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behaves

behaves Sentence Examples

  • According to Armstrong, anthracene behaves unsymmetrically towards substituents, and hence one lateral ring differs from the other; he represents the molecule as consisting of one centric ring, the remaining medial and lateral ring being ethenoid.

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  • The nitro group behaves very similarly to the hydroxyl group. The effect of varying the position of the nitro group in the molecule is well marked, and conclusions may be drawn as to the orientation of the groups from a knowledge of the crystal form; a change in the symmetry of the chemical molecule being often attended by a loss in the symmetry of the crystal.

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  • It behaves as a strong acid and on treatment with phosphorus pentachloride at high temperatures gives triazole.

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  • On evaporating this solution the hydrated salt CoI 2.6H 2 0 is obtained in hexagonal prisms. It behaves in an analogous manner to CoBr 2.6H 2 0 on heating.

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  • In this respect the plasma behaves in a similar manner towards the sugars as does the living yeast cell.

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  • Its aqueous solution gradually decomposes with evolution of oxygen, behaves as a strong oxidant, and liberates iodine from potassium iodide.

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  • The solution on the addition of ammoniacal silver nitrate behaves similarly to that of potassium pentathionate, but differs from it in giving an immediate precipitate of sulphur with ammonia, whereas the solution of the pentathionate only gradually becomes turbid on standing.

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  • It behaves as a strong oxidant and in aqueous solution is slowly hydrolysed.

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  • A base may be regarded as water in which part of the hydrogen is replaced by a metal, or by a radical which behaves as a metal.

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  • By actual observations it has been shown that ether, alcohol, many esters of the normal alcohols and fatty acids, benzene, and its halogen substitution products, have critical constants agreeing with this originally empirical law, due to Sydney Young and Thomas; acetic acid behaves abnormally, pointing to associated molecules at the critical point.

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  • It behaves as a powerful reducing agent, and on hydrolysis with dilute mineral acids is decomposed into formaldehyde and hydroxylamine, together with some formic acid and ammonia, the amount of each product formed varying with temperature, time of reaction, amount of water present, &c. This latter reaction is probably due to some of the oxime existing in the form of the isomeric formamide HCO NH 2.

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  • It is very explosive, dissolves readily in water and behaves as a dibasic acid.

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  • Roughly speaking, therefore, cobalt behaves oppositely to iron.

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  • The truth appears to be that a hardened steel rod generally behaves like one of iron or soft steel in first undergoing extension under increasing magnetizing force, and recovering its original length when the force has reached a certain critical value, beyond which there is contraction.

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  • The influence of high temperature on cobalt was very remarkable, completely altering the character of the change of length: the curves for annealed cobalt show that at 45 this metal behaves just like iron at ordinary temperatures, lengthening in fields up to about 300 and contracting in stronger ones.

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  • Steel behaves in a similar manner, but the maximum permeability is not so high as in iron, and the fall, when the critical point is approached, is less abrupt.

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  • The symbol e 0 behaves exactly like i in ordinary algebra; Hamilton writes I, i, j, k instead of eo, el, e2, es, and in this notation all the special rules of operation may he summed up by the equalities = - I.

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  • The solution when subjected to distillation behaves very much like a physical solution of the oxide in hydrochloric acid, while a solution of orthostannic acid in hydrochloric acid behaves like a solution of SnC1 4 in water, i.e.

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  • In opposition to stannous chloride, even sulphurous acid (solution) behaves as an oxidizing agent.

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  • Glass containing gold behaves in almost precisely the same way, but the ruby glass is less crimson than copper ruby glass.

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  • It behaves as a reducing agent.

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  • Silicon, so far as we know, behaves to metals pretty much like carbon, but our knowledge of facts is limited.

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  • To acids and to alkalis it behaves like the oxide, but dissolves more readily.

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  • It is a white solid, which readily decomposes water in the cold and behaves as a strong reducing agent.

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  • The ordinary hydrated variety forms quadratic crystals and behaves as a strong base.

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  • The thinnest possible spherical shell of metal, such as a sphere of insulator coated with gold-leaf, behaves as a conductor for static charge just as if it were a sphere of solid metal.

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  • It is a colourless solid and behaves as a dibasic acid.

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  • It behaves more as a ketone than as a quinone, since with hydroxylamine it yields an oxime, and on reduction with zinc dust and caustic soda it yields a secondary alcohol, whilst it cannot be reduced by means of sulphurous acid.

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  • Friend, The Theory of Valency (1909), p. iii.) The aqueous solution behaves on concentration similarly to the other halogen acids; E.

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  • It dissolves in three parts of water of o° C. The solution behaves pretty much as if its two congeners, K 2 SO 4 and H 2 SO 4, were present side by side of each other uncombined.

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  • Formaldehyde behaves abnormally with magnesium benzyl bromide (M.

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  • In addition to behaving as a basic oxide, aluminium oxide (or hydrate) behaves as an acid oxide towards the strong bases with the formation of aluminates.

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  • On germination, however, the fungus behaves in the same way as one which has entered in the seedling stage.

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  • Benzene diazonium hydroxide, although a strong base, reacts with the alkaline hydroxides to form salts with the evolution of heat, and generally behaves as a weak acid.

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  • Strontium hydride behaves similarly.

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  • The first compound, containing a group COH, or more explicitly 0 = CH, is an aldehyde, having a pronounced reducing power, producing silver from the oxide, and is therefore called propylaldehyde; the second compound containing the group - C CO C - behaves differently but just as characteristically, and is a ketone, it is therefore denominated propylketone (also acetone or dimethyl ketone).

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  • It crystallizes in deliquescent prisms and melts with partial decomposition at 119-120° C. It behaves as a ketonic acid, being reduced in aqueous solution by sodium amalgam to tartronic acid, and also combining with phenylhydrazine and hydroxylamine.

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  • It behaves as a monobasic acid and forms unstable salts.

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  • It crystallizes (from water) in glistening leaflets which melt at 130° C. and boil at 288° C. Its silver salt behaves as if it were the salt of an imido benzoic acid, since it yields benzimido ethyl ether C 6 H 5 C(:NH) OC 2 H 5 with ethyl iodide (J.

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  • In most cases it behaves as a divalent element, but it may also be quadrivalent.

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  • If the saturated vapour behaves as a perfect gas, the change of intrinsic energy E depends only on the temperature limits, and is equal to s (8-00), where s is the specific heat at constant volume.

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  • 37, p. 504, 1889) to give values of the total heat to to 6 calories too large between o° and 40° C. At low pressures and temperatures it is probable that saturated steam behaves very nearly as an ideal gas, and that the variation of the total heat is closely represented by Rankine's equation with the ideal value of S.

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  • The simplest assumptions to make are that the vapour behaves as a perfect gas (or that p(v-w) = Re), and that L is constant.

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  • Succinyl chloride, obtained by the action of phosphorus pentachloride on succinic acid, is a colourless liquid which boils at 190° C. In many respects it behaves as though it were dichlorbutyro-lactone, /CC12 C 2 He >O; e.g.

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  • He found that mercury specially prepared behaves quite differently from ordinary mercury, and that a drop of water deposited thereon spreads over the entire surface.

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  • It has an alkaline reaction and behaves as a tertiary, monacid base; its salts are soluble in water and alcohol.

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  • It is sparingly soluble in water (one part in 3000); and the moist oxide frequently behaves as the hydroxide, AgOH, i.e.

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  • It is decomposed by heat, burns with a blue flame, and behaves as a reducing agent.

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  • It melts at 22-23° C. and boils at 240° C., and behaves in most respects similarly to quinoline.

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  • group is very reactive and behaves in a similar manner to the grouping CO CH 2 CO in open chain compounds, e.g.

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  • Alcohols may be readily prepared from the corresponding alkyl haloid by the action of moist silver oxide (which behaves as silver hydroxide); by the saponification of their esters; or b the reduction of of h dric alcohols by P Y Y with hydriodic acid, and the subsequent conversion of the resulting alkyl iodide into the alcohol by moist silver oxide.

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  • or 4° C. Above this point water continuously expands, and at no temperature is it less dense than ice as is shown by the following table: - Density of ice at o°C. = 9175 „ water at o°C. = 99988 4°C. = 1.00000 Io °C. _ 99976 Ioo°C. _ 95866 Under the influence of heat, ice itself behaves as most solids do, contracting when cooled, expanding when heated.

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  • At angles other than the polarizing angle common light gives a reflected stream .that behaves as a mixture of common light with light polarized in the plane of incidence, and is accordingly said to be partially polarized in that plane.

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  • In some reactions it behaves as having the first formula, in others as having the second.

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  • then rahd); at the end of every word it behaves like ts, that is to say, changes.into u (preu, p, r e t i u m); instead of ts the second person plural of the verba t(i)s, e t(i)s, it(i)snow has au, eu, ia after having had ats, els its..

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  • We see to it that the rest of our population behaves within certain guidelines.

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  • C 60 behaves very much like an electron deficient alkene and readily reacts with electron rich species.

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  • The numeric problem occurs at 0, where the function behaves like, which has the y axis as a vertical asymptote.

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  • behaves in a fashion that generally agrees with the empirical evidence.

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  • If we make large enough to expand the numerator using the binomial theorem (so that behaves as ), then as.

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  • At temperatures a long way below T m the polymer behaves like a solid, although it is not crystalline.

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  • Note also that the neuter noun, nomen, behaves according to the same rules as you met with bellum in the second declension.

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  • We now know that cold clean Antarctic ice behaves as a low loss dielectric over a wide range of radar frequencies.

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  • Before he retired, one of them was chief of the local gendarmerie - and often behaves as if he still is.

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  • mesmerizemooth, mesmerizing tone that behaves as it should.

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  • Dividing by a null value returns the numerator, thus here a null behaves like one.

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  • Rhodri Morgan behaves as if money is literally sloshing around Wales.

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  • He behaves like a witness, completely unattached to the world.

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  • Angie behaves in a very aggressive, violent way, and is very wilful, and hyperactive.

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  • It behaves as a di-acid as well as a di-tertiary base.

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  • We may observe how even a very primitive people such as the Arunta of Australia behaves with the greatest solemnity at its ceremonies, and professes to be made "glad" and "strong" thereby; whilst of his countrymen, whom he would not trust to pray in private, Plato testifies that in the temples during the sacrificial prayers "they show an intense earnestness and with eager interest talk to the Gods and beseech them" (Laws, 887).

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  • Of such syntheses we may notice: the condensation of sodium malonic ester to phloroglucin tricarboxylic ester, a substance which gives phloroglucin or trioxybenzene when fused with alkalis, and behaves both as a triketohexamethylene tricarboxylic ester and as a trioxybenzene tricarboxylic ester; the condensation of succinic ester, (CH2 C02C2H5)2, under the influence of sodium to succinosuccinic ester, a diketohexamethylene dicarboxylic ester, which readily yields dioxyterephthalic acid and hydroquinone (F.

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  • OH 0 CI N, C1 CI ??C1 01-1 0 (t) (2) (3) (4) (5) Phloroglucin (I.3.5-trioxybenzene) (i) behaves similarly to resorcin, hexachlor [1.3.5] triketo-R-hexylene (2) being first formed.

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  • Succinosuccinic ester behaves both as a ketone and as a phenol, thereby exhibiting desmotropy; assuming the ketone formula as indicating the constitution, then in Baeyer's equation we have a migration of a hydrogen atom, whereas to bring Ladenburg's formula into line, an oxygen atom must migrate.

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  • For example, boracite forms pseudo-cubic crystals which become truly cubic at 265°, with a distinct change in density; leucite behaves similarly at about 560°.

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  • The blood of most species behaves differentially towards precipitants, and it is therefore conceivable that when blood is used as food and is elaborated into special compounds for the nutrition of the reproductive organs of a parasite, these specific or larger differences in the blood of animal hosts may prevent the ripening of the gonads of a widely diffused parasite and only one particular kind of blood prove suitable.

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  • It dissolves in three parts of water of o° C. The solution behaves pretty much as if its two congeners, K 2 SO 4 and H 2 SO 4, were present side by side of each other uncombined.

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  • ] Hydrogen peroxide behaves very frequently as a powerful oxidizing agent; thus lead sulphide is converted into lead sulphate in presence of a dilute aqueous solution of the peroxide, the hydroxides of the alkaline earth metals are converted into peroxides of the type MO 2.8H 2 0, titanium dioxide is converted into the trioxide, iodine is liberated from potassium iodide, and nitriles (in alkaline solution) are converted into acid-amides (B.

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  • It crystallizes in deliquescent prisms and melts with partial decomposition at 119-120° C. It behaves as a ketonic acid, being reduced in aqueous solution by sodium amalgam to tartronic acid, and also combining with phenylhydrazine and hydroxylamine.

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  • It crystallizes (from water) in glistening leaflets which melt at 130° C. and boil at 288° C. Its silver salt behaves as if it were the salt of an imido benzoic acid, since it yields benzimido ethyl ether C 6 H 5 C(:NH) OC 2 H 5 with ethyl iodide (J.

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  • 37, p. 504, 1889) to give values of the total heat to to 6 calories too large between o° and 40° C. At low pressures and temperatures it is probable that saturated steam behaves very nearly as an ideal gas, and that the variation of the total heat is closely represented by Rankine's equation with the ideal value of S.

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  • Succinyl chloride, obtained by the action of phosphorus pentachloride on succinic acid, is a colourless liquid which boils at 190° C. In many respects it behaves as though it were dichlorbutyro-lactone, /CC12 C 2 He >O; e.g.

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  • It melts at 22-23° C. and boils at 240° C., and behaves in most respects similarly to quinoline.

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  • or 4° C. Above this point water continuously expands, and at no temperature is it less dense than ice as is shown by the following table: - Density of ice at o°C. = 9175 „ water at o°C. = 99988 4°C. = 1.00000 Io °C. _ 99976 Ioo°C. _ 95866 Under the influence of heat, ice itself behaves as most solids do, contracting when cooled, expanding when heated.

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  • "Natalya Ilynichna behaves very well to me," remarked Boris.

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  • I suspect largely because it is young and different, and behaves a bit like a stroppy teenager at times.

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  • The coverage is better too - where most non-mineral based loose powder seems to disappear quickly with little ability to smooth the skin, this powder behaves more like a compact powder in its ability to offer a longer lasting coverage.

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  • Knowing what you want, understanding how the creature in question behaves, and being aware of its actions will lead to the shot you're hoping for.

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  • Keep an eye on the way your child dresses and how she behaves around the opposite sex.

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  • The manner in which the teen handles these issues can make a difference in how he behaves toward himself and others.

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  • Most people believe this type of fondant tastes better, and it still behaves in much the same way as regular fondant: it can still be rolled out, folded into flowers or roses, and used to make figurines or intricate decorations.

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  • It seems that she behaves badly on set as well and is very well known in the industry as being extremely high maintenance and very difficult to work with.

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  • Each microwave behaves differently, so start at half power and heat for two to four minutes at a time, stirring between stages.

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  • Depending on how well your dog behaves, you may have to be patient because there may be numerous stops and starts in your grooming and nail painting adventure.

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  • It stands out in a sea of blacks, browns, camels and navies, yet it also somehow behaves in much the same way as those colors do.

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  • You can interact with other characters in the game, sometimes changing how characters react to you depending on how your on-screen avatar behaves.

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  • A socially competent preschool child behaves differently from a socially competent adolescent.

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  • The character of a person is shown through his or her personality, by the way the person thinks, feels, and behaves.

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  • Finally, the third component of personality is character-the set of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral patterns learned from experience that determines how a person thinks, feels, and behaves.

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  • The right haircuts for curly hair can make a world of difference in how the hair behaves.

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  • Dating allows you to see how someone behaves in the company of others.

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  • Let's explore how each of you behaves lovingly toward one another and how each of you demonstrates trust for the other person.

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  • However, you can't control how someone else feels or behaves, so you may have to just deal with this issue and hope that over time, the pain your ex feels lessens with minimal impact on your children.

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  • It's a mistake to believe you can tell a lot about a guy by how he behaves in a group.

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  • Use positive reinforcement when the class behaves correctly or takes a step towards reaching the goal.

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  • Bitter orange behaves similar to ephedra and should be used with caution.

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  • To some degree, by following a sensible diet, we can control blood pressure and how it behaves throughout our life span.

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  • The ability to integrate PHP within the HTML pages that you're accustomed to writing makes it very easy to learn how PHP behaves, and how you can use it to easily make your page far more interesting and dynamic.

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  • By this method it is shown that water, when present as " water of crystallization," behaves as if it were ice.

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