Becket sentence example

becket
  • A papal bull having also been obtained, on the 28th of August 1425, the archbishop, in the course of a visitation of Lincoln diocese, executed his letters patent founding the college, dedicating it to the Virgin, St Thomas Becket and St Edward the Confessor, and handed over the buildings to its members, the vicar of Higham Ferrers being made the first master or warden.
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  • But I refused the permission which Becket solicited of reprinting it; the public curiosity was imperfectly satisfied by a pirated copy of the booksellers of Dublin; and when a copy of the original edition has been discovered in a sale, the primitive value of half-a-crown has risen to the fanciful price of a guinea or thirty shillings."
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  • Becket is an irregular structure, dating from the reign of Henry VI., but frequently restored.
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  • Such a mitre appears on a seal of Archbisho p Thomas Becket (Father Thurston, The ?P allium, London, 1892, p. 17), The custom was, however, .already growing up of setting the horns over the front and back of the head instead of the sides (the mitre said to have belonged to St Thomas Becket, now at Westminster Cathedral, is of this type), 1 and with this the essential character of the mitre, as it persisted through the middle ages, was established.
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  • Being forfeited by his grandson Eustace FitzJohn in the reign of Stephen, Knaresborough was granted to Robert de Stuteville, from whose descendants it passed through marriage to Hugh de Morville, one of the murderers of Thomas Becket, who with his three accomplices remained in hiding in the castle for a whole year.
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  • It had been the hope of Theobald that Becket's influence would be exercised to support the extensive privileges which the Church had wrested from Stephen.
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  • The appointment caused some murmurs; since Becket, at the time when it was made, was still a simple deacon.
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  • Henry on his side looked to find in Becket the archbishop a coadjutor as loyal as Becket the archdeacon; and anticipated that the Church would once more be reduced to that state of dependence in which she had stood during the latter years of Henry I.
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  • Becket, however, disappointed all the conflicting expectations excited by his appointment.
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  • They came into open conflict at the council of Woodstock (July 1163), when Becket successfully opposed the king's proposal that a land-tax, known as the sheriff's aid, which formed part of that official's salary, should be henceforth paid into the Exchequer.
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  • Becket had not shrunk from excommunicating a tenant in chief who had encroached upon the lands of Canterbury, and had protected against the royal courts a clerk named Philip de Brois who was charged with an assault upon a royal officer.
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  • These disputes involved questions of principle which had long occupied Henry's attention, and Becket's defiant attitude was answered by the famous Constitutions of Clarendon, in which the king defined, professedly according to ancient use and custom, the relations of Church and State.
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  • Becket and the bishops were required to give these constitutions their approval.
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  • It was fortunate for Becket's reputation that Henry punished him for his change of front by a systematic persecution in the forms of law.
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  • Becket fled to France in November 1164.
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  • In 1166 Becket received from the pope a commission to publish what censures he thought fit; of which he at once availed himself to excommunicate the king's principal counsellors.
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  • Becket was canonized in 1172.
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  • It was plundered by Henry VIII., to whom the memory of Becket was specially obnoxious; but the reformers were powerless to expunge the name of the saint from the Roman calendar, on which it still remains.
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  • 20 the principles for which he fought, the posthumous reputation of Becket must appear strangely exaggerated.
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  • But he was excessively timid and cautious, and hardly mentions events, like the murder of Becket, which were subjects of controversy.
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  • -The earliest description of London is that written by the monk Fitzstephen in 1174 as an introduction to his life of Archbishop Thomas a Becket.
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  • A good example of the camisia of the 12th century is the rochet of Thomas Becket, preserved at Dammartin in the Pas de Calais, the only surviving medieval example remarkable for the pleating which, as was the case with albs also, gave greater breadth and more elaborate folds.
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  • In the autumn of this year his tragedy of Becket was published, but the poet at last despaired of the stage, and disclaimed any hope of "meeting the exigencies of our modern theatre."
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  • Curiously enough, after his death Becket was the one of all his plays which enjoyed a great success on the boards.
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  • One of the r4th century is dedicated to Thomas Becket of Canterbury.
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  • He was brought to Canterbury, possibly by Becket, together with a supply of books upon the civil law, to act as counsel (causidicus) to Archbishop Theobald in his struggle, which ended successfully in 1146, to obtain the transfer of the legateship from the bishop of Winchester to himself.
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  • Darboy was the author of a number of works, of which the most important are a Vie de St Thomas Becket (1859), a translation of the works of St Denis the Areopagite, and a translation of the Imitation of Christ.
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  • The most common of the English pilgrims' signs are those of the shrine of Thomas Becket at Canterbury, the greatest centre of pilgrimage in England.
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  • To this old track the name of " pilgrims' way " has been given, for along it passed the stream of pilgrims coming through Winchester from the south and west of England and from the continent of Europe by way of Southampton to Canterbury Cathedral to view the place of the martyrdom of Thomas Becket, in the north transept, to the relics in the crypt where he was first buried after his murder, in 1170, and the shrine in the Trinity Chapel which rose above his tomb after the translation of the body in 1220.
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  • The chief events connected with the county under the Norman kings were the capture of Rochester by William Rufus during the rebellion of Odo of Bayeux; the capture of Dover and Leeds castles by Stephen; the murder of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury in 1170; the submission of John to the pope's legate at Dover in 21 3, and the capture of Rochester Castle by the king in the same year.
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  • The literary quarrel between him and Freeman excited general interest when it blazed out in a series of articles which Freeman wrote in the Contemporary Review (1878-1879) t ort Froude's Short Study of Thomas Becket.
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  • After the death of Theobald in 1161, John continued as secretary to Thomas Becket, and took an active part in the long disputes between that primate and his sovereign, Henry II.
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  • With Becket he withdrew to France during the king's displeasure; he returned with him in 1170, and was present at his assassination.
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  • In the following years, during which he continued in an influential situation in Canterbury, but at what precise date is unknown, he drew up the Life of Thomas Becket.
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  • The affair of Thomas Becket involved the papacy in a quarrel with the powerful monarchy of the Angevins, whose representative, Henry II., was master of England and of the half of France.
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  • Alexander's diplomatic skill and moral authority, reinforced by the Capetian alliance and the revulsion of feeling caused by the murder of Becket, enabled him to force the despotic Henry to yield, and even to do penance at the tomb of the martyr.
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  • Although Becket was a man of narrow sympathies and by no means of liberal views, he had died for the liberties of his caste, and the aureole that surrounded him enhanced the prestige and ascendancy of the papacy.
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  • The protests of Becket against this usurpation of the rights of Canterbury were the ultimate cause of the primate's murder.
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  • But Thomas Becket, archdeacon of Canterbury, a younger statesman whom Theobald had discovered and promoted, soon became all-powerful.
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  • Becket lent himself entirely to his master's ambitions, which at this time centred round schemes of territorial aggrandizement.
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  • He was bitterly disappointed that Becket, on whom he bestowed the primacy, left vacant by the death of Theobald (1162), at once became the champion of clerical privilege; he and the archbishop were no longer on speaking terms when the Constitutions of Clarendon came up for debate.
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  • The king's demands were not intrinsically irreconcilable with the canon law, and the papacy would probably have allowed them to take effect sub silentio, if Becket (q.v.) had not been goaded to extremity by persecution in the forms of law.
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  • After Becket's flight (1164), the king put himself still further in the wrong by impounding the revenues of Canterbury and banishing at one stroke a number of the archbishop's friends and connexions.
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  • When, in July 1170, he was forced by Alexander's threats to make terms with Becket, the king contrived that not a word should be said of the Constitutions.
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  • Becket's fate, though it supplied an excuse, was certainly not the real cause of the troubles with his sons which disturbed the king's later years (1173-1189).
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  • The king had to do with preachers who practically held the doctrines of Becket as to priestly pretensions.
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  • In England pilgrimages were made to the tomb of the murdered archbishop, Thomas Becket, in Canterbury Cathedral.
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  • The term is also given to the apse or semicircular termination of the choir; as at Canterbury in the part called "Becket's crown."
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  • (Nicholas Break speare) died here, and there is a chapel of St Thomas Becket in the crypt of the cathedral.
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  • Besides a number of handsome modern churches, among which is a Roman Catholic cathedral, Portsmouth possesses, in the church of St Thomas a Becket, a fine cruciform building dating from the second half of the 12th century, in which the chancel and transepts are original, but the nave and tower date from 1698, and the whole was extensively restored in 1904.
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  • He was buried at Canterbury near the spot where the shrine of St Thomas Becket once stood.
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  • It was this threat which forced John to sue for a reconciliation; and the first condition exacted was that he should acknowledge Langton as archbishop. During these years Langton had been residing at Pontigny, formerly the refuge of Becket.
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  • The fine church of St Thomas a Becket is transitional between Norman and Early English, and has a beautiful Norman east end.
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  • First among the lay nobles he signed the Constitutions of Clarendon, he sought to reconcile Henry and Archbishop Becket, and was twice in charge of the kingdom during the king's absences in France.
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  • His chancellor was a young clerk, Thomas Becket, who was recommended to him by archbishop Theobald as the most capable official in the realm.
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  • As a preliminary move he appointed his able chancellor Thomas Becket to the archbishopric of Canterbury, which fell vacant in ~ Jr 1162.
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  • Becket was one of those men who, without being either hypocrites or consciously ambitious, live only to magnify their office.
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  • But Becket vehemently opposed it, and got so much support when the great council met at Woodstock that Henry withdrew his schemes.
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  • Somewhat to the kings surprise, Becket yielded for a moment to his pressure, and declared his assent to the constitutions.
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  • Incensed with Becket for his repudiation of his original sub-.
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  • He also took the very mean step of declaring that he should call him to account for all the moneys that had passed~ through his hands when he was chancellor, though Becket had been given a quittance for them when he resigned the office more than two years before.
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  • When Becket was visited by the justiciar who came to rehearse the judgment, he started to his feet, refused to listen to a word, declared his repudiation of all lay courts and left the hall.
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  • If he sided with Becket and thundered against hispersecutor, there wassmalldoubt that the king of England would adhere to the schism.
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  • This was a clear invasion of the ancient rights of the primate, and Becket took it more to heart than any other of his grievances.
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  • The king offered to allow Becket to return from exile, and to restore him to his possessions, without exacting from him any promise of submission, or even a pledge that he would not reopen the dispute on his return.
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  • He had wholly misjudged the situation; Becket made neither promises nor threats, but three weeks after he reached Canterbury publicly excommunicated the bishops of London and Salisbury for the part that they had taken in the coronation of the young king, and suspended from their functions the other prelates who had been present at the ceremony.
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  • Among those who stood about him were four knights, some of whom had personal grudges against Becket, and all of whom were reckless ruffians, who were eager to win their masters favor by fair means or foul.
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  • They crossed the Channel with astonishing speed; two days after the kings outburst they stood before Becket at Canterbury and threatened him with death unless he should remove the excommunications and submit to his master.
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  • Between the outbreak of the kings quarrel with Becket at the council of Woodstock and the compromise of Avranches no less than ten years had elapsedthe best years of Henrys manhood.
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  • The quarrel with Becket, and the French war, were both distractij~g the English king at the moment.
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  • Among them are the sagas of Thorgils and Haflidi (I118-1121), the feud and peacemaking of two great chiefs, contemporaries of Ari; of Sturla (1150-1183), the founder of the great Sturlung family, down to the settlement of his great lawsuit by Jon Loptsson, who thereupon took his son Snorri the historian to fosterage, - a humorous story but with traces of the decadence about it, and glimpses of the evil days that were to come; of the Onundar-brennusaga (1185-1200), a tale of feud and fire-raising in the north of the island, the hero of which, Gudmund Dyri, goes at last into a cloister; of Hrafn Sveinbiornsson (1190-1213), the noblest Icelander of his day, warrior, leech, seaman, craftsman, poet and chief, whose life at home, travels and pilgrimages abroad (Hrafn was one of the first to visit Becket's shrine), and death at the hands of a foe whom he had twice spared, are recounted by a loving friend in pious memory of his virtues, c. 1220; of Aron Hiorleifsson (1200-1255), a man whose strength, courage and adventures befit rather a henchman of Olaf Tryggvason than one of King Haakon's thanes (the beginning of the feuds that rise round Bishop Gudmund are told here), of the Svinefell-men (1248-1252), a pitiful story of a family feud in the far east of Iceland.
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  • The life of Gudmund (Gudmundar Saga Goda), as priest, recounts the early life of this Icelandic Becket till his election as bishop (1160-1202); his after career must be sought out in Islendinga.
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  • He first makes his appearance in 117 4, as the chancellor of Archbishop Richard, the successor of Becket in the primacy.
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  • He belonged to the circle of Becket's admirers, and wrote two works dealing with the martyrdom and the miracles of his hero.
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  • Fragments of the former work have come down to us in the compilation known as the Quadrilogus, which is printed in the fourth volume of C. Robertson's Materials for the History of Thomas Becket (Rolls series); the miracles are extant in their entirety, and are printed in the second volume of the same collection.
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  • It was founded by William the Lion in 1178 for Tironesian Benedictines from Kelso, and consecrated in 1197, being dedicated to St Thomas Becket, whom the king had met at the English court.
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  • A college of secular canons followed in the 10th century, the provostship of which subsequently became an office of high dignity, and was held by Thomas Becket, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • Quite naturally, the archdeacon took in the Becket question the same side as his friends.
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  • Although his narrative is colourless, and although he was one of those who showed some sympathy for Becket at the council of Northampton (1164),(1164), the correspondence of Diceto shows that he regarded the archbishop's conduct as ill-considered, and that he gave advice to those whom Becket regarded as his chief enemies.
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  • Diceto was selected, in 1166, as the envoy of the English bishops when they protested against the excommunications launched by Becket.
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  • Henry II.s quarrel with Thomas Becket, archbishop of Canterbury, which ran its course in France (1164-1171) as a struggle for the independence and reform of the Church, both threatened by the Constitutions of Clarendon, and ended with the murder of Becket in 1172, gave Louis yet another advantage over his rival.
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  • Near the market house is the site of an ancient chapel dedicated to Thomas a Becket.
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  • Early in the reign of Henry II., however, he is found acting as a clerk in the king's court, probably under Thomas Becket, and he was one of the officials who assisted Henry in carrying out his great judicial and financial reforms. In 1162, or 1163, he was appointed archdeacon of Poitiers, but he passed most of his time in England, although in the next two or three years he visited Pope Alexander III.
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  • For promising to support Frederick against Alexander he was excommunicated by Becket in 1166.
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  • In ecclesiastical politics the bishop belonged to the school of Becket.
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  • He was one of many rebellious barons excommunicated by Thomas a Becket.
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  • Most Skippers have their own ideas how the cod ends should be false bellied and where the halving becket should be fixed.
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  • The halving becket, often called the doubling or double bag becket, is put on and the cod line rove.
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  • Mast End of spinnaker downhaul This is attached to the becket of a small block.
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  • The Becket window, in the Lucy Chapel of the Cathedral commemorates the martyrdom of Thomas of Canterbury.
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  • Becket's opposition rested upon a casuistic interpretation of the canon law, and an extravagant conception of the dignity attaching to the priesthood; he showed, moreover, a disposition to quibble, to equivocate, and to make promises which he had no intention of fulfilling.
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  • 201); life of St Modwenna, between 1225 and 1250 (Suchier, Die dem Matthdus Paris zugeschriebene Vie de St Auban, 18 73, pp. 54-5 8); Fragments of a life of St Thomas Becket, c. 12 3 0 (P. Meyer, Soc. Anc. Text.
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  • This conduct forced Alexanders hand, and he gave Becket leave to excommunicate his enemies.
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  • A brief quiz that asks questions about Becket and Canterbury The Murder of Archbishop Becket Students redraft the document to detect and insert bias.
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