Basra sentence example

basra
  • Two lines of steamers, an English and a Turkish, furnish an inadequate service between Basra and Bagdad, but there is no steam navigation on the river above the latter city.
    0
    0
  • The first of these canals, taken off on the right bank of the river a little below Hit, followed the extreme skirt of the alluvium the whole way to the Persian Gulf near Basra, and thus formed an outer barrier, strengthened at intervals with watch-towers and fortified posts, to protect the cultivated land of the Sawad against the incursions of the desert Arabs.
    0
    0
  • Dholahtaf, but is now known as the Cherra-Saadeh, and is in the popular tradition said to have been excavated by a man from Basra at the behest of a woman of Hit whom he desired to make his wife.
    0
    0
  • From Garmat Ali, where the Tigris and Euphrates at present unite,' under the title of Shattel-Arab, the river sweeps on to Basra, Ex p o yds.
    0
    0
  • From Korna to Basra the banks of the river are well cultivated and the date groves almost continuous; indeed this is the greatest date-producing region of the world.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Twenty-five miles below Basra the river Karun from Shushter and Dizful throws off an arm, which seems to be artificial, into the Euphrates.
    0
    0
  • The Mandaeans are found in the marshy lands of South Babylonia (al-bataih), particularly in the neighbourhood of Basra (or Bussorah), and in Khuzistan (Disful, Shuster).
    0
    0
  • When one remembers that missionaries like Piano Carpini, and traders like the Venetian Polos, either penetrated by land from Acre to Peking, or circumnavigated southern Asia from Basra to Canton, one realizes that there was, about 1300, a discovery of Asia as new and tremendous as the discovery of America by Columbus two centuries later.
    0
    0
  • From then, these towns decayed before the increasing prosperity of the new Arab capitals Basra and Bagdad.
    0
    0
  • In Palestine and elsewhere there is a large orange trade, and Basra, in Turkish Arabia, has the largest export of dates in the world.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In January 1902 the German group holding the Anatolian railway concession was granted a further concession for extending that railway from Konia, then its terminus, through the Taurus range and by way of the Euphrates, Nisibin, Mosul, the Tigris, Bagdad, Kerbela and Nejef to Basra, thus establishing railway communication between the Bosporus and the Persian Gulf.
    0
    0
  • The Indian rupee and the Persian kran are widely circulated through Mesopotamia; in Basra transactions are counted in krans, taking as a fixed exchange £T1 = 34.15 krans.
    0
    0
  • It maintains steam communication with Basra, its port, which is situated on the Shatt el-Arab, somewhat more than 50 m.
    0
    0
  • Only two of these, however, maintain a weekly connexion with Basra, and they are quite inadequate to the freight traffic between the two cities.
    0
    0
  • He spent his life and devoted himself in Basra chiefly to the study of polite literature.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A more important work is The Book of Chastity, by Isho`denah, who according to `Abadisho` was bishop of Kasrabut read Basra - about the end of the 8th century.
    0
    0
  • The former is divided into two sections: the first, of a metaphysical character, contains a sort of practical cosmography, chiefly based on Avicenna's theories, but frequently intermixed both with the freer speculations of the well-known philosophical brotherhood of Basra, the Ikhwan-es-safa'i, and purely Shiite or Isma`ilite ideas; the second, or ethical section of the poem, abounds in moral maxims and ingenious thoughts on man's good and bad qualities, on the necessity of shunning the company of fools and double-faced friends, on the deceptive allurements of the world and the secret snares of ambitious craving for rank and wealth.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Arabia a year later, he visited Oman and the shores of the Persian Gulf, and travelling from Basra through Syria and Palestine he reached Denmark in 1764 after four years' absence.
    0
    0
  • Sadlier hesitated about going farther, but he was unable to obtain a safe conduct to Basra, or to return by the way he had come, and was compelled reluctantly to accompany the army to Medina.
    0
    0
  • Under the second caliph Omar (634-644) the Persians were defeated at Kadesiya (Kadessia), and Irak was completely subdued and the new cities of Kuf a and Basra were ',For the general history of the succeeding period see Caliphate; Egypt: History, §" Mahommedan."
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Kufa attracted chiefly men of south Arabia, Basra those of the north.
    0
    0
  • But the quarrels which led to the murder of Othman were fomented not so much in Arabia as in Kufa and Basra and Fostat.
    0
    0
  • When 'Ali left Medina to secure Basra, he abandoned it as the capital of the Arabian empire.
    0
    0
  • Its originator, Mahommed Ibn Abdul Wahhab, was born (1691) at Ayana in Nejd, and after studying in Basra and Damascus, and making the pilgrimage to Mecca returned to his native country and settled down at Huremala near Deraiya.
    0
    0
  • A force was equipped at Basra under Ahmad Feizi Pasha with the intention of occupying Kuwet; Mubarak thereupon appealed to Great Britain and action was taken which prevented the Turkish designs from being carried out.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Porte now made another effort to assist its protégé two columns were despatched from Medina and Basra respectively, to relieve Hail, and drive out the Wahhabis.
    0
    0
  • Ahmad Feizi Pasha, in command of the Basra column, 4200 strong, crossed the desert and reached the wells of aina, 200 m.
    0
    0
  • Shabba has related to me in his book on the history of Basra."
    0
    0
  • In Irak the two towns of Basra and Kufa produced two rival schools of philologists.
    0
    0
  • Khalil ibn Ahmad (718-791), an Arab from Oman, of the school of Basra, was the first to enunciate the laws of Arabic metre and the first to write a dictionary.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Other members of the school of Basra were Abu `Ubaida (q.v.), Asma`i (q.v.), Mubarrad (q.v.) and Ibn Duraid.
    0
    0
  • In the fourth century of Islam the two schools of Kufa and Basra declined in importance before the increasing power of Bagdad, where Ibn Qutaiba, Ibn Jinni (941-1002) and others carried on the work, but without the former rivalry of the older schools.
    0
    0
  • It is now not only the headquarters of the English naval squadron in the Persian Gulf, and the land terminus of the Indo-European telegraph, but it also forms the chief station in the Gulf of the British India Steam Navigation Company, which runs its vessels weekly between Bombay and Basra.
    0
    0
  • These ruins were discovered in 1877 by Ernest de Sarzec, at that time French consul at Basra, who was allowed, by the Montefich chief, Nasir Pasha, the first Wali-Pasha, or governor-general, of Basra, to excavate at his pleasure in the territories subject to that official.
    0
    0
  • In Kufa and Basra were gathered representatives of all the Arabian tribes who formed the fighting force of the Islamic Empire, and from these al-Mufaddal was able to collect and record the compositions of the poets who had celebrated the fortunes and exploits of their forefathers.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The rival school of Basra, on the other hand, has given currency to a story that the original collection made by al-Mufaddal included a much smaller number of poems. The Berlin MS. of al-Marzugi's commentary states that the number was thirty, but a better reading of the passage, found elsewhere,' mentions eighty; and that al-Asma`i and his school added to this nucleus poems which increased the number to a hundred and twenty.
    0
    0
  • There is no mention of it in al-Anbari's work, and it is in itself somewhat improbable, as in al-Asma`i's time the schools of Kufa and Basra were in sharp opposition one to the other, and Ibn al-A`rabi in particular was in the habit of censuring al-Asma`i's interpretations of the ancient poems. It is scarcely likely that he would have accepted his rival's additions to the work of his step-father, and have handed them on to Abu `Ikrima with his annotations.
    0
    0
  • Henceforth it looked to Damascus and to Kufa and Basra, instead of to Constantinople or Ctesiphon.
    0
    0
  • The annual Consular Reports most nearly bearing on Mesopotamia are those for Aleppo, Mosul, Bagdad and Basra.
    0
    0
  • He died in Basra.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1878 the Mosul vilayet was created out of its northern, and in 1884 the Basra vilayet out of its southern sanjaks.
    0
    0
  • These three manuscripts will therefore be those which the caliph, according to trustworthy tradition, sent in the first instance as standard copies to Damascus, Basra and Kufa to the warriors of the provinces of which these were the capitals, while he retained one at Medina.
    0
    0
  • Of the four exemplars of Othman's Koran, one was kept in Medina, and one was sent to each of the three metropolitan cities, Kufa, Basra, and Damascus.
    0
    0
  • In 1865 an earthquake levelled the villages of Darveh Asul near Muga'rn; in 1880 an earthquake caused 120 deaths in Basra; in 1883 severe shocks were felt from Bushire to Tahiri; in 1884 an earthquake caused 132 deaths on Qishm I., which was in consequence deserted; in 1897 an earthquake destroyed Qishm town and caused over I,000 deaths; further shocks were experienced at Qishm and Bandar `Abbas in 1902 and 1905.
    0
    0
  • The Muscat date reaches maturity sooner than the Basra crop, and is commercially valuable.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Commerce.-A summary of import and export values of trade in the Persian Gulf, excluding Mohammerah and Basra, is appended.
    0
    0
  • Mail Communications.-The Persian Gulf was at the end of the 18th century the most rapid route between Europe and India, and it was not until 1833 that the Red Sea route was adopted by the East India Co.; from this date until 1862 the Gulf fell into an extraordinary state of inaccessibility-letters for India being sent from Bagdad and Basra via Damascus, and correspondence from Bushire for Bagdad via Teheran.
    0
    0
  • The fast weekly steamer stops only at Karachi, Bushire and Mohammerah on its way to Basra.
    0
    0
  • Bushire, Hanjam, Bahrein, Abadan and Basra Summary showing Import and Export Values of Trade in the Persian Gulf (excluding Iraq and Arabistan) in two pre-war years and in the latest post-war year available.
    0
    0
  • Kuwait is connected by land line with Basra; Jask is connected by a land line to Karachi.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Mohammerah is connected by land line and cable with Basra and Abadan and via Ahwaz with Bushire and with the inland Persian system.
    0
    0
  • Bushire has its own telephone system; Mohammerah is connected by telephone with Basra.
    0
    0
  • In 1917 she went with the military authorities to Basra and followed the army up to Bagdad, where she subsequently acted as assistant political officer, the first woman to occupy so important an administrative post.
    0
    0
  • The kingdoms of Ghassan and Hira, advanced posts hitherto, now became the headquarters of the Arabs; the new empire had its centres on the one hand at Damascus, on the other hand at Kufa and Basra, the two newly-founded cities in the region of old Babylonia.
    0
    0
  • But soon these two, along with Ayesha, the mother of the faithful, who had an old grudge against Ali, succeeded in making their escape to Irak, where at Basra they raised the standard of rebellion.
    0
    0
  • The new caliph, however, found means of disposing of their opposition, and at the battle of the Camel, fought at Basra in November 656, Talha and Zobair were slain, and Ayesha was taken prisoner.
    0
    0
  • Islam had its headquarters here; Kufa and Basra were the home of the pious and of the adventurer, the centres of religious and political movement.
    0
    0
  • Lastly, there were in Kufa, and still more in Basra, many Othmaniya or legitimists, on whose co-operation he could not rely.
    0
    0
  • Moawiya from his side made incessant raids into Ali's dominion, and by his agents caused a very serious revolt in Basra.
    0
    0
  • Abbas, the vicegerent of Ali at Basra and ancestor of the future Abbasid dynasty, was in command.
    0
    0
  • The latter made it a condition of surrender that he should have the free disposal of the funds in the treasury of Basra.
    0
    0
  • Aban had previously assumed the government of Basra.
    0
    0
  • This remarkable man was said to be a bastard of Abu Sofian, the father of Moawiya, and was, by his mother, the brother of Abu Bakra, a man of great wealth and position at Basra.
    0
    0
  • He was a faithful servant of Ali and put down for him the revolt excited by Moawiya's partisans in Basra.
    0
    0
  • Abi Arta to Basra, with orders to capture Ziyad's three sons, and to force Ziyad into submission by threatening to kill them.
    0
    0
  • In the next year Ziyad was appointed governor of Basra and the eastern provinces belonging to it.
    0
    0
  • We must not forget that Kufa and Basra were military colonies, and that each tribe had its own quarter of the city.
    0
    0
  • He brought 2000 Turkish archers with him to Basra, the first Turkish slaves to enter the Moslem empire.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile Yazid, having been informed of the riotous behaviour of the Shiites in Kufa, sent Obaidallah, son of the famous Ziyad and governor of Basra, to restore order.
    0
    0
  • Mokhtar was now at the zenith of power, but Ibn Zobair, determined to get rid at all costs of so dangerous an enemy, named his brother Mus`ab governor of Basra and ordered him to march against Kufa.
    0
    0
  • Basra was at that time full of fugitives from Kufa, Arabian chiefs who resented the arrogance of Mokhtar's adherents, and desired eagerly to regain their former position in Kufa.
    0
    0
  • The troops of Basra had been, since the death of Yazid, at war with the Kharijites, who had supported Ibn Zobair during the siege of Mecca, but had deserted him later.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, Mus`ab had to curb a violent revolt in Basra, brought about by agents of Abdalmalik, and called after a place in the city the revolt of the Jofrites.
    0
    0
  • When Abdalmalik, after a stay of forty days, returned from Irak to Syria, he left two Omayyad princes as his vicegerents in Kuf a and Basra.
    0
    0
  • This threat had its effect, and Hajjaj proceeded to Basra, where his presence was followed by the same results.
    0
    0
  • Ibn Ash`ath drove him back to Basra, entered the city, and then turned his arms against Kufa, of which he took possession with aid from within.
    0
    0
  • Ibn Ash`ath fled to Basra, where he managed to collect fresh troops; but having been again beaten in a furious battle that took place at Maskin near the Dojail, he took refuge at Ahwaz, from which he was soon driven by the troops of Hajjaj under `Omara b.
    0
    0
  • Immediately after the victories of Dair al-Jamajim and Maskin, in 702, Hajjaj, built a new residence on the Tigris, between Basra and Kufa, which he called Wasit ("Middle").
    0
    0
  • Mohallab had succeeded in escaping to Basra, the home of his family, where his own tribe the Azd was predominant.
    0
    0
  • His brothers and sons fled to Basra; thence they went by sea to Kirman and then to Kandabil in India; but they were pursued relentlessly and slain with only two exceptions by the officers of Maslama.
    0
    0
  • Ali, another uncle of Abu'l-Abbas, conducted the persecution; in Basra, Suleiman b.
    0
    0
  • Ali, received the government of Basra with Bahrein and Oman; Isma 'il b.
    0
    0
  • Abdallah was defeated and escaped to Basra, where he found a refuge with his brother Suleiman.
    0
    0
  • On the same day Mahommed was to raise the standard of revolt in Medina, Ibrahim in Basra.
    0
    0
  • In the meanwhile Ibrahim had not only gained possession of Basra, Ahwaz and Fars, but had even occupied Wasit.
    0
    0
  • Abu`l-Saraya's success continued, and several cities of Irak - Basra, Wasit and Madain - fell into his hands.
    0
    0
  • Kufa opened its gates; Basra was taken by assault.
    0
    0
  • In the time of the civil war the marshlands in Irak between Basra and Wasit had been occupied by a large population of Indians, called yat, or, according to the Arabic pronunciation, Zoti, who infested the roads and levied a heavy tribute from the ships ascending and descending the Tigris.
    0
    0
  • When Motasim came back to Bagdad, after the death of his brother, he found the people in great distress, their supply of dates from Basra having been cut off by the Zott, and resolved to put them down with all means.
    0
    0
  • Abu Sa`id al-Jannabi, who had founded a Carmathian state in Bahrein, the north-eastern province of Arabia (actually called Lahsa), which could become dangerous for the pilgrim road as well as for the commerce of Basra, in the year 900 routed an army sent against him by Motadid, and warned the caliph that it would be safer to let the Carmathians alone.
    0
    0
  • Then Kufa underwent the fate that had befallen Basra.
    0
    0
  • In this extremity the caliph bade Ibn Raiq, who had made himself master of Basra and Wasit, and had command of money and men, to come to his help. He created for him the office of Amir al-Omara, "Amir of the Amirs," which nearly corresponds to that of Mayor of the Palace among the Franks.'
    0
    0
  • A certain Baridi, who had carved out for himself a principality in the province of Basra, marched against Bagdad and made himself master of the capital, but was soon driven out by the Dailamite general 1 See Defremery, Memoire sur les Emirs al-Omara (Paris, 1848).
    0
    0
  • Just before his death, the Sultan had ordered him to transfer his residence from Bagdad to Basra.
    0
    0
  • He seems to have been a poor man until by the influence of the governor of Basra he was brought to the notice of Harun al-Rashid, who enjoyed his conversation at court and made him tutor of his son.
    0
    0
  • He became wealthy and acquired property in Basra, where he again settled for a time; but returned later to Bagdad, where he died in 831.
    0
    0
  • He then made the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina, and visited the shrine of Ali at Mashhad-Ali, travelling thence to Basra, and across the mountains of Khuzistan to Isfahan, thence to Shiraz and back to Kufa and Bagdad.
    0
    0
  • The rebel army was defeated at the "Battle of the Camel," near Bassorah (Basra), the two generals being killed, and Ayesha taken prisoner.
    0
    0
  • The real lowlands are the tracts near the sea-coast belonging to the forest-clad provinces of the Caspian in the north and the shores of the Persian Gulf below Basra and elsewhere.
    0
    0
  • His nephew Shah Walad reigned for a few months only and the throne was occupied by his widow Tandu, formerly wife of Barkuk, who ruled over Basra, Wasit and Shuster till 1416, paying allegiance to Shah Rukh, the second Timurid ruler.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Sadik, brother to Zaki, who had won considerable and deserved repute by the capture of Basra from the Turkish governor, abandoned his hold of the conquered town on hearing of the death of Karim, and appeared with his army before Shiraz.
    0
    0
  • He brought with him Captains Lindsay and Christie to assist the Persians in the war, and presented the shah with some serviceable fieldpieces; but there was little occasion for the exercise of his diplomatic ability save in his non-official intercourse with the people, and here he availed himself of it to the great advantage of himself and his country.i He was welcomed by the shah in camp at Ujani, and took leave a month afterwards to return via Bagdad and Basra to India.
    0
    0
  • Two great powers, Egypt and Turkey, challenged the naval and commercial supremacy of the Portuguese, but an Egyptian armada was destroyed by Almeida in 1509, and though Ottoman fleets were on several occasions (as in 1517 and 1521) despatched from Suez or Basra, they failed to achieve any success, and the Portuguese were able to close the two principal trade routes 1 Decadas, XII.
    0
    0
  • One of these trade routes passed up the Persian Gulf to Basra, and thence overland to Tripoli, for Mediterranean ports, and to Trebizond, for Constantinople.
    0
    0
  • The objects excavated by Place, together with the objects found by Fresnel's expedition in Babylonia and a part of the results of Rawlinson's excavations at Nineveh, were unfortunately lost in the Tigris, on transport from Bagdad to Basra.
    0
    0
  • In the south a small volunteer force of cavalry was eventually raised, but after fighting against the British at Shu`aiba near Basra it returned to Kurdistan owing to the illtreatment it received at the hands of the Turks.
    0
    0
  • Except the capital, Basra, there are no towns of importance.
    0
    0
  • Basra is the port of Bagdad, with which it has steam communication by an English line of river steamers weekly and also by a Turkish line.
    0
    0
  • The Shatt el-Arab is deep and broad, easily navigable for ocean steamers, and there is weekly communication by passenger steamer with India, while two or more freight lines, which also take passengers, connect Basra directly with the Mediterranean, and with European and British ports.
    0
    0
  • It is the great date port of the world, and the dates of Basra are regarded as the finest in the market.
    0
    0
  • Since 1898 there has been a British consul at Basra (before that time he was a representative of the Indian government).
    0
    0
  • France and Russia also maintain consular establishments at Basra.
    0
    0
  • The settled population of Basra is probably under 50,000, but how much it is impossible to estimate.
    0
    0
  • Basra is a station of the Arabian mission of the Dutch Reformed Church of America.
    0
    0
  • The original city of Basra was founded by the caliph Omar in A.D.
    0
    0
  • The modern town of Zobeir, a sort of health suburb, occupied by the villas of well-to-do inhabitants of Basra, lies near the ruin mounds which mark the situation of the ancient city.
    0
    0
  • Of the socalled Arabian philosophers of the East, al-Farabi, Ibn-Sina and al-Ghazali were natives of Khorasan, Bokhara and the outlying provinces of north-eastern Persia; whilst al-Kindi, the earliest of them, sprang from Basra, on the Persian Gulf, on the debatable ground between the Semite and the Aryan.
    0
    0
  • In him too is found the union of Platonism and Aristotelianism expressed in Neo-Platonic terms. Towards the close of the 10th century the presentation of an entire scheme of knowledge, beginning with logic and mathematics, and ascending through the various departments of physical inquiry to the region of religious doctrine, was accomplished by a society which had its chief seat at Basra, the native town of al-Kindi.
    0
    0
  • The reign of al-Hakam the Second (96197 6) inaugurated in Andalusia those scientific and philosophical studies which were simultaneously prosecuted by the Society of Basra.
    0
    0
  • Sometimes, indeed, traces of Indian origin are perceptible, even in stories in which Harun al-Rashid figures and the scene is Bagdad or Basra.
    0
    0
  • The province's security forces and the 10th army division deployed in Basra have declared allegiance to Maliki.
    0
    0
  • Brit soldier killed in Basra The Sun, UK - 16 Jul 2006 By SUN ONLINE REPORTER.
    0
    0
  • Last weekend five UK military personnel were killed in a helicopter crash in Basra, including the first British servicewoman to die in action.
    0
    0
  • Air raid sirens rang in Basra city around the time of the attack.
    0
    0
  • Ayesha, Talba and Zobair, who were strong in Mecca, succeeded in obtaining possession of Basra, but were defeated in 656 at the battle of the Camel (see AaI).
    0
    0
  • The Porte now made another effort to assist its protégé two columns were despatched from Medina and Basra respectively, to relieve Hail, and drive out the Wahhabis.
    0
    0
  • Damascus, Kuf a and Basra will attract the flower of all the Moslem provinces, and thus that great intellectual, literary and scientific movement, which reached its apogee under the first Abbasid Caliphs at Bagdad, steadily becomes more marked.
    0
    0
  • U.S. warplanes also attacked a mobile surface-to-air missile system near Basra on Monday.
    0
    0