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bastille

bastille

bastille Sentence Examples

  • On the 14th the Bastille was taken.

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  • Jung (La Verite sur la masque de fer) had brought forward another candidate, with the attractive name of "Marechiel," a soldier of Lorraine who had taken part in a poisoning plot against Louis XIV., and was arrested at Peronne by Louvois in 1673, and said to be lodged in the Bastille and then sent to Pignerol.

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  • In the same year he was appointed captain of the Bastille and lieutenant-general of Normandy, and married Marie de Rohan, daughter of the duke of Montbazon.

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  • In the same year he was appointed captain of the Bastille and lieutenant-general of Normandy, and married Marie de Rohan, daughter of the duke of Montbazon.

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  • Auvergne remained in the Bastille for eleven years, from 1605 to 1616.

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  • Upon the demolition of the Bastille the keys were presented to him.

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  • Le Maistre (de Sacy), and after a month in the Bastille was exiled to his estate of Fosse.

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  • Francois de Beauvillier, comte de Saint Aignan, after having been through the campaigns in Germany (1634-1635), Franche-Comte (1636), and Flanders (1637), was sent to the Bastille in consequence of his having lost the battle of Thionville in 1640.

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  • In 1783 he published a pamphlet, called Essais historiques, critiques, litteraires, et philosophiques, for which he was imprisoned in the Bastille.

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  • She became the great protectress of the Jansenists; it was in her house that Arnauld, Nicole and De Lane were protected; and to her influence must be in great part attributed the release of Lemaistre De Sacy from the Bastille, the introduction of Pomponne into the ministry and of Arnauld to the king.

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  • In 1789 he was given the command of a battalion of the National Guard, and took part in the storming of the Bastille.

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  • The plan was unsuccessful, and soon after his return to Paris Brissot was lodged in the Bastille on the charge of having published a work against the government.

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  • When the taking of the Bastille had assured the success of the Revolution, he warned the Assembly of the futility of passing fine-sounding decrees and urged the necessity for acting.

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  • On the 14th of July 1791 the Constitutional Society of Birmingham arranged a dinner to celebrate the anniversary of the fall of the Bastille.

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  • During the troubled period which culminated in the taking of the Bastille on the 14th of July 1789, he came prominently forward in public affairs, and was one of the seven members of the permanent Committee of Public Safety which sat at the hotel de ville.

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  • The revolt of Paris and the taking of the Bastille on the 14th of July were its results.

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  • Bastia dates from the building of the Genoese fortress or "bastille" by Lionello Lomellino in 1383.

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  • On the 15th of August 1785, Assumption day, when the whole court was awaiting the king and queen in order to go to the chapel, the cardinal de Rohan, who was preparing to officiate, was arrested and taken to the Bastille.

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  • Allowed to return, he again fell under suspicion of having been concerned in the composition of two violent libels - one in Latin and one in French - called from their first words the Puero Regnante and the J'ai vu, was inveigled by a spy named Beauregard into a real or burlesque confession, and on the 16th of May 1717 was sent to the Bastille.

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  • Ever after his exit from the Bastille in April 1718 he was known as Arouet de Voltaire, or simply Voltaire, though legally he never abandoned his patronymic. The origin of the famous name has been much debated, and attempts have been made to show that it actually existed in the Daumart pedigree or in some territorial designation.

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  • Nobody would take his part, and at last, nearly three months after the outrage, he challenged Rohan, who accepted the challenge, but on the morning appointed for the duel Voltaire was arrested and sent for the second time to the Bastille.

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  • Attempting to return to France in 1780 he was arrested for a caustic attack on the duc de Duras (1715-1789), an academician and marshal of France, and imprisoned nearly two years in the Bastille.

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  • His best legal treatise is Memoire pour le comte de Morangies (Paris, 1772); Linguet's imprisonment in the Bastille afforded him the opportunity of writing his Memoires sur la Bastille, first published in London in 1789; it has been translated into English (Dublin, 1783, and Edinburgh, 1884-1887), and is the best of his works, though untrustworthy.

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  • Monin, "Notice sur Linguet," in the 1889 edition of Memoires sur la Bastille; J.

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  • He was one of those who induced the states-general to proclaim itself a National Assembly on the 17th of June 1789; approved, in several speeches, of the capture of the Bastille and of the taking of the royal family to Paris (October 1789); demanded that strict measures be taken against the royalists who were intriguing in the south of France, and published some pamphlets on finance.

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  • He retired when Necker was dismissed on the 12th of July 1789, but on Necker's recall after the taking of the Bastille again resumed his office, which he continued to hold till October 1791.

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  • The same year saw the assembling of the States-general, which she had dreaded, the taking of the Bastille, and the events leading to the terrible days of the 5th and 6th of October at Versailles and the removal of the royal family to the Tuileries.

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  • In Paris itself he was for a short time committed to the Bastille by the Leaguers, as a kind of hostage, it is said, for a member of their party who had been arrested at Rouen by Henry of Navarre.

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  • In the latter half of the 18th century it served as a kind of bastille for political prisoners, and is now used as a museum in which a rather nondescript collection of articles, some from Mexico, has been allowed to accumulate.

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  • In 1778 he escaped from prison, but was soon re-arrested and finally committed to the Bastille.

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  • 278) state that Francois de Montmorency was "prisoner in our castle of the Bastille in Paris by verbal command" of the late king Charles IX.

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  • In the late romance of La Bastille de Loquifer Avalon has become a purely fairy kingdom, where Arthur rules in conjunction with Morgain.

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  • Etienne Pascal, who had bought some of the hotel-de-ville rentes, protested against Richelieu's reduction of the interest, and to escape the Bastille had to go into hiding.

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  • He was a prominent actor in the taking of the Bastille (14th of July 1789), in the massacre of the Champ de Mars (July 1791), and in the attack on the Tuileries (loth of August 1792).

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  • If they refused he was perfectly ready to make war on the one and send the others to the Bastille.

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  • The person so called was a political prisoner under Louis XIV., who died in the Bastille in 1703.

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  • 1706), the king's lieutenant at the Bastille, from which we learn that on the 18th of September 1698 a new governor, Benigne D'Auvergne de Saint-Mars, arrived from the fortress of the Isles Ste Marguerite (in the bay of Cannes), bringing with him "un ancien prisonnier qu'il avait 'a' Pignerol" (Pinerolo, in Piedmont), whom he kept always masked and whose name remained untold.

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  • Voltaire's influence in creating public interest in the "man in the mask," was indeed enormous; he had himself been imprisoned in the Bastille in 1717 and again in 1726; as early as 1745 he is found hinting that he knows something; in the Siècle de Louis XIV he justifies his account on the score of conversations with de Bernaville, who succeeded Saint-Mars.

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  • The evidence shows conclusively that these two were the only prisoners under Saint-Mars at Pignerol who could have been taken by him to the Bastille in 1698.

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  • But Jung's arguments, though strong destructively against the Mattioli theory, break down as regards any valid proof either that the prisoner arrested at Peronne was a Bastille prisoner in 1673 or that he was ever at Pignerol, where indeed we find no trace of him.

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  • "Marchioly" in the burial register of Saint Paul naturally suggests indeed at first that the "ancien prisonnier" taken by Saint-Mars to the Bastille in 1698 was Mattioli, Saint-Mars himself, sometimes 1 Barbezieux to Saint-Mars, May To, 1694: "J'ai recu la lettre que vous avez pris la peine de m'ecrire le 29 du mois passe; vous pouvez, suivant que vous le proposez, faire mettre dans la prison voiltee le valet du prisonnier qui est mort."

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  • If he was the individual who died in 1703 at the Bastille, the obscurity which gathered round the nameless masked prisoner is almost incomprehensible, for there was no real secret about Mattioli's incarceration.

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  • Subsequently Barbezieux and the governor continue to write to one another about their "ancien prisonnier" 1 He cites Bingham's Bastille, i.

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  • When, therefore, we come to Saint-Mars's appointment to the Bastille in 1698, Dauger appears almost certainly to be the "ancien prisonnier" he took with him.'

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  • Indeed three years before the arrival of Saint-Mars we hear (Gazette d'Amsterdam, March 14, 1695) of another masked man being brought to the Bastille, who eventually was known to be the son of a Lyons banker.

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  • He also, in 1755, published Memoires de Madame de Maintenon, in 6 vols., which caused him to be imprisoned in the Bastille.

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  • He was among the first of the clergy to join the third estate, and contributed largely to the union of the three orders; he presided at the permanent sitting of sixty-two hours while the Bastille was being attacked by the people, and made a vehement speech against the enemies of the nation.

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  • He profited by his position at court to obtain the lieutenancy of the Bastille, the governorship of the duchy of Nemours, and the confiscated territories of Jean Larcheveque, seigneur of Parthenay.

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  • When the troops at last advanced in three strong columns, every inch of ground was disputed, and the government troops were frequently repulsed, till, fresh regiments arriving, he forced his way to the Place de la Bastille and crushed the insurrection in its headquarters.

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  • After the fall of the Bastille he wished to save the throne.

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  • Whilst on furlough in Paris Marceau joined in the attack on the Bastille (July 14, 1789); after that event he took his discharge from the regular army and returned to Chartres, but the embarrassments of his family soon compelled him to seek fresh military enployment.

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  • The Revolution, though it had made an end of the Bastille, did not bring the only real practical liberty, that is to say, the liberty which comes with settled courts of justice, administering settled laws, undisturbed by popular fury, independent of everything but law, and with a clear law for their direction.

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  • With the same object they assailed the Bastille.

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  • The capture of the Bastille was hailed throughout Europe as' symbolizing the fall of absolute monarchy, and the victory of the insurgents had momentous consequences.

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  • At the suggestion of the municipality of Paris the Assembly decreed a general federation of all France, to be held on the anniversary of the fall of the Bastille.

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  • The fall of Choiseul brought about his recall, and somewhat later he was imprisoned in the Bastille, where he spent six months, occupying himself with literary pursuits.

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  • In the main hall hangs a glass casket containing the key to the Bastille which Washington received from Lafayette in 1790.

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  • Herault, who was an ardent champion of the Revolution, took part in the taking of the Bastille, and on the 8th of December 1789 was appointed judge of the court of the first arrondissement in the department of Paris.

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  • He was not a financier of genius; but he administered the public moneys with the same probity and exactitude which he used in managing his own, retrieving alienated property, straightening accounts, balancing expenditure and receipts, and amassing a reserve in the Bastille.

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  • Meeting with a refusal, Paris opposed the kings army with her citizen-soldiers; and Taking by the taking of the Bastille, that mysterious dark Bast tile, fortress which personified the ancien régime, secured the triumph of the Revolution (July 14).

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  • As Paris had taken her Bastille, it remained for the towns and country districts to take theirsall the Bastilles of feudalism.

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  • In 1661 a formulary, or solemn renunciation of Jansen, was imposed on all his suspected followers; those who would not sign it went into hiding, or to the Bastille.

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  • Necker's dismissal brought about the taking of the Bastille, which induced the king to recall him.

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  • He did not emigrate after the taking of the Bastille, but, possibly from motives of ambition, remained in Paris.

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  • However, she had to retreat to Paris, where she practically commanded the Bastille and the adjoining part of the walls.

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  • On the 2nd of July 1652, the day of the battle of the Faubourg Saint Antoine, between the Frondeurs under Conde and the royal troops under Turenne, Mademoiselle saved Conde and his beaten troops by giving orders for the gates under her control to be opened and for the cannon of the Bastille to fire on the royalists.

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  • brie (cheese)ime we stopped in here I'd just had a brie baguette in celebration of Bastille Day Eve.

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  • In 1783 he published a pamphlet, called Essais historiques, critiques, litteraires, et philosophiques, for which he was imprisoned in the Bastille.

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  • He embraced the revolutionary ideas, and after the taking of the Bastille became a member of the provisional municipality of Paris.

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  • Besides the work cited above and his political pamphlets, he was the author of Coup d'ceil philosophique sur le regne de St Louis (1786); L'Annee francaise (1788); La Bastille devoilee (1789); La Police de Paris devoilee (1791); and Lettres sur la Revolution (1792).

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  • Auvergne remained in the Bastille for eleven years, from 1605 to 1616.

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  • The court accused him of being at the bottom of every popular movement, and saw the "gold of Orleans" as the cause of the Reveillon riot and the taking of the Bastille, as the republicans later saw the "gold of Pitt" in every germ of opposition to themselves.

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  • She became the great protectress of the Jansenists; it was in her house that Arnauld, Nicole and De Lane were protected; and to her influence must be in great part attributed the release of Lemaistre De Sacy from the Bastille, the introduction of Pomponne into the ministry and of Arnauld to the king.

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  • He went to Germany and Holland once more, and to Russia, Poland, and then again to Paris, where, in 1785, he was implicated in the affair of the Diamond Necklace; and although Cagliostro escaped conviction by the matchless impudence of his defence, he was imprisoned for other reasons in the Bastille.

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  • In 1789 he was given the command of a battalion of the National Guard, and took part in the storming of the Bastille.

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  • The plan was unsuccessful, and soon after his return to Paris Brissot was lodged in the Bastille on the charge of having published a work against the government.

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  • Upon the demolition of the Bastille the keys were presented to him.

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  • Le Maistre (de Sacy), and after a month in the Bastille was exiled to his estate of Fosse.

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  • When the taking of the Bastille had assured the success of the Revolution, he warned the Assembly of the futility of passing fine-sounding decrees and urged the necessity for acting.

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  • On the 14th the Bastille was taken.

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  • On the 14th of July 1791 the Constitutional Society of Birmingham arranged a dinner to celebrate the anniversary of the fall of the Bastille.

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  • The author was sent to the Bastille, where he remained, however, only six weeks (Archives de la Bastille, vol.

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  • Francois de Beauvillier, comte de Saint Aignan, after having been through the campaigns in Germany (1634-1635), Franche-Comte (1636), and Flanders (1637), was sent to the Bastille in consequence of his having lost the battle of Thionville in 1640.

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  • During the troubled period which culminated in the taking of the Bastille on the 14th of July 1789, he came prominently forward in public affairs, and was one of the seven members of the permanent Committee of Public Safety which sat at the hotel de ville.

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  • The revolt of Paris and the taking of the Bastille on the 14th of July were its results.

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  • Bastia dates from the building of the Genoese fortress or "bastille" by Lionello Lomellino in 1383.

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  • On the 15th of August 1785, Assumption day, when the whole court was awaiting the king and queen in order to go to the chapel, the cardinal de Rohan, who was preparing to officiate, was arrested and taken to the Bastille.

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  • Allowed to return, he again fell under suspicion of having been concerned in the composition of two violent libels - one in Latin and one in French - called from their first words the Puero Regnante and the J'ai vu, was inveigled by a spy named Beauregard into a real or burlesque confession, and on the 16th of May 1717 was sent to the Bastille.

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  • Ever after his exit from the Bastille in April 1718 he was known as Arouet de Voltaire, or simply Voltaire, though legally he never abandoned his patronymic. The origin of the famous name has been much debated, and attempts have been made to show that it actually existed in the Daumart pedigree or in some territorial designation.

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  • Nobody would take his part, and at last, nearly three months after the outrage, he challenged Rohan, who accepted the challenge, but on the morning appointed for the duel Voltaire was arrested and sent for the second time to the Bastille.

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  • Attempting to return to France in 1780 he was arrested for a caustic attack on the duc de Duras (1715-1789), an academician and marshal of France, and imprisoned nearly two years in the Bastille.

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  • His best legal treatise is Memoire pour le comte de Morangies (Paris, 1772); Linguet's imprisonment in the Bastille afforded him the opportunity of writing his Memoires sur la Bastille, first published in London in 1789; it has been translated into English (Dublin, 1783, and Edinburgh, 1884-1887), and is the best of his works, though untrustworthy.

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  • Monin, "Notice sur Linguet," in the 1889 edition of Memoires sur la Bastille; J.

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  • He was one of those who induced the states-general to proclaim itself a National Assembly on the 17th of June 1789; approved, in several speeches, of the capture of the Bastille and of the taking of the royal family to Paris (October 1789); demanded that strict measures be taken against the royalists who were intriguing in the south of France, and published some pamphlets on finance.

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  • He retired when Necker was dismissed on the 12th of July 1789, but on Necker's recall after the taking of the Bastille again resumed his office, which he continued to hold till October 1791.

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  • The same year saw the assembling of the States-general, which she had dreaded, the taking of the Bastille, and the events leading to the terrible days of the 5th and 6th of October at Versailles and the removal of the royal family to the Tuileries.

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  • In Paris itself he was for a short time committed to the Bastille by the Leaguers, as a kind of hostage, it is said, for a member of their party who had been arrested at Rouen by Henry of Navarre.

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  • In the latter half of the 18th century it served as a kind of bastille for political prisoners, and is now used as a museum in which a rather nondescript collection of articles, some from Mexico, has been allowed to accumulate.

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  • In 1778 he escaped from prison, but was soon re-arrested and finally committed to the Bastille.

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  • 278) state that Francois de Montmorency was "prisoner in our castle of the Bastille in Paris by verbal command" of the late king Charles IX.

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  • In the late romance of La Bastille de Loquifer Avalon has become a purely fairy kingdom, where Arthur rules in conjunction with Morgain.

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    0
  • Etienne Pascal, who had bought some of the hotel-de-ville rentes, protested against Richelieu's reduction of the interest, and to escape the Bastille had to go into hiding.

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  • He was a prominent actor in the taking of the Bastille (14th of July 1789), in the massacre of the Champ de Mars (July 1791), and in the attack on the Tuileries (loth of August 1792).

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  • If they refused he was perfectly ready to make war on the one and send the others to the Bastille.

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  • The person so called was a political prisoner under Louis XIV., who died in the Bastille in 1703.

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  • 1706), the king's lieutenant at the Bastille, from which we learn that on the 18th of September 1698 a new governor, Benigne D'Auvergne de Saint-Mars, arrived from the fortress of the Isles Ste Marguerite (in the bay of Cannes), bringing with him "un ancien prisonnier qu'il avait 'a' Pignerol" (Pinerolo, in Piedmont), whom he kept always masked and whose name remained untold.

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  • Voltaire's influence in creating public interest in the "man in the mask," was indeed enormous; he had himself been imprisoned in the Bastille in 1717 and again in 1726; as early as 1745 he is found hinting that he knows something; in the Siècle de Louis XIV he justifies his account on the score of conversations with de Bernaville, who succeeded Saint-Mars (d.

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  • 1708) as governor of the Bastille, and others; and after Heiss in 1770 had identified the "mask" with Mattioli (see below), Voltaire was not above suggesting that he really knew more than he had said, but thought it sufficient to have given the clue to the enigma.

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  • The evidence shows conclusively that these two were the only prisoners under Saint-Mars at Pignerol who could have been taken by him to the Bastille in 1698.

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  • Jung (La Verite sur la masque de fer) had brought forward another candidate, with the attractive name of "Marechiel," a soldier of Lorraine who had taken part in a poisoning plot against Louis XIV., and was arrested at Peronne by Louvois in 1673, and said to be lodged in the Bastille and then sent to Pignerol.

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    0
  • But Jung's arguments, though strong destructively against the Mattioli theory, break down as regards any valid proof either that the prisoner arrested at Peronne was a Bastille prisoner in 1673 or that he was ever at Pignerol, where indeed we find no trace of him.

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    0
  • "Marchioly" in the burial register of Saint Paul naturally suggests indeed at first that the "ancien prisonnier" taken by Saint-Mars to the Bastille in 1698 was Mattioli, Saint-Mars himself, sometimes 1 Barbezieux to Saint-Mars, May To, 1694: "J'ai recu la lettre que vous avez pris la peine de m'ecrire le 29 du mois passe; vous pouvez, suivant que vous le proposez, faire mettre dans la prison voiltee le valet du prisonnier qui est mort."

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    0
  • If he was the individual who died in 1703 at the Bastille, the obscurity which gathered round the nameless masked prisoner is almost incomprehensible, for there was no real secret about Mattioli's incarceration.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently Barbezieux and the governor continue to write to one another about their "ancien prisonnier" 1 He cites Bingham's Bastille, i.

    0
    0
  • When, therefore, we come to Saint-Mars's appointment to the Bastille in 1698, Dauger appears almost certainly to be the "ancien prisonnier" he took with him.'

    0
    0
  • Indeed three years before the arrival of Saint-Mars we hear (Gazette d'Amsterdam, March 14, 1695) of another masked man being brought to the Bastille, who eventually was known to be the son of a Lyons banker.

    0
    0
  • He also, in 1755, published Memoires de Madame de Maintenon, in 6 vols., which caused him to be imprisoned in the Bastille.

    0
    0
  • He was among the first of the clergy to join the third estate, and contributed largely to the union of the three orders; he presided at the permanent sitting of sixty-two hours while the Bastille was being attacked by the people, and made a vehement speech against the enemies of the nation.

    0
    0
  • He profited by his position at court to obtain the lieutenancy of the Bastille, the governorship of the duchy of Nemours, and the confiscated territories of Jean Larcheveque, seigneur of Parthenay.

    0
    0
  • When the troops at last advanced in three strong columns, every inch of ground was disputed, and the government troops were frequently repulsed, till, fresh regiments arriving, he forced his way to the Place de la Bastille and crushed the insurrection in its headquarters.

    0
    0
  • After the fall of the Bastille he wished to save the throne.

    0
    0
  • Whilst on furlough in Paris Marceau joined in the attack on the Bastille (July 14, 1789); after that event he took his discharge from the regular army and returned to Chartres, but the embarrassments of his family soon compelled him to seek fresh military enployment.

    0
    0
  • The Revolution, though it had made an end of the Bastille, did not bring the only real practical liberty, that is to say, the liberty which comes with settled courts of justice, administering settled laws, undisturbed by popular fury, independent of everything but law, and with a clear law for their direction.

    0
    0
  • With the same object they assailed the Bastille.

    0
    0
  • The capture of the Bastille was hailed throughout Europe as' symbolizing the fall of absolute monarchy, and the victory of the insurgents had momentous consequences.

    0
    0
  • At the suggestion of the municipality of Paris the Assembly decreed a general federation of all France, to be held on the anniversary of the fall of the Bastille.

    0
    0
  • The fall of Choiseul brought about his recall, and somewhat later he was imprisoned in the Bastille, where he spent six months, occupying himself with literary pursuits.

    0
    0
  • In the main hall hangs a glass casket containing the key to the Bastille which Washington received from Lafayette in 1790.

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  • Herault, who was an ardent champion of the Revolution, took part in the taking of the Bastille, and on the 8th of December 1789 was appointed judge of the court of the first arrondissement in the department of Paris.

    0
    0
  • He was not a financier of genius; but he administered the public moneys with the same probity and exactitude which he used in managing his own, retrieving alienated property, straightening accounts, balancing expenditure and receipts, and amassing a reserve in the Bastille.

    0
    0
  • Meeting with a refusal, Paris opposed the kings army with her citizen-soldiers; and Taking by the taking of the Bastille, that mysterious dark Bast tile, fortress which personified the ancien régime, secured the triumph of the Revolution (July 14).

    0
    0
  • As Paris had taken her Bastille, it remained for the towns and country districts to take theirsall the Bastilles of feudalism.

    0
    0
  • In 1661 a formulary, or solemn renunciation of Jansen, was imposed on all his suspected followers; those who would not sign it went into hiding, or to the Bastille.

    0
    0
  • Necker's dismissal brought about the taking of the Bastille, which induced the king to recall him.

    0
    0
  • He did not emigrate after the taking of the Bastille, but, possibly from motives of ambition, remained in Paris.

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    0
  • However, she had to retreat to Paris, where she practically commanded the Bastille and the adjoining part of the walls.

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    0
  • On the 2nd of July 1652, the day of the battle of the Faubourg Saint Antoine, between the Frondeurs under Conde and the royal troops under Turenne, Mademoiselle saved Conde and his beaten troops by giving orders for the gates under her control to be opened and for the cannon of the Bastille to fire on the royalists.

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  • It's a very lively spot in the evening and it gets over-the-top giddy on Bastille Day with a spillover of celebrants.

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  • The French Flag flies atop all public buildings in France and is flown widely during national holidays like Bastille Day.If you would like to purchase a French flag, there are many websites where you can do so.

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  • The taking of the Bastille, however, and the events by which it was preceded, were a sign that the times had changed; and on the 18th of July Desmoulins's work was issued.

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  • The taking of the Bastille, however, and the events by which it was preceded, were a sign that the times had changed; and on the 18th of July Desmoulins's work was issued.

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