Belfast sentence example

belfast
  • He was educated at Taunton, Dublin and Belfast, and graduated at Queen's College, Belfast, in 1853.
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  • Since then it has met in Philadelphia, Belfast, London, Toronto, Glasgow, Washington and Liverpool.
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  • A stone inauguration chair of the O'Neills is preserved in the Belfast Museum.
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  • As a fellow and lecturer of his college he remained in Cambridge for two years longer, and then left to take up the professorship of mathematics at Queen's College, Belfast.
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  • It is greatly frequented as a watering-place, especially by the people of Belfast, and there are golf links and important regattas held by the Royal Ulster Yacht Club.
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  • "OSBORNE REYNOLDS (1842-1912), British engineer, was born at Belfast in 1842.
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  • Among the industries of Belfast are trade with the surrounding country, the manufacture of shoes, leather boards, axes, and sashes, doors and blinds, and the building and repairing of boats.
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  • Belfast was first settled (by Scottish-Irish) in 1769, and in 1773 was incorporated as a town under its present name (from Belfast, Ireland).
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  • Belfast was chartered as a city in 1850.
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  • On the 26th to 27th of August the combined forces engaged and defeated Botha in the action of Belfast or Bergendal, with the result that the enemy dispersed into the bush-veld north of the Middelburg railway.
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  • Before 1825, when the excise duty was introduced into Ireland, there were flourishing glassworks in Belfast, Cork, Dublin and Waterford.
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  • Glass-cutting was carried on at works in Birmingham, Bristol, Belfast, Cork, Dublin, Glasgow, London, Newcastle, Stourbridge, Whittington and Waterford.
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  • In Ireland there were works in Belfast, Cork, Dublin and Waterford.
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  • A Solemn League and Covenant was signed here in 1644 for the defence of the kingdom, and the document is preserved at Belfast.
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  • At the age of twelve he was sent to a grammar school in Belfast, whence he removed in 1746 to study medicine in Glasgow.
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  • Communications are monopolized by the Great Northern railway company, whose main line from Belfast divides at Portadown, sending off lines to Omagh, to Clones and to Dublin.
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  • Passenger steamers serve Belfast and Londonderry regularly, and the Isle of Man and other ports during the season.
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  • It is a seaport of the first rank, situated at the entrance of the river Lagan into Belfast Lough, 1121 m.
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  • It is an important railway centre, with terminal stations of the Great Northern, Northern Counties (Midland of England), and Belfast & County Down railways, and has regular passenger communication by sea with Liverpool, Fleetwood, Heysham, Glasgow, and other ports of Great Britain.
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  • One thoroughfare thus constructed at the close of the 19th century is the finest in Belfast - Royal Avenue.
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  • Campbell, a Belfast merchant, who left 200,000 for the building and endowment of a public school.
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  • The pulpit was formerly used in the nave of Westminster Abbey, being presented to Belfast cathedral by the dean and chapter of that foundation.
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  • The Presbyterians and Protestant Episcopalians each outnumber the Roman Catholics in Belfast, and these three are the chief religious divisions.
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  • The country surrounding Belfast is agreeable and picturesque, whether along the shores of the Lough or towards the girdle of hills to the west; and is well wooded and studded with country seats and villas.
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  • Here also are McArt's Fort and other earthworks, and from here the importance of the physical position of Belfast may be appreciated to the full.
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  • Belfast Lough is of great though quiet beauty; and the city itself is seen at its best from its seaward approach, with its girdle of hills in the background.
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  • Of these Whitehouse and White Abbey are the principal on the western shore, and on the eastern, Holywood, which ranks practically as a suburb of Belfast, and, at the entrance to the lough, Bangor.
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  • The harbour and docks of Belfast are managed by a board of harbour commissioners, elected by the ratepayers and the shipowners.
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  • By the Belfast Harbour Acts the commissioners were empowered to borrow more than 2,500,000 in order to carry out several new works and improvements in the port.
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  • The vast increase of the foreign trade of Belfast marks its development, like Liverpool, as a great distributing port.
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  • Belfast also has some of the largest tobacco works and rope works in the world.
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  • In conformity with the passing of the Municipal Corporations Act of 1840 the constitution of the corporation was made to consist of ten aldermen and thirty councillors, under the style and title of " The Mayor, Aldermen, and Burgesses of the Borough of Belfast."
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  • In 1888 the rank of a city was conferred by royal charter upon Belfast, with the incidental rank, liberties, privileges, and immunities.
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  • In 1892 Queen Victoria conferred upon the mayor of the city the title of lord mayor, and upon the corporation the name and description of The Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of the city of Belfast."
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  • By the passing of the Belfast Corporation Act of 1896, the boundary of the city was extended, and the corporation made to consist of fifteen aldermen and forty-five councillors, and the number of wards was increased from five to fifteen.
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  • By virtue of the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898, Belfast became a county borough on the 1st of April 1899.
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  • By the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898, Belfast became for assize purposes "the county of the city of Belfast," with a high sheriff.
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  • It may be noted here that Belfast Castle was finally burnt in 1708; but a modern mansion,, on Cave Hill, outside the city, bears that name.
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  • About the beginning of the 16th century, Belfast is described as a town and fortress, but it was in reality a mere fishing village in the hands of the house of O'Neill.
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  • In the course of the wars of Gerald Fitzgerald, 8th earl of Kildare, Belfast was twice attacked by him, in 1503 and 1512.
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  • The O'Neills, always opposed to the English, had forfeited every baronial right; but in 1552 Hugh O'Neill of Clandeboye promised allegiance to the reigning monarch, and obtained the castle of Carrickfergus, the town and fortress of Belfast, and all the surrounding lands.
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  • Belfast was then restored from the half ruined state into which it had fallen, and the castle was garrisoned.
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  • The turbulent successors of O'Neill having been routed by the English, the town and fortress were obtained by grant dated the 16th of November 1571 by Sir Thomas Smith, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, but were afterwards forfeited by him to the lord deputy Sir Arthur Chichester, who, in 1612, was created Baron Chichester of Belfast.
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  • In 1632 Thomas Wentworth, Earl Strafford, was appointed first lord deputy of Ireland, and Belfast soon shared largely in the benefits of his enlightened policy, receiving, among other favours, certain fiscal rights which his lordship had purchased from the corporation of Carrickfergus.
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  • Throughout the succeeding fifty years the progress of Belfast surpassed that of most other towns in Ireland.
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  • When the king arrived at Belfast in that year there were only two places of worship in the town, the old corporation church in the High Street, and the Presbyterian meeting-house in Rosemary Lane, the Roman Catholics not being permitted to build their chapels within the walls of corporate towns.
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  • At the beginning of the 18th century Belfast had become known as a place of considerable trade, and was then thought a handsome, thriving and well-peopled town, with many new houses and good shops.
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  • In September 1737, Henry and Robert Joy started the Belfast News Letter.
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  • New York is served by the American line, the North German Lloyd line, &c. Regular steamers serve the Channel Islands, Cherbourg and Havre, the principal English ports, Dublin, Belfast and Glasgow; and local steamers serve Cowes (Isle of Wight) and other neighbouring ports.
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  • On both coasts there are several frequented watering-places, of which may be mentioned on the north Portrush (with well-known golf links), Port Ballintrae and Ballycastle; on the east Cushendun, Cushendall and Milltown on Red Bay, Carn Lough and Glenarm, Larne, and Whitehead on Belfast Lough.
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  • The latter flows to Belfast Lough, the former drains Lough Neagh, which is fed by a number of smaller streams, among them the Crumlin, whose waters have petrifying powers.
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  • Volcanic necks may be recognized at Carrick-a-rede, in the intrusive mass of dolerite at Slemish, at Carnmoney near Belfast, and a few other points.
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  • Cotton-spinning by jennies was first introduced by Robert Joy and Thomas M ` Cabe of Belfast in 1777; and an estimate made twenty-three years later showed upwards of 27,000 hands employed in this industry within 10 m.
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  • Except that the Great Northern railway line from Belfast to the south and west runs for a short distance close to the southern boundary of the county, with a branch from Lisburn to the town of Antrim, the principal lines of communication are those of the Northern Counties system, under the control of the Midland railway of England.
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  • The chief routes are: - Belfast, Antrim, Ballymena (and thence to Coleraine and Londonderry); a line diverging from this at White Abbey to Carrickfergus and Larne, the port for Stranraer in Scotland; branches from Ballymena to Larne and to Parkmore; and from Coleraine to Portrush.
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  • Belfast though constituting a separate county ranks as the metropolis of the district.
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  • Belfast and Lame are the chief ports.
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  • The assize town is Belfast, and quarter sessions are held at Ballymena, Ballymoney, Belfast, Lame and Lisburn.
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  • The cromlechs most worthy of notice are: one near Cairngrainey, to the north-east of the old road from Belfast to Templepatrick; the large cromlech at Mount Druid, near Ballintoy; and one at the northern extremity of Island Magee.
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  • He was educated at the Royal College of Belfast, entered the Presbyterian ministry in 1835, and was appointed professor of biblical criticism at his own college.
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  • In Ireland the Hibernian Bible Society (originally known as the Dublin Bible Society) was founded in 1806, and with it were federated kindred Irish associations formed at Cork, Belfast, Derry, &c. The Hibernian Bible Society, whose centenary was celebrated in 1906, had then issued a total of 5,713,837 copies.
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  • British commerce therefore suffered severely, even as far off as the Irish coasts, where it was found necessary to supply convoy to the Belfast linen trade.
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  • The railways leaving Dublin are the following: the Great Northern, with its terminus in Amiens Street, with suburban lines, and a main line running north to Drogheda, Dundalk and Belfast, with ramifications through the northern countries; the Great Southern & Western (Kingsbridge terminus) to Kilkenny, Athlone and Cork; the Midland Great Western (Broadstone terminus), to Cavan, Sligo and Galway; the Dublin & South-Eastern (Harcourt Street and Westland Row for Kingstown); and there is the North Wall station of the London & North-Western, with the line known as the North Wall extension, connecting with the other main lines.
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  • After a period of retirement he reappeared in 1880, his final performance being given at Belfast in 1896.
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  • Newport News is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, of which it is a terminus; by river boats to Richmond and Petersburg, Va.; by coastwise steamship lines to Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Providence; by foreign steamship lines to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Dublin, Belfast, Rotterdam, Hamburg and other ports; and by electric lines to Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Portsmouth.
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  • In his Belfast address (1874), while admitting that matter as understood by Democritus is insufficient, because atoms without sensation cannot be imagined to produce sensation, he contended, nevertheless, that matter properly understood is " the promise and potency of all terrestrial life."
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  • His famous Belfast address (1874), delivered as president of the British Association, made a great stir among those who were then busy with the supposed conflict between science and religion; and in his occasional writings - Fragments of Science, as he called them, "for unscientific people" - he touched on current conceptions of prayer, miracles, &c., with characteristic straightforwardness and vigour.
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  • This is the system of the Presbyterian Churches, the missions of which are entirely controlled by the General Assemblies in Edinburgh, Belfast and London respectively.
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  • The goods manufactured, now no longer, as formerly, coarse in texture, vie with the finer and more delicate fabrics of Belfast.
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  • But its importance was sapped by the vicinity of Belfast, and its historical associations are now its chief interest.
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  • In 1880 the Victoria University, Manchester, was established, in which teaching and examining were again united; and in the universities since established, with the exception of the Royal University of Ireland (which was created in 1880 as an examining body on the model of London, but which was dissolved under the Irish Universities Act 1908, and replaced by the National University of Ireland and the Queen's University of Belfast), the precedent of Victoria has been followed.
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  • In 1613 Chichester was raised to the peerage as Baron Chichester of Belfast, and in the following year he went to England to give an account of the state of Ireland.
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  • This nobleman's eldest son Arthur(1606-1675),who distinguished himself as Colonel Chichester in the suppression of the rebellion of 1641, was created earl of Donegall in 1647, and was succeeded in his titles by his nephew, whose great-grandson, Arthur, 5th earl of Donegall, was created Baron Fisherwick in the peerage of Great Britain (the other family titles being in the peerage of Ireland) in 1790, and earl of Belfast and marquess of Donegall in the peerage of Ireland in 1791.
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  • In connexion with improvements in retting, Mr Michael Andrews, secretary of the Belfast Flax Supply Association, made some suggestions and experiments which deserve close attention.
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  • The Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland, and the Belfast Flax Supply Association, have jointly made some experiments with this method, and the following extract from the Association's report for 1905 shows the success which attended their efforts: " By desire of the department (which has taken up the position of an impartial critic of the experiment) a quantity of flax straw was divided into two equal lots.
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  • An experiment made by Professor Hodges of Belfast on 7770 lb of air-dried flax yielded the following results.
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  • The chief British ports for the landing of flax are: - Belfast, Dundee, Leith, Montrose, London and Arbroath, the two former being the chief centres of the flax industry.
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  • The following table, taken from the annual report of the Belfast Flax Supply Association, shows the quantities received from all sources into the different parts of the United Kingdom: - W, Wrack flax.
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  • For the purpose of showing the relative importance of British and Irish ports falling below the list, the following figures may be quoted for 1909 only: Methil, entered 824,375 tons, cleared 1,105,048 tons; Harwich, entered 792,980, cleared 776,595; Grangemouth, entered 988,007, cleared 1,064,217; Burntisland, entered 609,722, cleared 815,507; Bristol, entered858,933, cleared 615,266; Goole, entered 815,177, cleared 817,226; Hartlepool, entered 934, 8 3 6, cleared 730,141; Newhaven, entered 385,313, cleared 376,083; Folkestone, entered 364,524, cleared 359,697; Belfast, entered 490,51 3, cleared 165,670; Borrowstounness (Bo'ness), entered 3 01, 549, cleared 292,194; Dublin, entered 219,081, cleared 80,868; Cork, entered 146,724, cleared 7413; Maryport and Workington, entered 118,388, cleared 67,494 The figures for Plymouth have included vessels which call "off" the port to embark passengers, &c., by tender only since 1907; for 1909 they were: entered, 1,455,605; cleared, 1,292,244.
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  • It was founded as Queen's College, with other colleges of the same name at Belfast and Cork, under an act of 1845, and its name was changed when it was granted a new charter pursuant to the Irish Universities Act 1908.
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  • Until the middle of the 19th century it ranked second only to Dublin, but is now surpassed by Belfast in commercial importance.
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  • The most notable educational establishment is the University College, founded as Queen's College (1849), with those of the same name at Belfast and Galway, under an Act of 1845.
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  • Also an Irish section, the Belfast and Northern Counties system being acquired in 1903.
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  • Docks at Heysham, Lancashire; and steamship services to Belfast, &c.
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  • Fish, canned goods, potatoes, granite, lime, paper, and boots and shoes are also exported to foreign countries to some extent, but they are shipped in larger quantities to other states of the Union, from which Maine receives in return cotton, coal, iron, oil, &c. The ports of entry in Maine are Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk, Machias, Portland, Wiscasset and York.
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  • Forgiveness was easy to a man of Temple's elevation and temperament, and he not only despatched the necessary recommendation but added a personal request which obtained for Swift the small prebend of Kilroot near Belfast (January 1695), where the new incumbent carried on a premature flirtation with a Miss Jane Waring, whom he called "Varina."
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  • The result of this commission was the foundation of the National University of Ireland, with three colleges (Dublin, Cork and Galway), and the Queen's University, Belfast.
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  • Steamers run every week-day to Arran and Belfast, and during summer there is a service also to Douglas in the Isle of Man.
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  • Before it was introduced he went to Belfast in Easter week, and at a great demonstration, presided over by Sir Edward Carson, encouraged the Ulstermen to trust to themselves; Belfast was again, he said, a besieged city; the Government by the Parliament Act had erected a boom against them - they would burst that boom; and it would be said of them that they had saved themselves by their exertions, and would save the Empire by their example.
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  • Not only did he render a steady support to Ministers in Parliament; but he aided the national cause and promoted recruiting by speeches at Guild hall, in Belfast and elsewhere; and even when criticism of the mismanagement of the war began legitimately to raise its head in the early months of 1915, he used his influence, in the national interest, to repress or moderate its expression in Parliament.
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  • Down, Ireland, beautifully situated near the northern extremity of Strangford Lough, on a branch of the Belfast and Co.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (the Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line, the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic; the Northern Central; the Western Maryland and the Maryland & Pennsylvania railways; and by steamship lines running directly to all the more important ports on the Atlantic coast of the United States, to ports in the West Indies and Brazil, to London, Liverpool, Southampton, Bristol, Leith, Glasgow, Dublin, Belfast, Havre, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Bremen, Hamburg and other European ports.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Belfast discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • There is regular communication by steamer with Cork, with Dublin and Belfast, with Fishguard, Glasgow, Liverpool, Bristol, Plymouth, Southampton, London and other ports.
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  • In 1705 the Belfast Society was founded for theological discussion by Presbyterian ministers in the north, with the result of creating a body of opinion adverse to subscription to the Westminster standards.
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  • Till 1889 they maintained two theological chairs in Belfast, where John Scott Porter (1801-1880) was a pioneer in biblical criticism; they now send their students to England for their theological education, though in certain respects their views and practices are more conservative than those of their English brethren.
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  • A meeting of some 6000 persons in Belfast voted a congratulatory address to the French nation in July 1791.
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  • Reaching county Antrim, green wooded hills plunge directly into the sea; the deep Belfast Lough strikes some 10 m.
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  • All across Ireland, from the Ballyhoura Hills on the Cork border to the southern shore of Belfast Lough, slaty and sandy Silurian beds appear in the axes of the anticlinal folds, surrounded by Old Red Sandstone scarps or Carboniferous Limestone lowlands.
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  • The Permian sea has left traces at Holywood on Belfast Lough and near Stewartstown in county Tyrone.
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  • This increase was mainly due to the growth of a few of the larger towns, notably of Belfast, the chief industrial centre of Ireland.
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  • Between 1891 and 1901 Belfast increased from 273,079 to 349,180; Dublin from 268,587 to 289,108; and Londonderry, another industrial centre in Ulster, from 33,200 to 39,873.
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  • In 1836 the Ulster railway to connect Belfast and Armagh, and the Dublin and Drogheda railway uniting these two towns were sanctioned.
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  • In Ulster the Bann navigation connects Coleraine, by means of Lough Neagh, with the Lagan navigation which serves Belfast; and the Ulster canal connects Lough Neagh with Lough Erne.
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  • Belfast is the centre and market of the trade, but mills and factories are to be found dotted all over the eastern counties of Ulster.
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  • Cotton Manufacture.-This was introduced into Ireland in 1 777 and under the protection of import duties and bounties increased so rapidly that in 1800 it gave employment to several thousand persons, chiefly in the neighbourhood of Belfast.
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  • The following table shows the net annual amount of excise duties received in Ireland in a series of years: Other Industries.-Shipbuilding is practically confined to Belfast, where the firm of Harland and Wolff, the builders of the great " White Star " liners, have one of the largest yards in the world, giving employment to several thousand hands.
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  • The following table shows the value of the total imports and exports of merchandise in the foreign and colonial trade at the ports of Dublin, Belfast and Limerick in each of the years 1901-1905: The Department of Agriculture published in 1906 a report on the imports and exports at Irish ports for the year 1904.
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  • The towns of Galway, Limerick and Waterford lost one member each, while Dublin and Belfast were respectively divided into four divisions, each returning one member.
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  • Six towns-Dublin, Belfast, Cork, Limerick, Londonderry and Waterford-were constituted county boroughs governed by separate county councils; and five boroughs-Kilkenny, Sligo, Clonmel, Drogheda and Wexford-retained their former corporations.
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  • At the first vacancy the title and rank of chief baron of the exchequer will be abolished and the office reduced to a puisne judgeship. By the County Officers and Courts (Ireland) Act 1877, it was provided that the chairmen of quarter sessions should be called " county court judges and chairmen of quarter sessions " and that their number should be reduced to twenty-one, which was to include the recorders of Dublin, Belfast, Cork, Londonderry and Galway.
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  • Two colleges are connected with the denomination, the General Assembly's College, Belfast, and the.
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  • In 1881 the faculty of the Belfast College and the theological professors of the Magee College were incorporated and constituted as a faculty with the power of granting degrees in divinity.
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  • The three Queen's Colleges, at Belfast, Cork and Galway, were founded in 1849 and until 1882 formed the Queen's University.
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  • They were open to all denominations, but, as might be expected, the Belfast college (dissolved under the Irish Universities Act 1908; see below) was almost entirely Protestant.
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  • The Irish Universities Act 1908 provided for the foundation of two new universities, having their seats respectively at Dublin and at Belfast.
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  • The Royal University of Ireland at Dublin and the Queen's College, Belfast, were dissolved.
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  • Letters patent dated December 2, 1908, granted charters to these foundations under the titles of the National University of Ireland (Dublin), the Queen's University of Belfast and the University Colleges of Dublin, Cork and Galway.
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  • There are two Presbyterian colleges, the General Assembly's College at Belfast, which is purely theological, and the Magee College, Londonderry, which has literary, scientific and theological courses.
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  • Clarendon, A Sketch of the Revenue and Finances of Ireland (1791); the annual reports of the Flax Supply Association and other local bodies, published at Belfast; reports by the Department of Agriculture on Irish imports and exports (these are a new feature and contain much valuable information).
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  • At Belfast in the preceding June Lord Spencer, who afterwards became a Home Ruler, had announced that the secret conspirators would " not terrify the English nation."
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  • At Dublin they were well received, and at Belfast enthusiastically, but there were hostile demonstrations at Mallow and Cork.
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  • Terrible riots took place at Belfast in June, July and August.
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  • During the year 1892 a vast number of Unionist meetings were held throughout Ireland, the most remarkable being the great Ulster convention in Belfast, and that of the three other provinces in Dublin, on the 14th and 23rd of June.
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  • It recommended an examining university with the Queen's Colleges at Belfast, Cork and Galway, and with a new and well-endowed Roman Catholic college in Dublin.
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  • Under powers obtained from parliament in 1896, the Midland Railway Company constructed, and opened in 1904, a harbour, enclosed by breakwaters, for the development of traffic with Belfast and other Irish ports, a daily passenger-service of the first class being established to Belfast.
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  • The derisively small number of people made amenable for these crimes have been released under the Belfast agreement.
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  • That would put the enlarged East Belfast in the right ballpark.
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  • The year I left Belfast, 1999, Drumcree passed off with an eerie calm.
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  • The Ramsar boundary is entirely coincident with that of the Belfast Lough Special Protection Area.
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  • The city of Belfast, however, was periodically convulsed by sectarian rioting.
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  • The horrific blast left a huge crater in the main Belfast to Dublin road.
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  • The conference dinner will be held on board the historic WWII battle cruiser HMS Belfast.
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  • Mr M McGuinness: I have just returned from visiting a primary school in one of the most socially deprived areas of Belfast.
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  • I believe, and the news report would certainly confirm, that he still runs a secondhand record emporium in Belfast.
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  • Similarly it is very likely that no Catholics live in Tiger's Bay, a Protestant enclave in West Belfast.
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  • An economist friend long ago proposed the erection of a statue in Belfast to ' The Unknown British Taxpayer ' .
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  • However, the summits along the edge of the basalt escarpment have much steeper slopes which plummet toward Belfast.
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  • A retrospective exhibition of his work was held in 1981 at the Malone Gallery in Belfast.
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  • Methods: Seventy-two traumatically extruded permanent incisors were studied at the Departments of Pediatric Dentistry in Belfast, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Glasgow.
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  • He studied fine art at the University of Ulster and currently divides his time between Dublin and Belfast.
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  • Saturday 1 January 1994 The Irish Republican Army (IRA) planted a 11 firebombs in shops and other premises in and around Belfast.
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  • As a reporter in the Belfast office of the Dublin-based Sunday World he had investigated the criminal and paramilitary activities of loyalist gangs.
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  • At the University's summer graduations, the first cohort of architecture students studying at the Belfast campus received their degrees.
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  • Bramble The sixth Bramble was a 6-gun screw gunboat, launched at Belfast in 1886.
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  • His working life was spent in education, and included a headship at Lisnasharragh High School, Belfast.
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  • Glaciolacustrine deposits indicate that during initial deglaciation the lower valley contained an ice-dammed lake, probably impounded by Scottish ice in outer Belfast Lough.
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  • During the evening groups of Loyalist rioters began to make incursions into the Catholic Short Strand enclave of east Belfast.
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  • A colored lithograph by Jacob Connop, entitled " A Bird's Eye View of Belfast " was issued In 1863.
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  • Belfast lough is a large, open sea lough located on the north-eastern coast of Northern Ireland.
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  • A year before, on 12 February 1989, Eleanor McKerr's lawyer, Pat Finucane was murdered by loyalists in Belfast.
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  • For five months, a concerted media onslaught launched against republicans followed the Northern Bank robbery and the murder of Robert McCartney in Belfast.
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  • Available: Summer 2005 Belfast sink with weir BAK 710 Franke Professional Range standard Belfast sink with traditional weir overflow and 45mm waste.
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  • In the study, a team of Belfast researchers measured oxygen saturation levels - the amount of oxygen saturation levels - the amount of oxygen carried in the blood.
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  • Northern Ireland's only purely photographic gallery space is situated here in Belfast.
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  • Wednesday 2 July 1986 unionist politicians established their own version of the Northern Ireland Assembly in Belfast City Hall.
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  • The lack of English support for maintaining the Union with Northern Ireland long predates the Belfast Agreement.
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  • Belfast in the 1790s was well primed for revolution.
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  • Members of Belfast City Council had to determine his pay, and we had to ensure that he was properly remunerated.
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  • The large population movements in 1969 and 1971, described above, had the effect of worsening the housing shortage in West Belfast.
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  • Thank you HMS Belfast for giving us the opportunity to do something special for our birthday, we can't wait to return " .
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  • When it was light I peeped through the portholes and saw Belfast's dull wharves and warehouses looking sulky in the gray morning mist.
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  • For example, in 1990 the Orange Order held a special parade in Belfast to mark the tercentenary of the Battle of the Boyne.
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  • See the political murals and explore the underbelly of the city in your taxi with a real Belfast local at the wheel.
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  • As a result the summer months witnessed an upsurge in sectarian violence particularly in Belfast.
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  • At its meeting in Belfast in 1884 a report was submitted by a" committee on the eldership "which had been previously appointed.
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  • By 1907 altogether 59 local authorities had examined the proposition of establishing telephone systems after 1899, and licences were granted to local authorities at Brighton, Belfast, Chard, Glasgow, Grantham, Huddersfield, Hull, Portsmouth, Swansea, Tunbridge Wells, Oldham, Scarborough and Hartle - pool, but only six municipalities proceeded with the business.
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  • 1912 he made a daring incursion into Ulster, in order to advocate Home Rule at Belfast; but he was wise enough to give up his original intention of making the Ulster Hall, with its Orange and Protestant associations, the scene of his meeting, and also to represent the Government plan as an integral part of parliamentary devolution.
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  • Get them out of Northern Ireland to a neutral venue, beyond the rumor mills of Belfast.
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  • To do so we chose to sample the pastie choices on offer from some of Belfast 's most salubrious eating establishments.
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  • Terry, Belfast on June 24th, 2005 This is also my first non sky digibox and so far so good !
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  • Then look no further than HMS Belfast 's ' Kip in a Ship ' sleepover accommodation !
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  • Thank you HMS Belfast for giving us the opportunity to do something special for our birthday, we ca n't wait to return .
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  • When it was light I peeped through the portholes and saw Belfast 's dull wharves and warehouses looking sulky in the gray morning mist.
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  • For example, in 1990 the Orange Order held a special parade in Belfast to mark the Tercentenary of the Battle of the Boyne.
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  • We load the bikes into the guard 's van at Lisburn Train station and trundle back to Belfast.
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  • The Belfast Agreement was endorsed by 71.1 per cent of NI voters in a referendum held on 22 May.
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  • It has also been conferred during the closing years of the 19th century by letters patent on other cities - Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Bristol, Sheffield, Leeds, Cardiff, Bradford, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Belfast, Cork.
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