Beetles sentence example

beetles
  • The beetles are elegant insects with long, slender legs, running quickly, and flying in the sunshine.
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  • In male beetles, however, the two pairs of genital processes (paramera) belonging to the ninth abdominal segment are always present, though sometimes reduced.
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  • The luminous organs of these beetles consist of a specialized part of the fat-body, with an inner opaque and an outer transparent layer.
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  • Ganglbauer (1892) divides the whole order into two sub-orders only, the Caraboidea (the Adephaga of Sharp and the older writers) and the Cantharidoidea (including all other beetles), since the larvae of Caraboidea have five-segmented, two-clawed legs, while those of all other beetles have legs with four segments and a single claw.
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  • Kolbe, on the other hand, insists that the weevils are the most modified of all beetles, being highly specialized as regards their adult structure, and developing from legless maggots exceedingly different from the adult; he regards the Adephaga, with their active armoured larvae with two foot-claws, as the most primitive group of beetles, and there can be little doubt that the likeness between larvae and adult may safely be accepted as a primitive character among insects.
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  • As regards growth after hatching, all beetles undergo a "complete" metamorphosis, the wing-rudiments developing beneath the cuticle throughout the larval stages, and a resting pupal stage intervening between the last larval instal1 and the imago.
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  • Coming to the Tertiary we find the Oligocene beds of Aix, of east Prussia (amber) and of Colorado, and the Miocene of Bavaria, especially rich in remains of beetles, most of which can be referred to existing genera.
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  • Horn placed the Rhynchophora (weevils) in a group distinct from all other beetles, on account of their supposed primitive nature.
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  • The generalized arrangement of the wing-nervure and the nature of the larva, which is less unlike the adult than in other beetles, distinguish this tribe as primitive, although the perfect insects are, in the more dominant families, distinctly specialized.
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  • Two very small families of aquatic beetles seem to stand at the base of the series, the Amphizoidae, whose larvae are broad and well armoured with FIG.
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  • The beetles are ovoid in shape, with smooth contours, and the elytra fit over the edges of the abdomen so as to enclose a supply of air, available for use when the insect remains under water.
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  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.
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  • It is possibly for the purpose of feeding on parasitic mites that book-scorpions lodge themselves beneath the wing-cases of large tropical beetles; and the same explanation, in default of a better, may be extended to their well-known and oft-recorded habit of seizing hold of the legs of horse-flies or other two-winged insects.
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  • In many beetles the hindwings are reduced to mere vestiges useless for flight, or are altogether absent, and in such cases the two elytra are often fused together at the suture; thus organs originally intended for flight have been transformed into an armour-like covering for the beetle's hind-body.
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  • In the structure of the digestive system, beetles resemble most other mandibulate insects, the food-canal consisting of gullet, crop, gizzard, mid-gut or stomach, intestine and rectum.
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  • The nervous system is remarkably concentrated in some beetles, the abdominal ganglia showing a tendency to become shifted forward and crowded together, and in certain chafers all the thoracic and abdominal ganglia are fused into a single nervecentre situated in the thorax, - a degree of specialization only matched in the insectan class among the Hemiptera and some muscid flies.
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  • The most striking feature in the development of beetles is the great diversity noticeable in the outward form of the larva in different families.
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  • The distribution of many groups of beetles is restricted in correspondence with their habits; the Cerambycidae (longhorns), whose larvae are wood-borers, are absent from timberless regions, and most abundant in the great tropical forests.
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  • The beetles of the British islands afford some very interesting examples of restricted distribution among species.
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  • In general it may be stated that beetles live and feed in almost all the diverse ways possible for insects.
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  • Some of the scavengers, like the burying beetles, inter the bodies of small vertebrates to supply food for themselves and their larvae, or, like the "sacred" beetle of Egypt, collect for the same purpose stores of dung.
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  • Many beetles of different families have become the "unbidden guests" of civilized man, and may be found in dwelling-houses, stores and ships' cargoes, eating food-stuffs, paper, furniture, tobacco and drugs.
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  • Hence we find that beetles of some kind can hold their own anywhere on the earth's surface.
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  • A large number of beetles inhabit the deep limestone caves of Europe and North America, while many genera and some whole families are at home nowhere but in ants' nests.
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  • Most remarkable is the presence of a number of beetles along the seashore between tide-marks, where, sheltered in some secure nook, they undergo immersion twice daily, and have their active life confined to the few hours of the low ebb.
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  • Many beetles make a hissing or chirping sound by rubbing a "scraper," formed by a sharp edge or prominence on some part of their exoskeleton, over a "file" formed by a number of fine ridges situate on an adjacent region.
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  • The file may be on the head - either upper or lower surface - and the scraper formed by the front edge of the prothorax, as in various wood-boring beetles (Anobium and Scolytus).
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  • In a large number of beetles of different families, stridulating areas occur on various segments of the abdomen, and are scraped by the elytra.
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  • Whatever may be the true explanation of stridulating organs in adult beetles, sexual selection can have had nothing to do with the presence of these highly-developed larval structures.
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  • The eggs and larvae of the fire-flies are luminous as well as the perfect beetles.
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  • Such obvious features as the number of segments in the foot and the shape of the feeler were used by the early entomologists for distinguishing the great groups of beetles.
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  • Blind Carabidae form a large proportion of cave dwelling beetles, and several species of great interest live between tide-marks along the seashore.
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  • The beetles are fierce Antenna of Larva of Gyrinus.
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  • The Paussidae are a very remarkable family of small beetles, mostly tropical, found only in ants' nests, or flying by night, and apparently migrating from one nest to another.
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  • It is supposed that these beetles secrete a sweet substance on which the ants feed, but they have been seen to devour the ants' eggs and grubs.
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  • Some of these beetles are brightly coloured, while others are dull black.
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  • The Trichopterygidae, with their delicate narrow fringed wings, are the smallest of all beetles, while the Platypsyllidae consist of only a single species of curious form found on the beaver.
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  • Beetles and larvae are frequently carnivorous in habit, hunting for small insects under stones, or pursuing the soft-skinned grubs of beetles and flies that bore in woody stems or succulent roots.
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  • The Lymexylonidae, a small family of this group, characterized by its slender, undifferentiated feelers and feet, is believed by Lameere to comprise the most primitive of all living beetles, and Sharp lays stress on the undeveloped structure of the tribe generally.
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  • The Lampyridae are a large family, of which the glow-worm (Lampyris) and the "soldier beetles" (Telephorus) are familiar examples.
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  • The beetles are hairy and their larvae well-armoured and often predaceous.
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  • Of the numerous other families of the Clavicornia may be mentioned the Cucujidae and Cryptophagidae, small beetles, examples of which may be found feeding on stored seeds or vegetable refuse, and the Mycetophagidae, which devour fungi.
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  • The Nitidulidae are a large family with 1600 species, among which members of the genus Meligethes are often found in numbers feeding on blossoms, while others live under the bark of trees and prey on the grubs of boring beetles.
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  • The beetles have feelers with eleven segments, whereof the terminal few are thickened so as to form a club.
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  • The most interesting of the Heteromera, and perhaps of all the Coleoptera, are some beetles which pass through two or more larval forms in the course of the life-history (hypermetamorphosis).
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  • The Rhipidophoridae are beetles with short elytra, the feelers pectinate in the malesandserrate in the females.
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  • The wasps are said to leave the larval or pupal Metoecus unmolested, but they are hostile to the developed beetles, which hasten to leave the nest as soon as possible.
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  • The Passalidae are a tropical family of beetles generally considered to be intermediate between stag-beetles and chafers, the enlarged segments of the feeler being capable of close approximation.
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  • The mandibles are strong, adapted for biting the vegetable substances on which these beetles feed, and the palps of the second maxillae have three segments.
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  • Most of the Chrysomelidae are metallic in colour and convex in form; in some the head is concealed beneath the prothorax, and the so-called "tortoise" beetles (Cassidinae) have the elytra raised into a prominent median ridge.
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  • The Cerambycidae, or longhorn beetles, are recognizable by their slender, elongate feelers, which are never clubbed and rarely serrate.
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  • The ventraPscleriteof the head-skeleton (gula), well developed in most families of beetles, is absent among the Rhynchophora, while the palps of the maxillae are much reduced.
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  • The grubs, when hatched, start galleries nearly at right angles to this, and when fully grown form oval cells in which they pupate; from these the young beetles emerge by making circular holes directly outward through the bark.
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  • Of insects there are relatively few kinds; but ants, beetles and mosquitoes abound.
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  • Besides the aphids, other insects, such as scale insects (Coccidae), caterpillars of blue butterflies (Lycaenidae), and numerous beetles, furnish the ants with nutrient secretions.
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  • Among the Coleoptera or bettles there is a group of world-wide pests, the Elateridae or click beetles, the adults of the various " wireworms."
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  • A B In Great Britain the flea beetles (Halticidae) are one of the most serious enemies; one of these, the turnip flea (Phyllotreta nemorum), has in some years, notably 1881, caused more than 500,00o loss in England and Scotland alone by eating the young seedling turnips, cabbage and other Cruciferae.
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  • These beetles, characterized by their skipping movements and enlarged hind femora, also attack the hop (Haltica concinna), the vine in America (Graptodera chalybea, Illig.), and numerous other species of plants, being specially harmful to seedlings and young growth.
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  • In Europe a number of " long-snouted " beetles, such as the raspberry weevils (Otiorhynchus picipes), the apple blossom weevil (Anthonomus pomorum), attack fruit; others, as the " corn weevils " (Calandra oryzae and C. granaria), attack stored rice and corn; while others produce swollen patches on roots (Ceutorhynchus sulcicollis), &c. All these Curculionidae are very timid creatures, falling to the ground at the least shock.
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  • As many of these beetles are nocturnal, this trapping should take place at night.
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  • Willughby, Ray and others in the late 17th century to include the active larvae of beetles, as well as bugs, lice, fleas and other insects with undeveloped wings.
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  • In specialized biting insects, such as beetles (Coleo C ptera), the labium tends to become a hard transverse plate bearing the pair of palps, a median structure - known as the ligula - formed of the conjoined laciniae, and a pair of small rounded processes - the reduced galeae - often called the " paraglossae," a term better avoided since it has been applied also to the maxillulae of Aptera, entirety different structures.
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  • Lecaillon (1898) on various leaf beetles, tend to show that the organ " in the embryos of the lower Arthropoda corresponds with whole of the " mid-gut " arises from the proliferation of cells at the the region invaginated to form the serosa of the hexapod embryo.
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  • Among a few of the beetles or Coleoptera, and also in the neuropterous genus Mantispa, are found life-histories in which the earliest instar is campodeiform and the succeeding larval stages eruciform.
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  • The series of paired spiracles on most of the trunk-segments is well displayed, as a rule, in terrestrial larvae - caterpillars and the grubs of most beetles, for example.
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  • His classification was founded mainly on the nature of the wings, and five of his orders - the Hymenoptera (bees, ants, wasps, &c.), Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (two-winged flies), Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies), and Hemiptera (bugs, cicads, &c.) - are recognized to-day with nearly the same limits as he laid down.
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  • Includes the beetles and the parasitic Stylopidae, often regarded as a distinct order (Strepsiptera).
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  • The antiquity of the Coleoptera is further shown by the great diversity of larval form and habit that has arisen in the order, and the proof afforded by the hypermetamorphic beetles that the campodeiform preceded the eruciform larva has already been emphasized.
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  • Others again, like Gasteracantha and Acrosoma, belonging to the Argyopidae, are armed with sharp and strong abdominal spines, and these spiders are hard-shelled like beetles and are spotted with black on a reddish or yellow ground, their spines shining with steel-blue lustre.
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  • Beetles (Scarabaei) are the subjects of some of the oldest sculptured works of the Egyptians, and references to locusts, bees and ants are familiar to all readers of the Hebrew scriptures.
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  • The " tobacco flea-beetle " (Epitrix parvula, Fabr.) is a small active beetle, the larvae of which attack the roots, while the adult beetles eat holes in the leaves.
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  • Other beetles, such as the rice weevil (Calandra oryza), also attack dried tobacco.
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  • Ants and beetles too are very numerous, and anthills are prominent features in many places.
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  • It has been said with truth that an industrious collector of beetles, butterflies, neuroptera, &c., finds a greater number of species in a circuit of some miles near Tokyo than are exhibited by the whole British Isles.
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  • But there are also a number of tropical species, notably among butterflies and beetles.
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  • Most Hymenoptera are of moderate or small size, the giants of the order - certain saw-flies and tropical digging-waspsnever reach the bulk attained by the largest beetles, while the wing-spread is narrow compared with that of many dragonflies and moths.
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  • Scorpions and tarantulas are numerous, and lizards, frogs, beetles, ants, butterflies, moths and flies are abundant.
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  • These are very simple, open and generally regular flowers, white, greenish-yellow or yellow in colour and are chiefly visited by insects with a short proboscis, such as short-tongued wasps and flies, also beetles and more rarely bees.
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  • Ambrosia beetles bore deep though minute galleries into trees and timber, and the wood-dust provides a bed for the growth of the fungus, on which the insects and larvae feed.
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  • To the traveller, the most conspicuous among the Mexican insects, perhaps, are the butterflies, beetles, ants and the myriads of mosquitoes, midges, fleas and chinches.
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  • In pleasing contrast to such pests are the butterflies of all sizes and colours, beetles of an inconceivable variety of size, shape and colouration, and ants of widely dissimilar appearance and habits.
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  • The multiplication of orders is attended with practical difficulties, and the distinctions between the various groups of the Linnean Neuroptera are without doubt less obvious than those between the Coleoptera (beetles) and the Diptera (two-winged flies) for example.
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  • The cockroaches, grasshoppers, crickets and other insects that are included in this order were first placed by C. Linne (1735) among the Coleoptera (beetles), and were later removed by him to the Hemiptera (bugs, &c.).
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  • Again, several species of this order have become profoundly modified in form in imitation of inedible beetles.
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  • Coleoptera (beetles) supply instances of mimicry of ants, wasps and Ichneumonids, and some defenceless forms of this order mimic others that are protected.
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  • The front wings of the wasp have a conspicuous white patch near the tip and a patch similar in size and colour is present on the wings of the beetle, which, unlike the majority of beetles, habitually keeps its wings extended, and since the elytra are exceptionally short the wings are not covered by them when folded.
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  • The same explanation no doubt applies to the mimicry, both in Borneo and South Africa, of hairy bees of the family Xylocopidae by Asilid flies of the genus Hyperechia, and also to other cases of mimicry of Hymenoptera as well as of inedible beetles of the family Lycidae by Diptera.
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  • Amongst the orbweavers of the family Argyopidae there are species belonging to the genera Cyclosa and Cyrtophora which closely resemble small snail-like gastropods as they cling to the underside of leaves with their legs drawn up. Other members of the same family - like Araneus coccinella, and Paraplectana thorntoni- imitate beetles of the family Coccinellidae which are known to be distasteful; and certain genera of the family Salticidae (Homalattus and Rhanis) closely resemble small hard-shelled beetles.
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  • The mimicry of these insects therefore is synaposematic; but some, at all events, of the flies like the Bombylid Exoprosopa umbrosa, probably form pseudaposematic elements in the group. Into another category Hymenoptera enter not as models but as mimics, the models being inedible Malacodermatous beetles mostly belonging to the genus Lycus and characterized by orange coloration set off by a large black patch upon the posterior end of the elytra and a smaller black spot upon the thorax.
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  • Towards this Lycoid centre have converged Coleoptera (beetles) of the sub-order Lamellicornia (Copridae), Phytophaga; Heteromera (Cantharidae) and Longicornia; Hemiptera of the families Pyrrhocoridae, Lygaeidae and Reduviidae; Lepidoptera of the families Arctiidae and Zygaenidae; Diptera of the family Asilidae; and lastly Hymenoptera of the families Braconidae, Pompilidae, Crabronidae and Eumenidae.
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  • With the exception of the Asilid fly and perhaps some of the Longicorn and Phytophagous beetles, which are probably protected Batesian mimics, all the other species constituting the above-mentioned assemblage are, it is believed, Mullerian or synaposematic mimics.
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  • Among the remaining divisions of Invertebrata special mention may be made of the air-breathing Arthropoda - on the whole the most important and interesting group. About one-third of the animals belonging thereto that occur in the higher regions are exclusively alpine (or alpine and northern); these characteristically alpine forms being furnished chiefly by the spiders, beetles and butterflies.
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  • Most numerous are the beetles.
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  • Leaf-feeding beetles and larvae of moths are best got rid of by shaking the branches and collecting the insects.
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  • Laboulbeniineae are a group of about 150 species of fungi found on insects, especially beetles, and principally known from the researches of Thaxter in America.
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  • When beetles, or medusae, or cats vary, the range of possible variation is limited and determined by the beetle, medusa or cat constitution, and any possible further differentiation or specialization must be in a sense at least orthogenetic - that is to say, a continuation of the line along which the ancestors of the individual in question have been forced.
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  • In one ascent of Pichincha in 1880, Mr Whymper collected 21 species of beetles, all new to science, between 12,000 and 15,600 ft.
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  • Beetles are no less numerously represented, as is to be expected in a country so richly wooded as Borneo.
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  • Several green-coloured beetles are, on account of their colour, used as adulterants to cantharides, but they are very easily detected by examination with the eye, or, if powdered, with the microscope.
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  • The Bruchidae are often called "weevils," but they have no close affinity with the Rhynchophora, being nearly allied to the Chryso - melidae or leaf beetles.
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  • There are a few pigeons and aquatic birds, butterflies and beetles.
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  • White and red ants are very prevalent, as are mosquitos, centipedes, spiders and beetles.
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  • Beetles and land-shells are well represented.
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  • Mosquitoes, butterflies, spiders, beetles and ants are infinitely numerous, and some of the species are indescribably troublesome.
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  • The kima, a great mussel weighing (without shell) 20 to 30 Ib, and other shellfish, are eaten, as are also dogs, flying foxes, lizards, beetles and all kinds of insects.
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  • The insect life comprises many brilliantly-coloured beetles, butterflies (about eight hundred species of which are known), moths, locusts, spiders and flies, and also noxious spiders, with scorpions and centipedes.
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  • Gum tragacanth is used in calico-printing as a thickener of colours and mordants; in medicine as a demulcent and vehicle for insoluble powders, and as an excipient in pills; and feltsetting and mending beetles and other insect specimens.
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  • The slightest alteration in the chemical balance would result immediately in a race of exploded beetles.
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  • Angelic Acid angelic Acid Angelic acid isn't very angelic at all - it's a defense substance for certain beetles.
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  • Many different kinds of weird and wonderful beetles and other invertebrates may live in the cracks in gnarled and fissured old bark.
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  • The plant emits a stench to attract decaying flesh-eating beetles, flies and sweat bees for pollination.
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  • Other interesting subjects to study are wasps, bees, flies, beetles, butterflies, moths, and dragonflies.
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  • There are approximately 360 species of carabid beetles in the UK.
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  • There were also fewer birds and predatory carabid beetles that feed on weed seeds in transgenic fields.
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  • Inevitably, predators such as aquatic beetles fly in and lay their eggs.
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  • Numerous dung beetles were also recovered from the floor deposits.
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  • In autumn 2000 cabbage stem flea beetles were found in the Borders - posing a potentially serious new problem for growers in Scotland.
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  • Varied Carpet beetles and Wooly bears The adult varied Carpet Beetle is between 2 to 4mm long with a highly convex body.
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  • Another place to spend your money or simply have a gawk is the Chris Beetles Gallery (9) in St James's.
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  • Common and conspicuous insects include grasshoppers, earwigs, and many species of beetles, butterflies and moths.
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  • Further, the bugs, beetles and flies each include many large families present only in aquatic habitats.
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  • The virus is transmitted by various beetles with biting mouthparts.
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  • A rotting log can become a world of insect life and a home for beetles, including the increasingly uncommon stag beetle.
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  • For example, Monsanto's approach to Colorado Beetle is to develop potato plants that produce bacterial toxins which kill the beetles.
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  • He would be very interested if moth trappers have caught any others; in fact any records of Stag beetles would be of interest.
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  • My intervention is totally unaccountable in the world of beetles.
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  • Other creatures which live among the plants for shelter and food include water beetles, leeches and flat worms.
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  • Corbally also provides valuable habitat for wetland birds and invertebrates including a number of notable water beetles.
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  • Common pest species include grain weevils, grain beetles, flour beetles and cookie beetles which are all pests of stored food products.
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  • In the first place, they lessen the number of separate facts to be explained; in the second, they limit the field within which explanation must be sought, since, for instance, if a particular mode of repetition of parts occur in mosses, in flowering-plants, in beetles and in elephants, the seeker of ultimate explanations may exclude from the field of his inquiry all the conditions individual to these different organic forms, and confine himself only to what is common to all of them; that is to say, practically only the living material and its environment.
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  • Many larvae of beetles, moths, &c., bore into bark, and injure the cambium, or even the wood and pith; in addition to direct injury, the interference with the transpiration current and the access of other parasites through the wounds are also to be feared in proportion to the numbers of insects at work.
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  • In correlation with their heavy build and the frequent loss of the power of flight, many beetles are terrestrial rather than aerial in habit, though a large proportion of the order can fly well.
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  • The embryonic development (see Hexapoda) has been carefully studied in several genera of beetles.
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  • In the case of certain beetles whose larvae do not find themselves amid appropriate food from the moment of hatching, but have to migrate in search of it, an early larval stage, with legs, is followed by later sluggish stages in which legs have disappeared, furnishing examples of what is called hypermetamorphosis.
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  • Among the longhorn beetles, the prothorax scrapes over a median file on the mid-dorsal aspect of the mesothorax.
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  • Consequently, beetles of this family are most abundant in forest regions, and reach their highest development in the dense virgin forests of tropical countries, South America being particularly rich in peculiar genera.
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  • The number of species of beetles that inhabit ants' nests is almost incredibly large, and most of these are never found elsewhere, being blind, helpless and dependent on the ants' care for protection and food; these beetles belong for the most part to the families Pselaphidae, Paussidae and Staphylinidae.
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  • Of the latter, the Lepidopteron (Tascia homochroa) is distasteful, as also are the beetles of the family Cantharidae (e.g Lytta moesta).
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  • They are bright, iridescent, golden-green or bluish-coloured beetles (see Coleoptera), with the breast finely punctured and pubescent, head and thorax with a longitudinal channel, and elytra with two slightly elevated lines.
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  • The young are fed on invertebrates, particularly caterpillars, larvae and pupae of flies and beetles.
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  • The resultant craters provide a refuge for wildlife, whilst the fallen tree trunks become a haven for beetles.
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  • Rhinoceros beetles can grow to well over 4 inches in length.
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  • For example, Monsanto 's approach to Colorado Beetle is to develop potato plants that produce bacterial toxins which kill the beetles.
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  • Pond skaters, water boatmen and whirligig beetles remain in or on the water.
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  • On occasion, tobacco beetles and their larva can infest cigars.
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  • These beetles plague members of the potato family, including eggplant, tomato, peppers, and potatoes.
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  • Adult Colorado potato beetles are oval and about half the size of your thumbnail.
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  • Hand picking is the gardener's best defense against Colorado potato beetles.
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  • Knock any beetles and larvae you find into a can of soapy water to dispose of them.
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  • Try spreading a thick organic mulch over the garden to make it hard for emerging beetles to reach plants in the spring.
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  • Cucumber beetles eat holes in the leaves and roots of corn, cucumbers, and other members of the squash family.
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  • Flea beetles are common garden pests of many vegetable crops.
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  • Flea beetles are quick jumpers and hard to catch.
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  • Weeping willow is susceptible to aphids, borers, Japanese beetles, and lacebugs.
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  • Cleaning up vines after pumpkins, squash, and fall beans have been harvested helps eliminate squash bugs and cucumber beetles, two very common pests.
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  • It is likely to be attacked by a variety of insects, including aphids, scale, borers, caterpillars, tent caterpillars, Japanese beetles, and spider mites.
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  • Striped and spotted beetles attack watermelons and other types of melons.
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  • Japanese beetle control is important to many gardeners living along the eastern and southeastern portion of the United States where beetles are prevalent.
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  • The shiny iridescent green beetles appear in midsummer and quickly infest plants of all types in the home landscape, leaving behind a wake of destruction.
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  • While it's almost impossible to completely eradicate Japanese beetles, a comprehensive approach to their control can keep numbers in check and minimize damage.
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  • Various pesticides, lures and natural tactics are used to reduce the number of beetles and prevent plant damage.
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  • When the beetles eat the roots, they effectively kill the turf.
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  • During their adult stage, Japanese beetles swarm among leaves and flowers and eat both.
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  • Beetles feed wherever they land, so the holes may appear in the middle of leaves or along the edges.
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  • The U.S.Department of Agriculture's pamphlet on Japanese beetle control recommends several pesticides to kill Japanese beetles at their adult and larval stages.
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  • Look in your local nursery for other lawn products suited for controlling beetles.
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  • It repels beetles and also offers some protection against black spot and fungal diseases.
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  • You can also plant trees, shrubs and flowers resistant to Japanese beetles to discourage them from living in the garden.
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  • Such plants do not provide absolutely protection but decrease the number and quantity of food sources, thus discouraging beetles.
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  • Trees and shrubs that Japanese beetles don't like include boxwood, red maples, hickory trees, juniper, lilac, magnolia and many more.
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  • Some people swear by Japanese beetle traps while other insist they entice more beetles to the garden than they capture.
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  • Traps work through scent lures, either mimicking the sexual scents of female beetles to lure only males or using a general scent that entices both sexes.
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  • The beetles enter the trap, crawl into a bag, and cannot crawl out.
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  • Homeowners discard the bag and the beetles within it, replacing the bag when necessary.
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  • Some research suggests that lures attract more beetles into the garden and negate the positive benefits of using traps.
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  • In some parts of the USA, Japanese beetles are already emerging from their winter sleep in May, ready to feast upon someone's prized roses.
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  • Adult beetles lay their eggs in the month of July, which will mature throughout the winter months.
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  • The tomato horn worm and beetles are repelled by the smell and will typically stay away when these other plants are present.
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  • Potatoes - plant the herb catnip to ward off various potato beetles.
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  • Hobby Farms magazine lists trap plants such as morning glories that attract Japanese beetles, keeping them away from your prized vegetables.
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  • You may need to use row covers to keep beetles from laying eggs on squash plants, for example, or use an insecticidal soap to remove aphid infestations.
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  • Since you can't use chemicals, what is an organic gardener to do when Japanese beetles or other insects attach plants?
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  • Lady beetles and praying mantis are both beneficial to your organic garden.
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  • There are also natural remedies for beetles, such as knocking them off the plant into a bucket of soapy water in the early morning while they are still sleepy.
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  • It works equally well on squash bugs, Japanese beetles, tomato horn worms and bag worms, among others.
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  • If you know your roses attract Japanese beetles, place garlic and rue near your rose bushes to help keep them away.
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  • John also has access to secondary weapons, Holy Water Bombs, Screech Beetles and Moses Shroud.
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  • Natural lucky charms that bring good fortune such as ladybugs, scarab beetles and rainbows are often replicated in jewelry or statue form.
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  • These are likely to be less available in the U.S. in the future, since the wood sometimes carries longhorn beetles into the country.
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  • Deidre paused beside the bubbling nest of beetles the size of her hand.  Katie watched as she picked up one, peered at it and then flung it.  Deidre giggled.
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  • The name "firefly" is often applied also to luminous beetles of the family Lampyridae, to which the well-known glow-worm belongs.
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  • Tower (1903), of nervures similar to those of the hind-wing, and by the proof that the small membranous structures present beneath the elytra of certain beetles, believed by Meinert to represent the whole of the true fore-wings, are in reality only the alulae.
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  • The chin (gula) is a very characteristic stlerite in beetles, absent only in a few families, such as the weevils.
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  • The tergite of the prothorax (pronotum) is prominent in all beetles, reaching back to the bases of the elytra and forming a substantial shield for the front part of the body.
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  • The Amphizoidae, for example, a small family of aquatic beetles, are known only from western North America and Eastern Tibet, while an allied family, the Pelobiidae, inhabit the British Isles, the Mediterranean region, Tibet and Australia.
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  • Some beetles emit a bright light from a portion of their bodies, which leads to the recognition of mate or comrade by sight.
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