How to use Beeches in a sentence

beeches
  • Seen from a distance, the beeches clothe the hanger like a thick pelt.

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  • Several other pines are found, and among the less important timber trees are black spruce, Carolina balsam, beeches, ashes, sycamore or button wood, sweet gum and lindens.

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  • As a picturesque tree, for park and ornamental plantation, it is among the best of the conifers, its colour and form contrasting yet harmonizing with the olive green and rounded outline of oaks and beeches, or with the red trunk and glaucous foliage of the pine.

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  • Many of the mountains are clothed with forests of oak, chestnuts, beeches and other trees, and contain iron, copper, lead and marble.

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  • The early colonists found quite half the surface of the archipelago covered with dense, evergreen forest, a luxuriant growth of pines and beeches, tangled and intertwined with palms, ferns of all sizes, wild vines and other parasites, and a rank, bushy, mossed undergrowth.

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  • About 857,000 acres, or 85% of the whole forest land, are planted with conifers; and about 143,000 acres, or 15%, with deciduous trees, among which beeches and birches are the commonest.

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  • Fine oaks and beeches are numerous, and yew trees of great size and age are seen in some Kentish churchyards, as at Stansted, while the fine oak at Headcorn is also famous.

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  • A few oaks and red beeches occur, while chestnut trees grow anywhere between 1000 and 5300 ft.

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  • Near Klampenborg is the Dyrehave (Deer park) or Skoven (the forest), a beautiful forest of beeches.

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  • The mountain forests consist chiefly of firs, Free Towns pines and larches, but contain Lbeck also silver firs, beeches and Bremen oaks.

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  • On the boundary mountains the trees are mainly coniferous; in the interior oaks, elms, beeches and ashes are conspicuous.

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  • The ridges which ramify from the Paramera are covered with valuable forests of beeches, oaks and firs, presenting a striking contrast to the bare peaks of the Sierra de Gredos.

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  • Danish peat-mosses again show the existence of man at a time when the Scotch fir was abundant; at a later period the firs were succeeded by oaks, which have again been almost superseded by beeches, a succession of changes which indicate a considerable lapse of time.

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  • The hills are almost everywhere well wooded, the predominant trees being firs and beeches.

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  • Oaks, elms, firs, ashes and beeches are the principal forest trees.

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  • In northern Croatia and Slavonia the mountains are far more fertile, being often densely wooded with oaks, beeches and pines.

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  • Both species seemed to favor the very tops of tall beeches.

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  • Magical and seemingly timeless, the hilltop stands of beeches were a favorite subject of the modern artist John Piper.

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  • There is also the chance to have double deck workings but terminating on the eastern fringe of the Beeches.

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  • Among the most charming experiments for the tree-lover to make would be these Southern Beeches, but the trouble is that for some time it may be difficult to get healthy young stock.

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  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.

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  • The crater is densely overgrown with oaks and beeches which harbour wild boars and wolves.

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  • The poet Thomas Gray, who stayed frequently at Stoke Poges in the vicinity, is enthusiastic concerning the beauty of the Beeches in a letter to Horace Walpole in 1737.

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  • Oaks and beeches predominate in the north; pines, often of gigantic size, among the fantastic white or grey rocks of the wild south-western ridges.

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  • This may be due to frost, especially in thin-barked trees, and often occurs in beeches, pears, &c.; or it may result from bruising by wind, hailstones, gun-shot wounds in coverts, &c., the latter of course very local.

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