Benedict sentence example

benedict
  • He was beatified by Benedict XIII.
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  • He was made cardinal-priest of Sti Nereo ed Achilleo and administrator of the bishopric of Avignon by Benedict XII.
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  • He arrived at the abbey just about the feast of St Benedict (the 21st of March 1522), and there made a confession of his life to a priest belonging to the monastery.
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  • He may be reckoned the most illustrious pope since Benedict XIV., and under him the papacy acquired a prestige unknown since the middle ages.
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  • The monastery of Wearmouth was founded by Benedict Biscop in 674, and that of Jarrow in 681-682.
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  • Abandoned by almost all his adherents Benedict found refuge in the castle of Peniscola on an impregnable rock overlooking the Mediterranean, and remained intractable.
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  • He was a saint up till the time of Benedict XIV., who read Photius on Clement, believed him, and struck the Alexandrian's name out of the calendar.
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  • From 1415 it was the home of the schismatic pope Benedict XIII.
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  • (Lorenzo Corsini), pope from 1730 to 1740, succeeded Benedict XIII.
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  • He died on the 6th of February 1740, and was succeeded by Benedict XIV.
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  • Among the most illustrious natives of Bologna may be noted Luigi Galvani (1737-1798), the discoverer of galvanism, and Prospero Lambertini (Pope Benedict XIV.).
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  • The Latino-barbaric word Olibanum (quasi Oleum Libani), the common name for frankincense in modern commerce, is used in a bull of Pope Benedict IX.
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  • The great Benedictine monastery of Black Monks was situated away from the city at Westminster, and it was the only monastic house subject to the rule of St Benedict in the neigh roofing tenements.
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  • In 675 Benedict Biscop, abbot of Wearmouth, was obliged to obtain glass-workers from France, and in 758 Cuthbert, abbot of Jarrow, appealed to the bishop of Mainz to send him artisans to manufacture " windows and vessels of glass, because the English were ignorant and helpless."
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  • Except for the statement in Bede that the French artisans, sent by Benedict Biscop, taught their craft to the English, there is at present no evidence of glass having been made in England between the Roman period and the 13th century.
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  • She was canonized in 1746 by Benedict XIV., who fixed her festal day on the 13th of February.
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  • A successor was found for him in his nephew Benedict IX., a boy of only twelve years of age.
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  • He was chosen king of the Lombards at Pavia, and crowned emperor at Rome in February 9 01 by Pope Benedict IV.
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  • (Piero Francesco Orsini), pope from 1724 to 1730, at first styled Benedict XIV., was born on the 2nd of February 1649, of the ducal family of Orsini-Gravina.
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  • (Carlo della Torre Rezzonico), pope from 1758 to 1769, was born in Venice, on the 7th of March 1693, filled various important posts in the Curia, became cardinal in 1737, bishop of Padua in 1743, and succeeded Benedict XIV.
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  • At the outbreak of the War of Independence he abandoned the study of medicine to enter the American army, and he served with General Benedict Arnold in the Quebec campaign and was later under General Horatio Gates, acting from May 1777 to March 1778 as adjutant-general of the Northern Department.
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  • Bavarian For clerical accounts of Charles's voyage to the Holy Land see the Chronicon (c. 968) of Benedict, a monk of St Andre, and Descriptio qualiter Karolus Magnus clavum et coronam Domini.
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  • The only other surviving document of the 12th century bearing on this subject is a letter of which MS. copies are preserved in the Cambridge and Paris libraries, and which is also embedded in the chronicles of several English annalists, including Benedict of Peterborough, Roger Hovedon and Matthew Paris.
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  • Within four years there rose upon its site a pile of stately buildings under the title of St Benedict's Abbey and school, a monastic and collegiate institution intended for the higher education of the sons of the Roman Catholic nobility and gentry.
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  • Simultaneously with these proceedings in Bohemia, negotiations had been going on for the removal of the long-continued papal schism, and it had become apparent that a satisfactory solution could only be secured if, as seemed not impossible, the supporters of the rival popes, Benedict XIII.
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  • It is usually said that, at the synod which deposed Benedict, Leo conceded to the emperor and his successors as sovereign of Italy full rights of investiture, but the genuineness of the document on which this allegation rests is more than doubtful.
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  • Subiaco in the Abruzzi was the cradle of the Benedictines, and in that neighbourhood St Benedict established twelve monasteries.
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  • These fourteen are the only monasteries of which we have any knowledge as being founded before St Benedict's death; for the mission of St Placidus to Sicily must certainly be regarded as mere romance, nor does there seem to be any solid reason for viewing more favourably the mission of St Maurus to Gaul.
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  • There is some ground for believing that it was the third-abbot of Monte Cassino who began to spread a knowledge of the Rule beyond the circle of St Benedict's own foundations.
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  • The first of these movements arose during the Carolingian revival (c. 800), and is associated with the name of Benedict of Aniane.
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  • The scheme as a whole was shortlived and did not survive its originator; but the Capitula were commonly recognized as supplying a useful and much-needed supplement to St Benedict's Rule on points not sufficiently provided for therein.
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  • The general tendency of these Benedictine offshoots was in the direction of greater austerity of life than was practised by the Black Monks or contemplated by St Benedict's Rule - some of them were semi-eremitical; the most important by far were the Cistercians, whose ground-idea was to reproduce exactly the life of St Benedict's own monastery.
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  • Fitful attempts were made elsewhere to carry out the decrees, and in 1336 Benedict XII.
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  • In Italy, Spain, Portugal and Brazil only a few monasteries survive the various revolutions, and in a crippled state; but signs are not wanting of renewed life: St Benedict's own monasteries of Subiaco and Monte Cassino are relatively flourishing.
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  • St Gregory describes St Benedict's sister Scholastica as a nun (sanctimonialis), and she is looked upon as the foundress of Benedictine nuns.
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  • The closing episode of the war as far as New York was concerned was the discovery of Benedict Arnold's attempt in 1780 to betray West Point and other colonial posts on the Hudson to the British.
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  • The popes encouraged these centralizing tendencies; and in 1339 Benedict XII.
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  • Our only authority for the facts of St Benedict's life is bk.
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  • A precise chronology and a pedigree have been supplied for Benedict, according to which he was born in 480, of the great family of the Anicii; but all we know is what St Gregory tells us, that he was born of good family in Nursia, near Spoleto in Umbria.
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  • No one who has seen the spot will doubt that the Sacro Speco is indeed the cave wherein Benedict spent the three years of opening manhood in solitary prayer, contemplation and austerity.
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  • In order to understand St Benedict's character and spirit, and to discover the secret of the success of his institute, it is necessary, as St Gregory says, to turn to his Rule.
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  • The relation of St Benedict's Rule to earlier monastic rules, and of his institute to the prevailing monachism of his day, is explained in the article Monasticism.
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  • The "reading" in St Benedict's time was probably confined to the Bible and the Fathers.
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  • The "work" contemplated by St Benedict was ordinarily field work, as was natural in view of the conditions of the time and best suited to the majority of the monks; but the principle laid down is that the monks should do whatever work is most useful.
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  • We have seen St Benedict evangelizing the pagan population round Monte Cassino; and a considerable time each day is assigned to the reading of the Fathers.
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  • Though it has resisted all attempts to reduce it to an ordered scheme, and probably was not written on any set plan, still it is possible roughly to indicate its contents: after the prologue and introductory chapter setting forth St Benedict's intention, follow instructions to the abbot on the manner in which he should govern his monastery (2, 3); next comes the ascetical portion of the Rule, on the chief monastic virtues (4-7); then the regulations for the celebration of the canonical office, which St Benedict calls "the Work of God" or "the divine work," his monks' first duty, "of which nothing is to take precedence" (8-20); faults and punishments (23-30); the cellarer and property of the monastery (31,32); community of goods (33, 34); various officials and daily life (21, 22, 35-57); reception of monks (58-61); miscellaneous (62-73).
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  • The most remarkable chapters, in which St Benedict's wisdom stands out most conspicuously, are those on the abbot (2, 3, 2 7, 64) The abbot is to govern the monastery with full and unquestioned patriarchal authority; on important matters he must consult the whole community and hear what each one, even the youngest, thinks; on matters of less weight he should consult a few of the elder monks; but in either case the decision rests entirely with him, and all are to acquiesce.
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  • On St Benedict's life and Rule see Montalembert, Monks of the West, bk.
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  • Benedict made appointments carefully, reformed monastic orders and consistently opposed nepotism.
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  • The energy of a succession of distinguished abbots and the disciples whom they inspired succeeded in bringing about the victory of the reforming ideas in the French monasteries; once more the rule of St Benedict controlled the life of the monks.
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  • In the first of the new orders, that of the Cistercians (1098), the old monastic ideal set forth in the Rule of Benedict of Nursia still prevailed; but in the constitution and government of the order new ideas were at work.
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  • Aided by a deacon named Benedict, Arno drew up about 788 a catalogue of lands and proprietary rights belonging to the church in Bavaria, under the title of Indiculus or Congestum Arnonis.
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  • More than ten years before Cassiodorus founded his monasteries in the south of Italy, Benedict of Nursia (480-543) had rendered a more permanent service to the cause of scholarship by building, amid the ruins of the temple of Apollo on the crest of Monte Cassino, the earliest of those homes of learning that have lent an undying distinction to the Benedictine order.
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  • The Roman age thus ends in the West with Boethius, Cassiodorus and St Benedict, and in the East with Priscian and Justinian.
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  • When used by St Benedict in the singular number it seems (according to the commentator Menard) to denote the abbot himself.
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  • At a later date in the order of St Benedict the title was applied to the monk next in authority to the abbot, though this usage was not adopted technically until the r3th century.
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  • The proprietors of Maryland were: Cecilius Calvert, second Lord Baltimore (1605[?]-1675) from 1632 to 1675; Charles Calvert, third Lord Baltimore (1629-1715) from 1675 to 1715; Benedict Leonard Calvert, fourth Lord Baltimore (1684?-1715) 1715; Charles Calvert, fifth Lord Baltimore (1699-1751) from 1715 to 1751; Frederick Calvert, sixth and last Lord Baltimore (1731-1771) from 1751 to 1771; Henry Harford, from 1771 to 1776.
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  • Amiatinus, was copied in this way in the time of Ceolfrid, Benedict Biscop's successor, as a present for Pope Gregory in 716.
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  • The first muttering of the storm which was soon to break was heard in a breve issued in 1741 by Benedict XIV., wherein he denounced the Jesuit offenders as "disobedient, contumacious, captious and reprobate persons," and enacted many stringent regulations for their better government.
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  • He next complained to Benedict XIV.
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  • But at this juncture Benedict XIV., the most learned and able pope of the period, was succeeded by a pope strongly in favour of the Jesuits, Clement XIII.
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  • The seventh (Compline, Completorium) was added by Benedict.
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  • Fort Ticonderoga, the key to the passage of Lakes George and Champlain to Canada, was surprised and, taken on the 10th of May by a small band under Colonel Ethan Allen, while Colonel Benedict Arnold headed an expedition through the Maine woods to effect the capture of Quebec, where Sir Guy Carleton commanded.
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  • The year 1780 is also marked by the treason of General Benedict Arnold, and the consequent Long shore with 15,000 troops, increasing the number to Island.
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  • There he found British v detachments, 2000 strong, composed of troops whom Clinton had sent down separately under Generals Benedict Arnold and William Phillips to establish a base in the Chesapeake, as a diversion in favour of the operations of Cornwallis in the Carolinas.
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  • The first religious ardour cooled, the strictness of the rule was relaxed, until by the 10th century the decay of discipline was so complete in France that the monks are said to have been frequently unacquainted with the rule of St Benedict, and even ignorant that they were bound by any rule at all.
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  • Seven months after Charles's return from Scotland Henry secretly departed to Rome and, with the full approval of his father, but to the intense disgust of his brother, was created a cardinal deacon under the title of the cardinal of York by Pope Benedict XIV.
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  • In 1834 an Ursuline Convent, built in 1827 on Mt Benedict, was sacked and destroyed by an anti-Catholic mob.
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  • For all that, St Celestine, during his brief tenure of the papacy, tried to spread his ideas among the Benedictines, and induced the monks of Monte Cassino to adopt his idea of the monastic life instead of St Benedict's; for this purpose fifty Celestine monks were introduced into Monte Cassino, but on Celestine's abdication of the papacy the project fortunately was at once abandoned.
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  • With the help of the Normans, Hildebrand seized the castle of Galeria, where Benedict had taken refuge, and degraded him to the rank of a simple priest.
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  • In Rome, where he restored Pope Benedict VII., he held a splendid court, attended by princes and nobles from all parts of western Europe.
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  • It was under his conduct that Theodore of Tarsus came from Rome to Canterbury in 669, and in the same year Benedict was appointed abbot of St Peter's, Canterbury.
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  • A papal letter in 678 exempted the monastery from external control, and in 682 Benedict erected a sister foundation (St Paul) at Jarrow.
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  • He was not the author of the Histoire ecclesiastique (1580), sometimes ascribed to him; nor, probably, of the vulgar skit published under the name of Benedict Panavantius (1551) .
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  • Benedict died at Perugia on the 7th of July 1304; if he was really poisoned, as report had it, suspicion would fall primarily on Nogaret.
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  • Among Benedict's works are commentaries on part of the Psalms and on the Gospel of.
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  • Measures were here concerted against Pope Benedict, who was driven out of Rome in January 1059, Nicholas II.
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  • The war which ensued between the pope and the king of France ended in the complete defeat of the papacy, which was reduced to impotence (1303), and though the storm ceased during the nine months' pontificate of Benedict XI., the See of St Peter recovered neither its normal equilibrium Papacy nor its traditional character.
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  • Even the following pope, Benedict XII., a man of the strictest morality, failed, in spite of his mild and pacific disposition, to adjust the conflict with Louis of Bavaria and the eccentric Fraticelli.
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  • It was Benedict XII.
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  • This strict and upright pope appears to have taken c Benedict XII.
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  • Later his attitude changed; and the protracted negotiations for a conference with Benedict XIII.
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  • In that country, Benedict it became more and more manifest that Benedict XIII.
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  • In May 1408 France withdrew from his obedience; and it was not long before French policy succeeded in effecting a reconciliation and understanding between the cardinals of Benedict XIII.
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  • The council declared that it was canonically convened, ecumenical, and representative of the whole Catholic Church; then proceeded immediately to the trial and deposition of Benedict XIII.
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  • The p owerful following which Gregory enjoyed in Italy and Germany, and Benedict in Spain and Scotland, ought to have shown from the very first that a simple decree of deposition could never suffice to overthrow the two popes.
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  • No better fared Clement's medieval rights to Parma; nor could the sagacious and popular Benedict XIV.
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  • Thus by 1700 nepotistic plunder had practically ceased, and with the exception of the magnificent peculations of Cardinal Coscia under Benedict (1724-1730), the central administration of finance has been usually considered honest.
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  • Thus Clement XI., at war with Austria in 1708, debased the currency; Clement (1730-1740) issued paper money and set up a government lottery, excommunicating all subjects who put their money into the lotteries of Genoa or Naples; Benedict XIV.
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  • Since the 12th century, the papal court had already had officials known as penitentiaries (poenitentiarii) for matters of conscience; the organization of the Penitentiary, after several modifications, was renewed by Benedict XIV.
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  • At Vienna, in 1702, he picked up the Scottish general George Benedict Ogilvie, and enlisted him in Peter's service.
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  • They were known to St Benedict, who refers his monks to "the Rule of our holy Father Basil," - indeed St Benedict owed more of the ground-ideas of his Rule to St Basil than to any other monastic legislator.
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  • The Order of St Benedict of Aviz (earlier of Evora), founded in 1162 as a religious military order, was secularized in 1789 as an order of military merit, in four classes.
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  • Mexico has abolished its former orders, the Mexican Eagle, 1865, and Our Lady of Guadalupe, 1853; as has Brazil those of the Southern Cross, 1822, Dom Pedro I., 1826, the Rose, 1829, and the Brazilian branches of the Portuguese orders of Christ, St Benedict of Aviz and St James.
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  • He lingered at Avignon; but the French, compelled to hard measures by the English, refused to be satisfied; and Pope Benedict XIV., alarmed by the threat of a bombardment of Civita Vecchia, advised the prince to withdraw.
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  • He laid himself out to diffuse the system, and also to carry out a reform of its abuses by en- forcing a strict observance of the Rule of St Benedict (of whom, it may be noted, he was the earliest biographer).
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  • Boniface escaped from his captors only to die (October 11), and the short pontificate of his saintly successor, Benedict XI., was occupied in a vain effort to restore harmony to the Church.
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  • It was St Benedict who effected a permanently working adaptation of the monastic ideal and life to the requirements and conditions of the western races.
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  • St Benedict (c. 500) effected his purpose by a twofold break with the past: he eliminated from the idea of the monastic life the element of Oriental asceticism and extreme bodily austerity; and he put down the tendency, so marked in Egypt and the East, for the monks to vie with one another in ascetical practices, commanding all to live according to the rule.
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  • St Benedict's rule was a new creation in monastic history; and as it rapidly supplanted all other monastic rules in western Europe, and was for several centuries the only form of monasticism in Latin Christianity (outside of Ireland), it is necessary to speak in some little detail of its spirit and inner character.'
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  • St Benedict defines his monastery as " a school of the service of the lord " (Reg., Prol.).
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  • Work, and in St Benedict's time it was predominantly field work, took an even more recognized and integral place in the life than was the case under St Pachomius or St Basil, occupying notably more time than the church services.
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  • St Benedict introduced too into the monastic life the idea of law and order, of rule binding on the abbot no less than on the monks; thus he reduced almost to a vanishing point the element of arbitrariness, or mere dependence on the abbot's will and whim, found in the earlier rules.
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  • In spite of the frequent pillage and destruction of monasteries by Northmen, Saracens, Arabs and other invaders; in spite of the existence of even widespread local abuses, St Benedict's institute went on progressing and consolidating; and on the whole it may be said that throughout the early middle ages the general run of Benedictine houses continued to perform with substantial fidelity the religious and social functions for which they were created.
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  • In all these lesser orders may be discerned the tendency of a return to the elements of Eastern monasticism discarded by St Benedict - to the eremitical life; to the purely contemplative life with little or no factor of work; to the undertaking of rigorous bodily austerities and penances - it was at this time that the practice of self-inflicted scourgings as a penitential exercise was introduced.
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  • All this was a reaction from St Benedict's reconstruction of the monastic life - a reaction which in the matter of austerities .nd individualistic piety has made itself increasingly felt in the later manifestations of the monastic ideal in the West.
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  • It is a curious coincidence that the sister of each of the three great cenobitical founders, Pachomius, Basil and Benedict, was a nun and ruled a community of nuns according to an adaptation of her brother's rule for monks.
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  • Hither St Benedict migrated from Subiaco in the early years of the 6th century, and established the monastery that became the metropolis of Western monachism.
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  • Lambertini (Pope Benedict XIV.), De servorum Dei beatificatione et beatorum canonizatione (Bologna, 1 7341738), several times reprinted, and more remarkable for erudition and knowledge of canon law than for historical criticism; Al.
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  • Later on Eanfled enabled him to visit Rome in the company of Benedict Biscop. At Lyons Wilfrid's pleasing features and quick intelligence made Annemund, the archbishop, desire to adopt him and marry him to his niece.
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  • He seems to have also reformed the method of conducting the divine services by the aid of his skilled chanters, lEdde and ZEona, and to have established or renewed the rule of St Benedict in the monasteries.
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  • Benedict, however, was obliged to bow before the execration of the Romans.
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  • During this time Louis had been negotiating continually with Pope John and with his successor Benedict XII.
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  • The Benedictine Rule was taken as the basis of the life; but austerities were introduced beyond what St Benedict prescribed, and the government was framed on the mendicant, not the monastic, model, the superiors being appointed only for a short term of years.
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  • In the following March accordingly were published, with papal approval, the Index librorum prohibitorum, which continued to be reprinted and brought down to date, and the "Ten Rules" which, supplemented and explained by Clement VIII., Sixtus V., Alexander VII., and finally by Benedict XIV.
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  • After studying in various monasteries he became provost of St Benedict at Capua, and in 1055 obtained permission from Victor II.
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  • Six miles to the south is the large Benedictine monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore, founded in 1320, famous for the frescoes by Luca Signorelli (1497-1498) and Antonio Bazzi, called Sodoma (1505), in the cloister, illustrating scenes from the legend of St Benedict; the latter master's work is perhaps nowhere better represented than here.
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  • On the 19th Burgoyne attacked the American left under General Benedict Arnold.
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  • In 1750, on the illness of her father, she was appointed by Pope Benedict XIV.
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  • On his death in the same year he was followed by Benedict VI.
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  • According to Benedict XIV.
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  • No region was more often ravaged than that of the lower Loire, so rich in abbeys - St Martin of Tours, Marmoutiers, St Benedict, &c. But the country ceded to the vikings under Hasting at the Loire mouth was insignificant and not in permanent occupation.
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  • Marco (now converted into a national museum), a series of frescoes, beginning towards 1443; in the first cloister is the Crucifixion with St Dominic kneeling; and the same treatment recurs on a wall near the dormitory; in the chapterhouse is a third Crucifixion, with the Virgin swooning, a composition of twenty life-sized figures - the red background, which has a strange and harsh effect, is the misdoing of some restorer; an "Annunciation," the figures of about three-fourths of life-size, in a dormitory; in the adjoining passage, the "Virgin enthroned," with four saints; on the wall of a cell, the "Coronation of the Virgin," with Saints Paul, Thomas Aquinas, Benedict, Dominic, Francis and Peter Martyr; two Dominicans welcoming Jesus, habited as a pilgrim; an "Adoration of the Magi"; the "Marys at the Sepulchre."
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  • Bonaventura, Rome, he came under the notice of Benedict XIV., who conceived a high opinion of his talents and made him consulter of the Inquisition.
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  • The parish church of St Benedict dates from 1451, but was restored in 1775 - it has some fine 15th-century painted glass in the choir.
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  • These indulgences were extended by Benedict XIII.
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  • In January 1781 Benedict Arnold captured Richmond and compelled governor and legislature to flee beyond the Blue Ridge mountains, where one session of the Assembly was held.
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  • Into 1 Devised originally for the clergy of Chrodegang's cathedral, it was largely an adaptation of St Benedict's rule to secular clergy living in common.
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  • Their reform was more than once discussed; and death alone prevented Benedict XIV.
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  • A year after Benedict's death the first blow fell.
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  • The spirit which culminated in the treason of Benedict Arnold was a serious addition to his burdens; for what Arnold did others were almost ready to do.
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  • St Benedict in the 6th century drew up such an arrangement, probably, though not certainly, on the basis of an older Roman division which, though not so skilful, is the one in general use.
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  • The chief buildings, apart from the abbey, are the church of St John Baptist, Perpendicular in style, with a fine tower and some 15th-century monuments; St Benedict's, dating from 1493-1524; St John's hospital, founded 1246; and the George Inn, built in the time of Henry VII.
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  • Innocent died on the 7th of March 1724, and was succeeded by Benedict XIII.
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  • The orders of Crato and of St Benedict of Aviz had already been established, the traditional dates of their incorporation being 1113 and 1162.
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  • In 1022 he went to Rome to obtain the pallium, and was received with great respect by Pope Benedict VIII.
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  • This bull not only freed Rabelais from ecclesiastical censure, but gave him the right to return to the order of St Benedict when he chose, and to practise medicine.
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  • The city is the seat of Midland College (Lutheran, 1887), St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic, 1858) for boys, Mt.
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  • At an assembly of the clergy held in Paris in 1398 it was resolved to refuse to recognize the authority of Benedict who succeeded Clement VII.
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  • The question became a party one; Benedict was supported by Louis of Orleans, while Philip the Bold and the university of Paris opposed him.
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  • Obedience to Benedict's authority was resumed in 1403, only to be withdrawn again in 1408, when the king declared himself the guardian and protector of the French church, which was indeed for a time self-governing.
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  • In contrast to his immediate predecessor Pius X., who was of humble origin, and whose ministerial experience was mainly pastoral, Benedict XV.
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  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.
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  • On his return to Avignon he engaged in public affairs, pleaded the cause of the Scaligers in their lawsuit with the Rossi for the lordship of Parma, and addressed two poetical epistles to Pope Benedict XII.
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  • In 974 he was substituted by Crescentius and the Roman barons for Benedict VI., who had been assassinated.
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  • On the 5th of June 1409 was read the definitive sentence: that as heretics, and therefore separated from the Church, Pedro de Luna (Benedict XIII.) and Angelo Corrario (Gregory XII.) were ipso facto deposed from any office; they must not be obeyed, nor assisted, nor harboured.
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  • It was in vain that the ambassadors of Benedict XIII.
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  • There are a cathedral, the church of St Benedict and other churches, with Romanesque 14th-century facades; the town-hall; and the prefecture, with Romanesque arcades.
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  • During the War of Independence, the town of Falmouth (now Portland), which had ardently resisted the claims of the British, was bombarded and burned, in 1775; in the same year Benedict Arnold followed the course of the Kennebec and Dead rivers on his expedition to Quebec; and from 1779 to 1783 a British force was established at Castine.
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  • In the winter of 1775 he accompanied General Benedict Arnold to Canada, and in the assault on Quebec (Dec. 31) he and his riflemen penetrated well into the city, where he was hemmed in and was forced to surrender.
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  • In Italy Benedict supported the policy of the emperor, Henry II., and at the council of Pavia (1022) exerted himself in favour of ecclesiastical discipline, then in a state of great decadence.
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  • From the same source and at the same date came two other forged documents - firstly, a collection of Capitularies, in three books, ascribed to a certain Benedict (Benedictus Levita), 2 a deacon of the church of Mainz; this collection, in which authentic documents find very little place, stands with regard to civil legislation exactly in the position of the False Decretals with regard to canon law.
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  • P Bullarium of Benedict XIV., officially published by him in 1747; further, the Bullarium is a compilation arranged in chronological order, and its dimensions make it rather unwieldy.
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  • (4 vols., Rome, 1 7541758) has been reprinted several times and is of great importance; the continuation of the Bullarium since Benedict XIV.
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  • By the rule of St Benedict, which, until the reform of Cluny, was the norm in the West, the abbot has jurisdiction over only one community.
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  • By the rule of St Benedict, the consent of the laity was in some undefined way required; but this seems never to have been practically enforced.
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  • In the West the rule of St Benedict appointed him a separate table, at which he might entertain guests and strangers.
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  • The imperial government at length recognized Benedict and discontinued its opposition, with the result that he was at last successful.
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  • The mythical pope Joan is usually placed between Benedict and his predecessor, Leo IV.
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  • As Johannes Gratianus he had earned a high reputation for learning and probity, and in 1045 he bought the Roman pontificate from his godson Benedict IX.
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  • Among these subjects were the transit of Mercury, the Aurora Borealis, the figure of the earth, the observation of the fixed stars, the inequalities in terrestrial gravitation, the application of mathematics to the theory of the telescope, the limits of certainty in astronomical observations, the solid of greatest attraction, the cycloid, the logistic curve, the theory of comets, the tides, the law of continuity, the double refraction micrometer, various problems of spherical trigonometry, &c. In 1742 he was consulted, with other men of science, by the pope, Benedict XIV., as to the best means of securing the stability of the dome of St Peter's, Rome, in which a crack had been discovered.
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  • His latest labour was the editing of the Latin poems of his friend Benedict Stay on the philosophy of Descartes, with scientific annotations and supplements.
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  • John was succeeded by Benedict IV.
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  • At the next election (1724) he was himself proposed for the papal chair, and secured ten votes at the Conclave which elected Benedict XIII.
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  • Having crushed a rising at Parma and left the city in flames, Conrad restored Pope Benedict IX.
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  • Benedict Stolzenhagen, known in religion as Jacob, was born at Jiiterbogk in Brandenburg of poor peasant stock.
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  • In precision and fulness of detail the Ymagines are inferior to the chronicles of the so-called Benedict and of Hoveden.
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  • There was always the tendency for clerics in such cases to invest their sons with the temporalities of the Church; and the poonani synod convened by Benedict VIII.
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  • This edict, it is essential to observe, the responsibility for which rests with a disciplinary congregation in no sense representing the church, was never confirmed by the pope, and was virtually repealed in 1757 under Benedict XIV.
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  • But Benedict, the deacon of Otgar of Mainz, is as much of a hypothetical personage as Isidorus Mercator; moreover, in the middle of the 9th century the condition of the province of Mainz was not disturbed, nor were the chorepiscopi menaced.
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  • But the affair of Ebbo's clergy did not become critical till the council of Soissons in 853; up till then these clergy had, so far tic. The author gives himself out as a certain Benedict, a deacon of the church of Mainz; hence the name by which he is usually known, Benedictus Levita.
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  • The last-named industry was sold to the Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict Company in 1886, and soon afterwards, on the failure of the original Remington company, the fire-arms factory was bought by a New York City firm.
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  • Here General Herkimer began his advance to raise the siege of Fort Schuyler (1777), and subsequently Ilion was the rendezvous of Benedict Arnold's force during the same campaign.
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  • On the 29th of June 1408 he and seven of his colleagues broke away from Gregory XII., and together with six cardinals of the obedience of Avignon, who had in like manner separated from Benedict XIII., they agreed to aim at the assembling of a general council, setting aside the two rival pontiffs, an expedient which they considered would put an end to the great schism of the Western Church, but which resulted in the election of yet a third pope.
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  • He was a mere tool in the hands of the feudal nobility of the city; he was succeeded by Benedict VIII.
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  • The term olibano was used in ecclesiastical Latin as early as the pontificate of Benedict IX., in the iith century.
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  • That undoubtedly reflected his background as a Benedictine abbot, for he regarded the Rule of St Benedict as the rule of his life.
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  • Benedict wisely plays his part in a stolid, straightforward manner; Titmuss goes for sweet sadness but produces only girlish affectation.
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  • Clare Benedict, the highly articulate hen, holds the stage.
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  • Atwater Benedict (1903) invented a respiration chamber to perform direct & indirect calorimetry.
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  • Suddenly we are asked to stand and in walks Benedict XVI at a brisk pace in smart white cassock and stunning bright red shoes.
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  • This week's paper also offers in-depth analysis of Pope Benedict's first encyclical.
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  • From The Times, November 6 04 Benedict Nightingale argues that Greeks understood fanaticism better than anyone.
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  • On the south side of the ambulatory is the Chapel of St. Benedict, Father of western monasticism.
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  • The final insult is that Benedict plans to demolish Tishkoff's hotel in order to build another monstrosity on the Strip.
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  • Wow, check out this reaction to the election of Benedict XVI in the german newsmagazine Der Spiegel.
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  • These people should be remembered with the same opprobrium as Benedict Arnold is by the people of the United States.
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  • Clugny became the reformer, not only of the order of St. Benedict, but of monastic life in general.
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  • Even Pope Benedict XVI yesterday warned of the dangers of growing secularism while in Germany.
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  • Surely Benedict would not be so unkind as to leave her alone on such a dreadful night?
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  • These, together with Benedict's revolting cardinals, summoned a general council at Pisa.
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  • At Perugia on the 5th of June 1305 he was chosen to succeed Benedict XI.; the cardinals by a vote of ten to five electing one neither an Italian nor a cardinal, in order to end a conclave which had lasted eleven months.
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  • Other decrees denounced the abuse of indulgences, of festivals of saints, and of processions and suggested reforms; others again enjoined the closing of shops on Sunday during divine service, the issue of service-books with parallel translations in the vernacular, and recommended the abolition of all monastic orders except that of St Benedict, the rules of which were to be brought into harmony with modern ideas; nuns were to be forbidden to take the vows before the age of 40.
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  • San Domenico, a Gothic edifice originally designed by Giovanni Pisano but rebuilt in 1614, contains the monument of Pope Benedict XI.
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  • Benedict Spinoza, the eminent Jewish pantheist (1632-1677), to whom miracle is impossible, revelation a phrase, and who renews pioneer work in Old Testament criticism, finds at least a fair measure of liberty and comfort in Holland (his birth-land).
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  • It was imitated by Giovanni Pisano in his monument to Pope Benedict XI.
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  • The latter, though a partisan of the pope of Rome, took the opportunity of enjoining on Pierre d'Ailly to go in his name and argue with the pope of Avignon, a move which had as its object to persuade Benedict XIII.
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  • France next tried to bring violent pressure to bear to conquer the obstinacy of Benedict XIII.
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  • At this time he was still faithful to Benedict XIII., and the disinclination he felt to joining the members of the French clergy who were on the point of ratifying the royal declaration of neutrality excited the anger of Charles VI.'s government, and a mandate, which was however not executed, ordered the arrest of the bishop of Cambrai.
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  • Successively bishop of Castello, Latin patriarch of Constantinople, cardinal-priest of San Marco, and papal secretary, he was elected to succeed Innocent VII., after an interregnum of twenty-four days, under the express condition that, should the antipope Benedict XIII.
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  • The rascally Cardinal Coscia, who had deluded Benedict, was at once brought to justice and forced to disgorge his dishonest gains.
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  • And Benedict of Aniane's ideas of organization found embodiment a century later in the order of Cluny (910), which for a time overshadowed the great body of mere Benedictines (see Cluny).
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  • Midnight office was no part of St Benedict's Rule: the time for rising for the night office varied from 1.30 to 3.o, according to the season, and the monks had had unbroken sleep for 7 z or even 8 hours, except in the hot weather, when in compensation they were allowed the traditional Italian summer siesta after the mid-day meal.
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  • Benedict XIII., who had on his part tried to call together a council at Perpignan, was by this time recognized hardly anywhere but in his native land, in Scotland, and in the estates of the countship of Armagnac. He remained none the less full of energy and of illusions, repulsed the overtures of Sigismund, king of the Romans, who had come to Perpignan to persuade him to abdicate, and, abandoned by nearly all his adherents, he took refuge in the impregnable castle of Peniscola, on a rock dominating the Mediterranean (1415).
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  • The learned labours of the Benedictines were no part of the original requirements of the rule of St Benedict; but before the founder's death his favourite disciple had planted a monastery in France, and the name of that disciple is permanently associated with the learned labours of the Benedictines of the Congregation of St Maur (see Maurists) .
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  • In the Rule of St Benedict and other early rules the titles praepositus and praelatus (see Prelate) are generally used, but prior is also found signifying in a general way the superiors and elders in a monastery.
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  • His most signal act as king was to aid in closing the Great Schism in the Church by agreeing to the deposition of the antipope Benedict XIV., an Aragonese.
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  • Theodore, Wilfrid, Benedict Biscop, Bede, Boniface, Ecgbert, Alcuin, revived the fire of learning, which was almost extinct, and by their aid enlightenment was carried to the Continent, to decadent Gaul and barbarian Germany.
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  • He prosecuted successfully the conflict with the adherents of Benedict XIII., who, till the day of his death' clung to the remnants of his usurped authority (see BENEDICT XIII.).
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  • Grandjean has published the registers of Benedict XI.
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  • (965-972) was the first to bestow the right to wear the dalmatic on an abbot, and Pope Benedict VII.
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  • There are, besides, an academy of natural sciences, a college of medicine and surgery - confirmed by a bull of Benedict XIII.
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  • (See Cluny.) The chief offshoot from the Benedictine institute were the Cistercians (c. Ioo); their ground idea was a return to the letter of St Benedict's rule, and a reproduction, as close as could be, of the exterior conditions of life as they existed in St Benedict's own monastery; consequently field work held a prominent place in the Cistercian ideal.
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  • Cardinal Peter de Luna took him with him to Paris in 1391; and on his own election to the pontificate as antipope Benedict XIII.
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  • He planned the expeditions against Canada under Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold, and sent out privateers to harass British commerce.
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  • The election was opposed at Rome by a considerable party, but peace was maintained by the aid of Ladislaus of Naples, in return for which Innocent made a promise, inconsistent with his previous oath, not to come to terms with the antipope Benedict XIII., except on condition that he should recognize the claims of Ladislaus to Naples.
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  • These clerks, whose ordination was regarded as invalid by Hincmar and his adherents, were condemned in 8J3 at the council of Soissons, and the decisions of that council were confirmed in 855 by Pope Benedict III.
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  • When abbots dined in their own private hall, the rule of St Benedict charged them to invite their monks to their table, provided there was room, on which occasions the guests were to abstain from quarrels, slanderous talk and idle gossiping.
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  • Elizabeth Benedict of the Huffington Post writes, "Whatever you do, don't get divorced in Massachusetts - and don't be living there if your spouse decides to divorce you, especially if you're the higher earner.
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  • This was largely due to a man by the name of Dr. Benedict Lust.
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  • I had eggs benedict and Andie had a wonderful veggie omelet at a café on Broadway.
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  • Benedict: These are smooth aviators available in gold with chrome amber, gold with green gradient polar, and silver with chrome sapphire.
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  • Your activity level can be calculated into your daily caloric requirements using the Harris Benedict Equation.
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  • The Harris Benedict equation provides a multiplier based on activity level, which you apply to your BMR.
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  • Eat 500 fewer calories per day than the number obtained by using the Harris Benedict Equation without eating less than your BMR calculation.
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  • Despite lasting only one season over twenty years before, fans of the original series continued to hope that a new series would revisit the beloved characters played by actors like Lorne Greene, Richard Hatch and Dirk Benedict.
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  • Lt. Starbuck - Beyond the obvious gender differences, Katee Sackhoff's Starbuck was actually darker and far less optimistic than Dirk Benedict's rakish hero.
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  • It looks like even Pope Benedict XVI, of the Roman Catholic church, is getting on the social networking bandwagon with his recent release of the Vatican Facebook app.
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  • Their missionaries were received at the court of Akbar, and Benedict Goes, a native of the Azores, was despatched on a journey overland from Agra to China.
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  • Benedict governed Rome quietly for nearly nine years, a somewhat rare thing in those days.
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  • In 1755, on the recommendation of Pope Benedict XIV., he was admitted a member of the Institute of Bologna.
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  • Benedict, Die Gudrunsage in der neueren Literatur (1902.) '[[Guebriant, Jean Baptiste Budes,' Comte De]] (1602-1643), marshal of France, was born at Plessis-Budes, near St Brieuc, of an old Breton family.
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  • The term occurs very frequently in the Rule of St Benedict and other early monastic rules.
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  • But the suspicions aroused by his conduct found further confirmation when he caused himself - or allowed himself - to be nominated bishop of Le Puy by Benedict XIII.
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  • At the ecclesiastical council which took place at Paris in 1406 Pierre d'Ailly made every effort to avert a new withdrawal from the obedience and, by order of the king, took the part of defender of Benedict XIII., a course which yet again exposed him to attacks from the university party.
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  • It was not till after the cardinals of the two colleges had led to the convocation of the general council of Pisa that Pierre d'Ailly renounced the support of Benedict XIII., and, for want of a better policy, again allied himself with the cause which he had championed in his youth.
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  • Gregory, still supported by Naples, Hungary, Bavaria, and by Rupert, king of the Romans, found protection with Ladislaus, and in a synod at Cividale del Friuli banned Benedict and Alexander as schismatical, perjured and scandalous.
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  • The Pisans conquered Sardinia at the instigation of Benedict VIII.
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  • I was born in the territory of the said monastery, and at the age of seven I was, by the care of my relations, given to the reverend Abbot Benedict (Biscop), and afterwards to Ceolfrid, to 'be educated.
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  • All that remained was to obtain the abdication of Benedict XIII., the successor of the Avignon pope Clement VII., but the combined efforts of the council and the emperor were powerless to overcome the obstinacy of the Aragonese pope.
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  • The chief representatives of the strictly " classical " school, which adopted the ancient Greek and Latin authors as its models, were David Baroti Szabo, Nicholas Revai, Joseph Rajnis and Benedict Virag.
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