Vallombrosians (1038) near Florence maintained a cenobitical life, but eliminated every element of Benedictine life that was not devoted to pure contemplation.

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  • In the German lands, the lowest level was touched, and the writings of the Augustinian canon Johann Busch, and of the Benedictine abbot Trithemius reveal a state of things in the first half of the 15th century that urgently called for reform.

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  • In the West the Benedictine nuns played a great part in the Christian settlement of north-western Europe.

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  • Emperors and kings and the most illustrious men in church and state were commonly confraters of one or other of the great Benedictine abbeys.

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  • He was educated in a school attached to a Benedictine monastery at Augsburg, and in 1865 entered the Bavarian army as a lieutenant in a cavalry regiment.

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  • The Benedictine Rule was taken as the basis of the life; but austerities were introduced beyond what St Benedict prescribed, and the government was framed on the mendicant, not the monastic, model, the superiors being appointed only for a short term of years.

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  • The Benedictine abbey of Kempten, said to have been founded in 773 by Hildegarde, the wife of Charlemagne, was an important house.

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  • He was buried at the monastery and is accounted a saint by the Benedictine order.

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  • In 1043 she persuaded her husband to build and endow a Benedictine monastery at Coventry.

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  • Her mark, Ego Godiva Comitissa diu istud desideravi," was found on the charter given by her brother, Thorold of Bucknall - sheriff of Lincolnshire - to the Benedictine monastery of Spalding in 1051; and she is commemorated as benefactress of other monasteries at Leominster, Chester, Wenlock, Worcester and Evesham.

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  • Six miles to the south is the large Benedictine monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore, founded in 1320, famous for the frescoes by Luca Signorelli (1497-1498) and Antonio Bazzi, called Sodoma (1505), in the cloister, illustrating scenes from the legend of St Benedict; the latter master's work is perhaps nowhere better represented than here.

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  • Suppressed at the revolution, it was established as a Benedictine monastery in 1830.

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  • A Benedictine cell was founded here at the close of the 12th century by the lord of the manor, Richard Fitz-Roger.

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  • But its twin towers, known as the Sisters from the tradition that they were built by a Benedictine abbess of Faversham in memory of her sister, were preserved by Trinity House as a conspicuous landmark.

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  • In the neighbourhood is the fine mansion of Audley End, built by Thomas, 1st earl of Suffolk, in 1603 on the ruins of the abbey, converted in 11 9 0 from a Benedictine priory founded by Geoffrey de Mandeville in 1136.

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  • After an unhappy childhood, he studied at Heidelberg, and at the age of twenty entered the Benedictine monastery of Sponheim near Kreuznach, of which, in 1485, he became abbot.

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  • Founded about 1140 by Hugh de Morville, lord of Cunninghame, for Tyronensian monks of the Benedictine order, it was dedicated to St Winnin, who lived on the spot in the 8th century and has given his name to the town.

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  • He placed her for a couple of years in a Benedictine convent in Assisi, until the convent at St Damian's, close to the town, was ready.

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  • In the principal square are the Benedictine church, built at the end of the 13th century and restored in the 15th century, and the town hall, completed in 1894.

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  • Sweyn, in 1020, having destroyed the older monastery and ejected the secular priests, built a Benedictine abbey on its site.

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  • He became a Benedictine monk at Canterbury, and then joining the Cluniacs, was prior of Lenton Abbey, near Nottingham; he was chaplain to Henry V., whom he accompanied to France in 1415, being present at Agincourt.

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  • The college of St Martin for twenty-two secular canons, which had been established in the castle in 696, was removed into the town in the beginning of the 8th century, and in 1139 became a Benedictine priory under the jurisdiction of that at Canterbury, to which see the lands are still attached.

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  • Notable among its seven churches (six Roman Catholic) are the Kloster-Kirche (monasterial), a beautiful Gothic edifice with the sarcophagus of Maria of Brabant, and that of the former Benedictine abbey, Heilig-Kreuz, with a lofty tower.

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  • At the age of twenty he took the vows of the Benedictine order at the abbey of Ste Melaine, Rennes, and afterwards taught rhetoric and philosophy in several monasteries.

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  • It is the seat of the provincial authorities, and has three churches, a court of appeal, a Roman Catholic gymnasium, which was formerly the Benedictine abbey of Weddinghausen, a library, a normal school and a chamber of commerce.

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  • Of other buildings may be mentioned the Library, with upwards of 80,000 printed books and many valuable MSS., the stately palace with its gardens and orangery, the former Benedictine nunnery (founded 1625, and now used as a seminary), and the Minorite friary (1238) now used as a furniture warehouse.

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  • The great Benedictine abbey of Fulda occupies the place in the ecclesiastical history of Germany which Monte Cassino holds in Italy, St Gall in South Germany, Corvey in Saxony, Tours in France and Iona in Scotland.

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  • Early in the 10th century the monastery was reformed by introducing monks from Scotland, who were responsible for restoring in its old strictness the Benedictine rule.

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  • After entering the Benedictine order and teaching at the university of Paris from 1435 to 1438, he became almoner to Philip the Good, duke of Burgundy, who entrusted him with diplomatic missions in France, Italy, Portugal and Castile.

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  • Two miles to the east in a ravine below Monte Subasio is the hermitage delle Carceri (2300 ft.), partly built, partly cut out of the solid rock, given to St Francis by Benedictine monks as a place of retirement.

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  • It embraced an establishment for monks and (until the Conquest) for nuns of the Benedictine order, and under Hilda, a grand-niece of Edwin, a former king of Northumbria, acquired high celebrity.

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  • Thanks to the reverent charity of the laymen, they do not live much worse than Benedictine monks.

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  • The "dolce libriccino," the famous Trattato utilissimo del beneficio di Gesu Christo crocifisso verso i christiani, which was the composition of a Sicilian Benedictine and had been touched up by the great latinist Flaminio, just appeared at Mantua in 1542 under the auspices of Morone, and had a wide circulation (over 40,000 copies of the second edition, Venice 1543, were sold).

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  • He was educated at the Dominican gymnasium of his native town, and in 1790 entered, as a novice, the Benedictine abbey of Marienmiinster, in the bishopric of Paderborn.

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  • His Benedictine name was Leander.

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  • There is a Benedictine monastery on a small island opposite to Perasto (Perast), 8 m.

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  • A Benedictine monastery was founded (c. 1 i 50) by Hamon de Mascy, third baron of Dunham Massey, and dedicated to St Mary and St James.

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  • There are several extant specimens of 12th-century Breviaries, all Benedictine, but under Innocent III.

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  • This was inaugurated by Montalembert, but its literary advocates were chiefly Dom Gueranger, a learned Benedictine monk, abbot of Solesmes, and Louis Francois Veuillot (1813-1883) of the Univers; and it succeeded in suppressing them everywhere, the last diocese to surrender being Orleans in 1875.

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  • From this date to the Reformation the monastery, one of the chief Benedictine abbeys in England, continued to flourish, the chief events in its history being connected with the maintenance of its claims to the possession of the bodies or tombs of King Arthur and St Dunstan.

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  • He was educated at Downside College, Bath, afterwards becoming superior of the Downside Benedictine monastery (1878-1884).

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  • Of the ancient Benedictine abbey, the only remains are a part of a gateway, a lodge (a beautiful Perpendicular relic) and some buttresses, while some broken stone arches and walls remain of the conventual buildings.

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  • The oldest and most important of the eight convents at Salzburg is the Benedictine abbey of St Peter founded by St Rupert as the nucleus of the city.

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  • From a Franciscan he became a Benedictine, and from Fontenay he moved to Maillezais, of which Geoffroy d'Estissac was bishop. But even this learned and hospitable retreat did not apparently satisfy Rabelais.

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  • In or before 1530 he left Maillezais, abandoned his Benedictine garb for that of a secular priest, and, as he himself puts it in his subsequent Supplicatio pro Apostasia to Pope Paul III., "per seculum diu vagatus fait."

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  • The Protestant church of St Stephen (1782-1789) originally belonged to a Benedictine abbey.

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  • Jean Bodin wrote the first treatise on scientific history (Methodus ad facilem historiarum cognitionem, 1566), but he did not apply his own principles of criticism; and it was left for the Benedictine monks of the Congregation of St Maur to establish definitely the new science.

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  • During the middle ages it was famous for its great Benedictine abbey, which was founded and endowed by the emperor Louis the Pious about 820, and received its name from having been first occupied by a body of monks coming from Corbie in Picardy.

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  • Being confined to fundamental principles without entering into details, it has proved itself admirably suited to form the foundation of the religious life of the most varied orders and congregations, and since the 12th century it has proved more prolific than the Benedictine Rule.

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  • There is not only no room in history for this Median king of the Book of Daniel, but it is also highly likely that the interpolation of "Darius the Mede" was caused by a confusion of history, due both to the destruction of the Assyrian capital Nineveh by the Medes, sixty-eight years before the capture of Babylon by Cyrus, and also to the fame of the later king, Darius Hystaspis, a view which was advanced as early in the history of biblical criticism as the days of the Benedictine monk, Marianus Scotus.

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  • The village of Tegernsee (pop. 1742 in 1905), on the east bank, has a parish church dating from the 15th century, a ducal castle which was formerly a Benedictine monastery, and a hospital, founded in connexion with the large ophthalmic practice of the late Duke Charles Theodore of Bavaria.

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  • Adjoining the priory was St Mary's Benedictine nunnery, St James's church (1792) marking the site, and preserving in its vaults some of the ancient monuments.

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  • Westminster was a Benedictine foundation.

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  • The monastic remains in Bedfordshire include the fine fragment of the church of the Augustinian priory at Dunstable, serving as the parish church; the church (also imperfect) of Elstow near Bedford, which belonged to a Benedictine nunnery founded by Judith, niece of William the Conqueror; and portions of the Gilbertine Chicksands Priory and of a Cistercian foundation at Old Warden.

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  • As a dependency of the Benedictine abbey of Limburg, which was built and endowed by Conrad II., Di rkheim or Thurnigheim came into the possession of the counts of Leiningen, who in the 14th century made it the seat of a fortress, and enclosed it with wall and ditch.

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  • The ruins of the Benedictine abbey of Limburg lie about 1 m.

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  • It is the seat of St Bede College (Roman Catholic, opened in 1891), conducted by Benedictine fathers.

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  • He was educated at Freiburg in the Breisgau, at Klingenau in Switzerland and at the Benedictine abbey of St Blasien in the Black Forest, where in 1737 he took the vows.

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  • As a prince of the Empire Gerbert was devoted to the interests of the house of Austria; as a Benedictine abbot he was opposed to Joseph II.'s church policy.

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  • The ceremony of the formal admission of a Benedictine abbot in medieval times is thus prescribed by the consuetudinary of Abingdon.

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  • At the age of seventeen he joined the Benedictine order, and in 1698 was appointed to teach theology and philosophy at the abbey of Moyen-Moutier.

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  • The relations between the famous Benedictine abbey and the English court both before and after the Conquest were of an intimate character.

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  • Weissenburg grew up round a Benedictine abbey which was founded in the 7th century by Dagobert II.

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  • To the northwest of the town is the Gothic church of a former Benedictine monastery, dating from 1514-1525, with a tower of 1897.

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  • In 1539 the Reformation was introduced, and in 1546 the Benedictine monastery, founded about 1136 by the emperor Lothair II.

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  • Under the influence of Queen Margaret in 1075 the foundations were laid of the Benedictine priory, which was raised to the rank of an abbey by David I.

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  • The hotel de ville, which contains a museum and the municipal library, occupies the former bishop's palace, designed by Jules Mansart in the 17th century; the Romanesque tower beside it is the only survival of an old Benedictine abbey.

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  • Castres grew up round a Benedictine abbey, which is believed to have been founded in the 7th century.

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  • Near the town is the site of the Benedictine abbey of Weihenstephan, which existed from 725 to 1803.

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  • The abbey of Furness, otherwise Furdenesia or the further nese (promontory), which was dedicated to St Mary, was founded in 1127 by a small body of monks belonging to the Benedictine order of Savigny.

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  • The rule followed at first was that attributed to St Anthony; but when they settled in the West modifications from the Benedictine rule were introduced, and the Mechitharists are numbered among the lesser orders affiliated to the Benedictines.

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  • Essen was originally the seat of a Benedictine nunnery, and was formed into a town about the middle of the 10th century by the abbess Hedwig.

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  • Left fatherless at an early age, he was educated under the care of his uncle, a Camaldolese monk, who in 1627 sent him to Rome to study science under the Benedictine Benedetto Castelli (1577-1644), professor of mathematics at the Collegio, di Sapienza.

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  • Bernay grew up round the Benedictine abbey mentioned above, and early in the 13th century was the seat of a viscount.

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  • The splendid Benedictine monastery of Melk and the ruins of Di rrenstein, the prison of Richard Coeur de Lion, are among the most interesting.

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  • Benedictine foundations existed at Ikanho, Barrow, Bardney, Partney and Crowland as early as the 7th century, but all were destroyed in the Danish wars, and only Bardney and Crowland were ever rebuilt.

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  • The revival of monasticism after the Conquest resulted in the erection of ten Benedictine monasteries, and a Benedictine nunnery at Stainfield.

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  • The Benedictine Mitred Abbey of Crowland (q.v.) was founded 716, and refounded in 948.

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  • Clausthal was founded about the middle of the 12th century in consequence probably of the erection of a Benedictine monastery (closed in 1431), remains of which still exist in Zellerfeld.

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  • In December 1613 a Benedictine monk named Benedetto Castelli, at that time professor of mathematics at the university of Pisa, wrote to inform Galileo of a recent discussion at the grandducal table, in which he had been called upon to defend the Copernican doctrine against theological objections.

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  • The present archbishop's palace, adjoining the cathedral, occupies the site of an old Benedictine convent.

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  • The church of St Peter is principally Decorated; and there are fragments of a Benedictine convent founded in the 10th century and rebuilt after fire in the first half of the 14th.

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  • The town contains the ruins of the Benedictine abbey of St Ludger, which was secularized iro 1803.

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  • At Coggs, in the water-meadows bordering the river immediately below Witney, a priory was attached to the Benedictine Priory of Fecamp, and of this there are Early English remains in the vicarage, while the church is mainly Decorated.

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  • He introduced the Benedictine rule, and secured the right of the election of the abbot to the monks themselves.

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  • He died on the 26th of December 1707, in the midst of the production of the colossal Benedictine Annals.

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  • It has an interesting Roman Catholic church which belonged to the Benedictine abbey founded about 800 by St Ludger, whose stone coffin is preserved in the crypt.

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  • Werden grew up around the Benedictine abbey, which was dissolved in 1802.

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  • Evesham is a place of considerable antiquity, a Benedictine house having been founded here by St Egwin in the 8th century.

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  • Evesham (Homme, Ethomme) grew up around the Benedictine abbey, and had evidently become of some importance as a trading centre in 1055, when Edward the Confessor gave it a market and the privileges of a commercial town.

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  • Born at Lydgate, Suffolk, John Lydgate entered the Benedictine abbey of Bury St Edmunds at fifteen.

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  • The Benedictine abbeys which line the route are all worth a look.

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  • That undoubtedly reflected his background as a Benedictine abbot, for he regarded the Rule of St Benedict as the rule of his life.

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  • Since 1657 it has been served by monks of the English Benedictine congregation.

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  • The main buildings of the Benedictine convent occupied the site of the Grainger Market.

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  • Ince Manor was a medieval monastic grange, at the center of an estate held by the Benedictine Abbey of St Werburgh, Chester.

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  • The king, ashamed, gave him some of his land, on which later a Benedictine monastery was built.

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  • It was founded by Aelred Carlyle, an Anglo-Catholic who was determined to restore Benedictine monasticism in the Anglican church.

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  • This house was given to the Benedictine monks of Caldey Abbey in 1928.

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  • Near the Benedictine Abbey, a historic monument in the form of a cross can be admired.

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  • First he went to Rome; then he became organist to a community of English Benedictine nuns in Brussels.

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  • This was the church of a great Benedictine nunnery founded in Anglo-Saxon times on the river Test.

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  • In the 12th century a Benedictine priory, formed with monks from Evesham Abbey, was founded.

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  • Giovanni Evangelista, which was founded along with the Benedictine monastery in 981, but as a building dates from 1510, and has a façade erected by Simone Moschino early in the 17th century.

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  • The finding of the remains of the saint in 18J3 afforded striking confirmation of an incident recorded by a Spanish Benedictine named Haedo, who published a topography of Algeria in 1612.

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  • No people were more bountiful to ecclesiastical bodies on both sides of the Channel; the foundation of a Benedictine monastery in the i Ith century, of a Cistercian monastery in the 12th seemed almost a matter of course on the part of a Norman baron.

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  • It is shown likewise upon a number of maps which illustrate the Commentaries on the Apocalypse, by Beatus, a Benedictine monk of the abbey of Valcavado at the foot of the hills of Liebana in Asturia (776).

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  • There may be mentioned also an early pier in the church of St Katherine Cree or Christ Church, Leadenhall Street, belonging to the priory church of the Holy Trinity; old monuments in the vaults beneath St James's Church, Clerkenwell, formerly attached to a Benedictine nunnery; and the Perpendicular gateway and the crypt of the church of the priory of St John of Jerusalem (see Finsbury).

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  • What has here to be traced is the history of the great body of Benedictine monasteries that held aloof from these separatist movements.

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  • Nauvoo is the seat of St Mary's Academy and Spalding Institute (,907), two institutions of the Benedictine Sisters.

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  • In the garden of the château are two ancient towers, probably the remains of the Benedictine convent, but ascribed by local tradition to the knight Kolostuj, the legendary discoverer of the springs.

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  • The buildings of a Benedictine abbey were uniformly arranged after one lan modified where Y g P necessary (as at Durham and Worcester, where the monasteries, stand close to the steep bank of a river) to accommodate the arrangement to local circumstances.

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  • It is evidently planned in compliance with the Benedictine rule, which enjoined that, if possible, the monastery should contain within itself every necessary of life, as well as the buildings more intimately connected with the religious and social life of its inmates.

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  • Thanks to the reverent charity of the laymen, they do not live much worse than Benedictine monks; and the prohibition to live in houses does not extend to caves.

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  • In accordance with this boast, in February 1687 he issued a mandate directing that Father Alban Francis, a Benedictine monk, should be admitted a master of arts of the university of Cambridge, without taking the oaths of allegiance and supremacy.

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  • Benedictine University offers a Master of Education program in reading and literacy.

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  • Many river cruises stop in the Benedictine Abbey located at the shore to the entrance into Melk.

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  • One such company, is the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration.

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  • Communion wafers of the Benedictine Sisters are not totally gluten free.

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  • The earliest mention of the Chamonix Valley was in the 11th century when it became home to a large Benedictine abbey.

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  • Of a Benedictine abbey dedicated to the same saints there remain a gatehouse and lodge, and a fine doorway.

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  • In 1002 Wulfric, earl of Mercia, founded here a Benedictine abbey, and by charter of 1004 granted to it the town with other large endowments.

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  • It is, however, with the Benedictine abbey of Bury St Edmunds that he is chiefly associated.

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  • The church of St Mary and St German belonged to a Benedictine abbey founded under a grant from William the Conqueror in 1069 and raised to the dignity of a mitred abbey by Pope Alexander II.

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  • Giovanni Evangelista, which was founded along with the Benedictine monastery in 981, but as a building dates from 1510, and has a façade erected by Simone Moschino early in the 17th century.

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  • Educated at the neighbouring Benedictine abbey of Cerne and at Balliol College, Oxford, he graduated in law, and followed that profession in the ecclesiastical courts in London, where he attracted the notice of Archbishop Bourchier.

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  • There are a theological college for Redemptorists, and a Benedictine convent, dedicated to St Scholastica.

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  • St Rambert, in the arrondissement of Belley, besides being of industrial importance for its manufactures of silk and paper, possesses the remains of a Benedictine abbey, powerful in the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries.

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  • Of a Benedictine abbey there remain a beautiful Perpendicular gateway, and ruins of buildings called the prior's house, mainly Early English, and the guest house, with other fragments.

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  • The place suffered greatly from the earthquake of 1638, which also destroyed the Benedictine abbey of S Eufemia, founded by Robert Guiscard.

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  • The Michaelskirche, 12th-century Romanesque (restored), on the Michaelsberg, was formerly the church of a Benedictine monastery secularized in 1803, which now contains the Biirgerspital, or alms-house, and the museum and municipal art collections.

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  • The death of his patron in 1513 apparently put an end to his connexion with the west, and he became a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Ely.

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  • He died on the 6th of December 1352, and was buried in the Benedictine abbey at Auvergne, but his tomb was destroyed by Calvinists in 1562.

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  • In the Industrial Museum there is (besides collections of various kinds) some good painted glass of the 16th century, taken from the neighbouring Benedictine monastery of Muri (founded 1027, suppressed 1841 - the monks, are now quartered at Gries, near Botzen, in Tirol).

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  • In 978 Bishop Wulfsey introduced the stricter form of Benedictine rule into his cathedral of Sherborne, and became the first abbot.

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  • The buildings of the Benedictine abbey, founded in 1066, are now used as a prison.

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  • In 1507 he took up his residence in the Benedictine Abbey of St Germain des Pres, near Paris; this was due to his connexion with the family of Brigonnet (one of whom was the superior), especially with William Brigonnet, cardinal bishop of St Malo (Meaux).

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  • There are traces of monastic buildings near the church, for it belonged to a Benedictine house of early Norman foundation.

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  • The Benedictine abbey, founded in 1095, was used after the Reformation as a school, and is now an Evangelical theological seminary.

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  • One of the most ancient towns in Thuringia, Saalfeld, once the capital of the extinct duchy of Saxe-Saalfeld, is still partly surrounded by old walls and bastions, and contains some interesting medieval buildings, among them being a palace,, built in 1679 on the site of the Benedictine abbey of St Peter, which was destroyed during the Peasants' War.

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  • John Pits 1 says, but apparently without authority, that he became a Benedictine monk.

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  • Gladbach existed before the time of Charlemagne, and a Benedictine monastery was founded near it in 793.

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  • As soon as Ignatius had regained strength, he started ostensibly to rejoin the duke of Nagera, but in reality to visit the great Benedictine abbey of Montserrato, a famous place of pilgrimage.

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  • The great Benedictine monastery of Black Monks was situated away from the city at Westminster, and it was the only monastic house subject to the rule of St Benedict in the neigh roofing tenements.

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