Barrow sentence example

barrow
  • Another tomb in this region, Melgunov's barrow, found as long ago as 1760, contained a dagger-sheath and pommel of Assyrian work and Greek things of the 6th century.
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  • A Saxon barrow was opened near the town in 1824.
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  • Sometimes, instead of a chamber formed above ground, the barrow covered a pit excavated for the interment under the original surface.
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  • Thus, while the long barrow is characteristic of the Stone Age, it is impossible to tell without direct examination whether it may be chambered or unchambered, or whether the burials within it may be those of burnt or of unburnt bodies.
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  • Both were erected to defend the ford of the Barrow.
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  • Accompanied by eleven chosen warriors, he journeys to the barrow.
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  • The inland water communications reach to Dublin by means of the Barrow and the Grand Canal.
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  • With a good hard bottom, you could try using a wheel barrow.
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  • Stukeley's ' long barrow ' is actually a natural feature.
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  • A branch of the Brigantes also settled in the south-east corner of Ireland, near the river Birgus (Barrow).
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  • It is reported that in his examination for a scholarship at Trinity, to which he was elected on the 28th of April 1664, he was examined in Euclid by Dr Isaac Barrow, who formed a poor opinion of his knowledge, and that in consequence Newton was led to read the Elements again with care, and thereby to form a more favourable estimate of Euclid's merits.
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  • Shortly afterwards Barrow resigned his chair, and was instrumental in securing Newton's election as his successor.
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  • Waterford Harbour is a winding and well-sheltered bay formed by the estuary of the river Suir, and afterwards by the joint estuary of the Nore and Barrow.
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  • The Barrow Navigation connects a branch of the Grand canal with the tidal part of the river Barrow.
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  • The Barrow is crossed by an iron bridge with a swivel pillar in the centre on which a portion of the bridge is turned to admit the passage of vessels.
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  • There is a prehistoric barrow or burial mound near the farm which would have stood alongside the trackway.
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  • For more information barrow boys in America co-chair jack.
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  • The barrow is certainly a very indistinct one in long heather.
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  • We have started to excavate the turf core of the barrow mound.
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  • Barrow is: the base for laying offshore pipelines.
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  • Pop. of urban district (1901) 3599 It is intersected by the river Barrow, which is here crossed by a bridge of five arches.
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  • The trade, chiefly in grain, is aided by excellent water communication, by a branch of the Grand Canal to Dublin, and by the river Barrow, navigable from here to Waterford harbour.
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  • The implements used are two makes of iron-shod wooden ploughs; a large shovel, worked by three or five men, one working the handle, the others jerking the blade by ropes attached to it; a short sharp-pointed hoe, a bamboo rake, and a wooden barrow, all of rude construction.
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  • Wiglaf enters the barrow, and returns to show the dying king the treasures that he has found there.
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  • The notion that ancient burial mounds were liable to be inhabited by dragons was common in the Germanic world: there is perhaps a trace of it in the Derbyshire place-name Drakelow, which means " dragon's barrow."
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  • It is connected with Barrow Strait and Lancaster Sound by Prince Regent Inlet, with Franklin Strait by Bellot Strait, and with Fox Channel by Fury and Hecla Strait.
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  • In the following year he marched against Arminius, the conqueror of Varus, and performed the last rites over the remains of the Roman soldiers that still lay there unburied, erecting a barrow to mark the spot.
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  • The range of latitude from Point Barrow in the Arctic Ocean to Cape Muzon is almost 17 degrees - as great as from New Orleans to Duluth; the range of longitude from Attu Island to the head of Portland Canal is 58 degrees - considerably greater than from New York to San Francisco.
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  • He wrote a paper Analysis per Equationes Numero Terminorum Infinitas, which he put, probably in June 1669, into the hands of Isaac Barrow (then Lucasian professor of mathematics), at the same time giving him permission to communicate the contents to their common friend John Collins (1624-1683), a mathematician of no mean order.
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  • Barrow did this on the 31st of July 1669, but kept the name of the author a secret, and merely told Collins that he was a friend staying at Cambridge, who had a powerful genius for such matters.
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  • In a subsequent letter on the 10th of August, Barrow expressed his pleasure at hearing the favourable opinion which Collins had formed of the paper, and added, " the name of the author is Newton, a fellow of our college, and a young man, who is only in his second year since he took the degree of master of arts, and who, with an unparalleled genius (eximio quo est acumine), has made very great progress in this branch of mathematics."
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  • His sincere piety made him the intimate friend of Isaac Barrow, Archbishop Tillotson, Bishop Wilkins and Bishop Stillingfleet, as well as of the Nonconformist leader, Richard Baxter.
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  • By the Suir there is navigation for barges to Clonmel, and for sailing vessels to Carrick-on-Suir; by the Barrow for sailing vessels to New Ross and thence for barges to Athy, and so to Dublin by a branch of the Grand Canal; and by the Nore for barges to Inistioge.
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  • It was owing to the existence of this ore that the town of Barrow grew up in the 19th century; at first as a port from which the ore was exported to South Wales, while later furnaces were established on the spot, and acquired additional importance on the introduction of the Bessemer process, which requires a non-phosphoric ore such as is found here.
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  • The district is served by the main line of the Furness railway, from Carnforth (junction with the London & North-Western railway), passing the pleasant watering-place of Grange, and approximately following the coast by Ulverston, Dalton and Barrow, with branches to Lake Side, Windermere, and to Coniston.
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  • Lastly, rising in the Slieve Bloom or neighbouring mountains, the Suir, Nore and Barrow follow widely divergent courses to the south to unite in Waterford harbour.
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  • The banks of the rivers Shannon, Suir, Nore, Barrow and Bann are lined with long stretches of flat lands capable of producing fine crops.
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  • He died on the 6th of June 1762: A life of Lord Anson, inaccurate in some details but valuable and interesting, was published by Sir John Barrow in 1839.
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  • Benedictine foundations existed at Ikanho, Barrow, Bardney, Partney and Crowland as early as the 7th century, but all were destroyed in the Danish wars, and only Bardney and Crowland were ever rebuilt.
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  • The urban district of New Ross includes Rosbercon, on the opposite side of the Barrow.
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  • At a short distance from the town is a moated Elizabethan half-timbered house, and also an ancient barrow of great extent.
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  • Chad built a monastery at Barrow in Lincolnshire and fixed his see at Lichfield.
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  • A typical barrow, in effect, is more like an ' orgone accumulator ' than an electrostatic accumulator.
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  • Now I off back south to help excavate a round barrow on the last prehistoric dig of the summer for me.
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  • Whilst transporting the heavy bouncy castle on the sack barrow across the car park going between various parked cars.
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  • Any plans to excavate a selected oval barrow would need to await the outcome of the initial study and the identification of suitable examples.
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  • Were the Wessex chieftains the ` barrow boys ' of the Bronze Age economy?
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  • This completed, twelve chieftains rode around the barrow, reciting an elegy and speaking of their heroic king.
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  • Christopher barrow subject: birth sister Comment: I am trying to find my birth sister.
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  • Gazetteers ask for the gazetteers ask for the gazetteer for a calculation of the distance from Barrow in Furness to another place.
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  • The area has been transformed into a lovely woodland glade, exposing the obvious ditch and mound formation of the round barrow.
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  • A smaller hydraulic ram ejected the blocks from the molds, after which they were placed on a barrow and wheeled away.
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  • The stone was erected beside a long barrow, an ancient burial mound, which was built on the top of the hill.
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  • Many were sent North to Scotland where they were then given a barrow and became ' hokey pokey ' men.
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  • We visit the neolithic long barrow of Stoney Littleton near Bath, which is aligned to the winter solstice sunrise.
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  • Two cremations were found in large collared urns on either side of the barrow.
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  • The barrow contains two urns, found about 4 ft. apart, at a depth of 4ft.
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  • Brown looked sharply back at the road behind him; the man with the barrow had suddenly vanished.
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  • Oh, for the flimsy pensioners and truculent barrow boys of yesteryear - whither the legions of faint hearted English whimsy?
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  • These two had a slight amount of flash but nowhere near as much as some barrow wights which was quite a relief!
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  • A Latin version of them was published by Isaac Barrow in 1675 (London, 4to); Nicolas Tartaglia published in Latin the treatises on Centres of Gravity, on the Quadrature of the Parabola, on the Measurement of the Circle, and on Floating Bodies, i.
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  • It is the Tringa interpres 2 of Linnaeus and Strepsilas interpres of most later writers, and is remarkable as being perhaps the most cosmopolitan of birds; for, though properly belonging to the northern hemisphere, there is scarcely a sea-coast in the world on which it may not occur: it has been obtained from Spitzbergen to the Strait of Magellan and from Point Barrow to the Cape of Good Hope and New Zealand - examples from the southern hemisphere being, however, almost invariably in a state of plumage that shows, if not immaturity, yet an ineptitude for reproduction.
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  • The alignment of Kermario points to the dolmen of Kercado (Place of St Cado), where there is also a barrow, explored in 1863; and to the south-east of Menec stands the great tumulus of Mont St Michel, which measures 377 ft.
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  • But of organized churches we can trace none in England, until we come in 1586 to Greenwood and Barrow, the men whose devotion to a cause in which they felt the imperative call of God seems to have rallied into church-fellowship the Separatists in London, whether those of Fytz's day or those later convinced by the failure of the Puritan efforts at reform and by the writings of Browne.
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  • As in the case of the long barrows, the traditional form of the circular, chambered barrow was retained through various changes in the sepulchral customs of the people.
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  • Dr. Barrow begins by sowing the seeds of fear with a spooky bedtime tale.
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  • In the early phase the barrow had bare chalk sides, and would have stood stark against the landscape.
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  • Breamore Down has several tumuli, the long barrow known as the Giant 's Grave, and the mysterious Mizmaze on its heights.
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  • These two had a slight amount of flash but nowhere near as much as some barrow wights which was quite a relief !
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  • She was the first teen to become a member of the Barrow Group Theater Company's acting program.
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  • This allows you to get a wheel barrow, lawn mower, or other tools through the area easily.
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  • The authorship of the tracts has been attributed to several persons: to Penry himself, who however emphatically denied it and whose acknowledged works have little resemblance in style to those of Martin, to Job Throckmorton, and to Henry Barrow.
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  • If the name means "fivebeacons," only three of these are high, with a carnedd (stone-pile, probably a military or other landmark, rather than the legendary barrow or tomb) on each of the three.
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  • Usually both classes of graves lie below the natural surface of the ground without any perceptible trace of a barrow.
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  • On the other hand inhumation below the surface of the ground, without perceptible trace of a barrow, seems to have been the most usual practice during the national migration period, both in England and on the continent.
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  • In memory of the victory several monuments have been erected in the town and its vicinity, of which the most noticeable are the bronze statue of the Danish Land Soldier by Bissen (one of Thorvaldsen's pupils), and the great barrow over 50o Danes in the cemetery of the Holy Trinity Church, with a bas-relief by the same sculptor.
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  • After the destruction of Furness Abbey, Ulverston succeeded Dalton as the most important town in Furness, but the rapid rise of Barrow surpassed it in modern times.
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  • In 1675 Dr Barrow was chosen vice-chancellor of the university.
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  • See Ward, Lives of the Gresham Professors, and Whewell's biography prefixed to the 9th volume of Napier's edition of Barrow's Sermons.
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  • Isaac Barrow said that "his practical writings were never minded, and his controversial ones seldom confuted," and John Wilkins, bishop of Chester, asserted that "if he had lived in the primitive time he had been one of the fathers of the church."
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  • The chief towns on the banks of the Barrow are Athy (where it becomes navigable and has a junction with the Grand Canal), Carlow, Bagenalstown and New Ross.
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  • Let the stript ground then be neatly formed with the spade and barrow, into beds varying in breadth and shape according to the nature of the soil and the dip of the ground - the feeders from the conductor and the small drains to the main drain being formed at the same time.
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  • One or two vases are found in each barrow, ornamented with finger-imprints, string decoration, &c. The later period is characterized by the practice of cremation, though the remains are still placed in harrows.
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  • His tutor at Trinity was Dr James Duport (1606-1679), regius professor of Greek, and his intimate friend and fellow-pupil the celebrated Isaac Barrow.
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  • The primary idea of sepulture appears to have been the provision of a habitation for the dead; and thus, in its perfect form, the barrow included a chamber or chambers where the tenant was surrounded with the prized possessions of his previous life.
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  • When the barrow was a stone structure, the enclosure was usually a circle of standing stones.
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  • The custom of burning the body commenced in the Stone Age, before the long barrow or the dolmen had passed out of use.
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  • In Ireland, where the long barrow form is all but unknown, the round barrow or chambered cairn prevailed from the earliest Pagan period till the introduction of Christianity.
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  • It was the natural result of the practice of cremation, however, that it should induce a modification of the barrow structure.
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  • In Scandinavia a custom, alluded to in the sagas, of burying the viking in his ship, drawn up on land, and raising a barrow over it, is exemplified by the ship-burials discovered in Norway.
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  • An interesting example of the great timber-chambered barrow is that at Jelling in Jutland, known as the barrow of Thyre Danebod, queen of King Gorm the Old, who died about the middle of the 10th century.
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  • Finally, a barrow of great magnitude was heaped over the remains and the funeral feast was celebrated.
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  • A Siberian barrow, described by Demidov, contained three contiguous chambers of unhewn stone.
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  • Crag, a heap or barrow - Crag Mawr, Trichrug.
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  • In the first phase a round barrow was created with material dug from two ditches to either side of the mound.
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  • A remarkably fine cup turned in amber from a bronze-age barrow at Hove is now in the Brighton Museum.
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  • The horizontal lines are parallels, depending upon the altitude of the pole star, the Calves of the Little Bear and the Barrow of the Great Bear above the horizon.
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  • He afterwards added to his charge at Sparkford, Lovington, South Barrow and North Barrow, and in September 1782 was presented to the perpetual curacy of South Barrow by the Rev. John Hughes, Coln St Denys.
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  • The great names at this period were those of Isaac Barrow (1630-1677); Robert South (1634-1716), celebrated for his wit in the pulpit; John Tillotson (1630-1694), the copyright of whose sermons fetched the enormous sum of 2500 guineas after his death, and of whom it was said that he was "not only the best preacher of the age, but seemed to have brought preaching to perfection"; and Edward Stillingfleet (1635-1699), styled, for his appearance in the pulpit, "the beauty of holiness."
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  • On the one hand are Andrewes, Hall, Chillingworth, Jeremy Taylor, Barrow and South; on the other Baxter, Calamy, the Goodwins, Howe, Owen, Bunyan, in each case but a few names out of many.
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  • In this he was in advance even of most Separatists, who held with Barrow 1 " that the Prince ought to compel all their subjects to the hearing of God's Word in the public exercises of the church."
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  • As, however, the prince might approve a false type of Church, in spite of what they 2 both assumed to be the clear teaching of Scripture, and should so far be resisted, Browne and Barrow found themselves practically in the same attitude towards the prince's religious coercion.
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  • Possibly Barrow laid more stress also on the orderly " rules of the Word " to be followed in all church actions, and so conveyed a rather different impression.
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  • Johnson, a man autocratic by nature, and leaning to his old Presbyterian ideals on the point, held that the church had no power to control its elders, once elected, in their exercise of discipline, much less to depose them; while Ainsworth, true to Barrow and the " old way " as he claimed, sided with those who made the church itself supreme throughout.
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  • The rivers Brosna, Barrow and Boyne take their rise in these morasses, and the Grand and Royal canals cross them.
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  • As far as the circlesquaring functions are concerned, it would seem that Gregory was the first (in 1670) to make known the series for the arc in terms of the tangent, the series for the tangent in terms of the arc, and the secant in terms of the arc; and in 1669 Newton showed to Isaac Barrow a little treatise in manuscript containing the series for the arc in terms of the sine, for the sine in terms of the arc, and for the cosine in terms of the arc. These discoveries 1 See Euler, ” Annotationes in locum quendam Cartesii," in Nov.
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  • His prowess contributed largely to the Messenian victory over the Spartan and Corinthian forces at "The Boar's Barrow" in the plain of Stenyclarus, but in the following year the treachery of the Arcadian king Aristocrates caused the Messenians to suffer a crushing defeat at "The Great Trench."
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  • If for massive walls, it is usual to tip it out in large quantities from a barrow or wagon, and simply spread it in layers about a foot thick.
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  • A monument on Hoad Hill commemorates Sir John Barrow, secretary of the admiralty and a native of the town.
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  • His uncle was Bishop Isaac Barrow of St Asaph (1614-1680).
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  • The same year the executors of Henry Lucas, who, according to the terms of his will, had founded a mathematical chair at Cambridge, fixed upon Barrow as the first professor; and although his two professorships were not inconsistent with each other, he chose to resign that of Gresham College, which he did on the 20th of May 1664.
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  • Upon quitting his professorship Barrow was only a fellow of Trinity College; but his uncle gave him a small sinecure in Wtles, and Dr Seth Ward, bishop of Salisbury, conferred upon him a prebend in that church.
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  • By his English contemporaries Barrow was considered a mathematician second only to Newton.
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  • In a fragment of autobiography printed in the Athenaeum (12th of January 1850) he says that he was entirely self-taught, and attributes his poetic development to long country walks undertaken in search of wild flowers, and to a collection of books, including the works of Young, Barrow, Shenstone and Milton, bequeathed to his father by a poor clergyman.
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  • Yet as Barrow held that a church could exist prior to its ministry, this settles nothing.
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  • In 1589 Greenwood and Barrow composed " A true Description out of the Word of God of the visible Church," which represents the ideal entertained in their circle.
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  • After the execution of Greenwood, Barrow and the ex-Puritan Penry (a recent recruit to Separatism), in the spring of 1593, it seemed to some that Separatism was " in effect extinguished."
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  • It is to be observed that cremation and the use of the barrow are not mutually exclusive, for cremated remains, generally in urns, are often found in barrows.
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  • In England the long barrow usually contains a single chamber, entering by a passage underneath the higher and wider end of the mound.
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  • The standard Life is by Sir John Barrow (1838).
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  • When the barrow was of earth, this was effected by an encircling trench or a low vallum.
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