Bay-of-biscay sentence example

bay-of-biscay
  • On the whole, however, France is inadequately provided with natural harbours; her long tract of coast washed by the Atlantic and the Bay of Biscay has sqarcely three or four good seaports, and those on the southern shore of the Channel form a striking contrast to the spacious maritime inlets on theEnglish side.
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  • In the eastern trough the Peake Deep lies off the Bay of Biscay in 20° W.
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  • As to cost, one transatlantic cable repair cost 75,000; the repair of the Aden-Bombay cable, broken in a depth of 1900 fathoms, was effected with the expenditure of 176 miles of new cable, and after a lapse of 251 days, 103 being spent in actual work, which for the remainder of the time was interrupted by the monsoon; a repair of the Lisbon-Porthcurnow cable, broken in the Bay of Biscay in 2700 fathoms, eleven years after the cable was laid, took 215 days, with an expenditure of 300 miles of cable.
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  • Himilco, a contemporary of Hanno, was charged with an expedition along the west coast of Iberia northward, and as far as the uncertain references to this voyage can be understood, he seems to have passed the Bay of Biscay and possibly sighted the coast of England.
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  • Fons Rapidus), a town of northern Spain, in the province of Guipuzcoa; on the San Sebastian-Bayonne railway; near the Bay of Biscay and on the French frontier.
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  • 58° W., the French were seen by this vessel heading for the Bay of Biscay.
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  • hardy race of fishers, who were the first of their craft in Europe to pursue the whale, formerly abundant in the Bay of Biscay.
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  • In 1869 and 1870 this work was on the two sides of the Isthmus of Panama, which hindered the extended to the Irish Sea and Bay of Biscay in H.M.S.
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  • Where the French telegraph cable between Brest and New York passes from the continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay to the depths of the Atlantic the angle of slope is.
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  • In the North Atlantic a strong submarine current flowing outward from the Mediterranean leaves the Strait of Gibraltar with a salinity of 38 per mille, and can be traced as far as Madeira and the Bay of Biscay in depths of from 600 to 2800 fathoms, still with a salinity of 35.6 per mille, whereas off the Azores at equal depths the salinity is from 0.5 to 0.7 per mille less.
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  • PLAICE (Pleuronectes platessa), a species of flat-fish, common on the coasts of northern Europe from Iceland to the Bay of Biscay.
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  • The products of this region are sent for export to Cudillero, a small harbour on the Bay of Biscay.
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  • The territory occupied by the Basque Provinces forms a triangle bounded on the west and south by the provinces of Santander, Burgos and Logrono, on the east by Navarre, on the north by France and the Bay of Biscay.
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  • ADOUR (anc. Aturrus or Adurus, from Celtic dour, water), a river of south-west France, rising in the department of Hautes Pyrenees, and flowing in a wide curve to the Bay of Biscay.
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  • The town is situated on a promontory jutting north-west into the Bay of Biscay and on the coast which extends on each side of it.
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  • Lord Gambier was a man of earnest, almost morbid, religious principle, and of undoubted courage; but the administration of the admiralty has seldom given rise to such flagrant scandals as during the time when he was a member of it; and through the whole war the self-esteem of the navy suffered no such wound as during Lord Gambier's command in the Bay of Biscay.
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  • P. pinaster, the cluster pine or pinaster, is an important species from its vigorous growth in the sand-drifts of the coast, for the purpose of binding which it has been grown more extensively and successfully than any other tree, especially on the dunes of the Bay of Biscay.
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  • These vessels have a wide range of operations, pursuing their work as far as the Faeroe Islands and Iceland on the one hand, and the Bay of Biscay and the Portuguese coast on the other.
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  • inland from the Bay of Biscay.
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  • It was a different thing for John and his successors to undertake the long voyage to Bordeaux, around the stormy headlands of Brittany and across the Bay of Biscay.
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  • From this date onward Franco-Spanish fleets were perpetually to be met not only in the Bay of Biscay but in the Channel; they made the voyage to Bordeaux unsafe, and often executed descents on the shores of Kent, Sussex, Devon and Cornwall.
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  • LLANES, a seaport of northern Spain, in the province of Oviedo, on the river Carrocedo and the Bay of Biscay.
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  • the Basques and Gascons, who occupied the southern slope of the western Pyrenees and part of the shore of the Bay of Biscay.
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  • The Basques who now inhabit both sides of the Pyrenean range are probably the last representatives of the Iberians, who came from Spain to settle between the Mediterranean and the Bay of Biscay.
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  • Pyrenees], a range of mountains in south-west Europe, separating the Iberian Peninsula from France, and extending for about 240 m., from the Bay of Biscay to Cape Creus, or, if only the main crest of the range be considered, to Cape Cerbere, on the Mediterranean Sea.
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  • Except in Leon and the provinces bordering on the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic, irrigation is almost everywhere necessary for cultivation, at least in the case of certain crops.
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  • closely to the old Roman province of the same name extending from the Bay of Biscay to the line of the Duero, from the ocean to the foot of the mountains of Navarre.
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  • Some were described as from sea to sea, and seven times a day, that is to say they could take him anywhere in the kings dominions from the Bay of Biscay to the Straits of Gibraltar, and change him as often as they pleased.
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  • BARRINGTON's squadron which intercepted a French convoy bound for the East Indies in the Bay of Biscay during April 1782.
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  • intercepted a French convoy bound for the East Indies in the Bay of Biscay during April 1782.
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  • The low had moved NE to be in the Bay of Biscay tightening isobars across the S UK.
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  • neritic waters of the Bay of Biscay.
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  • The Bay of Biscay is the Sinus Aquitanicus, Sinus Cantabricus or Cantaber Oceanus of the Romans; hence it is sometimes known as the Cantabrian Sea.
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  • In the eastern trough the Peake Deep lies off the Bay of Biscay in 20° W.
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  • 58° W., the French were seen by this vessel heading for the Bay of Biscay.
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  • with a depth of 4030 fathoms. The Eastern Atlantic Trough cannot boast of such great depths though the Peake Deep with 3284 fathoms sinks abruptly from the Azores Plateau in 43° 9' N., 1 9° 45' W., and several soundings exceeding 2700 fathoms have been obtained in the Bay of Biscay east of the meridian of 5° E.
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