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bantu

bantu

bantu Sentence Examples

  • These Bantu are still heathen and nearly all are agriculturists.

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  • All these mixed Bantu peoples are immigrants at various periods from beyond the Zambezi.

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  • ZIMBABWE, a Bantu name, probably derived from the two words zimba (" houses") and mabgi (" stones"), given to certain ruins in South-East Africa.

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  • (For the Zulu speech, see Bantu Languages.) Towns.

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  • It may confidently be dated to a period not earlier than the 14th or 15th century A.D., and attributed to the same Bantu people the remains of whose stone-fenced kraals are found at so many places between the Limpopo and the Zambezi.

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  • The inhabitants of the interior may be divided into two classes, those namely of Bantu and those of Hamitic stock.

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  • The word "monomotapa " is of Bantu origin and has been variously interpreted.

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  • This alone would be sufficient to controvert the baseless assumption that there existed in southern Rhodesia a ruling caste of different racial origin from the general Bantu population.

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  • From that port the Arabs traded for ivory, slaves and (principally) gold with Bantu peoples of the far interior - the Rhodesia of to-day.

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  • Their general attitude may be explained as a reaction against the abuses which they saw going on around them, and to a misconception of the character of the Hottentot and Bantu races.

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  • Of the Bantu tribes several main groups may be distinguished.

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  • These Bantu races may be further divided into plain, forest and riverine tribes.

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  • Zaire is a Portuguese variant of a Bantu word (nzari) meaning river.

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  • With the exception of a few Bushmen, who cling to the slopes of the Drakensberg, all the natives are of Bantu stock.

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  • The Amahlubi, one of the highest in rank of the Bantu tribes of South Africa, fleeing from the cruelties of ' Between 1860 and 1866 some 5000 Indians entered the colony.

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  • The Shangaan are members of a Bantu tribe from the Delagoa Bay region who took refuge in the Transvaal between 1860 and 1862 to escape Zulu raids.

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  • Into these depopulated areas there was also a considerable immigration of Basuto, Bechuana and other Bantu tribes.

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  • When called upon to go to the aid of this settlement, which in1865-1866was sore pressed by one of the mountain Bantu tribes known as the Baramapulana, the burghers of the southern Transvaal objected that the white inhabitants of that region were too lawless and reckless a body to merit their assistance.

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  • As in Bantu, the verb presents a multiplicity of forms, including one present, three past and future tenses, with personal endings complete, passive, interrogative, conditional, elective, negative and other forms, each with its proper participial inflexions.

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  • TSETSE-FLY (Tsetse, an English rendering of the Bantu nsi-nsi, a fly), a name applied indiscriminately to any one of the eight species of Glossina, a genus of African blood-sucking Diptera (two-winged flies, see Diptera), of the family Muscidae.

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  • Bantu languages >>

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  • The Swahili (q.v.) are a mixed Bantu and Semitic race inhabiting the seaboard.

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  • What may be called the indigenous population consists of the older Bantu races.

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  • The Bantu tribes are in general peaceful agriculturists, though the Bantus of recent immigration retain the warlike instincts of the Zulus.

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  • In August 1905 serious disturbances broke out among the Bantu tribes in the colony.

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  • The same name was originally applied to the Bantu kingdom of Buganda, which is one of the five provinces of the protectorate, but which is now styled officially by the correct native name of " Buganda."

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  • Until recent years the Baganda and most of the other Bantu peoples of the protectorate worshipped ancestral and nature spirits who had become elevated to the rank of gods and goddesses.

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  • The languages spoken in the Uganda Protectorate belong to the following stocks: (1) Hamitic (Murle and Rendile of Lake Rudolf); (2) Masai (Bari, Elgumi, Turkana, Suk, &c.); (2a) Sabei, on the northern slopes of Elgon and on Mt Debasien; (2b) Nilotic (Acholi, Aluru, Gang, &c.); (3) Madi (spoken on the Nile between Aluru and Bari, really of West African affinities); (4) Bantu (Lu-ganda, Runyoro, Lu-konjo, Kuamba, Lihuku, the Masaba languages of west Elgon and Kavirondo, &c.); and lastly, the unclassified, isolated Lendu and Mbuba spoken by some of the pigmy-prognathous peoples.

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  • Unyoro has played rather an important role in the past (unwritten) history of Equatorial Africa as being the region from which the ancient Gala (Hamitic) aristocracy, coming from Nileland, penetrated the forests of Bantu Africa, bringing with them the Neolithic civilization, the use of metals, and the keeping of cattle.

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  • The coloured inhabitants were divided into Bantu 1,519,939, Asiatic 7,690, and " mixed " and other coloured 454,959.

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  • The name Angola (a Portuguese corruption of the Bantu word Ngola) is sometimes confined to the 105 m.

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  • Lunda is part of the old Bantu kingdom of Muata Yanvo, divided by international agreement between Portugal and the Congo Free State.

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  • (Arabic for unbeliever [in Islam]) a native of Bantu stock; more loosely any native.

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  • At first the Cape government endeavoured to come to an amicable arrangement with the new power threatening its eastern border, and in 1780 it was agreed that the Great Fish River should be the permanent boundary between the colonial and Bantu territories.

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  • Torrend, A Comparative Grammar of the South African Bantu Languages (1891); A.

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  • C. Madan, An Outline Dictionary intended as an Aid to the Study of the Languages of the Bantu and other Uncivilized Races (1905); C. Meinhof, Die Sprache der Herero, a grammar and vocabulary (Berlin, 1909); G.

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  • Yanvo fell to pieces on the death of the chief Muteba, killed in a war with the Kioke, a Bantu tribe of the upper Kasai, in 1892.

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  • Each tribe speaks a different language or dialect of Bantu,, the chief groups being described in the article Bantu Languages.

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  • Swahili, a Bantu tongue with an admixture of Arabic, &c., is understood by many tribes besides those which have been under the direct influence of the Zanzibar Arabs, and it is the most.

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  • They speak a rude creole patois, based on French but with a large admixture of Indian, Bantu and English words.

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  • Rhodes had retrieved his promise, and no one who has studied and lived amongst the Bantu will question that the action taken was both beneficent and wise.

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  • In 1897 a native rising occurred under Galeshwe, a Bantu chief, in Griqualand West.

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  • The Bushmen, a race of short yellowish-brown nomad hunters, inhabited, in the earliest times of which there is historic knowledge, the land adjoining the southern and eastern borders of the Kalahari desert, into which they were gradually being forced by the encroachment of the Hottentots and Bantu tribes.

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  • To the south of the line the condition of affairs is entirely different; here the entire population speaks one or another dialect of the Bantu Languages.

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  • The variation of type among the Bantu is due probably to a varying admixture of alien blood,which is more apparent as the east coast is approached.

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  • In fact the only Bantu tribes who are not agriculturists are the Ova-Herero of German South-West Africa, whose purely pastoral habits are the natural outcome of the barren country they inhabit.

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  • At the same time a natural check is imposed upon the desire for cattle, which is so characteristic of the Bantu peoples.

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  • With this may be contrasted the culture of the Bantu peoples to the south and east, also agriculturists, but in addition, where possible, great cattle-breeders, whose staple food is millet and milk.

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  • Within the eastern and southern Bantu area certain cultural variations occur; beehive huts are found among the ZuluXosa and Herero, giving place among the Bechuana to the cylindrical variety with conical roof, a type which, with few exceptions, extends north to Abyssinia.

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  • A modern parallel to the spread of Bantu speech is found in the rise of the Hausa language, which is gradually enlarging its sphere of influence in the western and central Sudan.

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  • Thus those qualities, physical and otherwise, in which the Bantu approach the Hamites gradually fade as we proceed westward through the Congo basin, while in the east, among the tribes to the west of Tanganyika and on the upper Zambezi, " transitional " forms of culture are found.

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  • The Zulu-Xosa, Bechuana and Herero together form a group which may conveniently be termed " Southern Bantu."

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  • The Swahili, inhabiting the coast-line from the equator to about r6° S., are a somewhat heterogeneous mixture of Bantu with a tinge of Arab blood.

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  • Stuhlmann into the Older Bantu (Wanyamwezi, Wasukuma, Wasambara, Waseguha, Wasagara, Wasaramo, &c.) and the Bantu of Later Immigration (Wakikuyu, Wakamba, Wapokomo, Wataita, Wachaga, &c.), who are more strongly Hamitized and in many cases have adopted Masai customs. These peoples, from the Victoria Nyanza to the Zambezi, may conveniently be termed the " Eastern Bantu."

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  • Pygmy present populations go back to Nilotic and Bantu migrations as well as the indigenous pygmies.

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  • ZIMBABWE, a Bantu name, probably derived from the two words zimba (" houses") and mabgi (" stones"), given to certain ruins in South-East Africa.

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  • It may confidently be dated to a period not earlier than the 14th or 15th century A.D., and attributed to the same Bantu people the remains of whose stone-fenced kraals are found at so many places between the Limpopo and the Zambezi.

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  • The Rahanwin, with numerous but little-known sub-groups, including, however, the powerful and warlike Abgals, Barawas, Gobrons, Tuni, Jidus and Kalallas, occupy in part the region between the Webi-Shebeli and Juba, but chiefly the territory extending from the Juba to the Tana, where they have long been in contact, mostly hostile, with the Wa-Pokomo and other Bantu peoples of the British East Africa Protectorate.

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  • Zaire is a Portuguese variant of a Bantu word (nzari) meaning river.

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  • With the exception of a few Bushmen, who cling to the slopes of the Drakensberg, all the natives are of Bantu stock.

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  • Before the Zulu devastations the natives belonged to the Ama-Xosa branch of the Kaffirs and are said to have been divided into ninety-four different tribes; to-day all the tribes have a large admixture of Zulu blood (see Kaffirs, Zululand and Bantu Languages).

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  • The Amahlubi, one of the highest in rank of the Bantu tribes of South Africa, fleeing from the cruelties of ' Between 1860 and 1866 some 5000 Indians entered the colony.

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  • The Shangaan are members of a Bantu tribe from the Delagoa Bay region who took refuge in the Transvaal between 1860 and 1862 to escape Zulu raids.

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  • Bantu Languages).

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  • Into these depopulated areas there was also a considerable immigration of Basuto, Bechuana and other Bantu tribes.

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  • When called upon to go to the aid of this settlement, which in1865-1866was sore pressed by one of the mountain Bantu tribes known as the Baramapulana, the burghers of the southern Transvaal objected that the white inhabitants of that region were too lawless and reckless a body to merit their assistance.

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  • (For the Zulu speech, see Bantu Languages.) Towns.

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  • As in Bantu, the verb presents a multiplicity of forms, including one present, three past and future tenses, with personal endings complete, passive, interrogative, conditional, elective, negative and other forms, each with its proper participial inflexions.

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  • TSETSE-FLY (Tsetse, an English rendering of the Bantu nsi-nsi, a fly), a name applied indiscriminately to any one of the eight species of Glossina, a genus of African blood-sucking Diptera (two-winged flies, see Diptera), of the family Muscidae.

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  • Bantu languages >>

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  • The Swahili (q.v.) are a mixed Bantu and Semitic race inhabiting the seaboard.

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  • The inhabitants of the interior may be divided into two classes, those namely of Bantu and those of Hamitic stock.

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  • What may be called the indigenous population consists of the older Bantu races.

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  • These tribes have been subject to the intrusion from the south of more recent Bantu folk, such as the Yao, belonging to the Ama-Zulu branch of the race, while from the north there has been an immigration of Hamito-Negroid peoples.

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  • The Bantu tribes are in general peaceful agriculturists, though the Bantus of recent immigration retain the warlike instincts of the Zulus.

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  • Many different dialects are spoken by the Bantu tribes, Swahili being the most widely known (see Bantu Languages).

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  • In August 1905 serious disturbances broke out among the Bantu tribes in the colony.

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  • The same name was originally applied to the Bantu kingdom of Buganda, which is one of the five provinces of the protectorate, but which is now styled officially by the correct native name of " Buganda."

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  • The Swahili followers of the first explorers always pronounced the territorial prefix, Bu, as a simple vowel, U; hence the incorrect rendering " Uganda " of the more primitive Bantu designation.

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  • Until recent years the Baganda and most of the other Bantu peoples of the protectorate worshipped ancestral and nature spirits who had become elevated to the rank of gods and goddesses.

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  • The languages spoken in the Uganda Protectorate belong to the following stocks: (1) Hamitic (Murle and Rendile of Lake Rudolf); (2) Masai (Bari, Elgumi, Turkana, Suk, &c.); (2a) Sabei, on the northern slopes of Elgon and on Mt Debasien; (2b) Nilotic (Acholi, Aluru, Gang, &c.); (3) Madi (spoken on the Nile between Aluru and Bari, really of West African affinities); (4) Bantu (Lu-ganda, Runyoro, Lu-konjo, Kuamba, Lihuku, the Masaba languages of west Elgon and Kavirondo, &c.); and lastly, the unclassified, isolated Lendu and Mbuba spoken by some of the pigmy-prognathous peoples.

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  • Unyoro has played rather an important role in the past (unwritten) history of Equatorial Africa as being the region from which the ancient Gala (Hamitic) aristocracy, coming from Nileland, penetrated the forests of Bantu Africa, bringing with them the Neolithic civilization, the use of metals, and the keeping of cattle.

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  • The coloured inhabitants were divided into Bantu 1,519,939, Asiatic 7,690, and " mixed " and other coloured 454,959.

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  • coast regions, and of the Bantu in 1911 no fewer than 871,062 lived in the Transkeian territories, where there were 54 persons to the sq.

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  • These Bantu are still heathen and nearly all are agriculturists.

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  • The name Angola (a Portuguese corruption of the Bantu word Ngola) is sometimes confined to the 105 m.

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  • Lunda is part of the old Bantu kingdom of Muata Yanvo, divided by international agreement between Portugal and the Congo Free State.

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  • The word "monomotapa " is of Bantu origin and has been variously interpreted.

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  • Torrend, Comparative Grammar of the South African Bantu Languages (p. Ioi) renders it " Lord of the water-elephants," and remarks that the hippopotamus is even to the present day a sacred animal among the Karanga.

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  • This alone would be sufficient to controvert the baseless assumption that there existed in southern Rhodesia a ruling caste of different racial origin from the general Bantu population.

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  • All these mixed Bantu peoples are immigrants at various periods from beyond the Zambezi.

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  • (Arabic for unbeliever [in Islam]) a native of Bantu stock; more loosely any native.

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  • From that port the Arabs traded for ivory, slaves and (principally) gold with Bantu peoples of the far interior - the Rhodesia of to-day.

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  • At first the Cape government endeavoured to come to an amicable arrangement with the new power threatening its eastern border, and in 1780 it was agreed that the Great Fish River should be the permanent boundary between the colonial and Bantu territories.

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  • Their general attitude may be explained as a reaction against the abuses which they saw going on around them, and to a misconception of the character of the Hottentot and Bantu races.

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  • Ethnology, archaeology, art and languages (see also works cited under racial headings and Bantu Languages).

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  • Torrend, A Comparative Grammar of the South African Bantu Languages (1891); A.

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  • C. Madan, An Outline Dictionary intended as an Aid to the Study of the Languages of the Bantu and other Uncivilized Races (1905); C. Meinhof, Die Sprache der Herero, a grammar and vocabulary (Berlin, 1909); G.

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  • In the north-east of the colony, in the upper basin of the Welle and the Mbomu, the Niam-Niam or Azandeh, a Negroid race of warriors and hunters with a social, political and military organization superior to that of the Bantu tribes of the Congo basin, have intruded from the north.

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  • Of the Bantu tribes several main groups may be distinguished.

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  • These Bantu races may be further divided into plain, forest and riverine tribes.

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  • Yanvo fell to pieces on the death of the chief Muteba, killed in a war with the Kioke, a Bantu tribe of the upper Kasai, in 1892.

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  • Each tribe speaks a different language or dialect of Bantu,, the chief groups being described in the article Bantu Languages.

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  • Swahili, a Bantu tongue with an admixture of Arabic, &c., is understood by many tribes besides those which have been under the direct influence of the Zanzibar Arabs, and it is the most.

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  • They speak a rude creole patois, based on French but with a large admixture of Indian, Bantu and English words.

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  • They dwelt chiefly in the south-west and north-west parts of the country; elsewhere the inhabitants were of Bantu negroid stock, and to them was applied the name Kaffir.

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  • Rhodes had retrieved his promise, and no one who has studied and lived amongst the Bantu will question that the action taken was both beneficent and wise.

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  • In 1897 a native rising occurred under Galeshwe, a Bantu chief, in Griqualand West.

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  • Ama-Swazi tribes are believed to have occupied the country now known as Swaziland from the period of the invasion of South East Africa by the Bantu peoples.

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  • The Bushmen, a race of short yellowish-brown nomad hunters, inhabited, in the earliest times of which there is historic knowledge, the land adjoining the southern and eastern borders of the Kalahari desert, into which they were gradually being forced by the encroachment of the Hottentots and Bantu tribes.

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    0
  • To the south of the line the condition of affairs is entirely different; here the entire population speaks one or another dialect of the Bantu Languages.

    0
    0
  • The variation of type among the Bantu is due probably to a varying admixture of alien blood,which is more apparent as the east coast is approached.

    0
    0
  • In fact the only Bantu tribes who are not agriculturists are the Ova-Herero of German South-West Africa, whose purely pastoral habits are the natural outcome of the barren country they inhabit.

    0
    0
  • At the same time a natural check is imposed upon the desire for cattle, which is so characteristic of the Bantu peoples.

    0
    0
  • With this may be contrasted the culture of the Bantu peoples to the south and east, also agriculturists, but in addition, where possible, great cattle-breeders, whose staple food is millet and milk.

    0
    0
  • Within the eastern and southern Bantu area certain cultural variations occur; beehive huts are found among the ZuluXosa and Herero, giving place among the Bechuana to the cylindrical variety with conical roof, a type which, with few exceptions, extends north to Abyssinia.

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  • The advance-guard of this wave of pastoral Negroids, in fact primitive Bantu, mingled with the Bushmen and produced the Hottentots.

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  • A modern parallel to the spread of Bantu speech is found in the rise of the Hausa language, which is gradually enlarging its sphere of influence in the western and central Sudan.

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  • Thus those qualities, physical and otherwise, in which the Bantu approach the Hamites gradually fade as we proceed westward through the Congo basin, while in the east, among the tribes to the west of Tanganyika and on the upper Zambezi, " transitional " forms of culture are found.

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  • The Zulu-Xosa, Bechuana and Herero together form a group which may conveniently be termed " Southern Bantu."

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  • The Swahili, inhabiting the coast-line from the equator to about r6° S., are a somewhat heterogeneous mixture of Bantu with a tinge of Arab blood.

    0
    0
  • Stuhlmann into the Older Bantu (Wanyamwezi, Wasukuma, Wasambara, Waseguha, Wasagara, Wasaramo, &c.) and the Bantu of Later Immigration (Wakikuyu, Wakamba, Wapokomo, Wataita, Wachaga, &c.), who are more strongly Hamitized and in many cases have adopted Masai customs. These peoples, from the Victoria Nyanza to the Zambezi, may conveniently be termed the " Eastern Bantu."

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  • The present populations go back to Nilotic and Bantu migrations as well as the indigenous pygmies.

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  • It's easy now to look at the old episdoes and realize that Lt. Uhura was a glorified receptionist, but at the time, with her Bantu name, her African hair and her long legs, elegantly displayed, she was a revolutionary.

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  • Bantu Languages).

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