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barley

barley

barley Sentence Examples

  • Wheat is the principal crop, with barley second.

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  • In only one year, 1878, did the annual average price of English barley touch 40s.

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  • Many kinds of vegetables, and cotton, wheat and barley are also grown.

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  • The principal crops are potatoes, rye and oats, but wheat and barley are grown in the more fertile districts; tobacco, flax, hops and beetroot are also cultivated.

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  • Taking cereals and pulse corn together, the aggregate areas of wheat, barley, oats, rye, beans and peas in the United Kingdom varied as follows over the six quinquennial intervals embraced in the period 1875-1905: - Year.

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  • Taking cereals and pulse corn together, the aggregate areas of wheat, barley, oats, rye, beans and peas in the United Kingdom varied as follows over the six quinquennial intervals embraced in the period 1875-1905: - Year.

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  • These show differences amounting to 2,106,470 acres for wheat, 1,059,504 acres for barley, and 529,699 acres for oats.

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  • These show differences amounting to 2,106,470 acres for wheat, 1,059,504 acres for barley, and 529,699 acres for oats.

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  • Oats and barley are generally cultivated, the former more especially in the Parisian region, the latter in Mayenne and one or two of the neighboring departments.

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  • Her name has been explained as (I) "grain-mother," from 8na1, the Cretan form of "ECai, " barley," or (2) " earth-mother," or rather " mother earth," 86, being regarded as the Doric form of AI).

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  • In these high and stony valleys every available patch of ground is utilized for the cultivation of barley, even up to altitudes of 7000 and 8000 ft.

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  • Other products are tobacco, olives, castor-oil, peanuts, canary-seed, barley, rye, fruit and vegetables.

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  • The seedtime, begun in October, extends, for wheat and some other white crops, through November and December; and barley continues to be sown until about the middle of February.

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  • Other products are tobacco, olives, castor-oil, peanuts, canary-seed, barley, rye, fruit and vegetables.

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  • The chief agricultural products are barley, oats, wheat, and in the north-east flax is also grown, and exported to South Holland and Belgium.

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  • Aube is an agricultural department; more than one-third of its surface consists of arable land of which the chief products are wheat and oats, and next to them rye, barley and potatoes; vegetables are extensively cultivated in the valleys of the Seine and the Aube.

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  • The chief agricultural products are barley, oats, wheat, and in the north-east flax is also grown, and exported to South Holland and Belgium.

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  • Though much land previously devoted to grain culture has been planted with vines, the area under wheat, barley, beans and maize is still considerable.

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  • Wheat and barley were the chief crops, and another plant, perhaps identical with the durra, i.e.

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  • The crops chiefly cultivated were wheat, millet, barley, beans and lentils; to which it is supposed, on grounds not improbable, may be added rice and cotton.

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  • Wheat and barley were the chief crops, and another plant, perhaps identical with the durra, i.e.

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  • Experiments upon the growth of barley for fifty years in succession on rather heavy ordinary arable soil resulted in showing that the produce by mineral manures alone is larger than that without manure; that nitrogenous manures alone give more produce than mineral manures alone; and that mixtures of mineral and nitrogenous manure give much more than either used alone - generally twice, or more than twice, as much as mineral manures alone.

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  • The corn harvest naturally follows: rye and wheat were usually shorn, and barley and oats cut with the scythe.

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  • The requirements of barley within the soil, and its susceptibility to the external influences of season, are very similar to those of its near ally, wheat.

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  • In the British Isles wheat is, as a rule, sown in the autumn on a heavier soil, and has four or five months in which to distribute its roots, and so it gets possession of a wide range of soil and subsoil before barley is sown in the spring.

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  • A similar comparison for the several sections of Great Britain, as set forth in Table VI., shows that to England belong about 95% of the wheat area, over 80% of the barley area, over 60% of the oats area, and over 70% of the potato area, and these proportions do not vary much from year to year.

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  • The commodities which the United Kingdom principally takes are wheat, wool, barley, eggs, oats and flax.

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  • The ground in the valleys and plains bear very good corn, but especially bears barley or bigge, and oats, but rarely wheat and rye."

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  • The comparative insignificance of Ireland in the case of the wheat and barley crops, represented by 2 and 8% respectively, receives some compensation when oats and potatoes are considered, about one-fourth of the area of the former and more than half that of the latter being claimed by Ireland.

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  • The mean values at the foot of the table-they are not, strictly speaking, exact averages-indicate the average yields per acre in the United Kingdom to be about 31 bushels of wheat, 33 bushels of barley, 40 bushels of oats, 28 bushels of beans, 26 bushels of peas, 44 tons of potatoes, 134 tons of turnips and swedes, 184 tons of mangels, 32 cwt.

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  • 16; presages recovery or death of patients); (4) the pelican (recalls its young to life by its own blood); (5) the owl (or nyktikorax; loves darkness and solitude); (6) the eagle (renews its youth by sunlight and bathing in a fountain); (7) the phoenix (revives from fire); (8) the hoopoe (redeems its parents from the ills of old age); (9) the wild ass (suffers no male besides itself); (1 o) the viper (born at the cost of both its parents' death); (I I) the serpent (sheds its skin; puts aside its venom before drinking; is afraid of man in a state of nudity; hides its head and abandons the rest of its body); (12) the ant (orderly and laborious; prevents stored grain from germinating; distinguishes wheat from barley on the stalk); (13) the sirens and onocentaurs (Isa.

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  • The grout, which he mentions as " coming over to us in Holland ships," about which he desires information, was probably the same as shelled barley; and mills for manufacturing it were introduced into Scotland from Holland towards the beginning of the 18th century.

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  • one of wheat, one of barley, one of pease and one of oats, so that the wheat is sowd after the pease, the barley after the wheat and the oats after the barley.

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  • At the beginning of the period the aggregate area under wheat, barley and oats was nearly 102 million acres; at the close it did not amount to 8 million acres.

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  • This, however, was not the case, for a fairly uniform decrease in the barley area was accompanied by somewhat irregular fluctuations in the acreage of oats.

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  • The highest and lowest areas of wheat, barley and oats in the United Kingdom during the period 1875-1905 were the following: Wheat.

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  • Under the old Norfolk or four-course rotation (roots, barley, clover, wheat) land thus seeded with clover or grass seeds was intended to be ploughed up at the end of a year.

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  • wheat 26�08 bushels, barley 2 9.3 o bushels, oats 38.14 bushels, beans 19.61 bushels, rotation hay 23.55 cwt., permanent hay 20.41 cwt.

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  • At the beginning of the period the aggregate area under wheat, barley and oats was nearly 102 million acres; at the close it did not amount to 8 million acres.

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  • Farther south, heavy crops of wheat, turnips and other cereals and green crops are not uncommon, while barley is cultivated about Repton and Gresley, and also in the east of the county, in order to supply the Burton breweries.

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  • Wheat, barley and spelt were the leading crops.

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  • The barley zone is geographicall xtensive but embraces not more than 1% of the total area, of whic raif is situated in Sardinia and Sicily.

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  • The external trade of the Russian empire (bullion and the external trade of Finland not included) since the year 1886 is shown in the following table: The exports rank in the following order :- cereals (wheat, barley, rye, oats, maize, buckwheat) and flour, 49.2%; timber and wooden wares, 7.2; petroleum, 5.8; eggs, 5.4; flax, 5; butter, 3; sugar, 2-4; cottons and oilcake, 2 each; oleaginous seeds, &c., 1.5; with hemp, spirits, poultry, game, bristles, hair, furs, leather, manganese ore, wool, caviare, live-stock, gutta-percha, vegetables and fruit, and tobacco.

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  • The export that comes next in value is silk, and after it may be named wheat, barley, manganese ore, maize, wool, oilcake, carpets, rye, oats, liquorice and timber.

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  • The export that comes next in value is silk, and after it may be named wheat, barley, manganese ore, maize, wool, oilcake, carpets, rye, oats, liquorice and timber.

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  • In this he lays it down as a rule that it is bad husbandry to take two crops of grain successively, which marks a considerable progress in the knowledge of modern husbandry; though he adds that in Scotland the best husbandmen after a fallow take a crop of wheat; after the wheat, peas; then barley, and then oats; and after that they fallow again.

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  • The principal crops in addition to wheat are oats, barley, maize, linseed and bird seed.

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  • While in college, Borlaug heard a lecture by Elvin Stakman about plant disease in wheat, barley, and oak crops.

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  • "They used to role their barley grounde 2 This process of enclosure must be distinguished from that of enclosing the arable common fields which, though advocated by Fitzherbert in a passage quoted below proceeded slowly till the 18th century.

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  • These prices are per imperial quarter, - that is, 480 lb of wheat, 400 lb of barley and 312 lb of oats, representing 60 lb, 50 lb and 39 lb per bushel respectively.

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  • The produce of barley, like that of oats, is less irregular than that of wheat, the extremes for barley being 80, 794,000 bushels (1890) and 62,453,000 bushels (1904), and those for oats 190,863,000 bushels (1894) and 161,17 5,000 bushels (1901).

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  • Although enormous single crops of mangels [[Table X]].--Decennial Average Yields in Great Britain of Wheat, Barley and Oats-Bushels per acre.

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  • According to early methods of cropping, which were destined to prevail for centuries, wheat, the chief article of food, was sown in one autumn, reaped the next August; the following spring, oats or barley were sown, and the year following the harvest was a period of fallow.

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  • But the average produce over forty years of continuous growth of barley was, in all cases where nitrogenous and mineral manures (containing phosphates) were used together, much higher than the average produce of the crop grown in ordinary rotation in the United Kingdom, and very much higher than the average in most other countries when so grown.

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  • Barley meal 1 was strewn on its neck, and a lock of hair cut from its forehead and burned.

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  • It is the principal port of the island, exporting barley, wheat, cotton, raisins, oranges, lemons and gypsum.

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  • Rye and wheat are the most important crops harvested in northern Caucasia, but oats, barley and maize are also cultivated, whereas in Transcaucasia the principal crops are maize, rice tobacco and cotton.

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  • Indian corn, quinoa, mandioca, possibly the potato, cotton and various fruits, including the strawberry, were already known to the aborigines, but with the conqueror came wheat, barley, oats, flax, many kinds of vegetables, apples, peaches, apricots, pears, grapes, figs, oranges and lemons, together with alfalfa and new grasses for the plains.

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  • The island is of great fertility - wheat, oats, barley, olives, sesame and valonia being the principal products, in addition to a variety of fruits.

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  • The cultivated plants of Arabia are much the same as those of northern India - wheat, barley, and the common Sorghum, with dates and lemons, cotton and indigo.

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  • touches the agrarian line already mentioned, the principal crops are rye and oats, with barley and wheat coming next, though flax and green crops are also grown.

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  • Crops, chiefly barley, rye, oats, turnips and green crops, are, however, grown on clearings in the forest, though the yield is poor.

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  • The province produces much wheat, barley, rice, millet, cotton, but the authorities every now and then prohibiting the export of cereals, the people generally sow just as much as they think will suffice for their own wants.

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  • In 1909 in the amount of barley per acre (38 bushels) Nevada ranked third, and in the average farm price per bushel ($0.75) ranked first among the barley-producing states of the country, but in the total amount produced (304,000 bushels) held only the twenty-second place; and in the same year the average yield of potatoes per acre in Nevada was 180 bushels, exceeded in two states - the average for the entire country was 106.8 bushels per acre - but the total crop in Nevada (540,000 bushels) was smaller than in any state or Territory of the Union, except New Mexico.

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  • The province produces much wheat, barley, rice, millet, cotton, but the authorities every now and then prohibiting the export of cereals, the people generally sow just as much as they think will suffice for their own wants.

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  • This, indeed, is the practice in Ireland, and in order to incorporate the Irish figures with those for Great Britain so as to obtain average values for the United Kingdom, the Irish yields are calculated into bushels at the rate of 60 lb to the bushel of wheat, of beans and of peas, 50 lb to the bushel of barley and 39 lb to the bushel of oats.

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  • He mentions the different kinds of wheat, barley and oats; and after describing the method of harrowing "all maner of cornnes," we find the roller employed.

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  • boundary of rye closely corresponds to that of barley.

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  • Out of the total acreage under cereals 34% is generally sown with rye, 26% with wheat, 20% with oats and 102% with barley.

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  • In southern India, and the other parts of Asia and of the islands having a similar climate, the difference of the winter and summer half-years is not sufficient to admit of the proper cultivation of wheat or barley.

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  • Hops, which had been introduced in the early part of the 16th century, and on the culture of which a treatise was published in 1574 by Reginald Scott, are mentioned as a well-known crop. Buckwheat was sown after barley.

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  • They use much pottage made of coal-wort, which they call kail, sometimes broth of decorticated barley.

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  • Barley.

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  • Barley, on the other hand, is sown in a lighter surface soil, and, with its short period for root-development, relies in a much greater degree on the stores of plant-food within the surface soil.

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  • The exhaustion of the soil induced by both barley and wheat is, however, characteristically that of available nitrogen; and when, under the ordinary conditions of manuring and cropping, artificial manure is still required, nitrogenous manures are, as a rule, necessary for both crops, and, for the spring-sown barley, superphosphate also.

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  • Although barley is appropriately grown on lighter soils than wheat, good crops, of fair quality, may be grown on the heavier soils after another grain crop by the aid of artificial manures, provided that the land is sufficiently clean.

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  • Additional significance to the value of the above experiments on wheat and barley is afforded by the fact that the same series, with but slight modifications, has also been carried out since 1876 at the Woburn (Bedfordshire) experimental farm of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, the soil here being of light sandy character, and thus very different from the heavy soil of Rothamsted.

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  • The cereal crops (wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize); the cruciferous crops (turnips, cabbage, kale, rape, mustard); the solanaceous crops (potatoes); the chenopodiaceous crops (mangels, sugar-beets), and other non-leguminous crops have, so far as is known, no such power, and are therefore more or less benefited by the direct application of nitrogenous manures.

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  • Although many different rotations of crops are practised, they may for the most part be considered as little more than local adaptations of the system of alternating root-crops and leguminous crops with cereal crops, as exemplified in the old four-course rotation - roots, barley, clover, wheat.

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  • The cleaning process is carried on through the next summer by means of successive hoeings of the spring-sown root-crop. As turnips or swedes May occupy the ground till after Christmas little time is left for the preparation of a seed-bed for barley, but as the latter is a shallow-rooted crop only surface-stirring is required.

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  • In times of scarcity the Norse peasant-farmer uses the sweetish inner bark, beaten in a mortar and ground in his primitive mill with oats or barley, to eke out a scanty supply of meal, the mixture yielding a tolerably palatable though somewhat resinous substitute for his ordinary flad-brod.

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  • Grapes, barley, esparto grass, dry figs, almonds and zinc are exported.

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  • The barley crop decreased from 1,715,221 bushels in 1870 to 1,053,240 bushels in 1899 and 829,000 bushels in 1909.

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  • The principal crops are wheat, rye, oats, barley, maize, hemp, flax, potatoes, beetroot and tobacco.

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  • Cotton, tobacco, pulse, millet, wheat and barley are also grown.

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  • He has 200 bezants, along with a quantity of wheat, barley, lentils and oil; and in return he must march with four horses (Rey, Les Colonies franques en Syrie, p. 24).

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  • The principal products are corn, oats, barley, potatoes, rye, beetroot, hemp, flax, hay and other fodder.

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  • Rice is grown in such quantities as to procure for Formosa, in former days, the title of the " granary of China "; and the sweet potato, taro, millet, barley, wheat and maize are also cultivated.

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  • The oat grain (excepting the naked oat), like that of barley, is closely invested by the husk.

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  • Among the Hebrews it was the third and chief of the three annual pilgrimage festivals connected respectively with the harvesting of the barley (Passover), of wheat (Pentecost), and of the vine (Tabernacles).

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  • The principal crops are barley,',rice, wheat, other food-grains, pulse, sugar-cane and opium.

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  • The largest grain crops are rye and barley, and nearly 40,000 acres are under vines.

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  • Among the other agricultural products are barley, hemp, flax and various vegetables, including good asparagus.

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  • In central Alberta coarse grains - oats and barley - and some wheat are grown, in conjunction with mixed farming.

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  • BARLEY-CORN, a grain of barley, and thus a measure taken from the length of a grain of barley, three of which (sometimes four) were considered to make up an inch.

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  • The barley-corn has been personified as representing the malt liquor made from barley, as in Burns's song "John Barleycorn."

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  • About one-sixth of the total area is under cultivation, oats and barley being the chief grain, and potatoes (introduced in 1730) and turnips (1807) the chief green crops.

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  • The principal crops are rye, oats, barley, buckwheat, potatoes, though wheat, beetroot, flax, hemp and tobacco are also grown.

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  • It is said to yield wheat eighty-fold and barley a hundred.

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  • Wheat, maize, oats, barley and rye are the chief agricultural products.

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  • "On the morrow of the Sabbath" a wave offering of a sheaf of barley was to be made.

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  • The beginning of barley harvest is however generally associated with it, while the wheat harvest is connected with Pentecost.

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  • 10, is associated in Jewish tradition with the barley harvest (Mishna, Menachoth x.).

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  • The attempt of modern critics to account for the period as that in which the barley harvest was gathered in, during which the workers in the field could not prepare leavened bread, is not satisfactory.

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  • The first-fruits of the barley harvest are to be gathered on the "morrow of the sabbath" (Lev.

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  • But the real agricultural occasion was not the eating of unleavened bread but the offering of the first sheaf of the barley harvest on the "morrow of the sabbath" in the Passover week (Lev.

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  • When the Israelites settled in Canaan they found there an agricultural festival connected with the beginnings of the barley harvest, which coincided in point of date with the Passover and was accordingly associated with it.

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  • In the " Kongespeil " (King's mirror) of the 13th century it is stated that the old Norsemen tried in vain to raise barley.

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  • Wheat, oats, barley and other cereals are grown and exported, and owing to the abundance of pasture and forage, sheep and cattle-rearing are actively carried on.

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  • Other important crops in the order of their value are oats, hay and forage, Indian corn, barley, flax-seed, potatoes, rye, grass seeds, wild grass, clover, beans, peas, and miscellaneous vegetables and orchard products.

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  • The vine, the cotton plant and barley are the main objects of cultivation.

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  • The market for leather and cloth is important, and Ulm is famous for its vegetables (especially asparagus), barley, beer, pipe-bowls and sweet cakes (Ulmer Zuckerbrot).

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  • In the lowland districts good crops of maize, wheat, barley, oats and rye, as well as of turnips and potatoes, are obtained.

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  • wheat, millet, barley and melons, also rice and cotton.

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  • While maize thrives in every part of the country, wheat, barley and oats - cultivated by the white farmers - flourish only in the midlands and uplands.

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  • Straw (from strew, as being used for strewing), is the general term applied to the stalky residue of grain-plants (especially wheat, rye, oats, barley).

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  • The chief agricultural products of Hungary are wheat, rye, barley, oats and maize, the acreage and produce of which are shown in the following tables: Seton -Watson, op. cit.

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  • The exports, which show plainly the prevailing agricultural character of the country, are flour, wheat, cattle, beef, barley, pigs, wine in barrels, horses and maize.

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  • Oats, barley and millet are largely grown for forage.

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  • Wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize, flax, hemp and tobacco are grown in large quantities, and the products of the vineyards are of a good quality.

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  • Other crops which are grown in the province, especially in Upper Burma, comprise maize, tilseed, sugar-cane, cotton, tobacco, wheat, millet, other food grains including pulse, condiments and spices, tea, barley, sago, linseed and other oil-seeds, various fibres, indigo and other dye crops, besides orchards and garden produce.

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  • 17) states that it was cut twice, and afterwards was good keep for sheep, and Berossus remarked that wheat, sesame, barley, ochrys, palms, apples and many kinds of shelled fruit grew wild, as wheat still does in the neighbourhood of Anah.

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  • Its chief agricultural products were oats and barley, from which the inhabitants brewed a kind of beer named sabaea.

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  • When wheat, barley, turnips and similar plants are grown, the soil upon which they are cultivated becomes depleted of its nitrogen; yet after a crop of clover or other leguminous plants the soil is found to be richer in nitrogen than it was before the crop was grown.

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  • The soil of Zeeland consists of a fertile sea clay which especially favours the production of wheat; rye, barley (for malting), beans and peas, and flax are also cultivated.

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  • The immediate environs are very fertile and produce a great variety of fruits, including many of the temperate zone, but the surrounding country is arid and sterile, producing scanty crops of barley, Indian corn and pease.

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  • Thence proceeding eastwards to higher altitudes where coffee plantations give way to fields of wheat and barley, they reached the town of Jibla situated among a group of mountains exceeding 10,000 ft.

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  • The lower valleys produce dates in abundance, and at higher elevations wheat, barley, millets and excellent fruit are grown, while juniper forests are said to cover the mountain slopes.

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  • In good seasons it is sufficient for the cultivation of the summer crop of millet, and for the supply of the perennial streams and springs, on which the irrigation of the winter crops of wheat and barley depend.

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  • When a raid is in contemplation, they are brought in and given a little barley for a few weeks.

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  • Of cereals the common millets, dhura and dukhn, are grown in all parts of the country as the summer crop, and in the hot irrigated Tehama districts three crops are reaped in the year; in the highlands maize, wheat and barley are grown to a limited extent as the winter crop, ripening at the end of March or in April.

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  • The soil of both islands is fertile, potatoes and barley being raised and cattle pastured.

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  • The principal crops are millets, pulse, cotton, wheat, barley and sugar cane.

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  • It was instituted in 1755 at the White Bear Inn (now St Bride's Tavern), Fleet Street, moved about 1850 to Discussion Hall, Shoe Lane, and in 1871 finally migrated to the Barley Mow Inn, Salisbury Square, E.C., its present quarters.

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  • These central uplands of Tunisia in an uncultivated state are covered with alfa or esparto grass; but they also grow considerable amounts of cereals - wheat in the north, barley in the south.

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  • Oats, wheat and barley are the chief crops in the north.

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  • The principal exports are olive oil, wheat, esparto grass, barley, sponges, dates, fish (especially tunny), hides, horses, wool, phosphates, copper, zinc and lead.

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  • Vineyards and sugar-cane yield crops in the warmer ravines; the sub-tropical valleys are famous for splendid crops of maize; wheat and barley thrive on the mountain slopes; arid at heights from 7000 to 13,000 ft.

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  • In the sierra region, wheat, barley, oats, quinua (Chenopodium quinoa), alfalfa, Indian corn, oca (Oxalis tuberosa) and potatoes are the principal products.

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  • Barley and oats are grown for forage, but for this purpose alfalfa has become the staple, and without it the mountain packtrains could not be maintained.

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  • The total acreage of cereals (barley, buckwheat, Indian corn, oats, rye and wheat) decreased from acres in 1879 to 10,552 acres in 1899, and the total product of these crops decreased from 801,111 bu.

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  • Agricultural products include rice and maize (the principal crops), wheat, barley and oats.

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  • These produce cotton, rice, sugar-cane, wheat, coffee, Indian corn, barley, potatoes and fruit.

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  • In the same year the chief crops were oats, barley, rye, wheat, potatoes and hay.

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  • In the valleys the soil is particularly fertile, yielding luxuriant crops of wheat, maize, barley, spelt, beans, potatoes, flax, hemp, hops, beetroot and tobacco; and even in the more mountainous parts rye, wheat and oats are extensively cultivated.

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  • Such is the effect of this combination of agricultural occupations with domestic manufactures that the farmers are more than competent to supply the resident population of the county with vegetable, though not with animal food; and some of the less crowded and less productive parts of Ulster receive from Armagh a considerable supply of oats, barley and flour.

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  • Agriculture is the principal industry, the chief products being sugar, barley, Indian corn and wheat.

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  • Rice, wheat, barley, oats, Indian corn, various kinds of millet, pulses, oil-seeds, tobacco, cotton, indigo, opium, flax and hemp and sugar-cane, are the principal agricultural products of Bhagalpur district.

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  • The other cereal crops consist of mandua (a grass-like plant producing a coarse grain resembling rice), wheat, barley, and china, a rice-like cereal.

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  • Their favourite drink is thong, distilled from rice or barley and millet, and Marwa, beer made from fermented millet.

    0
    0
  • Around the cottages in the mountains the land is cleared for cultivation, and produces thriving crops of barley, wheat, buckwheat, millet, mustard, chillies, etc. Turnips of excellent quality are extensively grown; they are free from fibre and remarkably sweet.

    0
    0
  • The wheat and barley have a full round grain, and the climate is well adapted to the production of both European and Asiatic vegetables.

    0
    0
  • The grain crops are maize, wheat and barley; the two latter are frequently sown together.

    0
    0
  • In 1906, 13,000 acres produced 17,975 quarters of wheat and 12,000 quarters of barley.

    0
    0
  • The principal fodder crops are green barley and a tall clover called " sulla " (Hedysarum coronarum), having a beautiful purple blossom.

    0
    0
  • Rice, cotton, sugar-cane, yucas (Manihot aipi) and tropical fruits are produced in the irrigated valleys of the coast, and wheat, Indian corn, barley, potatoes, coffee, coca, &c., in the upland regions.

    0
    0
  • The soil, though not very fertile, except in some of the valleys and sheltered hillsides, produces wheat, maize, barley, rye, flax, grapes, peaches, apples and other fruits.

    0
    0
  • It imports general merchandise and manufactures, and exports phosphates, iron, zinc, barley, sheep, wool, cork, esparto, &c. There are manufactories of native garments, tapestry and leather.

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    0
  • 6: "A choenix of wheat for a denarius, and three choenikes of barley for a denarius, and the oil and the wine hurt thou not."

    0
    0
  • Barley was largely the food of the poor."

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  • According to the words just quoted from the Apocalypse, there was to be a dearth of grain and a superfluity of wine; the price of the wheat was to be seven times the ordinary, according to Reinach's computation, and that of the barley four times.

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    0
  • In 1899 it ranked fourth in the production of barley (18,059,050 bushels) and in 1907 sixth (14,178,000 bushels).

    0
    0
  • and N.W., spring wheat most largely in the N.W., barley mostly in the N., flax-seed and prairie hay in the N.E.

    0
    0
  • The soil in the valleys is fertile, yielding wheat, barley, maize, flax, hemp and fruits.

    0
    0
  • In 1905 the total value of the factory product of San Jose was $6,388,445 (94.1% more than in 1900); nearly onehalf ($3,039,803) was the value of canned and preserved fruits and vegetables, $619,532 of planing-mill products, and $518,728 of malt liquors - much barley is grown in the Santa Clara Valley.

    0
    0
  • The principal granite quarries are in Milford, ' The yield of cereals and of such other crops in 1907 as are recorded in the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture was as follows: Indian corn, 1,584,000 bushels; oats, 245,000 bushels; barley, 64,000 bushels; buckwheat, 42,000 bushels; potatoes, 3,600,000 bushels; hay, 760,000 tons; tobacco, 7,167,500 lb.

    0
    0
  • The riverain population is largely engaged in agriculture, the chief crops cultivated being durra, barley, wheat and cotton.

    0
    0
  • The district produces wheat, maize, barley and tobacco; sericulture and viticulture are both practised on a limited scale.

    0
    0
  • The principal crops are rye, oats, barley, flax and potatoes, with some wheat, hemp and buckwheat.

    0
    0
  • Although New York has lost in the competition with the Western States in the production of most of the grains, especially wheat and barley, and in the production of wool, mutton and pork, it has made steady progress in the dairy business and continues to produce great crops of hay.

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    0
  • The oat crop in 1909 was 37,365,000 bushels; the Indian corn crop, 1,910,000 bushels; the wheat crop, 24,120,000 bushels; the barley crop, 8,820,000 bushels; the rye crop, 2,720,000 bushels; buckwheat, 7,512,000 bushels.

    0
    0
  • A large portion of the Indian corn, wheat and barley is produced on the Ontario plain.

    0
    0
  • BARLEY (Hordeum sativum), a member of the grass family, and an important cereal which belongs peculiarly to temperate regions.

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    0
  • distichon), two-rowed barley.

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    0
  • The chief sub-races are (a) peacock, fan or battledore barley, described by Linnaeus as a distinct species, H.

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    0
  • sativum, subsp. hexastichum, six-rowed barley (the H.

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    0
  • pallidum is the barley most frequently cultivated in northern Europe and northern Asia.

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    0
  • To this belong the varieties naked barley (H.

    0
    0
  • Barley is the most hardy of all cereal grains, its limit of cultivation extending farther north than any other; and, at the same time, it can be profitably cultivated in sub-tropical countries.

    0
    0
  • The last variety is both the most ancient and the most commonly found, and is the sacred barley of antiquity, ears of which are frequently represented plaited in the hair of the goddess Ceres, besides being figured on ancient coins.

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    0
  • The cultivation of barley in ancient Egypt is indicated in Exod.

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    0
  • Till within recent times barley formed an important source of food in northern countries, and barley cakes are still to some extent eaten.

    0
    0
  • Barley is now chiefly cultivated for malting to prepare spirits and beer, but it is also largely employed in domestic cookery.

    0
    0
  • For the latter purpose the hard, somewhat flinty grains are preferable, and they are prepared by grinding off the outer cuticle which forms " pot barley."

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    0
  • When the attrition is carried further, so that the grain is reduced to small round pellets, it is termed " pearl barley."

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    0
  • Patent barley is either pot or pearl barley reduced to flour.

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    0
  • Under the name decoctum hordei, a preparation of barley is included in the British Pharmacopoeia, which is of value as a demulcent and emollient drink in febrile and inflammatory disorders.

    0
    0
  • Apart from the growth-habits of the plant itself, the consideration that chiefly determines the routine of barley cultivation is the demand on the part of the maltster for uniformity of sample.

    0
    0
  • On rich soils the crop is liable to grow too rapidly and yield a"coarse, uneven sample, consequently the best barley is grown on light, open and preferably calcareous soils, while if the condition of the soil is too high it is often reduced by growing wheat before the barley.

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  • In most rotations barley is grown after turnips, or some other " cleaning " crop, with or without the interposition of a wheat crop. The roots are fed off by sheep during autumn and early winter, after which the ground is ploughed to a depth of 3 or 4 in.

    0
    0
  • As even distribution at a uniform depth is necessary, the drill is preferred to the broadcast-seeder for barley sowing.

    0
    0
  • Nitrogen must, however, be applied with caution as it makes the barley rich in albumen, and highly albuminous barley keeps badly and easily loses its germinating capacity.

    0
    0
  • Barley is cut, either with scythe or machine, when it is quite ripe with the ears bending over.

    0
    0
  • Barley is liable to smut and the other fungus diseases which attack wheat, and the insect pests which prey on the two plants are also similar.

    0
    0
  • The larvae of the ribbon-footed corn-fly (Chlorops taeniopus) caused great injury to the barley crop in Great Britain in 1893, when the plant was weakened by extreme drought.

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    0
  • A fair crop of barley yields about 36 bushels, (56 lb to the bushel) per acre, but under the best conditions 40 and 50 bushels may be obtained.

    0
    0
  • 1 Barley is occasionally sown in autumn to provide keep for sheep in the following spring.

    0
    0
  • The principal crops are rye, wheat, oats, barley and potatoes.

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    0
  • The wheat crop in 1909 was 35,780,000 bushels, valued at $33,275,000; oats, 9,898,000 bushels, valued at $4,751,000; barley, 7,189,000 bushels, valued at $4,601,000; rye, 84,000 bushels, valued at $79,000; Indian corn, 417,000 bushels, valued at $359,000.

    0
    0
  • The cereals chiefly grown are wheat, oats, barley and rye.

    0
    0
  • Little barley is cultivated.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 the farm area was almost equally divided between " dry " farming and farming under irrigation, three-fourths of the wheat produced was grown without irrigation, and the dry farming was very successful with the comparatively new and valuable crops of durum, or macaroni wheat, and Russian barley, which is used in straw for winter feed to sheep and neat cattle.

    0
    0
  • 2% was wheat, 9% was barley, and 1 .

    0
    0
  • In 1909 the oat crop was 1 5,39 0, 000 bushels from 300,000 acres; the acreage of wheat in 1909 was 350,000 and the production 10,764,000 bushels; the acreage of barley in 1909 was 50,000 acres, and 1,900,000 bushels were raised; the acreage of Indian corn in 1909 was 5000 acres, and 175,000 bushels were grown.

    0
    0
  • Wheat and barley are grown in considerably less quantity.

    0
    0
  • They practised agriculture, cultivating several varieties of wheat and barley, besides millet and flax.

    0
    0
  • It was only in years when the harvest was most favourable that AustriaHungary was able to provide for her own requirements in corn; for export purposes only barley was of considerable importance, while wheat, and above all, of recent years, maize had to be imported.

    0
    0
  • Wheat constituted 60.7% of the total for all cereals, Indian corn 21.1%, oats 11.9% and barley 5.8%.

    0
    0
  • Barley was cultivated on 1,021,000 acres, the product amounting to 19,910,000 bush.

    0
    0
  • In the quantity of barley produced the state ranked fifth.

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    0
  • Corn grows throughout the western half of the state, and especially in the south-western parts, in Lincoln, Clay, Union, Yankton and Bonhommie counties, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Lincoln county, 3,914,840 bush., nearly one-eleventh of the state crop. Oats has a distribution similar to that of corn, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Minnehaha county, 1,666,110 bush., about one-nineteenth of the state crop. Barley grows principally in the eastern and southern parts of the state - Minnehaha, Moody, Lake and Brookings counties - the largest crop in 1899 being that of Minnehaha county, 932,860 bush., more than one-seventh of the state.

    0
    0
  • Oats and wheat are grown in almost equal quantities, barley being of rather less importance.

    0
    0
  • Other important crops are oats ($16,368,000 in 1906) barley ($8,913,000), hay, potatoes, rye and Indian corn.

    0
    0
  • The chief agricultural products are potatoes and vegetables, beet-root and hops, wheat, rye, barley and oats.

    0
    0
  • The agriculture of the republic supplies the material for several important industries, including the production of sugar, beer and spirits, starch (120 factories), syrup, glucose, chicory, coffee substitutes from rye and barley, jams. Alcohol and spirits are distilled in 1,100 distilleries employing 18,000 workmen and producing annually some.

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  • On the Hessian fly, Cecidomyia destructor, Say, the May brood of which produces swellings immediately above the joints of barley attacked by it, see Asa Fitch, The Hessian Fly (Albany, 1847), reprinted from Trans.

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    0
  • Of the crops raised, wheat, barley and oats are the principal cereals.

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    0
  • The chief exports are sheep and oxen, most of which are raised in Morocco and Tunisia, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits (chiefly figs and grapes for the table) and seeds, esparto grass, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork, crin vegetal and tobacco.

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    0
  • The Passover was kept at the full moon of the lunar month Nisan, the first of the Jewish ecclesiastical year; the Paschal lambs were slain on the afternoon of the, 4th Nisan, and the Passover was eaten after sunset the same day - which, however, as the Jewish day began at sunset, was by their reckoning the early hours of the r 5th Nisan; the first fruits (of the barley harvest) were solemnly offered on the 16th.

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    0
  • Barley is grown up to an altitude of 650o ft.

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    0
  • The outskirts are richly cultivated with wheat, barley, lucerne and poppies.

    0
    0
  • Bananas are grown over a large and increasing area; rice, maize, barley, potatoes and beans are cultivated to some extent in the interior; cocoa, vanilla, sugar-cane, cotton and indigo are products of the warm coast-lands, but are hardly raised in sufficient quantities to meet the local demand.

    0
    0
  • The principal crops are rice, barley, other food-grains, pulse, sugar-cane and opium.

    0
    0
  • This region has, for the most part, a temperate climate, and produces wheat, barley, Indian corn and forage crops.

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    0
  • to 25,694 acres (30,000 acres in 1909), but that of oats decreased from 26,618 acres to 12,589 acres (14,000 acres in 1909), that of wheat decreased from 2027 acres to 271 acres (none reported in 1909), that of barley decreased from 4934 acres to 1596 acres (2000acres in 1909), that of buckwheat decreased from 3117 acres to 1835 acres (2000 acres in 1909), and that of rye decreased from 1056 acres to 350 acres (none reported in 1909).

    0
    0
  • The chief crops are maize, wheat, barley, beans, rye, hemp, potatoes and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • Potatoes and turnips are the only root crops that succeed, and barley and oats are grown in some of the islands.

    0
    0
  • The chief crops are oats, barley, wheat and rye, but by far the most land is planted with potatoes.

    0
    0
  • Barley was formerly grown for export to the United States for malting purposes.

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    0
  • After the raising of the duty on barley under the McKinley and Dingley tariffs that trade was practically destroyed and Canadian farmers were obliged to find other uses for this crop. Owing to the development of the trade with the mother-country in dairying and meat products, barley as a home feeding material has become more indispensable than ever.

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    0
  • Before the adoption of the McKinley tariff about nine million bushels of barley were exported annually, involving the loss of immense stores of plant food.

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    0
  • The preparation of pearl or pot barley is an incidental industry.

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    0
  • Throughout other parts bullocks are fed on pasture land, and also in stables on nourishing and succulent feed such as hay, Indian corn fodder, Indian corn silage, turnips, carrots, mangels, ground oats, barley, peas, Indian corn, rye, bran and linseed oil cake.

    0
    0
  • Practically the only grain crops that are cultivated are oats (which greatly predominate) and barley, while the favoured root crops are turnips (much the most extensively grown) and potatoes.

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    0
  • The valleys and slopes are carefully cultivated in fields divided by stone walls, and produce beans, peas, sweet potatoes, "Russian turnip radish," barley, a little rice and millet, the last being the staple article of diet.

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    0
  • The neighbourhood produces wheat, barley, olives and vines in abundance.

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    0
  • There is much forest on its northward slopes, and good red earth on the higher parts, which bears abundant crops of barley, much desired by European maltsters.

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    0
  • The principal crops are - in the cold weather, maize and bajra; in the spring, wheat, barley and gram.

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    0
  • In Ine's Laws we hear only of the hwitel or white cloak, which was to be of the value of six pence per household (hide), and of barley, which was to be six pounds in weight for each worker.

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  • (2) At the line where this east to west wall ends begins the sea of undulating plains where there is enough rain for abundant wheat and barley.

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    0
  • (2) The following are among the more important products of the central zone of Mesopotamia: wheat, barley, rice (e.g.

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  • The product of Indian corn was 48,800,000 bushels in 1909; of wheat 26,265,000 bushels; of oats 25,948,000 bushels; of barley 196,000 bushels; of rye 5,508,000 bushels; and of buckwheat 5,665,000 bushels.

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    0
  • Some of the larger oat-producing counties also are in the south-east, but most of the buckwheat, barley and oats are grown in the north and west counties.

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    0
  • Here, at an elevation of 15,000 ft., about the great Lake Dangra, we hear of well-built villages and of richly cultivated fields of barley, indicating a condition of climate analogous to that which prevails in the districts south of Lhasa, and in contrast to the sterility of the lake region generally and the nomadic character of its population.

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    0
  • Of the flora of Tibet Rockhill writes: " In the ` hot lands ' (Tsa-rong) in southern and south-eastern Tibet, extending even to Batang, peaches, apricots, apples, plums, grapes, water-melons, &c., and even pomegranates, are raised; most of Tibet only produces a few varieties of vegetables, such as potatoes, turnips, beans, cabbages, onions, &c. The principal cereals raised are barley and buckwheat, wheat in small quantities, and a little oats.

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    0
  • The prosperity of Ghuzzeh has partially revived through the growing trade in barley, of which the average annual export to Great Britain for 1897-1899 was over 30,000 tons.

    0
    0
  • It is the administrative centre of a district (sanjak) producing and exporting barley, oats, spelt and canary seed, and largely planted with mulberry trees, on which silkworms are fed.

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    0
  • The plain produces wheat, barley, millet and vegetables.

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    0
  • (2) In the Ransome system round bars are rejected in favour of square bars, which have been twisted in a lathe in "barley FIG.

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    0
  • The imports are principally iron, coal, salt and timber; the exports barley, oats, cattle, pigs and potatoes.

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    0
  • The level country, including both Lower Bavaria (extending northwards to the Danube) and the western and middle parts of Franconia, is productive of rye, oats, wheat, barley and millet, and also of hemp, flax, madder and fruit and vines.

    0
    0
  • The chief products of cultivation on the heavy clay soil are oats, barley and wheat, and on the sand-grounds rye, buckwheat and potatoes.

    0
    0
  • With the possible exception of oats, the cereals do not suffice for home consumption, and maize is imported in large quantities for cattle-feeding, and barley for the distilleries and breweries.

    0
    0
  • It is the rapid spread of these yeast-conidia in manure and soil waters which makes it so difficult to get rid of smuts, &c., in the fields, and they, like the ordinary conidia, readily infect the seedling wheat, oats, barley or other cereals.

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    0
  • The first named will grow on rye and barley but not on wheat or oat.

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    0
  • The form Tritici is the least sharply marked and will grow on wheat, barley, rye and oat but not on the other grasses.

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    0
  • In the last-named family the single morphological species Erysiphe graminis is found growing on the cereals, barley, oat, wheat, rye and a number of wild grasses (such as Poa, Bromus, Dactylis).

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    0
  • On each of these host-plants the fungus has become specialized so that the form on barley cannot infect the other three cereals or the wild grasses and so on.

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    0
  • Altogether nearly 16 million acres of Russian Poland, or almost one-half of the total area, are under crops, principally rye, oats, wheat, barley, potatoes and hay, with some flax, hemp, peas, buckwheat and hops.

    0
    0
  • Barley and cotton are cultivated in some districts.

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    0
  • The inhabitants, an industrious Gaelic-speaking community (110 in 1851 and 77 in 1901), cultivate about 40 acres of land (potatoes, oats, barley), keep about 1000 sheep and a few head of cattle.

    0
    0
  • The general agricultural products of the country are wheat, barley, pulse, fruit, madder, asafoetida, lucerne, clover and tobacco.

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    0
  • c. 71, in case one-third part of such rent charge had been invested in the purchase of wheat, one-third part in the purchase of barley, and the remaining third part in the purchase of oats; and the respective quantities of wheat, barley and oats so ascertained shall be stated in the draft of every apportionment.

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  • 54d., that of the barley bushel at 3s.

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    0
  • Their country was rough and unfruitful as a whole (barley, however, was cultivated), being chiefly used for the pasture of sheep. Its inhabitants either led a nomadic life or occupied small villages; large towns were few.

    0
    0
  • Of crops the vilayet produces wheat (which is indigenous), rice, barley (which takes the place of oats as food for horses), durra (a coarse, maize-like grain), sesame, cotton and tobacco; of fruits, the date, orange, lemon, fig, banana and pomegranate.

    0
    0
  • The general drink was water and the food barley bread; half a pint of wine was held an ample allowance.

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    0
  • In November the waters have passed off; and whenever a man can walk over the mud with a pair of bullocks, it is roughly turned over with a wooden plough, or merely the branch of a tree, and the wheat or barley crop is immediately sown.

    0
    0
  • Wheat, rye, barley and oats are cultivated everywhere, but spelt only in the south and buckwheat in the north and north-west.

    0
    0
  • The same kinds of cereal crops are cultivated in all parts of the empire, but in the south and west wheat is predominant, and in the north and east rye, oats and barley.

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    0
  • Taking the average of the six years 1900-1905, the crop of wheat amounted to 3,550,033 tons (metric), rye to 9,296,616 tons, barley to 3,102,883 tons, and oats to 7,160,883 tons.

    0
    0
  • Wheat, barley, oats, peas, potatoes and other roots are staple crops, the average yield of wheat being about 20 bushels an acre; cattle are increasing in number and improving in quality, and all branches of dairy farming prosper.

    0
    0
  • Their proprietors alternate the cultivation of wheat with that of barley and beans.

    0
    0
  • The zone of the latifondi, or extensive culture, yields, besides wheat, nearly 8,000,000 bushels of barley and beans every year.

    0
    0
  • The chief agricultural products are wheat, barley, millet, oats, maize, cotton, indigo and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • Cotton, sugar and rice are the chief summer crops; wheat, barley, flax an.d vegetables are chiefly winter crops; maize, millet and flood rice are Nih crops; millet and vegetables are also, but in a less degree, summer crops.

    0
    0
  • Wheat and barley are important crops, and some 2,000,000 acres are sown with them yearly.

    0
    0
  • The barley in general is not of good quality, but the desert or Mariut barley, grown by the Bedouins in the coast region west of Alexandria, is highly prized for the making of beer.

    0
    0
  • Under the Ptolemaic rgime the records show a great variety of crops, wheat and barley being probably the largest (see B.

    0
    0
  • or durra?) was the main crop, and earlier again inferior varieties of wheat and barley took the lead, with boti apparently in the second place.

    0
    0
  • The bread was mainly made of boti, the beer of barley.

    0
    0
  • In regard to the general rise in prices, all the ground cultivated under the Mamelukes was employed for producing foodwheat, barley, beans, &cin immense quantities.

    0
    0
  • The land under grain crops is not far short of one-half the remainder, the principal crops being oats, followed by barley and rye in about equal quantities, with wheat about one-sixth that of barley and hardly one-tenth that of oats.

    0
    0
  • About one-fourth only of the area of the county is under cultivation, and the chief crops grown are wheat and barley, but above all, turnips and oats.

    0
    0
  • A little coal is mined and some rye, wheat, oats, barley and vegetables are grown, although the period during which vegetation can grow averages less than ioo days.

    0
    0
  • Oats remain the staple grain crop, and barley, though fluctuating from year to year, is steadied by the demands of the distillers.

    0
    0
  • above the sea, the indigenous species include the potato, maize, oca (Oxalis tuberosa), and quinua (Chenopodium quinoa), and the exotic species, wheat, barley, oats, alfalfa (Medicago saliva), and most of the fruits and vegetables of the northern temperate zone.

    0
    0
  • On the uplands, wheat, Indian corn, oats, barley, potatoes and vegetables of many kinds are successfully cultivated, but wholly for home consumption.

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    0
  • Seven years before he had started a model farm at Frechine, where he demonstrated the advantages of scientific methods of cultivation and of the introduction of good breeds of cattle and sheep. Chosen a member of the provincial assembly of Orleans in 1787, he busied himself with plans for the improvement of the social and economic conditions of the community by means of savings banks, insurance societies, canals, workhouses, &c.; and he showed the sincerity of his philanthropical work by advancing money out of his own pocket, without interest, to the towns of Blois and Romorantin, for the purchase of barley during the famine of 1788.

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  • The rank of the state in the growing of rye also declined from second in 1879 to eighth in 1899 and to ninth in 1907 (when the crop was 1,106,000 bushels), and the rank in the growing of barley from third in 1869 to sixteenth in 1899.

    0
    0
  • In 1907 the barley crop was 600,000 bushels.

    0
    0
  • Potatoes, barley and a little oats are grown, and the pasture being good the cattle are larger than most of the Hebridean breeds.

    0
    0
  • The soil is fertile and produces grain, especially rye and barley, in great abundance, as well as potatoes and other vegetables, and fruit.

    0
    0
  • The winter crops (barley and wheat) are harvested from April to June.

    0
    0
  • Besides wheat, the following crops are to a greater or less extent cultivated - barley, millet, sesame, maize, beans, peas, lentils, kursenni (a species of vetch used as camel-food) and, in some parts of the country, tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The soil is very fertile, is well watered, and produces much wheat, barley and rice.

    0
    0
  • Barley and oats are grown.

    0
    0
  • Rice, barley and wheat are the chief cereals cultivated, and lucerne for fodder.

    0
    0
  • The soil of Bukovina is fertile, and agriculture has made great progress, the principal products being wheat, maize, rye, oats, barley, potatoes, flax and hemp. Cattlerearing constitutes another important source of revenue.

    0
    0
  • The staple crop is barley, but wheat, lentils, vetches, flax and gourds are also cultivated.

    0
    0
  • It consists of wheat, barley and a variety of lentils.

    0
    0
  • It is common to cut down the green wheat and barley before the ear forms, for fodder, and the repetition of this, with barley at least, is said not to injure the grain crop. Bellew gives the following statement of the manner in which the soil is sometimes worked in the Kandahar district: - Barley is sown in November; in March and April it is twice cut for fodder; in June the grain is reaped, the ground is ploughed and manured and sown with tobacco, which yields two cuttings.

    0
    0
  • The tract lying between these streams consists of a rich alluvial deposit, more or less subject to inundations, but producing good crops of rice, wheat and barley.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of livestock, jerked beef, hides, wool, and other animal products, wheat, flour, corn, linseed, barley, hay, tobacco, sealskins, fruit, vegetables, and some minor products.

    0
    0
  • The articles chiefly cultivated are rice, millet, beans, ginseng (at Songdo), cotton, hemp, oil-seeds, bearded wheat, oats, barley, sorghum, and sweet and Irish potatoes.

    0
    0
  • In 1900 the chief crops were oats, barley, rye, wheat, potatoes, hay, beet (for sugar), flax and oil-yielding plants.

    0
    0
  • Barley has always been very important.

    0
    0
  • The acreage given to it in 1899 was one-fourth the total cereal acreage, and San Francisco in 1902-1904 was the shipping point of the larger part of American exported barley, of (roughly) three-quarters in 1902, seven-eighths in 1903 and four-fifths in 1904.

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  • In 1906 California produced 38,760,000 bushels of barley, valued at $20,930,400.

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  • The great increase in the acreage of barley, which was 22-5% of the country's barley acreage in 1906, and 24.2% in 1 9 05, is one reason for the decreased production of wheat.

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  • Its principal products are cotton, wheat and opium - the anti-opium decrees of 1906 had little effect on the province up to 1910 - and these it exchanges with the neighbouring provinces for coal, iron, salt, &c. Kao-liang, pulse, millet, maize, groundnut, barley, beans, pease, lucerne, and rape seed are also grown.

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  • The chief grain crops are rye, oats, barley and potatoes.

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  • The surface of the islands is generally sandy, the soil thin and the climate keen; yet Scotch fir, spruce and birch are grown; and rye, barley, flax and vegetables are produced in sufficient quantity for the wants of the people.

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  • In 1906 the state produced 3,157,136 bushels of Indian corn, valued at $1,J78,568; 8,266,538 bushels of wheat, valued at $5,373, 2 5 0; 5,9 62, 394 bushels of oats, valued at $2,683,077; 759,77 1 bushels of barley, valued at $4 10, 2 7 6; 43,5 80 bushels of rye, valued at $24,405; and 1,596,542 tons of hay, valued at $15,167,149.

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  • 42), and among the plagues of Egypt that of hail destroyed the flax and barley crops, " for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was bolled " (Exod.

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  • Barley and wheat, carobs and raisins may be specially indicated among the agricultural exports.

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  • Stock-raising is generally preferred to the growing of cereals, and in western Wales the oat crops exceed in size those of wheat and barley.

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  • His biographer's statement as to his habits and appearance is worth quoting, and is probably true: - " From the time he became a monk to the end of his life his only food was barley bread and sometimes pulse and vegetables: his drink was water.

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  • The principal crops are rye, oats, barley and potatoes, with large quantities of vegetables.

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  • Oats, rye, barley, mixed grain and wheat are the grain-crops in order of importance.

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  • During the 19th century the percentage under wheat showed a general tendency to increase; that under oats increased much in the later decades as livestock farming became common, rye maintained a steady proportion, but barley, formerly the principal grain-crop, decreased greatly.

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  • The high agricultural development of the plains of Skane appears from the fact that although that province occupies only one-fortieth of the total area of Sweden, it produces 30% of the entire wheat crop, 33% of the barley, 18% of the rye and 13% of the oats.

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  • Among the many economic plants which have been introduced into Chile and have become important additions to her resources, the more prominent are wheat, barley, hemp and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), together with the staple European fruits, such as the apple, pear, peach, nectarine, grape, fig, olive and orange.

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  • Barley is largely produced, chiefly for home consumption.

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  • Agriculture is practised along the Crooked Rhine, wheat, barley, beans and peas being the chief products, and there is considerable fruit-farming in the south-west.

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  • Agricultural Products.Wheat, barley and rice are grown in all districts, the two former up to considerable altitudes (8000 ft.), the last wherever the water supply is abundant, and in inner Persia generally along rivers; and all three are largely exported.

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  • The principal exports are fruits (dried and fresh), carpets, cotton, fish, rice, gums, wool, opium, silk cocoons, skins, live animals, silks, cottons, wheat, barley, drugs and tobacco.

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  • Food was scarce: barley sold for ten times the usual price, and wheat was not procurable for any money.

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  • The export trade is largely in barley, shipped to British and other maltsters.

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    0
  • Wheat, barley, rice, beans and various oil-yielding plants are grown, and melons, grapes, apples and other fruits.

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  • In some cases of diarrhoea an entirely milk diet has to be prescribed, and in the diarrhoea of children it is sometimes necessary to alternate a diet of barley water with one of beef juice or white of egg and water, or to give whey instead of milk.

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  • The cereal most grown is maize (known in South Africa as mealies); kaffir corn, wheat, barley and oats are also largely cultivated.

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  • Cattle and sheep are raised; oats, barley and potatoes are cultivated along the eastern shore, and there is some fishing.

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  • Cultivation hardly extends above 7000 ft., except in the valleys behind the great snowy peaks, where a few fields of buckwheat and Tibetan barley are sown up to 11,000 or 12,000 ft.

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  • At the lower elevations rice, maize and millets are common, wheat and barley at a somewhat higher level, and buckwheat and amaranth usually on the poorer lands, or those recently reclaimed from forest.

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  • The principal crops are millets, pulses, barley, wheat, cotton and a little indigo.

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  • The air is cold and dry, and the warmer season is too short for the production of anything but potatoes and barley.

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  • Among the more important productions, the potato, oca (Oxalis tuberosa), quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) and some coarse grasses characterize the puna region, while barley, an exotic, is widely grown for fodder.

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  • Strawberries and Sahara dates; alfalfa, wheat, barley, corn and sorghum; oranges, lemons, wine grapes, limes, olives, figs, dates, peanuts and sweet potatoes; yams and sugar beets, show the range of agricultural products.

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  • They showed that, when grown on sterilized sand with the addition of mineral salts, the Leguminosae were no more able to use the atmospheric nitrogen than other plants such as oats and barley.

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  • Wheat, barley, millet and sesame are cultivated on the plain, but fruit and vegetables have mostly to be imported from Persia.

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  • Wheat, which in 1899 ranked second ($2,131,953), showed an increase of more than 400% in the decade, and the farm value of the crop of 1907, according to the Year-book of the United States Department of Agriculture, was $5,788,000; the value of the barley crop in 1899 ($312,730) also increased more than 400% over that of 1889, and in 1907 the farm value of the product, according to the same authority, was $1,265,000; the value of the oat crop in 1899 ($7 02, 955) showed an increase of more than 300% in the decade, and the value of the product in 1907, according to the United States Department of Agriculture, was $2,397,000.

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  • The principal products are oats, rye, barley and wheat, but since the competition of Hungarian wheat large tracts of land have been converted to the cultivation of beetroot.

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  • In 1907 the buckwheat crop was 852,000 bushels; rye, 545 2, 000 bushels; the hay crop, 3,246,000 tons; oats, 30,534,000 bushels; barley, 1,496,000 bushels; wheat 12,731,000 bushels; and Indian corn 57,190,000 bushels.

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  • Barley and buckwheat are grown chiefly in the east part of the lower peninsula south of Saginaw Bay.

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  • On an average, £3,000,000 to £4,000,000 worth of wheat, about £i,000,000 worth of rye, and over £1,500,000 worth of barley are exported annually, besides oats, flax, linseed, rape seed, oilcake, bran, flour, vegetable oils, raw wool and caviare.

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  • The principal crops are wheat, barley, sugar-cane and cotton.

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  • Wheat, barley, eggs, butter, oilcake, hides, tallow, leather, tobacco, rugs, feathers and other items add considerably to the total value of the exports, which increased from 14 million sterling in 1851-1860 to 8-14 millions sterling in 1901-1905.

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  • Barley >>

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  • Wheat, rye and barley are the principal crops grown, and the breeding of cattle is an important industry.

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    0
  • The crops principally raised are wheat and maize, though here, as well as in other parts of the government, barley, flax, tobacco, water-melons, gourds, fruit, wine, saffron and madder are grown.

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    0
  • The grain crops grown in England consist almost Distribu- exclusively of wheat, barley and oats.

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  • Riding of Yorkshire are especially productive in all crops these; the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire pro duce a notable quantity of barley and oats; and the oat-crops in the following counties deserve mention - Devonshire, Hampshire, Lancashire, Cumberland, Cornwall, Cheshire and Sussex.

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  • There is no county, however, in which the single crop of wheat or barley stands pre-eminently above others, and in the case of the upland counties of Cumberland, Westmorland and Derbyshire, the metropolitan county of Middlesex, and Monmouthshire, these crops are quite insignificant.

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  • In proportion to their area, the counties specially productive of wheat are Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire and Essex; and of barley, Norfolk, Suffolk and the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • of the Arctic circle, save along Bering Sea; also that there is little doubt of the practicability of successfully cultivating buckwheat, barley and oats, and possibly also rye and wheat; that grasses for grazing grow generally and often in abundance; and in general that the possibilities of interior Alaska as a live-stock country are very considerable.

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  • These villages, built in oases dotted over the desert, nestle in groves of datepalms and fruit trees and waving fields of barley.

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  • The principal cultivated varieties of plants in this section are wheat, rye, oats, barley, beans, millet and tobacco.

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  • - The general type of true grasses is familiar in the cultivated cereals of temperate climates - wheat, barley, rye, oats, and in the smaller plants which make up pastures and meadows and form a principal factor of the turf of natural downs.

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  • In wheat, barley and most of the British native grasses they are a development, not of the culm, but of the base of the leaf-sheath.

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  • In some cultivated races of barley, crossfertilization is precluded, as the flowers never open.

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  • 21), and Hordeum sativum, barley (q.v.).

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  • murinum, wild barley, is a common grass in waste places.

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  • The soil is admirably cultivated, the principal crops being wheat, rice, barley, maize, millet, lucerne, tobacco, vegetables and fruit.

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  • - among them maize, durra, wheat, barley, rye, teff, pease, cotton and sugar-cane - and many kinds of fruit trees are cultivated.

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  • Here the chief crops are wheat, barley, tell, peppers, vegetables of all kinds and coffee.

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  • the crops are confined practically to barley, oats, beans and occasionally wheat.

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  • Of all the cereals barley is the most widely grown.

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  • The principal cereal was wheat, the value of which was $1,575,064 (3,4 1 3,47 0 bu.) in 1899, and $5,481,000 (6,090,000 bu.) in 1909.1 The value and product of oats in 1899 was $553, 8 47 (1, 43 6, 22 5 bu.), and in 1909, $1,319,000 (2,536,000 bu.); of Indian corn, in 1899, $121,872 (250,020 bu.), and in 1909, $355, 000 (408,000 bu.); of barley, in 1899, $121,826 (252,140 bu.), and in 1909, $343,000 (520,000 bu.); of rye in 1899, $13,761 (28,630 bu.), and in 1909, $46,000 (66,000 bu.), .

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  • Agriculture is the chief occupation, the principal crops being rye, barley, oats, wheat, flax and potatoes.

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  • Azuay is an elevated mountainous district with a great variety of climates and products; among the latter are silver, quicksilver, wheat, Indian corn, barley, cattle, wool, cinchona and straw hats.

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  • The chief work of the Helots was to provide a certain quantity of corn, wine and oil for the lords of the shares on which they were settled (roughly 82 medimni of barley a year per share); personal services to other Spartiates were exceptional.

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  • - allows of the cultivation of barley, oats and occasionally potatoes, which, however, grow better along Beagle Channel.

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  • Although his favourite method was by word of mouth, yet signs were sometimes used; thus Calchas interpreted the flight of birds; burning offerings, sacrificial barley, the arrow of the god, dreams and the lot, all played their part in communicating the will of the gods.

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  • Other food and economic plants are coffee, rice, tobacco, sugar-cane, cotton, indigo, vanilla, cassava or "yucca," sweet and white potatoes, wheat, maize, rye, barley, and vegetables of both tropical and temperate climates.

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  • The imports include wheat flour, rice, barley, prepared foods, sugar, coal, kerosene, beer, wines and liquors, railway equipment, machinery and general hardware, fence wire, cotton and other textiles, drugs, lumber, cement, paper, &c., while the exports comprise coffee, bananas, hides and skins, tobacco, precious metals, rubber, cabinet woods, divi-divi, dye-woods, vegetable ivory, Panama hats, orchids, vanilla, &c.

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  • The principal cereal crops are wheat, with a yield of 1,701,000 bushels in 1904, oats, barley, rye, mealies (Indian corn) and Kaffir corn (a kind of millet).

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  • The barley crop was 1,984,000 bushels.

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  • The staples of food are dates and fish in the south, elsewhere the produce of the herds and flocks and rice, wheat and barley.

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  • square, chiefly mountainous., Wheat and barley are the staple products of the arable tracts.

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  • Barley is principally grown in the northern parts of the presidency.

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  • The principal crops are rye, the chief cereal grown, wheat, oats, barley, potatoes, beets and hops.

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  • In the production of the hardy cereals, barley, rye and buckwheat, Wisconsin ranks high among the states of the Union; but oats and Indian corn are the largest cereal crops in the state.

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  • The crop of oats was 79,800,000 bushels (raised on 2,280,000 acres and valued at $31,122,000) in 1909; of Indian corn, 50,589,000 bushels (raised on 1,533,000 acres and valued at $3 0, 353, 000); of barley, 24,248,000 bushels (raised on 866,000 acres and valued at $13,579,000 - a crop exceeded only by that of California and that of Minnesota), of wheat, 3,484,000 bushels (raised on 179,000 acres and valued at $3,345, 000); of rye,4,727,000bushels (raised on290,000acresandvalued at $3,214,000 - a crop exceeded only by that of Pennsylvania and that of Michigan); and of buckwheat,221,000 bushels (grown on 18,000 acres and valued at $172,000).

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  • Wheat and maize are exported to the Aegean islands and to Turkish ports on the mainland; barley, oats and linseed to Great Britain; canary seed chiefly to Australia; beans to France and Spain.

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  • Wheat, barley, millet, pease, lentils, rice, sorghum, lucerne and cotton are the chief agricultural products.

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  • Excellent crops of wheat, barley, maize, sesame, millet, cotton, opium, tobacco and rice are grown, and several of the oases, e.g.

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  • A considerable amount of trade is done in the export of wool, hides, cotton, carpets, silks, felts, cereals (wheat, barley, maize, rice), sheep, fruit and vegetables, and in tea, silver, porcelain and opium imported from China, cloth and groceries from India, and cloth, cottons, silks, sugar, matches and leather from West Turkestan and Russia.

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  • Rye is a tall-growing annual grass, with fibrous roots, flat, narrow, ribbon-like bluish-green leaves, and erect or decurved cylindrical slender spikes like those of barley.

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  • The chief agricultural products are oats, spelt, rye, wheat, barley, hops.

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  • Helminthosporium gramineum, a disease of barley, has also been recorded as growing on wheat; it forms long narrow dark-brown streaks on the leaves, which wither and die.

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  • Flesh is their favourite, in winter almost their only food, though they also use reindeer milk, cheese and rye or barley cakes.

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  • In ancient times barley was grown in some places, but it never paid for the cost of cultivation.

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  • Here and there are found extensive rice-fields; liquorice, wheat, barley and roses are also cultivated in places.

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  • Indian corn, wheat, cotton, oats and hay are the principal crops, but the variety of farm and garden produce is great, and includes Kafir corn, broom corn, barley, rye, buckwheat, flax, tobacco, beans, castor beans, peanuts, pecans, sorghum cane, sugar cane, and nearly all the fruits and vegetables common to the temperate zone; stock-raising, too, is a very important industry.

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  • Nearly one-half of the area under oats is to be found in Ulster; Leinster and Munster are fairly equal; and Connaught has something over ioo,000 acres under this crop. The area under barley and rye has also declined during the period under review by about one-half - from 345,070 acres in 1847 to 164,800 in 1905.

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  • Oats was the chief corn crop, but wheat, barley and rye were also grown.

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    0
  • Indian corn heads the list of cereals, but wheat, oats, rye and barley are also cultivated, besides hemp, flax, tobacco and large quantities of potatoes.

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  • The winters are here long and cold; the vine and maize are no longer cultivated,the principal crops being wheat, barley, oats, rye, hemp and flax.

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  • At the base are found vines and maize; on the lower slopes are green pastures, or wheat, barley and other kinds of corn; above are often forests of oak, ash, elm, &c.; and still higher the yew and the fir may be seen braving the climatic conditions.

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  • The principal products are barley, oats, rye, wheat, maize and leguminous plants.

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  • Its commerce in other grains is also extensive; in the amount of barley received and shipped Minneapolis surpasses any other city in the United States, and in receipts and shipments of rye is second only to Chicago.

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  • The largest individual grain-crop, however, is barley.

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  • Wheat or barley is perhaps the staple cultivation; but pease, beans, oil-seeds and cotton are also grown.

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  • It produces wheat and barley, melons, and perhaps a few vegetables and oil seeds.

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  • Beyond the Chakhansur limits, southward or up to the Helmund, there is probably no cultivation save that obtained on the river bank, and ordinarily illustrated by patches of wheat and barley with melon beds.

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  • Cereals constitute the principal object of cultivation, and among these wheat ranks first, the next in imoortance beine barley, the chief fodder of horses and mules.

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  • Oats and rye are cultivated only in the higher parts of the mountains, the former as a substitute for barley in feeding horses and mules, the latter as a breadstuff.

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    0
  • Considerable quantities of wheat and barley are also grown.

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  • Cotton, cotton-seed and grain (durra, wheat, barley) sesame, livestock, hides and skins, beeswax, mother-of-pearl, senna and gold are also exported.

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  • All the horses now on the turf or at the stud trace their ancestry in the direct male line to one or other of these three - the Byerly Turk, the barley Arabian, and the Godolphin Arabian or Barb.

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  • According to the Stud-Book, " Darley's Arabian was brought over by a brother of Mr barley of Yorkshire, who, being an agent in merchandise abroad, became member of a hunting club, by which means he acquired interest to procure this horse."

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  • Newly crushed barley or cracked maize, even in considerable proportion to the rest of the food, gives good results with draught, coach, 'bus and light harness horses generally.

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  • Pease straw, if not sandy, and good bright oat straw are good fodder for horses; but with barley and wheat straw, in the case of a horse, more energy is consumed during its passage through the alimentary canal than the digested straw yields.

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  • Of these, Indian corn is by far the most important, representing normally about two-thirds of the total crop value; while wheat and oats each represented in 1906 about oneseventh of the total crop, and rye, barley, kafir-corn and buckwheat make up the small remainder.

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  • Compared with adjoining states - Iowa, Minnesota, South Dakota, Kansas, Missouri - none shows a greater, if indeed any shows so great an average value per acre in the yield of Indian corn, wheat, oats, barley and rye; and this despite the assumed handicap of the western half of the state.

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  • The maltliquor industry is favoured by the great production of barley in Iowa; the value of malt liquors manufactured in 1900 was $ 1, 433,5 01, and in 1905 $1,663,788.

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  • The principal crops are wheat, barley, millet and coffee, the last-named more particularly on the western slopes of the range within reach of the moist sea-breezes.

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  • In the surrounding gardens and fields walnuts, apricots, wheat, barley, maize, &c. are grown.

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  • Was she not accustomed to demanding barley in the middle of the night?

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  • A large acreage of barley is grown for malting used by the brewing industry.

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  • A strong mellow ruby colored ale, brewed using malt made from Maris Otter barley and the finest English aromatic hops.

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  • English ale was made with malted barley or even oats, not hops.

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  • The sprouting barley is turned by a machine resembling a lawn-mower.

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  • In other fields autumn sown barley is already nearly ripe.

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  • Guinness Red, a new product made from lightly roasted barley, will be launched in the UK over the next few months.

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  • growing barley in most farms in Scotland is a loss making exercise.

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  • In earlier times this had been used to dry barley when the Dirleton Granary occupied this site.

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  • Whole wheat, brown rice, pearl barley, oats, bulgur wheat.

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  • The soil and sub-soil are clay, and the chief crops grown are wheat, barley, beans and peas.

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  • Analysis of transgenic barley in a small scale field trial.

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  • barley cultivars displayed good levels of resistance in field nurseries.

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  • barley malt added.

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  • barley stubble.

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  • barley straw which didnt seem too dusty?

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  • barley mildew isolates continue to become more complex, the majority carrying eight or more virulence factors.

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  • barley loaves, left by those who had eaten.

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  • Did farmers tell you where their nearest homes for milling wheat & malting barley are?

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  • In the first place there was the problem over how much spring barley to sow.

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  • Crops winter wheat, winter barley & winter oats.

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  • feed barley can give higher yields per acre of both grain and straw.

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  • The straw I was using I felt was good quality barley straw which didnt seem too dusty?

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  • barley sugar with some spice and floral hints.

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  • The palate is also sweet, barley sugar with some spice and floral hints.

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  • net blotch of barley The higher than expected levels of net blotch on some crops of cv.

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  • Net blotch of barley The higher than expected levels of net blotch of barley The higher than expected levels of net blotch on some crops of cv.

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  • That part of Gilmerton possessed by Mungo Short, are 4 bolls of barley, and 1 bolls of barley, and 1 boll of oats.

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  • He sweels it doon wi a lagoon O vats o barley bree.

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  • bulgur (wheat) brown rice, pearl barley, oats, bulgur wheat.

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  • In 1847, the Tithe records show that there were six farms, each paying an annual payment of twelve bushels of barley.

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  • bushels of barley.

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  • There is only one sample that comprises just barley chaff with no grains.

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  • Detailed assessment identified oak charcoal along with traces if charred cereal grains which included oat, barley and wheat along with fused plant ash.

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  • Over expression of barley aquaporin gene in rice led to increased carbon dioxide conductance and assimilation [21] .

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  • Barley breeding: believing in what is best Over 10,000 years ago, barley was domesticated in the fertile crescent of the Near East.

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  • Spring barley cultivars were grouped on the basis of their responses to three isolates.

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  • cutlets coat with barley flour batter and maize flakes and fry.

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  • During germination the barley secretes the enzyme diastase which makes the starch in the barley soluble, thus preparing it for conversion into sugar.

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  • gene discovery and expression studies are used to characterize both major and polygenic resistance pathways in barley to pathogens.

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  • distillerythe barley grown around Royston finds its way to the Scottish distilleries for malt whiskey production.

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  • domesticated cattle, sheep, pigs, wheat and barley.

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  • Expression of barley yellow dwarf or wheat streak mosaic virus coat proteins in transgenic wheat.

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  • Robert Newman remains as gloomy as ever about the Barley Mow pub: ` Usually runs out of real ale before closing time.

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  • These sacks of wheat or barley grains are cleaned to remove any dust.

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  • grains of wheat or barley, and fresh coconut.

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  • granaryhis reason all Roman forts had large granaries to store such things as wheat, barley, peas and beans.

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  • Just nine days remained before the barley harvest here in northern Iraq.

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  • The 29 residents and visitors donned union flag hats and enjoyed a party at the housing scheme in Barley Croft.

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  • Yellowhammers & Reed Buntings - Barley Lane A patch of winter heliotrope is in flower along barley lane.

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  • As a result winter barley has more need than winter wheat for a pre-emergence herbicide.

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  • hoed the fields and reaped more barley than wheat until Sepphoris demanded more wheat than barley.

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  • Another, turnips all hoed, Barley, Wheat, Beans weeded by sheep.

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  • inoculum pressure and fertilizer level on disease tolerance in spring barley.

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  • But this is no ordinary strawberry jelly, there is the added twist of lemon barley!

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  • lactation in nursing mothers (use the tincture or boil the seed in barley water ).

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  • Probably the first cultivated legume, sometimes linked with wheat and barley, which may have been domesticated at around the same time.

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  • Two months pre-calving the cows are fed on barley straw which has been undersown with the red clover ley straw which has been undersown with the red clover ley.

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  • linkage map of barley.

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  • loaf they gathered them up and filled twelve baskets with fragments from the five barley loaves, left by those who had eaten.

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  • Barley is an economically important crop and does not normally secrete malate in the presence of aluminum and is therefore very sensitive to aluminum.

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  • malting barley in the Bow of Fife for over 60 years.

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  • Offer it warm with rice syrup or barley malt added.

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  • The current generation of the family have more than 30 years specialist experience of growing malting barley for the country's leading maltsters.

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  • malty sweetness, marmalade and barley sugar.

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  • mildew of Barley There has been little change in the barley mildew populations in the UK in recent years.

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  • barley mildew isolates continue to become more complex, the majority carrying eight or more virulence factors.

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  • mildew in spring barley.

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  • mildew of barley and yellow rust of wheat have been updated for 1992.

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  • The population is self-sufficient and everyone is a farmer, growing millet, barley and a special kind of pink rice.

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  • Dealers weigh out teff, barley and finger millet which form the staple diet.

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  • You may use either sweet white miso, barley miso, or a combination of both.

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  • Barley, whole wheat, egg noodles, Brewers yeast.

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  • The soil in the enclosed land is generally light and gravelly, producing excellent oats and potatoes, with some wheat and barley.

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  • Grain and grain impressions include oats and possibly barley.

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  • oat straw in comparison with spring barley.

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  • Crops winter wheat, winter barley & winter oats.

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  • pathogenic on barley.

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  • The principal crops are oats and barley, a few pease, and sometimes a little wheat.

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  • pecks of wheat and 300,000 of barley, but the actual amount of the money indemnity is doubtful.

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  • PINEAPPLE WINE 1 lb dried pineapple WINE 1 lb dried pineapple, 1 lb barley, 8 pints water, 4 lbs sugar.

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