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bees

bees Sentence Examples

  • Bees feed on honey and pollen.

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  • The bees were buzzing among the flowers.

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  • Bees store honey and pollen to serve as food for their young.

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  • The chief points in the life-history of Stylops and Xenos, which are parasitic on certain bees (Andrena) and wasps (Polistes), have been investigated by K.

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  • Not one of the bees so much as looked at those in her left hand.

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  • "I thought bees were attracted to flowers by sight and smell," I said.

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  • For the Fossores, wasps, ants and bees see E.

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  • They do not make honey for us, like the bees, but many of them are as beautiful as the flowers they light upon, and they always delight the hearts of little children.

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  • Beetles (Scarabaei) are the subjects of some of the oldest sculptured works of the Egyptians, and references to locusts, bees and ants are familiar to all readers of the Hebrew scriptures.

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  • Beetles (Scarabaei) are the subjects of some of the oldest sculptured works of the Egyptians, and references to locusts, bees and ants are familiar to all readers of the Hebrew scriptures.

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  • Honey bees are protected from a large number of insect enemies because they sting and are distasteful.

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  • Paired erectile plates (patagia) are borne on the prothorax in moths, while in moths, sawflies, wasps, bees and other insects there are small plates (tegulae) - see Fig.

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  • Bees, wasps and larger insects serve as pollinating agents FIG.

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  • These were removed to Paris, and when Napoleon was crowned emperor a century and a half later he chose Childeric's bees for the decoration of his coronation mantle.

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  • Honey is one of the minor food-products of Canada, and in many localities bees have abundance of pasturage.

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  • EDMUND GRINDAL (c. 1519-1583), successively bishop of London, archbishop of York and archbishop of Canterbury, born about 1519, was son of William Grindal, a farmer of Hensingham, in the parish of St Bees, Cumberland.

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  • Poultry, bees and silkworms are commonly kept.

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  • Bees carry the spores of Scierotinia as they do the pollen of the bilberries, and flies convey the conidia of ergot from grain to grain.

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  • Further, while among wasps and bees we find some solitary and some social genera, the ants as a family are social, though some FIG.

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  • Lubbock's (Lord Avebury) Ants, Bees and Wasps (London, 1882), dealing with British and European species, has been followed by numerous important papers by A.

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  • readily movable on the segment (mesothorax) immediately behind - smaller and of less importance where the prothorax is fixed to the mesothorax, as in bees and flies.

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  • The Apoidea consists of the bees only.

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  • The Apoidea consists of the bees only.

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  • Ants form a distinct and natural family (Formicidae) of the great order Hymenoptera, to which bees, wasps and sawflies also belong.

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  • 7), so called from the seal-like scars on the rhizome of stems of previous seasons, the hanging flowers of which contain no honey, but are visited by bees for the pollen.

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  • Bees can excavate timber and make their brood-chambers in hollow plant-stems.

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  • Above her, bees buzzed around the aromatic apple blossoms.

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  • The offspring of the virgin females are in most of these instances females; but among the bees and wasps parthenogenesis occurs normally and always results in the development of males, the " queen " insect laying either a fertilized or unfertilized egg at will.

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  • The next moment two bees flew eagerly in.

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  • Bees are kept, and in Yemen and Hadramut the honey is exceptionally good.

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  • On the English side the low Solway Plain borders the firth; except for a short distance above St Bees Head.

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  • Bees are kept, and in Yemen and Hadramut the honey is exceptionally good.

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  • The eggs are laid in the nests of various bees and wasps, the chrysid larva living as a " cuckoo " parasite.

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  • The " tongue," for example, is short and obtuse or emarginate in Colletes and Prosopis, while in all other bees it is pointed at the tip. But in Andrena and its allies it is comparatively short, while in the higher genera, such as A pis and Bombus, it is elongate and flexible, forming a most elaborate and perfect organ for taking liquid food.

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  • Butterflies, moths and bees are very abundant, the former being remarkable for their size and splendid coloration; but these groups have not been investigated exhaustively enough to afford a correct idea of their number or their true affinities.

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  • The " tongue," for example, is short and obtuse or emarginate in Colletes and Prosopis, while in all other bees it is pointed at the tip. But in Andrena and its allies it is comparatively short, while in the higher genera, such as A pis and Bombus, it is elongate and flexible, forming a most elaborate and perfect organ for taking liquid food.

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  • In a third place a crowd of bees, crushing one another, attack some victim and fight and smother it, and the victim, enfeebled or killed, drops from above slowly and lightly as a feather, among the heap of corpses.

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  • If we narrow it down to the US, the most people are killed by bees and wasps.

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  • The long sucking " tongue " of bees is probably a modification of the ligula.

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  • Wheat and other cereals are cultivated, with fruits of many kinds, olives, and vines which yield a wine of fair quality; while saffron is largely produced, and some attention is given to the keeping of bees and silkworms. Stock-farming, for which the wide plains afford excellent opportunities, employs many of the peasantry; the bulls of Albacete are in demand for bull-fighting, and the horses for mounting the Spanish cavalry.

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  • He remembered that he had seen many bees flying among these flowers and gathering honey from them.

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  • You're doing this so the bees will be more interested in certain flowers?

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  • Among the many other types of caring games to be found online are those that allow your child to become a teacher or daycare provider, as well as others that extend that nurturing spirit to a colony of honey bees or a virtual garden.

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  • At PlayKidsGames there is a wide range of alphabet games, most of which involve putting a jumble of letters in alphabetical order with the help of moles you whack, bees that stock their hive, or snowflakes to catch.

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  • Other movies you may have spotted her in include Hairspray, Hairspray 2, The Secret Life of Bees, Beauty Shop, Bringing Down the House, and several others.

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  • Free Saver has an assortment of screensavers that includes dancing dinosaurs, flying 3D dragons, animated astrological signs, buzzing bees, and bouncing bunnies.

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  • Some popular newer titles, such as Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt and The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd are also available.

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  • The Mattie Wedge Sandal has a fun pattern of bees and flowers, perfect for summer days!

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  • They are predatory insects, meaning they eat other smaller insects such as mosquitoes and bees.

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  • This site has a full range of animal clocks from pigs to bumble bees.

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  • Remember the quilting bees that our great-grandmothers used to attend?

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  • Bees create honey from the nectar in flowers through a process of regurgitation.

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  • The sting of wasps, ants and bees is a modified ovipositor and is used for egg-laying by the fertile females, as well as for defence.

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  • Thus we find throughout the order a degree of care for offspring unreached by other insects, and this family-life has, in the best known of the Hymenoptera - ants, wasps and bees - developed into an elaborate social organization.

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  • Fragments of wings from the Lias and Oolitic beds have been referred to ants and bees, but the true nature of these remains is doubtful.

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  • The Sapygidae are parasitic on bees, while the Scoliidae are large, robust and hairy insects, many of which prey upon the grubs of chafers.

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  • The bees which make up this group agree with the Sphecoidea in the short pronotum, but may be distinguished from all other Hymenoptera by the widened first tarsal segment and the plumose hairs on head and body.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Ants, Bees and Wasps (9th ed., London, 1889); C. Janet, Etudes sur les fourmis, les guepes et les abeilles (Paris, &c., 1893 and onwards); and G.

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  • It was famous in ancient times for its bees, which gathered honey of peculiar flavour from its aromatic herbs; their fame still persists.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Ants, Bees and Wasps (9th ed., London, 1889); C. Janet, Etudes sur les fourmis, les guepes et les abeilles (Paris, &c., 1893 and onwards); and G.

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  • Her father wrote to her last summer that the birds and bees were eating all his grapes.

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  • In August, the large masses of berries, which, when in flower, had attracted many wild bees, gradually assumed their bright velvety crimson hue, and by their weight again bent down and broke the tender limbs.

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  • On that third of March, all the rooms in the English Club were filled with a hum of conversation, like the hum of bees swarming in springtime.

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  • The bees circle round a queenless hive in the hot beams of the midday sun as gaily as around the living hives; from a distance it smells of honey like the others, and bees fly in and out in the same way.

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  • In and out of the hive long black robber bees smeared with honey fly timidly and shiftily.

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  • Here and there a couple of bees, by force of habit and custom cleaning out the brood cells, with efforts beyond their strength laboriously drag away a dead bee or bumblebee without knowing why they do it.

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  • In another corner two old bees are languidly fighting, or cleaning themselves, or feeding one another, without themselves knowing whether they do it with friendly or hostile intent.

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  • The process is surprisingly involved; a hive of 60,000 bees may need to visit more than two million flowers in order to gather enough nectar to create just one pound of honey.

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  • Some vegans are extreme not even eating honey (it comes from bees) others are not so extreme.

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  • The poison-glands of the sting in wasps and bees are well-known examples of these.

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  • His classification was founded mainly on the nature of the wings, and five of his orders - the Hymenoptera (bees, ants, wasps, &c.), Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (two-winged flies), Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies), and Hemiptera (bugs, cicads, &c.) - are recognized to-day with nearly the same limits as he laid down.

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  • Lucian's De Dea Syria, § 48; for " bees," &c., as titles of sacred attendants, see J.

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  • Wasps, bees and hornets, generically known as hachi, differ little from their European types, except that they are somewhat larger and more sluggish.

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  • Fertilization is effected by insects, especially by bees, which are directed in their search by the colour and fragrance of the flowers; but some pollen must also be transported by the wind to the female flowers, especially in arctic species which, in spite of the poverty of insect life, set abundant fruit.

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  • Thus, wasps catch flies; worker ants make raids and carry off weak insects of many kinds; bees gather nectar from flowers and transform it into honey within their stomachs - largely for the sake of feeding the larvae in the nest.

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  • The idea of an Incarnation of God is absurd; why should the human race think itself so superior to bees, ants and elephants as to be put in this unique relation to its maker?

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  • Thus, wasps catch flies; worker ants make raids and carry off weak insects of many kinds; bees gather nectar from flowers and transform it into honey within their stomachs - largely for the sake of feeding the larvae in the nest.

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  • He placed her on the table and retreated, shaking his head and swiping at the air around him, as if plagued by bees.

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  • When we use pesticides, we kill them as well as the harmful insects - and even the bees.

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  • Among the relics were three hundred small golden models of bees.

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  • He is the constant companion of Dionysus, whom he was said to have instructed in the cultivation of the vine and the keeping of bees.

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  • Mermis (in the larval state) is confined to the Invertebrata and Sphaerularia to bees.

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  • Such " workers " are essential to the formation of a social community of Hymenoptera, and their wingless condition among the ants shows that their specialization has been carried further in this family than among the wasps and bees.

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  • In this instinct we have a correspondence with the habits of social wasps and bees.

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  • These are very simple, open and generally regular flowers, white, greenish-yellow or yellow in colour and are chiefly visited by insects with a short proboscis, such as short-tongued wasps and flies, also beetles and more rarely bees.

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  • White and yellow colours predominate and insects with a proboscis of medium length are the common pollinating agents, such as short-tongued bees.

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  • Bees are principally kept on the Luneburger Heide, and the annual yield of honey is very considerable.

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  • arrangement self-pollination is prevented and cross-pollination ensured by the visits of bees which come for the honey secreted by the glands at the base of the inner stamens.

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  • Insect-eating birds soon learn to associate distastefulness with the size, form and colour of the bees, and consequently leave them alone after one or more trials.

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  • It is in the first place a matter of common knowledge that human beings who have been taught to avoid handling bees invariably fear to touch drone-flies, unless specially trained to distinguish the one from the others.

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  • Typical dipterous insects (flies) closely resemble in general form aculeate Hymenoptera belonging to the families of bees and wasps.

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  • But the likeness probably goes deeper than superficial resemblance that appeals to the eye, for spiders which distinguish flies from bees by touch and not by sight, treat drone-flies after touching them, not in the fearless way they evince towards bluebottles (Calliphora), but in the cautious manner they display towards bees and wasps, warily refraining from coming to close quarters until their prey is securely enswathed in silk.

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  • The same explanation no doubt applies to the mimicry, both in Borneo and South Africa, of hairy bees of the family Xylocopidae by Asilid flies of the genus Hyperechia, and also to other cases of mimicry of Hymenoptera as well as of inedible beetles of the family Lycidae by Diptera.

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  • Trochilium apiforme, crabroniforme - present to bees and wasps is effected in the main by the loss of the scales from the wings, leaving these organs transparent.

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  • larly abundant; crickets, beetles, locusts, walking-stick insects, mayflies and bugs are found, but there were neither flies, moths, butterflies nor bees, which is no more than we should expect from the conditions of plant life.

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  • In many cases the slimy masses of spermatia (Uredineae), conidia (Claviceps), basidiospores (Phallus, Coprinus), &c., emit more or less powerful odours, which attract flies or other insects, and it has been shown that bees carry the flagrant oidia of Sclerotinia to the stigma of Vaccinium and infect it, and that flies carry away the foetid spores of Phallus, just as pollen is dispersed by such insects.

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  • The conidia are fragrant and are carried by bees to the stigma of the bilberry; here they germinate with the pollen and the hyphae pass with the pollen tubes down the style; the former infect the ovules and produce sclerotia, therein reducing the fruits to a mummified condition.

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  • Caymans, water-hogs (capinchos), several kinds of deer (Cervus paludosus the largest), ounces, opossums, armadillos, vampires, the American ostrich, the ibis, the jabiru, various species popularly called partridges, the pato real or royal duck, the Palamedea cornuta, parrots and parakeets, are among the more notable forms. Insect life is peculiarly abundant; the red stump-like ant-hills are a feature in every landscape, and bees used to be kept in all the mission villages.

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  • It is said also to dig up the nests of wasps in order to eat the larvae, as the ratel - a closely allied South African form - is said to rob the bees of their honey.

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  • These floral products which form the food of bees and of their larvae, are in most cases collected and stored by the industrious insects; but some genera of bees act as inquilines or "cuckoo-parasites," laying their eggs in the nests of other bees, so that their larvae may feed at the expense of the rightful owners of the nest.

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  • Many genera of bees are represented, like most other insects, by ordinary males and females, each female constructing a nest formed of several chambers ("cells") and storing in each chamber a supply of food for the grub to be hatched from the egg that she lays therein.

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  • Details of the structure of bees are given in the article Hymenoptera.

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  • The tongue is bifid at the tip in a few genera; usually it is pointed and varies greatly in length, being comparatively short in Andrena, long in the humble-bees(Bombus), and longest in Euglossa, a tropical American genus of solitary bees.

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  • The legs, which are so highly modified as pollen-carriers in the higher bees, are comparatively simple in certain primitive genera.

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  • The hairy covering, so notable in the hive-bee and especially in humble-bees, is greatly reduced among bees that follow a parasitic mode of life.

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  • As is usual where an abundant food supply is provided for the young insects, the larvae of bees (fig.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) are degraded maggots; they have no legs, but possess fairly well-developed heads.

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  • Bees of different genera vary considerably in the site and arrangement of their nests.

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  • Many - like the common "solitary" bees Halictus and Andrena - burrow in the ground; the holes of species of Andrena are commonly seen in springtime opening on sandy banks, grassy lawns or gravel paths.

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  • Our knowledge of such bees is due to the observations of F.

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  • Sometimes the passage is the conjoint work of many bees whose cells are grouped along it at convenient distances apart.

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  • Other bees, the species of Osmia for example, choose the hollow stem of a bramble or other shrub, the female forming a linear series of cells in each of which an egg is laid and a supply of food stored up. J.

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  • The leaf-cutter bees (Megachile) - which differ from Andrena and Halictus and agree with Osmia, Apis and Bombus in having elongate tongues - cut neat circular disks from leaves, using them for lining the cells of their underground nests.

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  • Among the solitary bees none has more remarkable nesting habits than the mason bee (Chalicodoma) represented in the south of France and described at length by Fabre.

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  • The working bees, such as have been mentioned, are victimized by bees of other genera, which throw upon the industrious the task of providing for the young of the idle.

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  • The bees hitherto described are "solitary," all the individuals being either males or unmodified females.

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  • One species of Halictus nearly reaches the desired stage; but the first young bees to appear in the perfect state are males, and when the females emerge the mother dies.

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  • Among the social bees the mother and daughter-insects co-operate, and they differ from the "solitary" groups in the nature of their nest, the cells (fig.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) in position, but in the "stingless" bees of the tropics (Trigona and Melipona) they are dorsal.

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  • They are closely" mimicked "by bees of the genus Psithyrus, which often share their nests.

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  • The "stingless" bees (Trigona) of the tropics have the parts of the sting reduced and useless for piercing.

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  • As though to compensate for the loss of this means of defence, the mandibles are very powerful, and some of the bees construct tubular entrances to the nest with a series of constrictions easy to hold against an enemy.

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  • The habits of the Brazilian species of these bees have been described in detail by H.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) FIG.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) Poison bag.

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  • - Modifications in the Legs of Bees.

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  • - More has been written on bees, and especially on the genus Apis, than on any other group of insects.

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  • Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping (London, 1885-1888), and T.

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  • vi., should be consulted for further information on bees generally.

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  • British bees are described in the catalogues of Smith, mentioned above, and by E.

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  • The Beni-Abbas tribe in the Algerian Atlas is famed for its walnuts, and many tribes keep bees, chiefly for the commercial value of the wax.

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  • Bees are abundant, and wild honey and wax are gathered in considerable quantities.

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  • Hornets, bees and wasps of many varieties abound.

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  • The work by which he is known is the Fable of the Bees, published first in 1705 under the title of The Grumbling Hive, or Knaves Turn'd Honest (two hundred doggerel couplets).

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  • Great attention is given to the rearing of bees and silk-worms; and the wine of the province is held in high repute throughout Spain, while some inferior kinds are sent to France to be mixed with claret.

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  • Bernard de Mandeville's Fable of the Bees is unique in that it describes the downfall of an ideal commonwealth.

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  • Many Utopias, such as the Fable of the Bees and Erewhon, are designed to satirize existing social conditions as well as to depict a more perfect civilization.

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  • Mosquitoes, termites, bees, ants, centipedes, millipedes, locusts, grasshoppers, butterflies, dragonflies, sandflies and spiders' are found in immense numbers.

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  • and x.), each of which would make it an offering acceptable to God; the rush-wick is the product of pure water, the wax is the offspring of virgin bees," the flame is sent from heaven.

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  • 11 Bees were believed, like fish, to be sexless.

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  • by the command didst cause this liquid to come by the labour of bees to the perfection of wax,.

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  • Audubon's Avenue, the one nearest the entrance, is occupied in winter by myriads of bats, that hang from the walls in clusters like swarms of bees.

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  • Ants, bees and wasps of many species, and flies and gnats abound, particularly during the summer rainy season, and at all elevations.

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  • Later, the fragrance of its flowers, rich in honey, attracts innumerable bees; in the autumn the foliage becomes a clear yellow but soon falls.

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  • The flowers contain honey, and attract flies, short-lipped bees or other small insects by the agency of which pollination is effected.

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  • The green rusticity of Whittier's farm and village life imparted a bucolic charm to such lyrics as " In School Days," " The Barefoot Boy," " Telling the Bees," " Maud Muller," and " My Schoolmate."

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  • The general practice for many years past among naturalists has been to restrict the terms "Insecta" and "insect" to the class of Arthropods with three pairs of legs in the adult condition: bees, flies, moths, bugs, grasshoppers, springtails are "insects," but not spiders, centipedes nor crabs, far less earthworms, and still less slugs, starfishes or coral polyps.

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  • There were also three classes of priestesses, Mellierae, Hierae, Parierae; there is no evidence that they were called Melissae ("bees"), although the bee is a frequent symbol on the coins of the city.

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  • Of these latter Mandeville, the author of The Fable of the Bees, or vile.

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  • Bees are very generally kept, the honey being consumed in the country, the wax exported.

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  • Bees have been introduced.

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  • Near Fiume the orange, lemon, pomegranate, fig and olive bear well; mulberries are planted on many estates for silkworms; and the heather-clad uplands of the central region favour the keeping of bees.

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  • Bees are very numerous in parts of the country.

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  • In England also, some bee-keepers include queen-rearing as part of their business, while one large apiary on the south coast is exclusively devoted to the rearing of queen bees on the latest scientific system, and to breeding by selection from such races as are most suited to the exceptional climatic conditions of the country.

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  • Extensive apiaries have been established on the American continent, some containing from 2000 to 3500 colonies of bees, and in these honey is harvested in hundreds of tons yearly.

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  • The magnitude of the bee industry in the United States may be judged from the fact of a single bee-farmer located in California having harvested from 150,000 lb of honey in one year from 2000 stocks of bees, and, as an instance of the enormous weight of honey obtainable from good hives in that favoured region, the same farmer secured 60,000 lb of comb-honey in one season from his best 300 colonies.

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  • In proof thereof, we may quote the case of an extensive grower in the midland counties - sending fruit to the London market in tons - whose crop of gooseberries increased nearly fourfold after establishing a number of stocks of bees in close proximity to the gooseberry bushes.

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  • The fruit orchards and raspberry fields of Kent are also known to be greatly benefited by the numerous colonies of bees owned by more than 3000 bee-keepers in the county.

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  • Moreover, their views are confirmed by the constant references to bees and the profits obtainable from bee-keeping in the leading papers on all sides.

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  • io) it forms the section or box C, measuring 1 n I n a 44 X 44 Xz when complete, and holds about i lb of comb-honey when filled by the bees and ready for table use.

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  • A swarm of bees hived in a straw skep, the picturesque little domicile known the world over as the personification of industry, will furnish their home with waxen combs in form and shape so admirably adapted to their requirements as to need no improvement by man.

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  • Why the circular form was chosen for the skep need not be inquired into, beyond saying that its shape conforms to that of a swarm, as the bees usually hang clustered on the branch of a neighbouring tree or bush after issuing from the parent hive.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) itself as illustrating the admirable way in which the bees furnish their dwelling.

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  • A.) box for The straw sleep. and how the lower portion allows the bees to cluster around the tender larvae and thus maintain the warmth necessary during its metamorphosis from the egg to the perfect insect.

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  • Huber found that although he could induce swarms to occupy the glass-sided single frame advised by Reaumur, if the frame was fitted with ready-built pieces of comb patched together before hiving the swarm, the experiment was successful, while if left to themselves the bees built small combs across the space between the sheets of glass, and the desired inspection from the outside was thus rendered impossible.

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  • He also gathered that the abnormal conditions forced upon the bees by a ready-built single comb might so turn aside their natural instincts as to render his investigations less trustworthy than if conducted under perfectly natural conditions; so, in order to remove all doubt, he decided to have a series of wooden frames made, measuring 12 in.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) frames of comb could be opened for inspection like a book, while when closed the bees clustered together as in an ordinary hive.

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  • Ten of these frames had a small piece of comb fixed to the topbar in each, supported (temporarily) by a thin lath wedged up with pegs at side, the latter being removed when the comb had been made secure by the bees.

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  • 13) - to raise up any frame between two sheets of glass which confined the bees and allowed him to study the process of comb-building abserr's better than any hive we know of to-day.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) Huber's hive was defective in many respects; the parting of each frame, thus letting loose the whole colony, caused much trouble at times, but it remained the only movable-comb hive till 1838, when Dr Dzierzon - whose theory of parthenogenesis has made his name famous - devised a box-hive with a loose top-bar on which the bees built their combs and a movable side or door, by means of which the frames could be lifted out for inspection.

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  • Langstroth, in his measurements, hit upon the happy mean which keeps bees from propolizing or fastening the frames to the hive body, as they assuredly would do if sufficient space had not been allowed for free passage round the side-bars; it is equally certain that if too much space had been provided, they would fill it with comb and thus render the frame immovable.

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  • space between the roof and A top-bars for bees to pass from frame to frame.

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  • Consequently, on the roof being raised B the bees can take wing if not prevented from doing so.

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  • This feature C finds no favour with British bee-keepers, nevertheless the " improved Langstroth " is a useful and simple hive, moderate in price, and no doubt efficient, but not suitable for bees wintered on their summer stands, as nearly all hives are in Great Britain.

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  • American bee-keepers, therefore, find it necessary to provide underground cellars, into which the bees are carried in the fall of each year, remaining there till work begins in the following spring.

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  • Those among them who cannot, for various reasons, adopt the cellar-wintering plan are obliged to provide what are termed " chaff-covers " for protecting their bees in winter.

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  • The difference here is that packing is now dispensed with, it being found that bees winter equally well with an outer case giving 12 in.

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  • Thus no change is needed in winter or summer, the air-space protecting the bees from cold in winter and heat in summer.

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  • Another point of difference between the English and American hive is the roof, which being gable-shaped in the former allows warm packing to be placed directly on the frame tops, so that the bees are covered in when the roof is removed and may be examined or fed with very little disturbance.

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  • At the same time the combs were preserved for refilling by the bees, in lieu of melting them down for wax.

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  • Next in importance, to bee-keepers, is the enormous advance made in late years through the invention of a machine for manufacturing the impressed wax sheets known as " comb foundation," aptly so named, because upon it the bees build the cells wherein they store their food.

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  • In 1843 a German bee-keeper, Krechner by name, conceived the idea of first dipping fine linen into molten wax, then pressing the sheets so made between rollers, and thus forming a waxen midrib on which the bees would build their combs.

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  • This experiment was partially successful, but the instinctive dislike of bees to anything of a fibrous nature caused them completely to spoil their work of comb-building in the endeavour to tear or gnaw away the linen threads whenever they got in touch with them.

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  • These sheets were readily accepted by the bees, and afterwards plates cast from metal were employed, with so good a result as to give to the bees as perfect a midrib as that of natural comb with the deep cell walls cut away.

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  • Mr Wagner first conceived the idea of adding slightly raised side walls to the hexagonal outlines of the cells, by means of which the bees are supplied with the material for building out one-half or more of the complete cell walls or sides.

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  • The manifest advantage of this was at once realized by practical American apiarists as saving labour to the bees and money to the bee-keeper.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) I!!!II!Iiii Iiiiv ??IiIIIIIUu+ 0 FIG.

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  • Weed, a skilful American machinist, who, after some years of strenuous effort, succeeded in devising and perfecting special rollers and dies, by the use of which foundation was produced with a midrib so thin as to compare favourably with natural comb built by the bees.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) placed the resources of his enormous factory at his disposal), devised and perfected machinery - driven by motor power - for manufacturing foundation by what is known as the " Weed " process.

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  • Practical Management of Bees.

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  • Authoritative text-books specially written for the guidance of bee-keepers are numerous and cheap, and on no account should any one engage in an attempt to manage bees on modern lines without a careful perusal of one or more of these.

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  • A prosperous bee-colony managed on modern lines will in the height of summer consist of three kinds of bees: a queen or mother-bee, a certain number of drones, and from 80,000 to ioo,000 workers.

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  • The relative importance of the three kinds of bees differs greatly in a b c degree and in FIG.

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  • somewhat curious (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and fashion.

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  • During the summer season, however (from May to July), when drones are abundant, the loss of a queen is of comparatively little moment, as the workers can transform eggs (or young larvae not more than three days old), which would in the ordinary course produce worker bees, into fully-developed queens, capable of fulfilling all the maternal duties of a mother-bee.

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  • The value of this wonderful provision of nature to the bee-keeper of to-day may be estimated from the fact that bees managed according to modern methods are necessarily subject to so much manipulating or handling, that fatal accidents are as likely to happen in bee-life as among human beings.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) the high-pressure system followed in modern bee-management, exhausts the period of her greatest fecundity in two years, so that queens are usually superseded after their second season has expired and egg-production gradually decreases.

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  • Drones (or male bees) are more or less numerous in hives according to the skill of the bee-keeper in limiting their production.

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  • The modern bee-keeper, therefore, allows just so much drone comb in the hive as will produce a sufficient number of drones to ensure queen-mating, while affording to the bees the satisfaction of dwelling in a home equipped according to natural conditions, and containing all the elements necessary to bee-life.

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  • The action of the bees themselves makes this point clear, for when the season of mating is past the drone is no longer needed, the providing of winter stores taking first place in the economy of the hive.

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  • On the other hand, worker-bees hatched in the autumn will seven months later be strong with the vigour of lusty youth; able to take their full share in the labour of the hive for six weeks or more in the early spring, which is the most critical period in the colony's existence; hence the value to the apiarist of bees hatched in the autumn.

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  • If healthy and young she begins egg-laying at once, and brood-rearing proceeds at an ever-increasing rate as each week passes, until the hive is brimming over with bees in time for the first honey flow.

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  • It soon becomes apparent to the onlooker when the queen has joined the flying multitude of bees in the air, for they are seen to be closing up their ranks, and in a few moments begin to form a solid cluster, usually on the branch of a small tree or bush close to the ground.

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  • When this stage of swarming is reached the bee-keeper has but to take his hiving skep, hold it under the swarm, and shake the bees into it, preparatory to transferring them into a frame-hive already prepared for their re ception.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) from egg to perfect insect, with the latter biting their way out of sealed cells.

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  • With regard to the British bee-keeper located in the south, the early fruit crop is what concerns him most, and bees will make steady progress.

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  • If pollen is scarce, a substitute in the form of either pea-meal or wheaten flour must be supplied to the bees, as brood-rearing cannot make headway without the nitrogenous element indispensable in the food on which the young are reared.

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  • He must also acquire the ability to handle bees judiciously and well under all imaginable conditions.

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  • In doing this it is needful to remember that bees resent outside interference with either their work or their hives, and will resolutely defend themselves when aroused even at the cost of life itself.

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  • Experience has also proved that, when alarmed, bees instinctively begin to fill their honey-sacs with food from the nearest store-cells as a safeguard against contingencies, and when so provided they are more amenable to interference.

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  • The bee-keeper, therefore, by the judicious application of a little smoke from smouldering fuel, blown into the hive by means of an appliance known as a beesmoker, alarms the bees and is thus able to manipulate the frames of comb with ease and almost no disturbance.

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  • No other protection is needed beyond a bee-veil of fine black net, which slipped over a wide-brimmed straw hat protects the face from stings when working among bees; as experience is gained the veil is not always used.

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  • The methods of handling bees vary in different countries, this being in a great measure accounted for by the number of hives kept.

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  • It naturally follows that bee-life is there regarded very slightly by cornparison, and the " bee-garden " in England becomes the " bee-yard " in America, where the apiarist when at work must thoroughly protect himself from being stung, and, safe in his immunity from damage, cares little for bee-life in getting through his task, the loss of a few hundred bees being considered of.

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  • There are, however, ?Ls other reasons, apart from humanity,; to account for the difference in -_ n handling bees as advocated in the United Kingdom.

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  • close proximity to neighbours; ' a? ?j1'; jI i consequently a serious upset among `ij:!i the bees would in many cases in volve an amount of trouble which I.

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  • The uncertain climate renders it necessary to include either other branches of the craft less dependent on warmth and sunshine, or to combine it with fruit-growing, poultry-rearing, &c. Under such conditions the bees will usually occupy a good position in the balance-sheet.

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  • Root Co., Medina, Ohio, U.S.A.) his hives, but to overlook nothing that tends to be of advantage to the bees at all seasons.

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  • The main honey-gathering time (lasting about six or seven weeks) is so brief that in no pursuit is it more important to " make hay while the sun shines," and if the bee-keeper example set by his bees.

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  • It requires a level head to keep cool amongst a couple of hundred strong stocks of bees on a hot summer's day in a good honey season.

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  • It is quite natural that bees living in colonies should be subject to diseases, and only since the introduction of movable-comb hives has it been possible to learn something about these ailments.

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  • Coming to later times, Della Rocca minutely describes a disease to which bees were subject in the island of Syra, between the years 1 777 and 1780, and through which nearly every colony in the island perished.

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  • The remains then change to buff colour, afterwards turning brown, when decomposition sets in, and as the bacilli present in the dead larvae increase and the nutrient matter is consumed, the mass in some cases becomes sticky and ropy in character, making its removal impossible by the bees.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) any means simple, but that it is produced by different microbes,.

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  • The brood of bees, when healthy, lies in the combs in compact masses, the larvae being plump and of a pearly whiteness, and when quite young curled up on their sides at the base of the cells.

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  • The only other disease to which reference need be made here is dysentery, which sometimes breaks out after the long confinement bees are compelled to undergo during severe winters.

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  • This trouble may be guarded against by feeding the bees in the early autumn with good food made from cane sugar, and housing them in well-ventilated hives kept warm and dry by suitable coverings.

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  • When bees are wintered on thin, watery food not sealed over, and are unable for months to take cleansing flights, they become weak and involuntarily discharge their excrement over the combs and hive, a state of things never seen in a healthy colony under normal conditions.

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  • The above embraces all that is necessary to be said in relation to diseases, though bees have been subject to other ailments such as paralysis, constipation, &c.

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  • Though in modern times a great deal has appeared in the daily newspapers on the subject, it is a notable fact that not a tithe of the wonderful things published in such articles about bees and bee-keeping is worthy of credence or possesses any real value.

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  • The account given above is the result of forty years' practical experience with bees in England, the writer having for a great portion of the time been connected editorially with the only two papers in that country entirely devoted to bees and bee-keeping, The British Bee Journal (weekly, founded 1873), and Bee-keepers' Record (monthly, founded 1882), the former being the only weekly journal in the world.

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  • The following books on the subject may be consulted for further details: - Francois Huber, New Observations on the Natural History of Bees; T.

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  • Cheshire, Bees and Bee-keeping; Dr Dzierzon, Rational Bee-keeping; E.

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  • Cook, Manual of the Apiary; Dr C. C. Miller, Forty Years among the Bees; F.

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  • Of the latter there are probably 12,000 to 15,000 species, including 140 butterflies, at least 180 grasshoppers, several hundred bees, &c. The so-called " grass hoppers," true locusts, have done great damage at times in Nebraska.

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  • It's known for instance that bees, which have a positive electric charge, can sense the negative charge that certain flowers emit.

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  • "I thought bees were attracted to flowers by sight and smell," I said.

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  • You're doing this so the bees will be more interested in certain flowers?

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  • He placed her on the table and retreated, shaking his head and swiping at the air around him, as if plagued by bees.

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  • Above her, bees buzzed around the aromatic apple blossoms.

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  • If we narrow it down to the US, the most people are killed by bees and wasps.

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  • When we use pesticides, we kill them as well as the harmful insects - and even the bees.

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  • A. Action will clearly be required where a dense aggregation of bees threatens the fabric of a building.

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  • anise hyssop Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) Perennial North American native produces fantastic spikes of purple flowers, which are loved by bees.

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  • Female adult bot flies resemble bees and are often a considerable annoyance to the horse when laying eggs.

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  • apiary visit to his bees.

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  • The leaves are strongly aromatic, a good attractor for bees.

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  • We were in absolute awe of Robert and Grant - thought they were the Bees Knees - still do.

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  • bees swarmed from the nest leaving the delicious honey comb behind.

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  • The top lip of the flower is hooded and it is pollinated by bees.

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  • SKINNER: You're saying this man was stung by bees carrying smallpox?

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  • Most honey bees in Britain come from domestic hive colonies.

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  • When fully grown the larvae pupate and a few days later they emerge as the first worker bumble bees of the year.

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  • The South American Brazil nut tree is dependant on carpenter bees for its pollination.

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  • Or spelling bees be small but successfully market online.

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  • bees in the hive 'd let them do it, too.

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  • The plant emits a stench to attract decaying flesh-eating beetles, flies and sweat bees for pollination.

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  • The Museum has its own beehive: safe behind glass, you can watch the bees constructing their honeycomb from London pollen.

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  • Apple blossom Heather Self raising flower Clover 4. What do beekeepers call the special box their bees live in?

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  • Honey Bees Honey Bees are the bees that are kept by beekeepers in hives.

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  • People would go to their local beekeeper who would isolate bees from the hive to sting them several times over a course of weeks.

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  • He is the only commercial beekeeper in Derby, selling the by-products of his 40 colonies of two million bees directly to the public.

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  • Candles made from natural and colored beeswax Created by the bees, constructed by Miranda, empowered by Cassandra, made magical by you!

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  • Other interesting subjects to study are wasps, bees, flies, beetles, butterflies, moths, and dragonflies.

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  • It is decked with racemes of small fragrant white blossoms in spring which attract butterflies and bees.

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  • I imagined fields full of blue flowered borage, with her bees busying themselves on it.

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  • I have just had butterfly visitors to my white buddleia only this week, up till then it was covered in bumble bees!

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  • bumble bees.

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  • In waste places, white dead nettle, violets and coltsfoot may be in flower, attracting early bumblebees and honey bees.

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  • buzzing bees that bumped against my window's netting.

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  • buzz of bees among the flowers.

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  • colony of bees and a cool, quiet place to rest and think.

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  • This means that it can forage on flowers that have deep corollas that would keep out other bees.

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  • corydalis flower Again I am not the only one enjoying the flowers as the bees are attracted by them as well.

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  • Shrubs come in all shapes and sizes -- Buddleia for butterflies, flowering currant, hebe and mahonia for bees.

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  • Famous for their Stylized Bees logo our wine decanter & drying stand is perfect for red wine.

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  • drone of the bees was a series of ' yelps!

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  • And like everyone else my previous experience of in-ear earphones was Sony's (which I thought were the bees, until... ).

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  • My second line of research concerns the behavioral ecology of social bees.

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  • flesh-eating beetles, flies and sweat bees for pollination.

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  • The sweet smelling starry yellow flowers fill summer days with a heady fragrance which attracts the bees.

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  • The red freestone found here is similar to that obtained at St. Bees.

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  • In fact come the spring they had hardly touched the stores, being northern black bees they were very frugal.

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  • The trumpeter gadfly and a number of his relations, beside several Grasshoppers and Bees, were the chief musicians.

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  • Hot summer days will find the heath grasshopper and bees on the heather blossoms, and solitary wasps mining tunnels in sandy banks.

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  • Attacked by some particularly fierce bees, he defended himself by throwing a hatchet which flew up to the Moon.

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  • heady fragrance which attracts the bees.

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  • hillock on the west side is used by solitary bees; nearby a pond leads off the brook.

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  • hive beetle is not the only threat to British bees posed by Europe.

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  • hives of bees are kept all round the world for the sake of the honey they produce.

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  • honey bees in Britain come from domestic hive colonies.

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  • honey comb is naturally produced by bees, particularly the youngest bees in the hive.

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  • honey from bees they keep in the middle of the farm.

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  • This that we are now created the body, cell by cell, like bees building a honeycomb.

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  • humming of the bees is the voice of the Goddess, the sound of Creation, which draws us into the dream world.

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  • When honey is diluted, a special enzyme the bees have added produces hydrogen peroxide, a well-known antibiotic.

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  • anise hyssop Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) Perennial North American native produces fantastic spikes of purple flowers, which are loved by bees.

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  • Routinely inspect stuffed animals and even old wax combs where honey bees have died out.

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  • She had jottings about bees, she had jottings about what you could make from household ingredients.

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  • The fresh cream puff pastry Sandwich was the " bees knees " .

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  • longhorn bees, which specialize in collecting pollen from wild peas.

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  • mason bees.

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  • They drank mead brewed to a secret formula from the nectar of sacred bees who lived in the grove.

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  • The deadly varroa mite has wiped out local colonies of bees in several countries around the world.

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  • mosaic floor is a pattern of bees.

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  • observation hives, moving bees, removing honey... and Vandals.

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  • oxidase enzyme added by the bees that becomes activated by contact with water.

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  • Painshill bees provide honey available all year, while permanent mementos include a paperweight of Painshill's Chinese bridge.

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  • Apparently bees like more enclosed spaces for their nests and now I come to think about it, this hive looks pretty papery.

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  • The fresh cream puff pastry Sandwich was the " bees knees " .

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  • More REPORT: Phantoms stung by Bracknell Bees BRACKNELL 7, phantoms stung by Bracknell Bees BRACKNELL 7, PHANTOMS 5 PHANTOMS were stung by.. .

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  • Then smoke the area to mask the alarm pheromone in the sting to stop any more bees from stinging in the same area.

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  • piscatorial bees in his bonnet!

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  • etching A flat metal plate is first coated with an acid resistant ground, which consists of bees wax, bitumen and resin.

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  • So we see how highly fertile these short-styled plants were when illegitimately fertilized with their own-form pollen by the aid of bees.

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  • pollinated by bees, who come to collect a sweet juicy sap stored round the base of the ovary.

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  • pollinated by flies and bees.

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  • puff pastry Sandwich was the " bees knees " .

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  • The fresh cream puff pastry Sandwich was the " bees knees " .

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  • resurfaceRESOLVED that St Bees School be asked to consider resurfacing the footpath.

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  • rosebay willow herb, and the bees are hard at work.

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  • The female bees of most species feed on the nectar secreted by many plants.

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  • secreted from glands on the underneath the worker bees ' abdomen.

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  • Five veined yellow sepals some 20 - 25 mm across the flower, pollinated by bees close-up.

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  • shriveled in the sun and occupied by a swarm of bees!

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  • skep of wild bees " .

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  • On top of all this is a straw skep with bees flying round it.

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  • smallholding with sheep, chickens and honey bees.

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  • solitary wasps and bees, and butterflies such as the grayling, small heath and common blue.

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  • spelling bees be small but successfully market online.

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  • good colonies with a population of healthy winter bees are the best springboard for the next season.

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  • Famous for their Stylized Bees logo our steak knife set is ideal for slicing through grilled steaks & chops.

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  • Bees produce an enzyme which splits sucrose (from nectar) into glucose and fructose.

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  • And yet, he says, we are spiritually like young bees not yet able to attain the summit of perfection.

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  • The bees swarmed from the nest leaving the delicious honey comb behind.

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  • swarm of bees, he wouldn't put a mask or anything on.

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  • taper down to St Bees Head.

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  • With regular teamster Chris Harris out through injury, the Bees have named Tomas Topinka at number two.

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  • D.Phil Oxford University 1990: Behavioral and physiological thermoregulation in solitary bees.

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  • trumpeter gadfly and a number of his relations, beside several Grasshoppers and Bees, were the chief musicians.

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  • Azure a lamb argent standing on a mount vert and a chief argent with three bees therein.

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  • wax moth does not kill bees or infest strong colonies, only weak colonies that are dying out or stored frames.

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  • By early summer the spring flowers have given way to the rosebay willow herb, and the bees are hard at work.

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  • worker bees collect nectar and pollen for the queen and new larvae to eat, and keep the burrow tidy.

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  • Among the relics were three hundred small golden models of bees.

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  • These were removed to Paris, and when Napoleon was crowned emperor a century and a half later he chose Childeric's bees for the decoration of his coronation mantle.

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  • Aristaeus was essentially a benevolent deity; he was worshipped as the first who introduced the cultivation of bees (Virgil, Georg.

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  • He is the constant companion of Dionysus, whom he was said to have instructed in the cultivation of the vine and the keeping of bees.

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  • Mermis (in the larval state) is confined to the Invertebrata and Sphaerularia to bees.

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  • Bees carry the spores of Scierotinia as they do the pollen of the bilberries, and flies convey the conidia of ergot from grain to grain.

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  • The chief points in the life-history of Stylops and Xenos, which are parasitic on certain bees (Andrena) and wasps (Polistes), have been investigated by K.

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  • EDMUND GRINDAL (c. 1519-1583), successively bishop of London, archbishop of York and archbishop of Canterbury, born about 1519, was son of William Grindal, a farmer of Hensingham, in the parish of St Bees, Cumberland.

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  • He left considerable benefactions to Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, Queen's College, Oxford, and Christ's College, Cambridge; he also endowed a free school at St Bees, and left money for the poor of St Bees, Canterbury, Lambeth and Croydon.

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  • Ants form a distinct and natural family (Formicidae) of the great order Hymenoptera, to which bees, wasps and sawflies also belong.

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  • Such " workers " are essential to the formation of a social community of Hymenoptera, and their wingless condition among the ants shows that their specialization has been carried further in this family than among the wasps and bees.

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  • Further, while among wasps and bees we find some solitary and some social genera, the ants as a family are social, though some FIG.

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  • Belt, " clustered together in a dense mass like a great swarm of bees hanging from the roof."

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  • Lubbock's (Lord Avebury) Ants, Bees and Wasps (London, 1882), dealing with British and European species, has been followed by numerous important papers by A.

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  • Swine and bees conclude this branch of the work.

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  • The long sucking " tongue " of bees is probably a modification of the ligula.

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  • readily movable on the segment (mesothorax) immediately behind - smaller and of less importance where the prothorax is fixed to the mesothorax, as in bees and flies.

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  • Paired erectile plates (patagia) are borne on the prothorax in moths, while in moths, sawflies, wasps, bees and other insects there are small plates (tegulae) - see Fig.

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  • The poison-glands of the sting in wasps and bees are well-known examples of these.

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  • The offspring of the virgin females are in most of these instances females; but among the bees and wasps parthenogenesis occurs normally and always results in the development of males, the " queen " insect laying either a fertilized or unfertilized egg at will.

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  • His classification was founded mainly on the nature of the wings, and five of his orders - the Hymenoptera (bees, ants, wasps, &c.), Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (two-winged flies), Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies), and Hemiptera (bugs, cicads, &c.) - are recognized to-day with nearly the same limits as he laid down.

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  • Comprises gall-flies, ichneumon-flies, ants, wasps, bees.

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  • The third tractatus of this volume deals with birds - including among them bats, bees and other flying creatures; but as it is the first printed book in which figures of birds are introduced it merits notice, though most of the illustrations, which are rude woodcuts, fail, even in the coloured copies, to give any precise indication of the species intended to be represented.

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  • Poultry, bees and silkworms are commonly kept.

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  • Law's next controversial work was Remarks on Mandeville's Fable of the Bees (1723), in which he vindicates morality on the highest grounds; for pure style, caustic wit and lucid argument this work is remarkable; it was enthusiastically praised by John Sterling, and republished by F.

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  • 7), so called from the seal-like scars on the rhizome of stems of previous seasons, the hanging flowers of which contain no honey, but are visited by bees for the pollen.

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  • Lucian's De Dea Syria, § 48; for " bees," &c., as titles of sacred attendants, see J.

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  • deal in a similar way with domesticated and wild animals, including the dog, serpents, bees and insects; they also include a general treatise on animal physiology spread over books xxi.

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  • Wasps, bees and hornets, generically known as hachi, differ little from their European types, except that they are somewhat larger and more sluggish.

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  • On the English side the low Solway Plain borders the firth; except for a short distance above St Bees Head.

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  • Fertilization is effected by insects, especially by bees, which are directed in their search by the colour and fragrance of the flowers; but some pollen must also be transported by the wind to the female flowers, especially in arctic species which, in spite of the poverty of insect life, set abundant fruit.

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  • all naturalists in the sense proposed by him, to include the sawflies, gall-flies, ichneumon-flies and their allies, ants, wasps and bees.

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  • The sting of wasps, ants and bees is a modified ovipositor and is used for egg-laying by the fertile females, as well as for defence.

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  • Bees store honey and pollen to serve as food for their young.

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  • Thus we find throughout the order a degree of care for offspring unreached by other insects, and this family-life has, in the best known of the Hymenoptera - ants, wasps and bees - developed into an elaborate social organization.

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  • Digging wasps make simple holes in the ground; many burrowing bees form branching tunnels; other bees excavate timber or make their brood-chambers in hollow plant-stems; wasps work up with their saliva vegetable fibres bitten off tree-bark to make paper; social bees produce from glands in their own bodies the wax whence their nest-chambers are built.

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  • Fragments of wings from the Lias and Oolitic beds have been referred to ants and bees, but the true nature of these remains is doubtful.

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  • The eggs are laid in the nests of various bees and wasps, the chrysid larva living as a " cuckoo " parasite.

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  • The Sapygidae are parasitic on bees, while the Scoliidae are large, robust and hairy insects, many of which prey upon the grubs of chafers.

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  • In this instinct we have a correspondence with the habits of social wasps and bees.

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  • The bees which make up this group agree with the Sphecoidea in the short pronotum, but may be distinguished from all other Hymenoptera by the widened first tarsal segment and the plumose hairs on head and body.

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  • Bees feed on honey and pollen.

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  • For the Fossores, wasps, ants and bees see E.

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  • Butterflies, moths and bees are very abundant, the former being remarkable for their size and splendid coloration; but these groups have not been investigated exhaustively enough to afford a correct idea of their number or their true affinities.

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  • It was famous in ancient times for its bees, which gathered honey of peculiar flavour from its aromatic herbs; their fame still persists.

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  • The idea of an Incarnation of God is absurd; why should the human race think itself so superior to bees, ants and elephants as to be put in this unique relation to its maker?

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  • The small pendulous bellshaped flowers contain no honey but are visited by bees for the pollen.

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  • These are very simple, open and generally regular flowers, white, greenish-yellow or yellow in colour and are chiefly visited by insects with a short proboscis, such as short-tongued wasps and flies, also beetles and more rarely bees.

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  • White and yellow colours predominate and insects with a proboscis of medium length are the common pollinating agents, such as short-tongued bees.

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  • Bees, wasps and larger insects serve as pollinating agents FIG.

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  • Bees find a highly congenial habitat in Mexico, and some honey is exported.

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  • Honey is one of the minor food-products of Canada, and in many localities bees have abundance of pasturage.

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  • Wheat and other cereals are cultivated, with fruits of many kinds, olives, and vines which yield a wine of fair quality; while saffron is largely produced, and some attention is given to the keeping of bees and silkworms. Stock-farming, for which the wide plains afford excellent opportunities, employs many of the peasantry; the bulls of Albacete are in demand for bull-fighting, and the horses for mounting the Spanish cavalry.

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  • Bees are principally kept on the Luneburger Heide, and the annual yield of honey is very considerable.

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  • arrangement self-pollination is prevented and cross-pollination ensured by the visits of bees which come for the honey secreted by the glands at the base of the inner stamens.

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  • Honey bees are protected from a large number of insect enemies because they sting and are distasteful.

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  • Insect-eating birds soon learn to associate distastefulness with the size, form and colour of the bees, and consequently leave them alone after one or more trials.

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  • It is in the first place a matter of common knowledge that human beings who have been taught to avoid handling bees invariably fear to touch drone-flies, unless specially trained to distinguish the one from the others.

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  • Typical dipterous insects (flies) closely resemble in general form aculeate Hymenoptera belonging to the families of bees and wasps.

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  • Hence we find that the majority of flies that mimic insects of other orders have bees or wasps for their models.

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  • But the likeness probably goes deeper than superficial resemblance that appeals to the eye, for spiders which distinguish flies from bees by touch and not by sight, treat drone-flies after touching them, not in the fearless way they evince towards bluebottles (Calliphora), but in the cautious manner they display towards bees and wasps, warily refraining from coming to close quarters until their prey is securely enswathed in silk.

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  • The same explanation no doubt applies to the mimicry, both in Borneo and South Africa, of hairy bees of the family Xylocopidae by Asilid flies of the genus Hyperechia, and also to other cases of mimicry of Hymenoptera as well as of inedible beetles of the family Lycidae by Diptera.

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  • Trochilium apiforme, crabroniforme - present to bees and wasps is effected in the main by the loss of the scales from the wings, leaving these organs transparent.

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  • larly abundant; crickets, beetles, locusts, walking-stick insects, mayflies and bugs are found, but there were neither flies, moths, butterflies nor bees, which is no more than we should expect from the conditions of plant life.

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  • In many cases the slimy masses of spermatia (Uredineae), conidia (Claviceps), basidiospores (Phallus, Coprinus), &c., emit more or less powerful odours, which attract flies or other insects, and it has been shown that bees carry the flagrant oidia of Sclerotinia to the stigma of Vaccinium and infect it, and that flies carry away the foetid spores of Phallus, just as pollen is dispersed by such insects.

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  • The conidia are fragrant and are carried by bees to the stigma of the bilberry; here they germinate with the pollen and the hyphae pass with the pollen tubes down the style; the former infect the ovules and produce sclerotia, therein reducing the fruits to a mummified condition.

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  • Caymans, water-hogs (capinchos), several kinds of deer (Cervus paludosus the largest), ounces, opossums, armadillos, vampires, the American ostrich, the ibis, the jabiru, various species popularly called partridges, the pato real or royal duck, the Palamedea cornuta, parrots and parakeets, are among the more notable forms. Insect life is peculiarly abundant; the red stump-like ant-hills are a feature in every landscape, and bees used to be kept in all the mission villages.

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  • It is said also to dig up the nests of wasps in order to eat the larvae, as the ratel - a closely allied South African form - is said to rob the bees of their honey.

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  • Bees are specialized in correspondence with the flowers from which they draw the bulk of their food supply, the flexible c tongue being used for sucking nectar, the plumed hairs and the modified legs (fig.

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  • These floral products which form the food of bees and of their larvae, are in most cases collected and stored by the industrious insects; but some genera of bees act as inquilines or "cuckoo-parasites," laying their eggs in the nests of other bees, so that their larvae may feed at the expense of the rightful owners of the nest.

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  • Many genera of bees are represented, like most other insects, by ordinary males and females, each female constructing a nest formed of several chambers ("cells") and storing in each chamber a supply of food for the grub to be hatched from the egg that she lays therein.

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  • Such bees, although a number of individuals often make their nests close together, are termed "solitary," their communities differing in nature from those of the "social" bees, among which there are two kinds of females - the normal fertile females or "queens," and those specially modified females with undeveloped ovaries (see fig.

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  • Details of the structure of bees are given in the article Hymenoptera.

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  • 6, pg, st.) of female bees is usually highly specialized, but in a few genera it is reduced and useless.

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  • The tongue is bifid at the tip in a few genera; usually it is pointed and varies greatly in length, being comparatively short in Andrena, long in the humble-bees(Bombus), and longest in Euglossa, a tropical American genus of solitary bees.

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  • The legs, which are so highly modified as pollen-carriers in the higher bees, are comparatively simple in certain primitive genera.

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  • The hairy covering, so notable in the hive-bee and especially in humble-bees, is greatly reduced among bees that follow a parasitic mode of life.

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  • As is usual where an abundant food supply is provided for the young insects, the larvae of bees (fig.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) are degraded maggots; they have no legs, but possess fairly well-developed heads.

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  • The larvae of some bees spin cocoons (fig.

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  • Bees of different genera vary considerably in the site and arrangement of their nests.

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  • Many - like the common "solitary" bees Halictus and Andrena - burrow in the ground; the holes of species of Andrena are commonly seen in springtime opening on sandy banks, grassy lawns or gravel paths.

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  • Our knowledge of such bees is due to the observations of F.

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  • Sometimes the passage is the conjoint work of many bees whose cells are grouped along it at convenient distances apart.

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  • Other bees, the species of Osmia for example, choose the hollow stem of a bramble or other shrub, the female forming a linear series of cells in each of which an egg is laid and a supply of food stored up. J.

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  • The leaf-cutter bees (Megachile) - which differ from Andrena and Halictus and agree with Osmia, Apis and Bombus in having elongate tongues - cut neat circular disks from leaves, using them for lining the cells of their underground nests.

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  • Among the solitary bees none has more remarkable nesting habits than the mason bee (Chalicodoma) represented in the south of France and described at length by Fabre.

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  • The working bees, such as have been mentioned, are victimized by bees of other genera, which throw upon the industrious the task of providing for the young of the idle.

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  • The bees hitherto described are "solitary," all the individuals being either males or unmodified females.

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  • The most highly developed of the long-tongued bees are "social" species, in which the females are differentiated into egg - laying queens and (usually) infertile "workers" (fig.

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  • One species of Halictus nearly reaches the desired stage; but the first young bees to appear in the perfect state are males, and when the females emerge the mother dies.

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  • Among the social bees the mother and daughter-insects co-operate, and they differ from the "solitary" groups in the nature of their nest, the cells (fig.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) in position, but in the "stingless" bees of the tropics (Trigona and Melipona) they are dorsal.

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  • They are closely" mimicked "by bees of the genus Psithyrus, which often share their nests.

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  • The "stingless" bees (Trigona) of the tropics have the parts of the sting reduced and useless for piercing.

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  • As though to compensate for the loss of this means of defence, the mandibles are very powerful, and some of the bees construct tubular entrances to the nest with a series of constrictions easy to hold against an enemy.

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  • The habits of the Brazilian species of these bees have been described in detail by H.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) FIG.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping.) Poison bag.

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  • - Modifications in the Legs of Bees.

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  • - More has been written on bees, and especially on the genus Apis, than on any other group of insects.

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  • Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping (London, 1885-1888), and T.

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  • vi., should be consulted for further information on bees generally.

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  • British bees are described in the catalogues of Smith, mentioned above, and by E.

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  • The Beni-Abbas tribe in the Algerian Atlas is famed for its walnuts, and many tribes keep bees, chiefly for the commercial value of the wax.

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  • Bees are abundant, and wild honey and wax are gathered in considerable quantities.

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  • Hornets, bees and wasps of many varieties abound.

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  • The work by which he is known is the Fable of the Bees, published first in 1705 under the title of The Grumbling Hive, or Knaves Turn'd Honest (two hundred doggerel couplets).

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  • Great attention is given to the rearing of bees and silk-worms; and the wine of the province is held in high repute throughout Spain, while some inferior kinds are sent to France to be mixed with claret.

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  • Bernard de Mandeville's Fable of the Bees is unique in that it describes the downfall of an ideal commonwealth.

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  • Many Utopias, such as the Fable of the Bees and Erewhon, are designed to satirize existing social conditions as well as to depict a more perfect civilization.

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  • Mosquitoes, termites, bees, ants, centipedes, millipedes, locusts, grasshoppers, butterflies, dragonflies, sandflies and spiders' are found in immense numbers.

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  • and x.), each of which would make it an offering acceptable to God; the rush-wick is the product of pure water, the wax is the offspring of virgin bees," the flame is sent from heaven.

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  • 11 Bees were believed, like fish, to be sexless.

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  • by the command didst cause this liquid to come by the labour of bees to the perfection of wax,.

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  • Audubon's Avenue, the one nearest the entrance, is occupied in winter by myriads of bats, that hang from the walls in clusters like swarms of bees.

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  • Ants, bees and wasps of many species, and flies and gnats abound, particularly during the summer rainy season, and at all elevations.

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  • Later, the fragrance of its flowers, rich in honey, attracts innumerable bees; in the autumn the foliage becomes a clear yellow but soon falls.

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  • The flowers contain honey, and attract flies, short-lipped bees or other small insects by the agency of which pollination is effected.

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  • The green rusticity of Whittier's farm and village life imparted a bucolic charm to such lyrics as " In School Days," " The Barefoot Boy," " Telling the Bees," " Maud Muller," and " My Schoolmate."

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  • The general practice for many years past among naturalists has been to restrict the terms "Insecta" and "insect" to the class of Arthropods with three pairs of legs in the adult condition: bees, flies, moths, bugs, grasshoppers, springtails are "insects," but not spiders, centipedes nor crabs, far less earthworms, and still less slugs, starfishes or coral polyps.

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  • There were also three classes of priestesses, Mellierae, Hierae, Parierae; there is no evidence that they were called Melissae ("bees"), although the bee is a frequent symbol on the coins of the city.

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  • Of these latter Mandeville, the author of The Fable of the Bees, or vile.

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  • Bees are very generally kept, the honey being consumed in the country, the wax exported.

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  • Bees have been introduced.

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  • Near Fiume the orange, lemon, pomegranate, fig and olive bear well; mulberries are planted on many estates for silkworms; and the heather-clad uplands of the central region favour the keeping of bees.

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  • Bees are very numerous in parts of the country.

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  • As a forcible illustration of the manner in which a colony of bees was recognized as the embodiment of government by a chief or ruler, in the earliest times of which there is any existing record, it may be mentioned that on the sarcophagus containing the mummified remains of Mykerinos (now in the British Museum and dating back 3633 years B.C.) will be found a hieroglyphic bee (fig.

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  • In England also, some bee-keepers include queen-rearing as part of their business, while one large apiary on the south coast is exclusively devoted to the rearing of queen bees on the latest scientific system, and to breeding by selection from such races as are most suited to the exceptional climatic conditions of the country.

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  • Extensive apiaries have been established on the American continent, some containing from 2000 to 3500 colonies of bees, and in these honey is harvested in hundreds of tons yearly.

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  • The magnitude of the bee industry in the United States may be judged from the fact of a single bee-farmer located in California having harvested from 150,000 lb of honey in one year from 2000 stocks of bees, and, as an instance of the enormous weight of honey obtainable from good hives in that favoured region, the same farmer secured 60,000 lb of comb-honey in one season from his best 300 colonies.

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  • In proof thereof, we may quote the case of an extensive grower in the midland counties - sending fruit to the London market in tons - whose crop of gooseberries increased nearly fourfold after establishing a number of stocks of bees in close proximity to the gooseberry bushes.

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  • The fruit orchards and raspberry fields of Kent are also known to be greatly benefited by the numerous colonies of bees owned by more than 3000 bee-keepers in the county.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) and otherwise, with regard to apiculture - as well as the lack of sufficient natural bee-forage for large apiaries - are such as to preclude the possibility of establishing apiaries on a scale comparable with those located in less confined lands.

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  • Moreover, their views are confirmed by the constant references to bees and the profits obtainable from bee-keeping in the leading papers on all sides.

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  • io) it forms the section or box C, measuring 1 n I n a 44 X 44 Xz when complete, and holds about i lb of comb-honey when filled by the bees and ready for table use.

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  • A swarm of bees hived in a straw skep, the picturesque little domicile known the world over as the personification of industry, will furnish their home with waxen combs in form and shape so admirably adapted to their requirements as to need no improvement by man.

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  • Why the circular form was chosen for the skep need not be inquired into, beyond saying that its shape conforms to that of a swarm, as the bees usually hang clustered on the branch of a neighbouring tree or bush after issuing from the parent hive.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) itself as illustrating the admirable way in which the bees furnish their dwelling.

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  • A.) box for The straw sleep. and how the lower portion allows the bees to cluster around the tender larvae and thus maintain the warmth necessary during its metamorphosis from the egg to the perfect insect.

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  • Huber found that although he could induce swarms to occupy the glass-sided single frame advised by Reaumur, if the frame was fitted with ready-built pieces of comb patched together before hiving the swarm, the experiment was successful, while if left to themselves the bees built small combs across the space between the sheets of glass, and the desired inspection from the outside was thus rendered impossible.

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  • He also gathered that the abnormal conditions forced upon the bees by a ready-built single comb might so turn aside their natural instincts as to render his investigations less trustworthy than if conducted under perfectly natural conditions; so, in order to remove all doubt, he decided to have a series of wooden frames made, measuring 12 in.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) frames of comb could be opened for inspection like a book, while when closed the bees clustered together as in an ordinary hive.

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  • Ten of these frames had a small piece of comb fixed to the topbar in each, supported (temporarily) by a thin lath wedged up with pegs at side, the latter being removed when the comb had been made secure by the bees.

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  • 13) - to raise up any frame between two sheets of glass which confined the bees and allowed him to study the process of comb-building abserr's better than any hive we know of to-day.

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  • (From Cheshire's Bees and Bee-keeping, Scientific and Practical.) Huber's hive was defective in many respects; the parting of each frame, thus letting loose the whole colony, caused much trouble at times, but it remained the only movable-comb hive till 1838, when Dr Dzierzon - whose theory of parthenogenesis has made his name famous - devised a box-hive with a loose top-bar on which the bees built their combs and a movable side or door, by means of which the frames could be lifted out for inspection.

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  • Langstroth, in his measurements, hit upon the happy mean which keeps bees from propolizing or fastening the frames to the hive body, as they assuredly would do if sufficient space had not been allowed for free passage round the side-bars; it is equally certain that if too much space had been provided, they would fill it with comb and thus render the frame immovable.

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  • space between the roof and A top-bars for bees to pass from frame to frame.

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  • Consequently, on the roof being raised B the bees can take wing if not prevented from doing so.

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  • This feature C finds no favour with British bee-keepers, nevertheless the " improved Langstroth " is a useful and simple hive, moderate in price, and no doubt efficient, but not suitable for bees wintered on their summer stands, as nearly all hives are in Great Britain.

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  • American bee-keepers, therefore, find it necessary to provide underground cellars, into which the bees are carried in the fall of each year, remaining there till work begins in the following spring.

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  • Those among them who cannot, for various reasons, adopt the cellar-wintering plan are obliged to provide what are termed " chaff-covers " for protecting their bees in winter.

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  • The difference here is that packing is now dispensed with, it being found that bees winter equally well with an outer case giving 12 in.

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  • Thus no change is needed in winter or summer, the air-space protecting the bees from cold in winter and heat in summer.

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  • Another point of difference between the English and American hive is the roof, which being gable-shaped in the former allows warm packing to be placed directly on the frame tops, so that the bees are covered in when the roof is removed and may be examined or fed with very little disturbance.

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  • At the same time the combs were preserved for refilling by the bees, in lieu of melting them down for wax.

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