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bell

bell

bell Sentence Examples

  • Corn seasoned with red bell peppers and black beans made a colorful vegetable.

  • She was awakened later by the door bell.

  • The name doesn't ring a bell.

  • I rang the bell and I could see shadow movement behind the thin drapes but no one answered.

  • They looked towards her as the bell over the door rang.

  • Later, after the guests left, the three-person management team was cleaning up when the front door bell rang.

  • A single bell sat on the counter.

  • She rang the bell again.

  • Dean turned away and like a beaten boxer long after the bell had sounded, slowly returned to his room.

  • He stood outside Elisabeth's house for a minute, took a deep breath and rang the bell.

  • When he rang the bell, she yelled, Come in.

  • Elisabeth opened the door before Jackson had a chance to ring the bell.

  • The door was open, so he entered without ringing the bell.

  • Nick Volpe had his bell rung and they sent me in for one play, 'Yellow 42.'

  • A little bell jingled in the empty office as Dean entered and an unshaven man in his sixties took his time sauntering out from behind a curtain, hoisting up his suspenders as he moved behind the desk.

  • Dean copied the information from the forms, including the license num­bers, and then rang the bell summoning the manager.

  • They turned your music up loud and started tearing the place apart but then someone rang the bell and they hightailed it out the back.

  • Blowing it on a tissue, she rang the door bell.

  • A bell on the door jingled as she entered, and a middle-aged woman smiled a greeting from behind the counter.

  • 3-5, Bell.

  • 51, Bell.

  • The Florentine carroccio was usually followed by a smaller car bearing the martinella, a bell to ring out military signals.

  • Bell.

  • 45; Appian, Bell.

  • 4-6; Appian, Illyrica, 12, Bell.

  • I, 2; Appian, Bell.

  • In the next experiment the air was compressed as before, and then allowed to escape through a long lead tube immersed in the water of a calorimeter, and finally collected in a bell jar.

  • This could be fixed, within certain limits, at whatever pitch suited the composition; but on the horn it could be only very partially filled out by notes of a muffled quality produced by inserting the hand into the bell of the instrument, a device impossible on the trumpet.

  • The earliest successful form was " Bright's bell " sounder, which consisted of two bells of distinct tone or pitch, one of which was sounded when the current was sent in one [[International Code O]] --- 4 - 5 p-- - 6 R - 7 '...'

  • Each coil is attached to a shaft by a bell crank arrangement, and to these shafts there is secured a system of levers similar to that at the transmitter carrying the receiving pencil at the junction.

  • Experiments of this kind were actually tried by Graham Bell in 1882, with boats on the Potomac river, and signals were detected at a distance of a mile and a half.

  • Popoff employed an electromagnetic tapper, in fact the mechanism of an electric bell with the gong removed, for this purpose.

  • The term " telephony " was first used by Philipp Reis of Friedrichsdorf, in a lecture delivered before the Physical Society of Frankfort in 1861.1 But, although this lecture and Reis's subsequent work received considerable notice, little progress was made until the subject was taken up between 1874 and 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell, a native of Edinburgh, then resident in Boston, Mass., U.S.A. Bell, like Reis, employed electricity for the reproduction of sounds; but he attacked the problem in a totally different manner.

  • The instrument was described in over fifty publications 6 in various countries, and was well known to physicists previous to Bell's introduction of the electric telephone as a competitor with the electric telegraph.

  • The next worker at the telephone, and the one to whom the present great commercial importance of the instrument is due, Bell's re- was Bell.

  • Bell, " Telephone Researches," in Journ.

  • - Bell's Telephone (1877).

  • A telephone transmitter and a receiver on a novel plan were patented in July 1877 by Edison, shortly after the introduction of Bell's instruments.

  • Dolbear, 2 the effects were produced by electrostatic instead of electromagnetic forces, as in con- the Bell telephone.

  • Both Bell and Gray proposed to do this by introducing a column of liquid into the circuit, the length or the resistance of which could be varied by causing the vibrations of the diaphragm to vary the depth of immersion of a light rod fixed to it and dipping into the liquid.

  • Hughes, while engaged in experiments upon a Bell telephone in an electric circuit, discovered that a peculiar noise was produced whenever two hard electrodes, such as two wires, were - drawn across each other, or were made to touch each other with a variable degree of firmness.

  • A single line of wire, like an ordinary telegraph line, had a Bell telephone included in it at each end, and the ends were put to earth.

  • The telephone was switched out of circuit when not in use and the bell put in its place, a key being used for throwing the battery into circuit to make the signal.

  • This arrangement is still employed, a hook being attached to the switch lever so that the mere hanging up of the telephone puts the bell in circuit.

  • When the relay is operated it connects a bell between one of the wires of the circuit and earth, while the bell itself is arranged to respond to current pulsations in one direction only.

  • In another party line system a harmonic principle is employed: the ringing machines deliver alternating currents of four frequencies, while each bell is constructed to operate at a particular frequency only.

  • Graham Bell's telephone patent was granted for the United Kingdom.

  • Both the Bell and the Edison Companies opened negotiations with the Post Office for the sale of their patents to the government, but without success.

  • The Bell telephone patents expired.

  • In 1885 there were only 3800 telephone subscribers in London and less than io,000 in the rest of the United Kingdom, and telephonic services were available in only about 75 towns, while in the same year the American Bell Telephone Company had over 134,000 subscribers.

  • 15; Appian, Bell.

  • The external form of the Hydromedusae varies from that of a deep bell or thimble, characteristic of the Anthomedusae, to the shallow saucer-like form characteristic of the Leptomedusae.

  • In cases where the cormus has no pneumatophore the topmost swimming bell may contain an oil-reservoir or oleocyst.

  • The planula develops, on the whole, in a similar manner, but the ectodermal invagination arises, not at the pole of the planula, but on the side of its broader portion, and gives rise, not to a pneumatophore, but to a nectocalyx, the primary swimming bell or protocodon (" Fallschirm ") which is later thrown off and replaced by secondary swimming bells, metacodons, budded from the coenosarc.

  • The Russian Captain Vassili Chitschakov in 1765 and 1766 made two persevering attempts to penetrate the ice north of Spitsbergen, and reached 80° 30' N., while Russian parties twice wintered at Bell Sound.

  • 36, 37; De harusp. resp. 13, and above all Pro rege Deiotaro; Appian, Bell.

  • The ancient authorities for Sulla and his time are his Life by Plutarch (who made use of the Memoirs); Appian, Bell.

  • 25; Suetonius, Caesar, 9; Caesar, Bell.

  • 51, 89; Appian, Bell.

  • When the port of Boston was closed by Great Britain in 1774 the bell of the old First Parish Church (Unitarian) of Portland (built 1740; the present building dates from 1825) was muffled and rung from morning till night, and in other ways the town showed its sympathy for the patriot cause.

  • Bell, Oxford, 1878; H.

  • The case A contains the registering wheelwork and a sounding bell.

  • It always had a prince, no doubt, but he was engaged by formal contract without much attention being paid to hereditary rights, and he was merely leader of the troops, while all the political power remained in the hands of the civil officials and the Vetche, a popular assembly which was called together in the market-place, as occasion required, by the tolling of the great bell.

  • their ancient liberties, he abolished the popular assembly, removed the great bell to Novgorod, installed his own boyars in the administration, transported 300 of the leading families to other localities, replaced them by 300 families from Moscow, and left in the town a strong garrison of his own troops.

  • Joao d'Albuquerque, bishop of Goa, he asked his permission to officiate in the diocese, and at once began walking through the streets ringing a small bell, and telling all to come, and send their children and servants, to the "Christian doctrine" or catechetical instruction in the principal church.

  • Robertson Smith, on the other hand, a new era was reached, in which the recently recognized existence of Totemism was made the basis of an attempt to give a 1 Scipione de Ricci, bishop of Pistoia from 1780 to 1791, on the ex-Jesuits requesting him to consecrate a bell dedicated to this object, issued a pastoral letter (3rd June 1784) in which he pointed out that the spirit of true religion was "far removed from fetichism," and warned his flock against "cardiolatry."

  • Bell, History of the Town of Exeter (Exeter, 1888).

  • The bell is one of five which the emperor Yung-lo ordered to be cast.

  • C. Bell (1877); The Wives of Henry VIII.

  • " To me the reigns of the successors of Constantine were absolutely new; and I was immersed in the passage of the Goths over the Danube, when the summons of the dinner bell reluctantly dragged me from my intellectual feast."

  • Christopher C. Stephenson, Rep., 1887-1889.1 Frank Bell, Rep., 1890.

  • high, has a bell weighing 64 tons.

  • The town appears under the name 015p(3e'(3Evras in Procopius (Bell.

  • According to the statement of the deputation from the Remi to Caesar (Bell.

  • Mark Bell crossed the continent in 1887 and illustrated its ancient trade routes, following the steps of Archibald Colquhoun, who wandered from Peking to Talifu in 1881.

  • fine example of the style, having an ornate south porch of two storeys and a detached bell tower.

  • The reaping-machine, invented in 1812 by John Common, improved upon by the Rev. Patrick Bell in England and by Cyrus H.

  • Jeffrey Bell, with an appendix by Garrod containing a summary of the latter's own continuation of the same line of research.

  • Chladni's experiment of strewing a vibrating bell with flour, investigated the nature of sound and the function of the air in respiration and combustion, and originated the idea of using the pendulum as a measure of gravity.

  • Alexander Graham Bell >>

  • We learn from Appian (Bell.

  • Antony's raid in 41 B.C. (Bell.

  • In the breeding season the male spins a bell or thimble near that of the female and joins the two by means of a silken passage.

  • " The distinction seems to be that if the destruction be permanent, though partial, the failure of the subject let will give relief by entitling the tenant to renounce the lease, unless a deduction shall be allowed, but that if it be merely temporary or occasional, it will not entitle the tenant to relief " (Bell's Prin.

  • (Bell's Principles, ss.

  • Bell, The Desert and the Sown (1907); H.

  • - Appian, Bell.

  • The embryos escape into the uterus through the "bell," a funnellike opening continuous with the uterus.

  • Just at the junction of the "bell" and the uterus there is a second small opening situated dorsally.

  • m The "bell" swallows the matured embryos and passes them on into the uterus, and thus out of the body via the oviduct, which opens at one end into the uterus and at the other on to the exterior at the posterior end of o.-- the body.

  • But should the "bell" swallow any of the ova, or even one of the younger embryos, these are passed back into the body cavity through the second and dorsal opening.

  • the nerve cells and the bell.

  • yds., is provided with an electric bell communicating with the warder in the tower, heated by hot-air pipes, and lighted by day through a window on the outer wall of the rotunda, and from sunset till ten o'clock by electric light.

  • Two fairs are held in Nola, on the 14th of June and the 12th of November; and the 26th of July is devoted to a great festival in honour of St Paulinus, one of the early bishops of the city, who invented the church bell (campana, taking its name from Campania).

  • There are factories of linen and cotton goods, and of felt hats, paper mills, and a celebrated bell foundry at Annecy le Vieux.

  • Bell & Sons.) 6.

  • Gold-mining and quartz-mining are its principal industries, and in 1907 Nevada county's output of gold (104,J90.76 oz., worth $2,162,083) was second only to that of Butte county (134,813.39 oz., worth $2,786,840) in California; the county is the leading producer 1 Died the 21st of September, 1890, and Frank Bell became governor by virtue of his office as lieutenant-governor.

  • Caesar (De Bell.

  • Bell, Lives and Legends of the Evangelists, Apostles and other early Saints (London, 1901), pp. 238-240.

  • It is found (Bell, Phil.

  • Varius, whereby those who had secretly or openly aided the Italian allies against Rome were to be brought to trial (Appian, Bell.

  • 43; Appian, Bell.

  • The remarkable physiological discoveries of Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842) and Marshall Hall (1790-1857) for the first time rendered possible the discrimination of diseases of the spinal cord.

  • Laennec and Claude Bernard in France, was accepted in England, as that of Matthew Baillie, Charles Bell, Bright, Graves and others of the British school, quickly made itself felt abroad.

  • The discoveries of the separate paths of sensory and motor impulses in the spinal cord, and consequently of the laws of reflex action, by Charles Bell and Marshall Hall respectively, in their illumination of the phenomena of nervous function, may be compared with the discovery in the region of the vascular system of the circulation of the blood; for therein a key to large classes of normal and aberrant functions and a fertile principle of interpretation were obtained.

  • The folk-moot met in the precincts of St Paul's at the sound of the bell of the famous belltower, which also rang out when the armed levy was required to march under St Paul's banner.

  • He was disappointed at the resistance which was made, and after musing a while " upon a stall over against the Bell Savadge Gate " he turned back.

  • John Bell, clerk to the company, who wrote an essay during the great plague of 1665, had no records in his office of an earlier date than 1593, and he was not aware that his company had been engaged in registering births and deaths before that year.

  • Referring to this important event Mr Round writes: " The excited citizens, who had poured out overnight, with lanterns and torches, to welcome John to the capital, streamed together on the morning of the eventful 8th of October at the wellknown sound of the great bell swinging out from its campanile in St Paul's Churchyard.

  • Consider, for instance, the operation of casting a hemispherical bell, in fig.

  • Bell and Sir W.

  • The great bell of the commune called together the adherents of the archbishop; the bell of the people summoned the partisans of the count, After a day's fighting (July 1, 1288) the count, his two sons and his two grandsons were captured in the palazzo del popolo (or town hall), and cast into a tower belonging to the Gualandi and known as the "Tower of the Seven.

  • above sea-level, has a fine Portuguese bell, made in 1810.

  • Of his manner and personal appearance we have the following account from one who was his pupil: - " Daily as the clock struck eight on the horologe of the Luxembourg, while the ringing hammer on the bell was yet audible, the door of my room opened, and there entered a man, short, rather stout, almost what one might call sleek, freshly shaven, without vestige of whisker or moustache.

  • A socalled "paletta" (a bronze plate with a handle - possibly a bell or a votive axe or a simple pendant) with a figure of a horse on one side and a votive inscription on the other, belonging to the 5th or 4th century B.C., was found in 1899 at a great depth close to the church of S.

  • 30; Appian, Bell.

  • The most successful of the first class, or pick machines, that of William Firth of Sheffield, consists essentially of a horizontal pick with two cutting arms placed one slightly in advance of the other, which is swung backwards and forwards by a pair of bell crank levers actuated by a horizontal cylinder engine mounted on a railway truck.

  • The chain machine has been largely developed in America in the Jeffrey, Link Bell, and Morgan Gardner coal cutters.

  • See Caesar, Bell.

  • The first instance, however, of excommunication by "bell, book and candle" is comparatively late (c. 1190) .

  • From the balcony of the town house, which overlooks the square, proclamations were read to the burghers, summoned to the spot by the ringing of the bell in the smalldomed tower.

  • His place in Uganda was taken by Sir Henry Hesketh Bell, who was made the first governor of Uganda in 1 9 06.

  • It has three entrances on the Plaza, and over its main gateway hangs the " liberty bell " of Mexico, first rung by the humble parish priest Hidalgo, on the night of the 16th of September 1810, to call the people of Dolores to arms, and now rung at midnight on each recurring anniversary by the president himself.

  • C. P. Bell, Archaeological Reports (Colombo, 1892-1906) Rhys Davids, " Sigiri, the Lion Rock," in Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society (1875), pp. 191-220; H.

  • 8; Euripides, Orestes, 1376; Caesar, Bell.

  • This can be shown by suspending an electric bell in the receiver of an air-pump, the wires conveying the current passing through an air-tight cork closing the hole at the top of the receiver.

  • These wires form a material channel from the bell to the outside air, but if they are fine the sound which they carry is hardly appreciable.

  • If while the air within the receiver is at atmospheric pressure the bell is set ringing continuously, the sound is very audible.

  • bell is almost inaudible.

  • As sound arises in general from vibrating bodies, as it takes time to travel, and as the medium which carries it does not on the whole travel forward, but subsides into its original position when the sound has passed, we are forced to conclude that the disturbance is of the wave kind, We can at once gather some idea of the nature of sound waves in air by considering how they are produced by a bell.

  • I) be a small portion of a bell which vibrates to and fro from CD to EF and back.

  • A bell under water was struck, and at the same instant some gunpowder was flashed in air above the bell.

  • Ordinarily when a bell is struck the impulse primarily excites the radial motion, and the tangential motion follows as a matter of course.

  • When a finger-glass (an inverted bell), is excited by passing the finger round the circumference, the tangential motion is primarily excited and the radial follows it.

  • As to Scots law: Bell, On Arbitration (2nd ed., Edinburgh, 1877); Erskine, Principles (20th ed., Edinburgh, 1903).

  • 10, 13; Suetonius, Vespasian, 4; Josephus, Bell.

  • Caesar, Bell.

  • He was present at evening in the church, and when the midnight bell sounded for the nocturnal office early on Sunday morning he again went thither unsupported, but sank down before the altar and passed away as in a gentle sleep.

  • He was simply Faust's "other self," appearing in various guises - as a bear, as a little bald man, as a monk, as an invisible presence ringing a bell - but always recognizable as the same "familiar."

  • The first mention of the city is made by Caesar (Bell.

  • The Chinese galls of commerce (Woo-pei-tsze) are stated to be produced by Aphis Chinensis, Bell, on Rhus semialata, Murr.

  • Bell, Archbishop Laud and Priestly Government (1907).

  • The church of St Francis de Sales (in Walnut Hills), built in 1888, has a bell, cast in Cincinnati, weighing fifteen tons, and said to be the largest swinging bell in the world.

  • Miller's edition of Scrivener's Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament (George Bell, 1894); C. R.

  • The largest coal-producing counties in 1907 were Hopkins (2,064,154 short tons) and Muhlenberg (1,882,913 short tons) in the western coalfield, and Bell (1,437,886 short tons) and Whitley (762,923 short tons) in the south-western part of the eastern coalfield.

  • But with the exception of that mined in Hopkins and Bell counties, very little is fit for making coke; in 1880 the product was 4250 tons of coke (value $12,250), in 1890, 12,343 tons ($22,191); in 1900, 95,532 tons ($235,505); in 1902, 126,879 tons ($3 1 7, 8 75), the maximum product up to 1906; and in 1907, 67,068 tons ($157,288).

  • They naturally assumed the leadership in the Constitutional Union movement of 1860, casting the vote of the state for Bell and Everett.

  • In 1860 Everett was the candidate of the short-lived Constitutional-Union party for the vice-presidency, on the ticket with John Bell, but received only 39 electoral votes.

  • MEDUSA, the name given by zoologists to the familiar marine animals known popularly as jelly-fishes; or, to be more accurate, to those jelly-fishes I in which the form of the body resembles that of an umbrella, bell or parachute.

  • From the centre of the subumbral surface hangs down the manubrium, like the handle of an umbrella or the clapper of a bell, bearing the mouth at its extremity.

  • The body may show modifications of form which can be compared to a shallow saucer, a cup, a bell or a thimble.

  • Charles Henry Bell.

  • This last is a handsome building, opened in 1873, surmounted by a bell tower.

  • Frag.; Appian, Bell.

  • It is a full vestment of the type of the Western bell chasuble; but, instead of being cut away at the sides, it is for convenience' sake either gathered up or cut short in front.

  • In the breeding-season the male Dunlin utters a most peculiar and farsounding whistle, somewhat resembling the continued ringing of a high-toned musical bell.

  • Celtic altar-bell of hammered iron, known as the "Ronnell bell."' Such is the odour of sanctity of this venerable church that there is an old local saying that "to be thrice prayed for in the kirk of Birnie will either mend or end ye."

  • Bell, London, 1820); Grundriss einer Geschichte der merkwiirdigsten Welthdndel von 1796-1810 (Hamburg, 1810).

  • The castle itself is mentioned by Procopius (Bell.

  • He died soon afterwards (48) of fatigue and mortification (Caesar, Bell.

  • high, with three gates and towers; an imposing audience-hall in Chinese style; and a great bell tower, with a fine bronze bell, sounded to drive off "evil dragons."

  • The 8th book of the Bell.

  • The town-hall, with its remarkable bell tower, dates from the 15th century.

  • Appian, Bell.

  • "The Republic" (Period C); also Appian, Bell.

  • 5 -13; Bell.

  • Returning to Evesham he was there when the abbey was surrendered to the king (27th of January 1540); and then, with a pension of fro a year, he once more went back to Oxford, but soon after became chaplain to Bishop Bell of Worcester and then served Bonner in that same capacity from 1543 to 1549.

  • In 1860, not being quite ready to ally himself wholly with the Republican party, he declined to be a candidate for the Republican nomination for the vice-presidency, and supported the Bell and Everett ticket.

  • In 1649, as he was walking towards Nottingham, he heard the bell of the "steeple house" of the city, and was admonished by an inward voice to go forward and cry against the great idol and the worshippers in it.

  • Like Kant, he supposes that experience is concerned with sensations, distinguishes matter and form in sense, identifies time and space, eternal time and infinite space, with the formal element, and substitutes 'synthesis of sensations of touch and sight for association and inference, as the origin of our knowing such a solid material object as a bell.

  • the solid interior of a bell.

  • We know more, however, about a body, such as a bell, than either Spencer or Hodgson allows.

  • We know, from the concomitant variations between its vibrations and our perceptions, that its vibrations are not mere conditions but real causes of our perceptions; and that those vibrations are not our perceptions, because we cannot perceive them, but are real attributes of the bell.

  • Some of these were essays, such as his Baptized Property, an attack on serfdom; others were periodical publications, the Polyarnaya Zvyezda (or Polar Star), the Kolokol (or Bell), and the Golosa iz Rossii (or Voices from Russia).

  • 5 - 7; Appian, Bell.

  • Bell (Calcutta, 1905), which has full English-Tibetan vocabularies, graduated exercises and examples in the Lhasa dialect of to-day.

  • Two of Birney's sons, William Birney (1819-1907) and David Bell Birney (1825-1864), were prominent as officers on the Federal side during the Civil War in America.

  • 57; Lucan, Bell.

  • Gallimard, Moldenarius, Septalius, Saunders, C. Lebrun (a precursor of Charles Bell), Elsholz, de la Belliere, J.

  • The few works which have since appeared, before the rise of the physiological school of Sir Charles Bell and Charles Darwin, are undeserving of notice, the development of phrenology having given to pure physiognomy the coup de grace by taking into itself whatever was likely to live of the older science.

  • The physiological school of physiognomy was foreshadowed by Parsons and founded by Sir Charles Bell, whose Essay on the Anatomy of the Expression, published in 1806, was the first scientific study of the physical manifestation of emotions in the terms of the muscles which produce these manifestations.

  • These observations confirmed by experimental demonstration the hypothetical conclusions of Bell.

  • Illustrations of these theoretic propositions are to be found in the works of Bell, Duchenne and 'Darwin, and in the later publications of Theodor Piderit, Mimike and Physiognomik (1886) and Mantegazza, Physiognomy and Expression (1890), to which the student may be referred for further information.

  • By observation and experiment it was discovered independently by Messrs Bates, Wallace and Bell that they are not attacked by birds nor by many other enemies that prey upon unprotected Lepidoptera.

  • Between 1860 and 1874 Messrs Bell Brothers manufactured the metal at Washington, near Newcastle, under Deville's supervision, producing nearly 2 cwt.

  • The principal buildings are the Stadt Kirche, a beautiful Gothic building, erected about 1320 and restored in 1899, with a fine tower and a large bell; the old and interesting town hall (Rathaus) and the ruins of the abbey church.

  • Numerous biographies of Mary Stuart have been published, as well as essays and treatises dealing with particular episodes in her life, of which the most worthy of mention are: George Chalmers, Life of Mary Queen of Scots, (2 vols., London, 1818); Henry Glassford Bell, Life of Mary Queen of Scots (2 vols., Edinburgh, 1828-1831); the "Life" in Agnes Strickland's Lives of the Queens of Scotland (8 vols., Edinburgh, 1850); J.

  • Michauxia campanuloides, a remarkable bell flower, 3 to 8 ft.

  • wide covered with lights, and a number of large bell glasses or " cloches."

  • Bell, and of Laokoon, Dramatic Notes and the Representation of Death by the Ancients, by E.

  • Bell gave to the college Manitou Park, a tract of forest land covering about 13,000 acres and situated about 20 m.

  • GG; Flanges on the ore bucket; P, Cinder notch; HH, Fixed flanges on the top of RR', Water cooled boxes; the furnace; S, Blast pipe; J, Counterweighted false bell; T, Cable for allowing conical K, Main bell; bottom of bucket to 0, Tuyere; drop.

  • - Method of transferring charge from bucket to main charging bell, without permitting escape of furnace gas (lettering as in fig.

  • counter-weighted false cover J of the furnace, so that the contents of the bucket slide down into the space between this false;cover and the true charging bell, K.

  • In the Bell-Krupp or "pig-washing" process, invented independently by the famous British iron-master, Sir Lowthian Bell, and Krupp of Essen, advantage is taken of the fact that, at a relatively low temperature, probably a little above 1200° C., the phosphorus and silicon of molten cast iron are quickly oxidized and removed by contact with molten iron oxide, though carbon is thus oxidized but slowly.

  • The church or minster of St Cuthberga is a fine cruciform structure of various styles from Early Norman to Perpendicular, and consists of a central lantern tower, nave and choir with aisles, transepts without aisles, western or bell tower, north and south porches, crypt and vestry or sacristy, with the library over it.

  • JACOB BELL (1810-1859), British pharmaceutical chemist, was born in London on the 5th of March 1810.

  • Always keenly alive to the interests of chemists in general, Bell conceived the idea of a society which should at once protect the interests of the trade, and improve its status, and at a public meeting held on the 15th of April 1841, it was resolved to found the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

  • Bell carried his scheme through in the face of many difficulties, and further advanced the cause of pharmacy by establishing the Pharmaceutical Journal, and superintending its publication for eighteen years.

  • One of the first abuses to engage the attention of the new body was the practice of pharmacy by unqualified persons, and in 1845 Bell drew up the draft of a bill to deal with the matter, one of the provisions of which was the recognition of the Pharmaceutical Society as the governing body in all questions connected with pharmacy.

  • In 1850 Bell successfully contested the borough of St Albans in order that he might be able to advocate his proposals for reform more effectually in parliament.

  • Bell was the author of an Historical Sketch of the Progress of Pharmacy in Great Britain.

  • John Bell (Traveller) >>

  • 39; Caesar, Bell.

  • 112; Appian, Bell.

  • BELL or INCHCAPE Rock, a sandstone reef in the North Sea, II m.

  • According to tradition an abbot of Aberbrothock (Arbroath) had ordered a bell - whence the name of the rock - to be fastened to the reef in such a way that it should respond to the movements of the waves, and thus always ring out a warning to mariners.

  • The heaviest of the seven bells (Kaiserglocke), cast in 1874 from the metal of French guns, weighs 543 cwt., and is the largest and heaviest bell that is rung.

  • The Roman Catholic cathedral of St Stephen (Elizabeth Street) is an imposing building, having a detached campanile containing the largest bell in Australia.

  • Moberly Bell (1884); and in Lord Cromer's Modern Egypt (1908).

  • The story has to be pieced together from the vague and somewhat discrepant accounts of Plutarch (Crassus, 8 - II; Pompey, 21), Appian (Bell.

  • Towards evening it reveals its presence by a clear whistling note, which has often been compared to the sound of a little bell, or to a chime when produced by numerous individuals.

  • Lincoln was elected by a popular vote of 1,866,452 to 1,375,157 for Douglas, 847,953 for Breckinridge and 590,631 for Bell - as the combined vote of his opponents was so much greater than his own he was often called "the minority president"; the electoral vote was: Lincoln, 180; John C. Breckinridge, 72; John Bell, 39; Stephen A.

  • ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL (1847-), American inventor and physicist, son of Alexander Melville Bell, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 3rd of March 1847.

  • Alexander Melville Bell >>

  • He made powerful onslaughts on the Church in connexion with the Bell and Lancaster controversy, and took a prominent part in the discussions which led to the foundation of London University in 1825.

  • 4) the island on condition of a tribute, which was hardly paid by Theodoric. Sicily was now ruled by a Gothic count, and the Goths claimed to have treated the land with special tenderness (Procopius, Bell.

  • Theodoric gave back Lilybaeum to the Vandal king Thrasamund as the dcwry Sicily and kidnapping that followed them, filled the Mediter of his sister Analafrida (Proc. Bell.

  • Yet Lilybaeum was a Gothic possession when Belisarius, conqueror of Africa, demanded it in vain as part of the Vandal possessions (Proc. Bell.

  • 5; Bell.

  • It consists of various trading stations and native towns close to one another on the south bank of the river and known, before the German occupation, as Cameroon, Bell town, Akwa town, &c. Hickory, on the north side of the stream and the starting point of the railway to the interior, is also part of Duala, which has a total population of 2 2,000, including about 170 Europeans.

  • Before this happened the "kings" of the chief trading stations - Akwa and Bell - were wealthy merchant princes.

  • The struggles between the Bell (Mbeli) and Akwa families were also largely composed.

  • A treaty with King Bell was negotiated by Dr Gustav Nachtigal, the signature of the king and the other chiefs being obtained at midnight on the 15th of July 1884.

  • Though too late to secure King Bell's territory, Mr Hewett concluded treaties with all the neighbouring chiefs, but the British government decided to recognize the German claim not only to Bell town, but to the whole Cameroon region.

  • Mechanism is provided whereby the speed of the paper is doubled on receipt of a shock, an electric bell ringing at the same time to summon an attendant.

  • Ebers, Egypt, Descriptive, Historical and Picturesque, translated from the erman edition of 1879 by Clara Bell, new edition, 2 vols.

  • Moberly Bell (published anonymously); D.

  • To take one's watch from the pocket and look at it when from a familiar clock-tower a familiar bell strikes a familiar hour, is an instance of a habitual action initiated by a sense perception outside attentive consciousness.

  • The same afternoon the guards in the streets and on the ramparts were doubled; on the following morning the gates of the city were closed, powder and bullets were distributed among the city train-bands, who were bidden to be in readiness when the alarm bell called them, and cavalry was massed on the environs of the city.

  • bell y donna, " beautiful lady," the berries having been used as a cosmetic), the roots and leaves of Atropa belladonna, or deadly nightshade, widely used in medicine on account of the alkaloids which they contain.

  • According to Caesar (Bell.

  • The Middlesbrough deposit was discovered by Bolckow and Vaughan in boring for water in 1862 at a depth of 400 yds., but was not utilized, and was again found by Messrs Bell Brothers at Port Clarence at a depth of 376 yds.

  • On the esplanade stands an obelisk to Henry Bell, the pioneer of steam navigation, who died at Helensburgh in 1830.

  • St Patrick's bell, long preserved at Armagh, the oldest Irish relic of its kind, is now, with its shrine of the year 1091, preserved in the museum of the Royal Irish Academy at Dublin.

  • A turret containing a huge bell was added in the 18th century, and restored after being injured by lightning in 1881.

  • Bell, Coins (1916); E.

  • Much of these last has been destroyed, and threatened encroachment upon the remaining relics so far aroused public feeling that in 5905 it was decided that the Board of Works should take over these ruins, including the Bell Tower, from the town council, and enclose them as national relics.

  • The Bell Tower, from which alarms were given when border raiders were observed, is in fair preservation.

  • The church of St Olai, first erected in 1240, and often rebuilt, was completed in 1840 in Gothic style; it has a bell tower 456 ft.

  • The Estates refused to give them an amnesty for seven years; and the arch rebel, Angus Bell the Cat, with Argyll, the young prince, Lennox and other malcontents, declared that he was deposed, and proclaimed his son as his successor and Argyll as chancellor.

  • In one of its towers is the famous bell, called Maria Gloriosa, which bears the date 1497, and weighs 270 cwt.

  • In 1762 he also leased the Brick - House, alias " Bell " works, at Burslem.

  • Bell (1884).

  • "GERTRUDE MARGARET LOWTHIAN BELL (1868-), English traveller and geographer, was born at Washington, Durham, July 14 1868, the eldest daughter of Sir T.

  • Hugh Bell, Bart.

  • Designed by Aston Webb and Ingres Bell, and executed by Dent And Hellier.

  • Here the anode is fixed in a bell, mounted in a larger iron tank where the cathodes are placed.

  • The intermediate layer of the salt solution, floating over the caustic soda solution, plays the part of a diaphragm, by preventing the chlorine evolved in the bell from acting on the sodium hydrate formed outside, and this solution offers much less resistance to the electric current than the ordinary diaphragms. This process therefore consumes less power than most others.

  • Boltzmann Suggested That A Diatomic Molecule Regarded As A Rigid Dumb Bell Or Figure Of Rotation, Might Have Only Five Effective Degrees Of Freedom, Since The Energy Of Rotation About The Axis Of Symmetry Could Not Be Altered By Collisions Between The Molecules.

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