Barcelona sentence example

barcelona
  • He left Barcelona and, travelling on foot to Paris, he arrived there in February 1528.
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  • Barcelona has a long record as a centre of the glass industry.
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  • The town dates from 1637, when it was located at the foot of the Cerro Santo and was called Nueva Barcelona; it reached a state of much prosperity and commercial importance before the end of the century.
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  • The city is connected with Barcelona and Valencia by the coast railway, and with Saragossa by the Ebro valley line; it is also the terminus of a railway to San Carlos de la Rapita on the Mediterranean.
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  • In 1842 he was sent to Barcelona, and soon afterwards promoted to the grade of consulgeneral.
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  • of Barcelona, with which it is connected by rail.
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  • During February and March 1808 the frontier fortresses of Pampeluna, St Sebastian, Barcelona and Figueras were treacherously occupied and Spain lay at the feet of Napoleon.
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  • Barcelona, Spain (Province) >>
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  • Its more important towns are the capital, Barcelona, Maturin (pop. 14,473), capital.
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  • At the head of a band of 300 free lances he offered his services first to the count of Barcelona; then, failing him, to Moktadir, the Arab king of Saragossa, of the race of the Beni Houd.
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  • of Barcelona, on a hill almost surrounded by the river Cardoner, a branch of the Llobregat.
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  • Ignatius remained at Manresa for about a year, and in the spring of 1523 set out for Barcelona on his way to Rome, where he arrived on Palm Sunday.
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  • Ignatius returned to Venice in the middle of January 1524; and, determining to devote himself for a while to study, he set out for Barcelona, where he arrived in Lent.
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  • For the next five years he sought every opportunity of inflicting defeat and humiliation on the Spanish navy, and he distinguished himself by his bravery in the engagement at Guetaria (1638), the expedition to Corunna (1639), and in battles at Tarragona (1641), Barcelona (1643), and the Cabo de Gata.
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  • Phison +barya L op felice Other Catalans are, Jahuda Cresques, a Jew of Barcelona, the supposed author of the famous Catalan map of the world (1375), Guglielmo Solerio (1384), Mecia de Viladestes (1413-1433) Gabriel de Valleseche (1439-1447) and Pietro Roselli, a pupil of Beccario of Genoa (1462).
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  • in 1148, and was captured by Ramon Berenguer IV., count of Barcelona, assisted by Templars, Pisans and Genoese.
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  • 12 a of Aragon and Barcelona, and harrying even the border lands of Castile.
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  • Duhesme, having failed to take Gerona, was blockaded in Barcelona, Joseph fled from Madrid (Aug.
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  • 25, 1809) had taken refuge in Tarragona; and Rosas had fallen (Dec. 5, 1808) to the French general Gouvion St Cyr who, having relieved Barcelona, was besieging Gerona.
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  • Clinton had, on the i 6th of January, attacked Suchet at Molins de Rey and blockaded Barcelona (Feb.
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  • He took Barcelona from the Saracens in 803, and in the next year founded the monastery of Gellone (now Saint Guilhem-le Desert), of which he became a member in 806.
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  • In this duke we may certainly recognize Borel, who, according to the Spanish chroniclers, was count of Barcelona from 967 to 993, while the bishop may probably be identified with Hatto, bishop of Vich or Ausona from about 060 to 971 or 972.
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  • Everywhere - at Rome, at Treves, at Moutier-en-Der, at Gerona in Spain, at Barcelona - he had friends or agents to procure him copies of the great Latin writers for Bobbio or Reims. To the abbot of Tours he writes that he is "labouring assiduously to form a library," and "throughout Italy, Germany and Lorraine (Belgica) is spending vast sums of money in the acquisition of MSS."
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  • The principal coal deposits developed are at Naricual, near Barcelona, and a railway has been constructed to bring the output to the port of Guanta.
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  • de Saint-Priest, Histoire de la conquete de Naples par Charles d'Anjou (4 vols., Paris, 1847-1849), is still of use for the documents from the archives of Barcelona, but it needs to be collated with more recent works; S.
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  • " Jealousy Offering") called upon the famous rabbi Solomon ben Adret of Barcelona to come to the aid of orthodoxy.
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  • Marineus Siculus, writing early in the 16th century, says that the best glass was made at Barcelona; and Gaspar Baneiros, in his Chronographia, published in 1562, states that the glass made at Barcelona was almost equal to that of Venice and that large quantities were exported.
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  • The author of the Atlante espanol, writing at the end of the 18th century, says that excellent glass was still made at Barcelona on Venetian models.
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  • In addition to the works at Barcelona, the works which chiefly affected Venetian methods were those of Cadalso in the province of Toledo, founded in the 16th century, and the works established in 1680 at San Martin de Valdeiglesias in Avila.
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  • Labour disturbances are frequent, for, like Barcelona, Alcoy has become one of the centres of socialistic and revolutionary agitation, while preserving many old-fashioned customs and traditions, such as the curious festival held annually in April in honour of St George, the patron saint of the town.
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  • In the course of a few days the king arrived at Madrid, passing through Barcelona and Valencia, and was received everywhere with acclamation (1875).
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  • The asceticism of Paulinus and his liberality towards the poor soon brought him into great repute; and while he was spending Christmas at Barcelona the people insisted on his being forthwith ordained to the priesthood.
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  • In 415 Ataulphus crossed the Pyrenees into Spain and died at Barcelona, being assassinated by a groom.
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  • Mataro (anc. Iluro), a seaport of north-eastern Spain, in the province of Barcelona, on the Mediterranean Sea and the Barcelona-Perpignan railway.
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  • The wine of the neighbourhood, which resembles port, is shipped in large quantities from Barcelona; and the district furnishes fine roses and strawberries for the Barcelona market.
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  • The railway to Barcelona, opened in October 1848, was the first to be constructed in Spain.
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  • Of later date have been the Revista iberica (1861-1863), conducted by Sanz del Rio; La America (1857-1870), specially devoted to American subjects and edited by the brothers Asquerino; Revista de Cataluna, published at Barcelona; Revista de Espana; Revista contempordnea; Espana moderna (1889), and Revista critica (1895).
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  • beyond Barcelona, and was created for the shipment of coal.
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  • These advantages have made Guanta the best port on this part of the coast, and the trade of Barcelona and that of a large inland district have been transferred to it.
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  • The Spanish versions of Carolingian legends are studied by Mila y Fontanals in De la poesia heroico-popular castellana (Barcelona, 1874).
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  • TARRASA, a town of north-eastern Spain, in the province of Barcelona, 6 m.
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  • Espartero crushed with much energy a revolutionary rising in Barcelona, but on his return to Madrid was so coldly welcomed that he perceived that his prestige was on the wane.
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  • The advanced Progressists coalesced with the partisans of the ex-regent Christina to promote pronunciamientos in Barcelona and many cities.
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  • the Bold, giving her Anjou and Maine for dowry, in exchange for the kingdoms of Aragon and Valentia and the countship of Barcelona given up by Charles.
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  • IGUALADA, a town of north-eastern Spain, in the province of Barcelona, on the left bank of the river Noya, a right-hand tributary of the Llobregat, and at the northern terminus of the Igualada-Martorell-Barcelona railway.
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  • Quadrado (Barcelona, 1886).
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  • The provisions of the Truce of God were often incorporated bodily in municipal and district statutes such as the laws of Barcelona (1067).
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  • From Bordeaux there is also a direct line to Bayonne and Irun (for Madrid), and at the other end of the Pyrenees a line leads from Narbonne to Perpignan and Barcelona.
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  • In 1812 his Escuela de los maridos, a translation of Moliere's Ecole des maris, was produced at Madrid, and in 1813 El Medico a Palos (a translation of Le Medecin malgre lui) at Barcelona.
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  • CARDONA (perhaps the anc. Udura), a town of north-eastern Spain, in the province of Barcelona; about 55 m.
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  • It seems probable that the Archant was situated in Spain near Vivien's headquarters at Tortosa, and that Guillaume started from Barcelona, not from Orange, to his nephew's help. The account of the disaster was modified by successive trouveres, and the uncertainty of their methods may be judged by the fact that in the ChanQun de Willame two consecutive accounts (I I.
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  • south-west of Barcelona, after forming by its delta a conspicuous projection on the otherwise regular coast line.
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  • Nothing daunted, however, he obtained reinforcements at Aux Cayes, and in December landed first in Margarita, and then at Barcelona.
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  • In 798 he had concluded an alliance with Alphonso II., king of the Asturias, and a series of campaigns mainly under the leadership of King Louis resulted in the establishment of the " Spanish march," a district between the Pyrenees and the Ebro stretching from Pampeluna to Barcelona, as a defence against the Saracens.
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  • Charlemagne's march on Saragossa, and the capture of Huesca, Barcelona and Girone, gave rise to La Prise de Pampelune (14th century, based on a lost chanson); and Gui de Bourgogne (12th century) tells how the children of the barons, after appointing Guy as king of France, set out to find and rescue their fathers, who are represented as having been fighting in Spain for twenty-seven years.
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  • ver., New York, 1887); and the Plano de la ciudad de Mexico, in the Diccionario enciclopedico hispano-americano (Barcelona, 1893), xii.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Barcelona discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • From 1792 to 1799 he was occupied with the measurement of the arc of the meridian extending from Dunkirk to Barcelona, and published a detailed account of the operations in Base du systeme metrique (3 vols., 1806, 1807, 1810), for which he was awarded in 181 o the decennial prize of the Institute.
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  • Fruit, grain, wine and oil are produced in the islands, and there is an active trade with Barcelona in fresh fish, including large quantities of lobsters.
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  • There is not a very active trade direct with foreign countries, as the principal imports - cotton, leather, petroleum, sugar, coal and timber - are introduced through Barcelona.
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  • Vuillier (Paris, 1904), the first edition of which has been translated under the title of The Forgotten Isles(London, 1896) - and Islas Baleares, an illustrated volume of 1423 pages, by P. Pifferrer, in the series "Espana" (Barcelona, 1888).
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  • The British Foreign Office Reports for the Consular District of Barcelona give some account of the movement of commerce (London, annual).
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  • of Barcelona, on the south-west coast of Majorca, at the head of the fine Bay of Palma, which stretches inland for about 10 m.
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  • Palma has frequent and regular communication by steamer with Barcelona, Valencia and Alicante.
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  • Written about 1750, it was first printed in Barcelona in 1882 (later edition, San Sebastian, 1896).
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  • A full account of the physical features, and of the modern development of commerce, communications, &c., in this area is given in the articles on the four provinces Barcelona, Gerona, Lerida and Tarragona, into which Catalonia was divided in 1833.
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  • The coast, which is partly sandy, partly rocky, extends about 240 m.; its chief harbours are those of the capital, Barcelona, of Matar6, of Rosas and of Tarragona.
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  • of Barcelona with Petronilla of Aragon, Catalonia became annexed to Aragon; but this union was frequently severed.
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  • Pijoan (Barcelona, 1884); Historia de Cataluna, by V.
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  • Bori y Fontesta (Barcelona, 1898); Origines historicos de Cataluna, by J.
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  • Balari y Jovany (Barcelona, 18 99); Coleccio dels monogra j Las de Catalunya, by J.
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  • Reig y Vilardell (Barcelona, 1890); Historia del derecho en Catalonia, Mallorca y Valencia, by B.
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  • de Bofarull y Sans (Barcelona, 1898).
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  • The Revista catalana (Catalan Review), published at Barcelona from 1889, contains many valuable papers on local affairs.
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  • See also Spain: sections Language, Literature and History, and Barcelona.
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  • In early life he was settled in Barcelona, as a writer and journalist.
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  • He saw some service against the Carlists; was elected deputy to the Cortes of 1836; took part for Espartero, and then against him; was imprisoned in 1843; went into exile and returned; was governor of Barcelona in 1854, and minister of finance in 1855; had a large share in secularizing the Church lands; and after the revolution of 1868 was governor of Madrid.
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  • (Barcelona, 1876-1882); J.
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  • large 4to), sumptuously produced and badly translated, is Mexico, its Social Evolution (Barcelona, 1900-1904); a useful and handy chronicle is Nicolas Leon's Cornpendio de la historia general de Mexico hasta el ano de zgoo (Mexico and Madrid, 1902).
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  • VICTOR BALAGUER (1824-1901), Spanish politician and author, was born at Barcelona on the 11th of December 1824, and was educated at the university of his native town.
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  • From 1843 to 1868 he was the chief of the Liberal party in Barcelona, and as proprietor and editor of El Conseller did much to promote the growth of local patriotism in Catalonia.
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  • MANRESA, a town of north-eastern Spain, in the province of Barcelona, on the river Cardoner and the Barcelona-Lerida railway.
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  • His principal works are - Memorias histOricas sobre la marina, commercio, y artes de la antigua ciudad de Barcelona (4 vols.
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  • Capmany died at Barcelona on the 14th of November 1813.
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  • of Aragon (1162-1196) was the son of Raymond Berenger, count of Barcelona, and of Petronilla, niece of Alphonso the Battler, and daughter of Ramiro surnamed the Monk.
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  • He succeeded to the county of Barcelona in 1162 on the death of his father, at the age of eleven, and in 1164 his mother renounced her rights in Aragon in his favour.
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  • of Aragon:(1416-1458), surnamed the Magnanimous, who represented the old line of the counts of Barcelona only through women, and was on his father's side descended from the Castilian house of Trastamara, is one of the most conspicuous figures of the early Renaissance.
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  • SABADELL, a town of north-eastern Spain, in the province of Barcelona; on the river Ripoll and on the Barcelona-Saragossa railway.
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  • On his return to Spain in 1892 he was appointed to the command first of the 6th Army Corps in the Basque Provinces and Navarre, where he soon quelled agitations, and then as captain-general at Barcelona, where he remained until January 1896.
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  • At the end of October 1909 he was appointed captain-general at Barcelona, where the disturbances connected with the execution of Francisco Ferrer were quelled by him without bloodshed.
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  • But they still continued to desire the restoration of the Angevin dynasty in Sicily and to assist the designs of France on Aragon by preaching a crusade against the masters of Barcelona and Palermo.
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  • After the fall of the French dominion in Italy he made his peace with the emperor at Barcelona (June 29, 1529); in return for which he received the assistance of Charles in re-establishing the rule of the Medici in Florence.
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  • de la Fuente (Barcelona, 1885-1886), and the Guia del antiguo reino de Castilla, by E.Valverde y Alvarez (Madrid, 1886), which deals with the provinces of Burgos, Santander, Logrono, Soria, Avila and Segovia.
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  • He next took to medicine, which he studied at the universities of Valencia and Barcelona with such success that the local authorities of the latter city made him a grant to enable him to follow his studies at Madrid and Paris, preparatory to appointing him professor.
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  • The last great event of the War of the Spanish Succession was the storming of Barcelona by Berwick, after a long siege, on the 11th of September 1714.
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  • BARCELONA, formerly the capital of Catalonia, and since 1833 the capital of the province of Barcelona in eastern Spain, in 41° 23' N.
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  • Barcelona is a flourishing city and the principal seaport of Spain.
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  • Barcelona was formerly surrounded by a strong line of ramparts, and defended, or more correctly, overawed by a citadel on the north-east, erected in 1715 by Philip V.; but these fortifications being felt as a painful restriction on the natural development of the city, were, in spite of the opposition of the central government, finally abolished by the local authorities in 1845.
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  • Barcelona is the see of a bishop, and, like most Spanish towns, has a large number of ecclesiastical buildings, though by no means so many as it once possessed.
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  • The educational institutions of Barcelona have from an early period been numerous and important.
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  • Remains of the former royal state of Barcelona are found in the Palacio Real of the kings of Aragon and the Palacio de la Reina.
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  • The so-called port of Barcelona was at first only an open beach, on the east, slightly sheltered by the neighbouring hills, but at an early period the advantage of some artificial protection was felt.
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  • Long after this, however, travellers speak of Barcelona as destitute of a harbour; and it is only in the 17th century that satisfactory works were undertaken.
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  • Barcelona is well supplied with inland communication by rail, and the traffic of its streets is largely facilitated by tramway lines running from the port as far as Gracia and the other chief suburbs.
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  • Barcelona has long been the industrial and commercial centre of eastern Spain - a pre-eminence which dates from the 12th and 13th centuries.
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  • The bishopric of Barcelona was founded in 343.
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  • I n 415 and 531, the Visigoths chose Barcelona as their temporary capital; in 540 and 599 church councils were held there.
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  • From 874 the counts of Barcelona ruled as independent monarchs.
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  • of Aragon empowered Barcelona to issue its famous Consulado del Mar, a code of maritime law recognized as authoritative by many European states.
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  • Consuls represented Barcelona at the principal commercial centres on or near the Mediterranean; and the city was among the first communities to adopt the practice of marine insurance.
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  • But the union of Castile and Aragon in 1479 favoured other cities of Spain at the expense of Barcelona, whose commercial supremacy was transferred to the ports of western Spain by the discovery of America in 1492.
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  • In 1640 Barcelona was the centre of the Catalonian rebellion against Philip IV., and threw itself under French protection.
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  • During the War of the Succession (1701-1714) Barcelona adhered to the house of Austria.
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  • For the historic antagonism between the Catalans and the other inhabitants of Spain was strengthened by the industrial development of Barcelona.
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  • A strange contrast is presented by the co-existence of these turbulent elements with the more old-fashioned Spanish society of Barcelona.
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  • Church festivals, civic and ecclesiastical processions are almost as animated and picturesque as in Seville itself; and many medieval customs continue to flourish side by side with the most modern features of industrial life, giving to Barcelona a character altogether unique among Spanish cities.
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  • The literature relating to Barcelona is extensive.
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  • P. Arimon, Barcelona antigua y moderna, two illustrated folio volumes (Madrid, 1850); and J.
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  • Artigas y Feiner, Guia itineraria de Barcelona (Barcelona, 1888).
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  • Sampere, Topografia antigua de Barcelona (1890).
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  • Capmany in his Memorias historicas sobra la marina, comercio, y artes de la antigua ciudad de Barcelona (Madrid, 1779-1792); and, for its political history, the same work should be consulted, together with Historias e conquestas dels comtes de Barcelona, by T.
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  • Tomich (Barcelona, 1888), and the Coleccio de documents inedits del Arxin municipal de la ciutat de Barcelona (Barcelona, 1892).
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  • Gil Maestre, in his El Anarquismo en Espana, y el especial de Barcelona (Madrid, 1897), and in his La Criminalidad en Barcelona (Barcelona, 1886).
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  • Barcelona, Venezuela >>
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  • Vigilantius now settled for some time in Gaul, and is said by one authority (Gennadius) to have afterwards held a charge in the diocese of Barcelona.
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  • A steam tramway runs from Messina to the Faro at the north-east extremity of the island, and thence along the north coast to Barcelona, and another along the east coast from Messina to Giampilieri: while the island is fairly well provided with high roads, but is very backward in rural communications, there being only 244 yds.
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  • He afterwards received a pension, but the Directory banished him from France, and as he refused to share in the plots of the royalists he lived at Barcelona till his death in 1814, when the house of Conti became extinct.
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  • At Cardona, near Barcelona, Tertiary salt forms hill-masses, while the Carpathian sandstone in Galicia and Transylvania is rich in salt.
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  • In the 16th century we must mention the pilgrimages to the "Holy Mount" at Gorz on the Austrian coast, and to Montserrat in the Spanish province of Barcelona: in the 17th century, those to Luxemburg, Kevelaer (Gelderland), Notre Dame de Fourviere in Lyons, Heiligenberg in Bohemia, Roermond in the Netherlands, &c. The 18th century, which witnessed the religious Aufkleirung, was not favourable to the pilgrimage.
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  • Colin Labor evangelica, ministerios apostolicos de los obreros de la compania de Jesus, fundacion, y progressos de su provincia en islas Filipinas (3 vols., Barcelona, 1900-1902); J.
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  • Delmas, La In surreccion de Filipinas en 1896 y 1897 (2 vols., Barcelona, 18 99); F.
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  • by Gerona and Barcelona, S.
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  • Lerida is traversed by the main railway from Barcelona to Saragossa, and by a line from Tarragona to the city of Lerida.
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  • Solsona, on a small tributary of the Cardoner, which flows through Barcelona to the Mediterranean, is the Setelix of the Romans, and contains in its parish church an image of the Virgin said to possess miraculous powers, and visited every year by many hundreds of pilgrims. Cervera, on a small river of the same name, contains the buildings of a university which Philip V.
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  • This university had originally been founded at Barcelona in the 15th century, and was reopened there in 1842.
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  • The church of San Lorenzo (1270-1300) is noteworthy for the beautiful tracery of its Gothic windows; its nave is said to have been a Roman temple, converted by the Moors into a mosque and by Ramon Berenguer IV., last count of Barcelona, into a church.
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  • Hazel-nuts, under the name of Barcelona or Spanish nuts, are largely exported from France and Portugal, and especially Tarragona and other places in Spain.
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  • Of greater individual importance than all the rest was Barcelona.
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  • In the first quarter it was very destructive in Italy, in Spain (especially Barcelona and Seville), in Germany and in England, where London was severely visited in 1400 and 1406, and again in 1428.
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  • On the outbreak of war with Spain in 1823, Carrel, whose sympathies were altogether with the liberal cause, sent in his resignation, and succeeded in effecting his escape to Barcelona.
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  • There is regular communication with Marseilles, Cette, Barcelona, Valencia, Cartagena, Malaga, Gibraltar, and the various ports on the Barbary coast.
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  • Vigilantius, a presbyter of Barcelona, still occupied the position of Tertullian and Lactantius in this matter.
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  • Castelar then went into voluntary exile for fifteen months, at the end of which he was elected deputy for Barcelona.
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  • of France arranged a treaty with the sultan of Egypt under which French consuls were established at Tripoli and Alexandria, and Du Cange cites a charter of James of Aragon, dated 1268, granting to the city of Barcelona the right to elect consuls in partibus ultramarinis, &c. The free growth of the system was, however, hampered by commercial and dynastic rivalries.
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  • His marriage with Placidia, the daughter of the great Theodosius, was taken as the seal of the union between Goth and Roman, and, had their son Theodosius lived, a dynasty might have arisen uniting both claims. But the career of Ataulphus was cut short at Barcelona in 415, by his murder at the hands of another faction of the Goths.
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  • The duke of Calabria, after repeated misfortunes in Italy, was offered the crown of Aragon in 1467, but died, apparently by poison, at Barcelona on the 16th of December 1470; the duke's eldest son Nicholas perished in 1473, also under suspicion of poisoning; Rene's daughter Margaret was a refugee from England, her son Prince Edward was murdered in 1471, and she herself became a prisoner, to be rescued by Louis XI.
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  • Margall, Almeria, (Barcelona, 1886) .
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  • de Luanco, Ramon Lull, considerado como alquimista (Barcelona, 1870) and' La Alquimia en Espana (2 vols., Barcelona, 1889-1897); K.
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  • and of Berenguela, of the house of the counts of Barcelona.
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  • Aviles Arnau, El Pallas y Andorra (Barcelona, 1893); L.
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  • Refounded in 1231 by Raymond Berenger IV., count of Provence (he was of the family of the counts of Barcelona, whence the name of the town he rebuilt), Barcelonnette passed to Savoy in 1388 (formal cession in 1 4 19), and in 1713 by the treaty of Utrecht was ceded to France in exchange for the valleys of Exilles, Fenestrelles, and Château Dauphin (Casteldelfino).
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  • had, in his own words, made up his mind to live and die an imperialist; the last remnants of the French army in Italy had been routed, and the pope had perforce concluded the treaty of Barcelona, a sort of family compact between himself and Charles, whereby he undertook to protect Charless aunt, and the emperor to support the Medici dynasty in Florence.
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  • Spain, Gibraltar was captured by Rooke (1704) and Barcelona by Peterborough (1705).
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  • BARCELONA, a maritime province of north-eastern Spain, formed in 1833 out of districts belonging to the ancient kingdom of Catalonia, and bounded on the N.E.
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  • The central districts are watered by the Llobregat, which rises at the base of the Sierra del Cadi, and flows into the sea near Barcelona, the capital, after receiving many small tributaries.
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  • Barcelona can be divided into three climatic zones; a temperate one near the sea, where even palm and orange trees grow; a colder one in the valleys and plains, more inland; and a colder still among the mountains, where not a few peaks are snow-clad for a great part of the year.
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  • Barcelona (pop. 1900, 533,000), Badalona (19,240), Cardona (3855), Igualada (10,442), Manresa (23,252), Mataro (19,704), Sabadell (23,294), Tarrasa (15,956), Vich (11,628) and Villanueva y Geltru (11,856).
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  • Important lines radiate from the city of Barcelona north-east along the coast to Gerona and to Perpignan in France; south-west along the coast to Tarragona and Valencia; and west to Saragossa and Madrid.
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  • Barcelona, Spain (Capital) >>
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  • The committee decided in favour of the latter and a commission was appointed to measure the arc of the meridian between Dunkirk and Mont Jany, near Barcelona.
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  • Charlemagne had created the kingdom ofAquitaine especially to defend Septimania, and William, duke of Toulouse, from 790 to 806, succeeded in restoring Frankish authority down to the Ebro, thus founding the Spanish March with Barcelona as its capital.
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  • In 1258, by renouncing his rights over Roussillon and the countship of Barcelona, conquered The d ~ by Charlemagne, he made an advantageous bargain ta5e ~ because he kept Montpellier; but he committed a grave fault in consenting to accept the offers regarding Sicily made by Pope Urban IV.
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  • Between 1857 and 1877 Barcelona the population increased to 16,631,869; and by Tarragona 1897 it had risen to 18,132,475.
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  • The oldest line is that from Barcelona to Matar, 171/2 ni., which was opened on the 28th of October 1848.
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  • The vine-growing districts had formerly been mostly in the provinces of Cadiz, Malaga, Barcelona, Aragon and Navarre.
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  • Spanish salt is partly marine, partly derived from brine-springs and partly from rock-salt, of which last there is an entire mountain at Cardona in Barcelona.
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  • The cotton industry was long principally centred in Catalonia, and mainly in the province and town of Barcelona, famed also for their manufactures of lace, woollen and linen goods.
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  • The same rule applies to their schools, which are, however, numerously attended, in Madrid, Seville, Barcelona and other towns, by children of Protestant families and of many Roman Catholics also.
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  • Spain has nine universities: Madrid, the most numerotisly attended; Salamanca, the most ancient; Granada, Seville, Barcelona, Valencia, Santiago, Saragossa and Valladolid.
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  • del Castillo, Gran diccionario geogrdfico de Espana (4 vols., Barcelona, 1889 1892); R.
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  • Pardo Bazn, Per Ia Espana pintoresca (Barcelona, 1895); R.
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  • volumes by various writers (Barcelona, 1884 1891).
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  • Arnirall, El Catalanismo (Barcelona, 1902); J.
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  • Amalaric (50753) fled from Narbonne, to meet the usual violent end of a Visigothic king at Barcelona.
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  • Wilfred the Hairy the Comes Vellosus, so called because his countship was poor and covered with scrub wood, and not because the palms of his hands were covered with hair as the legend has itbecame the founder of the counts of Barcelona.
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  • As the Marca Hispanica on the cast became the county of Barcelona, so the chiefs of Bardulia became the counts of Castile, then the count of Castile, the rival of the king at Leon, and in time the king of Castile, and head of Christian Spain.
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  • It mattered little that he desolated the shrine of St James at Compostella, the monastery of Cardena in Castile, took Leon, Pamplona and Barcelona, if at the end he left the roots of the Christian states firm in the soil, and to his son and successor as hajib only a mercenary army without patriotism or loyalty.
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  • Ramiro, having been first ex-claustrated by the pope, married Agnes of Aquitaine, and on the birth of his daughter Petronilla affianced her to Ramon Berenguer (Raymond Berenger), count of Barcelona, and then retired to his cell at Narbonne~ Union of This marriage united Aragon and Catalonia for ever,Aragonand and marks a great step forward in the constitution Calalonia.
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  • In 1135 he was Aiphonso crowned at Leon, in the presence of the new king vii., of Navarre, of the counts of Barcelona and Toulouse, Emperor and of other princes, Christian and Mahommedan, in Spain.
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  • Aiphonso had conquered Cuenca, in the hill country between Castile and Valencia, in 1177, with the help of the king of Aragon, also an Alphonso, the son of Petronilla and of Ramon Berenguer of Barcelona.
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  • Its king was also a ruler of many titlesking in Aragon, in Valencia, and the Balearic Isles (with one interval of separation), count of Barcelona, and in Provence.
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  • The commercial activity of Barcelona brought it into collision with Genoa and alliance with Venice.
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  • The landlords who found the Moriscoes useful tenants, and the commercial authorities of towns like Barcelona, who knew the value of the converted Jews, endeavoured to moderate the zeal of the inquisitors.
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  • was forced to reduce Aragon, Catalonia and Valencia by arms. Barcelona was only taken in 1714, the year after the signing of the treaty of Utrecht.
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  • In some cities, notably in Barcelona, it was accompanied by cruel massacres.
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  • landed in Barcelona on the 10th of January 1875.
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  • Before a year had passed, in view of the signal failure of Marsha] Campos, the Madrid government decided to send out General Weyler, who bad made himself famous in the Philippines and at Barcelona for his stern and cruel procedure against disaffection of every kind.
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  • He had to proclaim not only such important provinces as Barcelona, Valencia and Bilbao, but even the capital of Spain itself, in order to check a widespread agitation which had assumed formidable proportions under the direction of the chambers of commerce, industry, navigation and agriculture, combined with, about 300 middle-class corporations and associations, and supported by the majority of the gilds and syndicates of taxpayers in Madrid and the large towns.
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  • The industrial unrest, fomented by Socialist agitation, culminated in January 1902 ~fl Industrial serious riots at Barcelona and Saragossa, and on Unrest and the 16th of February in the proclamation of a general Socialist strike in the former city.
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  • At Barcelona the university had to be closed to stop the revolutionary agitation of the students; in April there were serious riots at Salamanca, Barcelona and Madrid.
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  • troubles at Barcelona.
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  • The Republicans, on tlIe other hand, split into sections; in Barcelona, Tarragona and Gerona they were Separatists, while a new party appeared under the name of Sohdarists, consisting of Separatists, Carlists and Socialists.
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  • At the close of the year an Anarchist outrage gave the excuse for the proclamation of martial law in Barcelona, and after the opening of the new session of the Cortes (January 23, 1908) a bill was introduced into the senate giving to the government the most drastic powers for the suppression of Anarchism.
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  • Two months before (March 1013) King Alphonso, with characteristic courage, had paid a surprise visit to Barcelona, and the general enthusiasm of his reception seemed to prove that the disaffection was less widespread or deep than had been supposed.
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  • On the 26th of July a general strike ~as proclaimed at Barcelona, and a movement directed at first against the conscription rapidly developed into a revolutionary attack on the established order in.
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  • Barcelona The city, a colluvies genhium, was seething with Rising of dangerous elements, its native proletariat being July1909.
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  • In Barcelona the rising was suppressed after three days street fighting (July 27-29).
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  • In the fortress of Monjuich in Barcelona were collected, not only rioters caught red-handed, but many othersnotably journalistswhose opinions were obnoxious.
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  • He was accused of being the chief instigator of the Barcelona rising, was tried by court martial (Oct.
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  • It sent General Weyler to keep Barcelona in order, caused the release of most of the prisoners in Monjuich, reduced the forces in Morocco, reopened negotiations with Rome for a modification of the concordat, and on the 31st of December, the end of the financial year, was responsible for the issue of a royal decree stating that the budget would remain in force until the Cortes could pass a new one.
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  • Kings of the Visigoths, having relations with Spain, but not established within it Ataulf - -, 410415 Entered the north-east of Spain, murdered at Barcelona.
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  • Fled before Franks to Barcelona at end of reign, and was murdered at Barcelona.
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  • -1137-1164Married to Ramon Berenguer, count of Barcelona, who be came king by right of his wife.
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  • THE EARLY COUNTS OF BARCELONA
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  • The territory gained was called the Marca Hispanica, and was governed by counts of Roussillon, Ampurias, Besaltu, Barcelona, Cerdea, Pallars and Urgeli.
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  • The supremacy was acquired gradually by the counts of Barcelona who became independent with Wilfred I.
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  • Berenguer Ramon I.1018-1035Held Barcelona, Vich and Manresa with land con quered from the Moors to the south.
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  • Aragon, from the union, with the county of Barcelona, to the union with Castile :
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  • The male line of the kings of Aragon of the House of Barcelona ended with Martin.
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  • (2) Worki: The standard general history of Spain written by a Spaniard is that of Don Modesto Lafuente in 30 volumes (1850-1867; new ed., by Valera, 22 vols., Barcelona, 1888).
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  • Don Rafael Altamira has published an Historia de Espana y de la civilizacin espaola (2 vols., Barcelona, 1900-1902), in which he sums up the results of later research.
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  • The latest general history of Spain is Don Rafael Altamira y Creveas Historia de EspaCa y de la civilizacin espatiola, ~ vols(Barcelona 1902-1906).
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  • Barcelona, Tarragona and Lrida (the old principality of Catalonia), and of Castellon de la Plana, Valencia and Alicante (the old kingdom of Valencia), and, in the Mediterranean, that of the Balearic Islands (the old kingdom of li.Iajorca).
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  • Catalan, which by the reunion of Aragon and the countship of Barcelona in 1137 became the official language of the Aragonese monarchyalthough the kingdom of Aragon, consisting of the present provinces of Saragossa, Huesca and Teruel, has always been Castilian in speechestablished a footing in Italy also, in all parts where the domination of the kings of Aragon extended, viz, in Sicily, Naples, Corsica and Sardinia, but it has not maintained itself here except in a single district of the last-named island (Aighero); everywhere else in Italy, where it was not spoken except by the conquerors, nor written except in the royal chancery, it has disappeared without leaving a trace.
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  • Milh y Fontanals, De los Trovadores en Espana (Barcelona, 186i), and Estudios ~1e lengua catalana (Barcelona, 1875); A.
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  • P. Ballot y Torres, Grarnatca y apologia de la llengua cathalana (Barcelona, 1815); A.
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  • de Bofarull, Estudios, s/sterna gramaticaly crestomatia de la lengucs catalana (Barcelona, 1864); P. Fabr, Contr/buci a la gramatica de la llengua catalana (Barcelona, 1898).
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  • BADALONA (anc. Baetulo), a town of north-eastern Spain, in the province of Barcelona; 6 m.
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  • of the city of Barcelona, on the left bank of the small river Besos, and on theMediterranean Sea.
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  • Badalona has a station on the coast railway from Barcelona to Perpignan in France, and a small harbour, chiefly important for its fishing and boat-building trades.
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  • Badalona thus largely contributes to the export trade of Barcelona, and may, in fact, be regarded as its industrial suburb.
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  • Ac. Barcelona (3), iv., 1902, No.
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  • apartment with balcony sleeping 1-4 on a quiet pedestrian street in the very heart of Barcelona's famous Gothic Quarter.
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  • Meanwhile, back in Barcelona, Do Lai lies comatose on a guarded hospital room.
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  • In the area around Barcelona vegetables and fruit are intensively cultivated.
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  • On June 13, the Swiss embassy in Barcelona has been occupied, particularly in support of Martin Shaw.
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  • frills flights to Barcelona are offered by Easyjet from Luton, Gatwick or Stansted.
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  • His work in Barcelona led to the creation of some of the city's most notable landmarks.
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  • The area begins about 40km north of Barcelona and includes the entire shoreline of Girona.
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  • In particular, there are now postdoctoral positions available at Barcelona.
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  • prestigious ceremony in Barcelona.
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  • Like all previous large scale anti-capitalist protests, Barcelona was made up of a very local crowd.
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  • The equation might have sounded simple but, as O'Leary has constantly reminded us, they were ' only ' playing Barcelona.
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  • However, the poor condition of the newly resurfaced track in Barcelona meant that the test team decided to move south to Valencia instead.
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  • rumba Catalan is a variation of a particular form of flamenco rumba played by gypsies in Barcelona.
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  • One night out in Barcelona has permanently seared into my upper left arm.
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  • shrill blasts on his whistle, prompting raucous celebrations from the Barcelona players.
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  • I've been to Barcelona and - just a tinier bit down on the international glamor stakes - Lytham St Annes.
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  • The latter celebrated her native city in a highly theatrical duet (Barcelona) with the late Freddie Mercury of Queen.
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  • The Ramblas are a tree-lined pedestrian thoroughfare running from Plaza Catalunya to Barcelona port district.
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  • In particular the is effected the city's once shabby waterfront, which was completely transformed & opened up Barcelona to the sea.
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  • She was the little waif of Barcelona - the image of the great Games in that city of fantasy.
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  • Sydney, situated in latitude 33°51'S., has a mean temperature of 62.9° Fahr., which corresponds with that of Barcelona in Spain and of Toulon in France, the former of these being in latitude 41° 22' N.
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  • A pupil, though not a follower of Nahmanides, was Solomon Adreth (not Addereth), of Barcelona (d.
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  • It was created in 1881 by the union of the states of Barcelona, Cumana and Maturin, dissolved in 1901 into its three original states, and reorganized in 1904 with a slight modification of territory.
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  • The division was as follows: Federal District (Caracas); Anzoategui (Barcelona); Apure (San Fernando de Apure); Aragua (La Victoria); Bolivar (Ciudad Bolivar); Carabobo (Valencia); Cojedes (San Carlos); Falcon (Coro); Guarico (Calabozo); Lara (Barquisimeto); Merida (Merida); Miranda (Ocumare); Monagas (M'Iaturin); Nueva Esparta (La Asuncion); Portuguesa (Guanare); Sucre (Cumana); Tachira (San Cristobal); Trujillo (Trujillo); Yaracuy (San Felipe); Zamora (Barinas); Zulia (Maracaibo), with the following territories: Amazonas (San Fernando de Atabapo); Delta-Amacuro (Tucupita).
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  • In 1455 the glass-makers of Barcelona were permitted to form a gild.
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  • In 1680 the works in Barcelona, Valdemaqueda and Villafranca are named in a royal schedule giving the prices at which glass was to be sold in Madrid.
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  • During the Revolution, he was one of the three members of the council established to introduce the decimal system, and he was also a member of the commission appointed to determine the length of the metre, for which purpose the calculations, &c., connected with the arc of the meridian from Barcelona to Dunkirk were revised.
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  • ANTONIO DE CAPMANY Y MONTPALAU (1742-1813), Spanish polygraph, was born at Barcelona on the 24th of November 1742.
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  • BARCELONA, formerly the capital of Catalonia, and since 1833 the capital of the province of Barcelona in eastern Spain, in 41° 23' N.
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  • Barcelona thus comprises an old town, still consisting for the most part of irregular and narrow streets, and a new town built with all the symmetry and precision of a premeditated scheme.
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  • Dalmau de Baquer, Historia de la Republica de Andorra (Barcelona, 1849); C. Baudon de Mony, Origines historiques de la question d'Andorre (in the Bibliotheque de l'Ecole des Chartes, vol.
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  • Refounded in 1231 by Raymond Berenger IV., count of Provence (he was of the family of the counts of Barcelona, whence the name of the town he rebuilt), Barcelonnette passed to Savoy in 1388 (formal cession in 1 4 19), and in 1713 by the treaty of Utrecht was ceded to France in exchange for the valleys of Exilles, Fenestrelles, and Château Dauphin (Casteldelfino).
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  • Burns reminisces fondly of a show in Barcelona last December, where his fourteen piece band turned a concert performance into a party.
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  • Rumba Catalan is a variation of a particular form of flamenco rumba played by gypsies in Barcelona.
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  • The referee draws proceedings to a close with three shrill blasts on his whistle, prompting raucous celebrations from the Barcelona players.
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  • I 've been to Barcelona and - just a tinier bit down on the international glamor stakes - Lytham St Annes.
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  • In particular the is effected the city 's once shabby waterfront, which was completely transformed & opened up Barcelona to the sea.
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  • Look for classic pieces like the Barcelona Chair or the Womb Chair.
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  • European discount cruises can make the wonders of Venice, the Greek islands, Barcelona, and other popular ports along the Mediterranean Sea and northern European shores much more affordable.
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  • With ports such as Rome, Barcelona, Capri, Sardinia, Gibraltar, Cannes, Florence, Lisbon, and Marseille, the western sailings are typically more popular than similar eastern Mediterranean cruises.
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  • Departure Port: The most popular departure ports in the Mediterranean include Barcelona, Rome, and Venice.
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  • From the Holy Lands to ancient empires, from Barcelona to Venice, you will find a wealth of culture, art and history on a Mediterranean cruise.
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  • The cruises are slated to depart from Barcelona and will include calls in Italy (Livorno and Civitavecchia), Spain and Naples.
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  • Rome, Barcelona and Venice are the most popular departure ports.
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  • Another option from NCL is the roundtrip cruise from Barcelona.
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  • Eastbound: Leaving from Galveston, Texas, this cruise has ports of call in Ponta Delgada, Azores, Malaga, Cartagena, and Barcelona, Spain.
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  • Westbound: This westbound cruise leaves from Barcelona, Spain.
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  • In addition to the aforementioned options, the company also offers transatlantic cruises from Miami, Florida to Barcelona, Spain.
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  • Most of the year, Antonio Ben Chimol works out of his studio in Barcelona.
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  • Hailing from Barcelona, Spain, Vega (known as Balrog in Japan) is one of the all-time fastest Street Fighter characters.
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  • The EX version of the Barcelona drop can pass through fireballs, so it can be easy to set up for an additonal attack.
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  • Steve Ballmer, CEO of Microsoft, announced the Windows Phone 7 Series at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.
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  • Born in 1913, Carmen was a child of the slums of Barcelona.
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  • Upon her death, in 1963, she was buried with honor in her birthplace of Barcelona.
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  • Like Carmen Amaya, Laura Del Sol was born in Barcelona.
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  • The Seaton Barcelona Sun Splashed Tote futures two seahorses and a unique blue and green tie-dye design.
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  • The women's Air Barcelona Thong is another hot pick for spring.
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  • Bulova's Barcelona watches are a part of the award winning Accutron collection.
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  • Wearing a Barcelona watch is like wearing a piece of history, and it shows a keen sense of sophistication and style like no other.
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  • Barcelona watches come in men and women's styles.
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  • From Bulova's fine Accutron models, the Barcelona 28E05 features a black enamel dial, sapphire crystal, and a stainless steel bracelet and case.
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  • The Barcelona 28E05 is also water resistant up to 100 feet or 30 meters.
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  • From the Accutron Barcelona Collection, this model features a black enamel dial, sapphire crystal and a stainless steel case.
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  • From the Accutron Barcelona Collection, this model features a white enamel dial and inlaid gold running the length of the stainless steel band.
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  • From the Accutron Barcelona Collection, this ultra thin stainless steel watch comes with a white enamel dial, sapphire crystal, and a stainless steel case set with 44 diamonds.
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  • From the Accutron Barcelona Collection, this Bulova watch has a white dial, ultra thin stainless steel casing and sapphire crystal.
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  • Tanga features fine lingerie collections from Andres Sarda of Barcelona, Argentovivo of Italy, Lise Charmel of France, Aubade of Paris, Nina Ricci, Chantelle and many more.
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  • It became the highest grossing independent film of 2008, even beating out Woody Allen's Vicky Christina Barcelona.
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  • Previous trips have included Milan, Paris, Barcelona, and Tokyo.
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  • In the course of a bloody insurrection in Catalonia, which ended in the bombardment of Barcelona, Ferdinand de Lesseps showed the most persistent bravery, rescuing from death, without distinction, the men belonging to the rival factions, and protecting and sending away not only the Frenchmen who were in danger, but foreigners of all nationalities.
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  • By the treaty of Barcelona in 1529 the pope and emperor made terms. By that of Cambray in the same year France relinquished Italy to Spain.
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  • See this and other instances collected in Usages y demas derechos de Cataluna, by Vives y Cebria (Barcelona, 1835), tom.
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  • The abuses connected with nocturnal vigils 1 led to their being attacked, especially by Vigilentius of Barcelona (c. 400), against whom Jerome fulminated in this as in other matters.
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  • BARCELONA, a town and port of Venezuela, capital of the state of Bermudez, on the Neveri river, 3 m.
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  • Discontent at this arrangement increased to the point of rebellion, which broke out the following year, provoked by Judith's intrigues with Bernard, count of Barcelona, whom she had installed as her favourite at court.
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