Basques sentence example

basques
  • The Bretons, who most nearly represent the Celts, and the Basques, who inhabit parts of the western versant of the Pyrenees, have preserved their distinctive languages and customs, and are ethnically the most interesting sections of the nation; the Flemings of French Flanders where Flemish is still spoken are also racially distinct.
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  • For an account of the people, their origin, customs and language, see Basques.
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  • The Basques still made their own treaties with England and France and are mentioned apart from Spain in the treaty of Utrecht (1713).
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  • Basques >>
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  • In their great energy and their love of enterprise they resemble the Basques.
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  • They make admirable soldiers and sailors, but lack the enterprise and commercial aptitude of the Basques and Catalans; while they are differentiated from the inhabitants of central and southern Spain by their superior industry, and perhaps their lower standard of culture.
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  • The duke of the Basques came to his court to swear fidelity, and at his villa at Clichy the chief of the Bretons of Domnone promised obedience.
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  • His reign is also marked by the creation of numerous monasteries and by renewed missionary activity in Flanders and among the Basques.
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  • The beach to the north-east is known as the Grande Plage, that to the south-west as the Cote des Basques.
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  • The same writer represents Milo as discharging a mission among the Vascones, or Basques, the very people to whom authentic history has ascribed the great disaster which befell the army of Charlemagne at Roncesvalles.
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  • There are mineral springs at Eaux-Bonnes, EauxChaudes, Cambo-les-Bains (resorted to by the Basques on St John's Eve), St Christau, and Salies.
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  • The origin of the Latin name secale, which exists in a modified form among the Basques and Bretons, is not explained.
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  • In the course of the 6th century there was a considerable emigration of Basques to the north of the Pyrenees.
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  • Yet the Basques maintained their independence.
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  • The Basques who now inhabit both sides of the Pyrenean range are probably the last representatives of the Iberians, who came from Spain to settle between the Mediterranean and the Bay of Biscay.
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  • Dagoberts victories over Samo, king of the Slays along the Elbe, and his subjugation of the Bretons and the Basques, maintained the prestige of the Frankish empire; while the luxury of his court, his taste for the fine arts (ministered to by his treasurer Eloi i), his numerous achievements in architectureespecially the abbey of St Denis, burial-place of the kings of Francethe brilliance and the power of the churchmen who surrounded him and his revision of the Salic law, ensured for his reign, in spite of the failure of his plans for unity, a fame celebrated in folksong and ballad.
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  • The kings of Northumbria and Sussex, the kings of the Basques and of Galicia, Arab amirs of Spain and Fez, and even the caliph of Bagdad came to visit him in person or sent gifts by the hands of ambassadors.
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  • The ethnology, folk-lore, institutions and history of the Pyrenean region form an interesting study: see Andorra; Aragon; Basques; Bearn; Catalonia; Navarre.
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  • Spain occupies an unsurpassed geographical position; its resources are rich, varied and to some extent unexploited; its inhabitants include the Basques and Catalans, noted for their commercial enterprise, and the Galicians, noted for their industry.
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  • This undoubtedly was the case in the north, where the Asturians and Basques, the least Romanized part of the population, appear from the beginning of the age of barbarization as acting for themselves.
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  • The father wa.s manifestly a man of great energy who cowed his unruly nobles by murder, forced the Orospedans to recognize his superiority, swept away the Suevic kingdom which had lingered in the north-west, and checked the raids of the Basques.
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  • In the centre were the Basques, dwelling on both sides of the Pyrenees, who kept against the Mahommedan the independence they had vindicated against the Visigoth.
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  • With the aid of the Spanish Moslem Beni-Casi the Basques drove off the counts and wardens of the marches of the Carolingians.
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  • The greatest destiny was preserved for the Christian remnant which stood out to the west of the Basques, in the mountains of Asturias.
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  • But the Conservatives preferred to support the late kings brother Don Carlos, and they had the active aid of the Basques, who feared for their local franchises, and of the mountaineers of Navarre, Aragon, Catalonia and Valencia, who were either quite clerical, or who had become attached, during the French invasion and the troubles of the reign of Ferdinand, to a life of guerrillero adventure.
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  • At last, in August 1839, exhaustion brought the Basques to reccgnize the government of Queen Isabella by the convention of Vergara in return for the confirmation of their privileges.
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  • The Basques are an ancient pre-Indo-European race and the origins of their language have baffled etymologists for centuries.
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  • They preserved their own laws, customs, fueros (see Basques), which the Spanish kings swore to observe and maintain.
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  • The latter constitute the Basque region of France (see Basques) and cover the west of the department.
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  • Of these formulae '(chosen because illustrated by Greek heroic legends) - (I) is a sanction of barbarous nuptial etiquette; (2) is an obvious ordinary incident; (3) is moral, and both (3) and (1) may pair off with all the myths of the origin of death from the infringement of a taboo or sacred command; (4) would naturally occur wherever, as on the West Coast of Africa, human victims have been offered to sharks or other beasts; (5) the story of flight from a horrible crime, occurs in some stellar myths, and is an easy and natural invention; (6) flight from wizard father or husband, is found in Bushman and Namaqua myth, where the husband is an elephant; (7) success of youngest brother, may have been an explanation and sanction of " tungsten-recht " - Maui in New Zealand is an example, and Herodotus found the story among the Scythians; (8) the bride given to successful adventurer, is consonant with heroic manners as late as Homer; (9) is no less consonant with the belief that beasts have human sentiments and supernatural powers; (to) the " strong man," is found among Eskimo and Zulus, and was an obvious invention when strength was the most admired of qualities; (II) the baffled ogre, is found among Basques and Irish, and turns on a form of punning which inspires an " ananzi " story in West Africa; (12) descent into Hades, is the natural result of the savage conception of Hades, and the tale is told of actual living people in the Solomon Islands and in New Caledonia; Eskimo Angekoks can and do descend into Hades - it is the prerogative of the necromantic magician; (13) " the false bride," found among the Zulus, does not permit of such easy explanation - naturally, in Zululand, the false bride is an animal; (14) the bride accused of bearing be 1st-children, has already been disposed of; the belief is inevitable where no distinction worth mentioning is taken between men and animals.
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  • The Basques were going across to the Grand Banks well before 1492, as were the Portuguese for their salt cod.
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  • Many have the same look as basques and can be easily paired with a simple stretch slip.
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  • Basques: This section is devoted to corsets made with bone, and they are designed to give you a knockout hourglass shape while delighting the senses with touches of lace and silk.
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  • The term is French and means bodice, as basques are similar to corsets but extend further down over the hips than a typical corset does.
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  • Most basques close in the front, but you may occasionally run across one with a back closure.
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  • Basques aren't quite as tightly fitting as corsets, but are similar in shape, look, and design.
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  • During the Victorian era, basques were worn as body shaping garments, but today's basques are usually not so constricting and are worn as seductive lingerie rather than true body shapers.
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  • Some basques are slimming and offer underwire support for the breasts.
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  • Silk basques are popular wedding lingerie items.
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  • Because of basques' suitability for wedding days, many of them come in white.
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  • The outside of satin basques have a slight sheen to them, though the inside of the fabric may be completely matte.
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  • Satin can be made of polyester, acetate, nylon, or rayon, and the fact that satin doesn't have to be made from silk blends makes satin basques more affordable.
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  • It is not improbable that he was in fact an hereditary chief of the Basques, but no contemporary records exist.
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  • The survival of the non-Aryan language among the Basques around the west Pyrenees has suggested the attempt to interpret by its means a large class of similarsounding place-names of ancient Spain, some of which are authenticated by their occurrence on the inscribed coins, and to link it with other traces of non-Aryan speech round the shores of the Western Mediterranean and on the Atlantic seaboard of Europe.
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  • In reply, Graslin (De l'Iberie, Paris, 1839), maintained that the name Iberia was nothing but a Greek misnomer of Spain, and that there was no proof that the Basque people had ever occupied a wider area than at present; and Blade (Origine des Basques, Paris, 1869) took the same line of argument, holding that Iberia is a purely geographical term, that there was no.
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  • Their remains have been found in Belgium and France, in Britain, Germany and Denmark, as well as in Spain; and they bear a close resemblance to a type which is common among the Basques as well as all over the Iberian peninsula.
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  • Blade, Etudes sur l'origine des Basques (Paris, 1869), Defense des etudes, &c. (Paris, 1870); Phillips, Die Einwanderung der Iberer in die pyren.
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  • See also the works quoted in the footnotes; and the bibliography under BASQUES.
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  • The deputies assembled under an old oak-tree, celebrated by the Basque poet, Jose Maria Iparraguirre, in a song which is regarded by the Spanish Basques almost as a national anthem.
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  • For the history of the Basques, see Basque..
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  • Provinces; for their origin, language and customs, see Basques.
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  • As the Frankish forces were defiling through the passes of the Pyrenees they were attacked by the Wascones (probably Basques), and the rearguard of the army was almost annihilated.
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  • For a fuller account of the history, people and customs of Alava, see Basques and Basque Provinces, with the works there cited.
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  • Meanwhile the Basques and Bretons, asserting that they were being ruined by de Monts' privileges, got his patent revoked, and Champlain returned with the discouraged colonists to Europe.
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  • The island was variously identified with America, Scandinavia, the Canaries and even Palestine; ethnologists saw in its inhabitants the ancestors of the Guanchos, the Basques or the ancient Italians; and even in the 17th and 18th centuries the credibility of the whole legend was seriously debated, and sometimes admitted, even by Montaigne, Buffon and Voltaire.
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