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bangor

bangor

bangor Sentence Examples

  • Benjamin Hoadly, the newly-appointed bishop of Bangor, scented the opportunity and wrote a speedy and able reply, Preservative against the Principles and Practices of Non-Jurors, in which his own Erastian position was recommended and sincerity proposed as the only test of truth.

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  • of Bangor.

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  • COLUMBAN (543-615), Irish saint and writer, was born in Leinster in 543, and was educated in the monastery of Bangor, Co.

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  • BANGOR, a seaport and market-town of Co.

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  • Bangor was incorporated by James I.

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  • Bangor, Maine >>

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  • and is served by an interurban electric line and by steamboat lines to Portland, Boston, Bangor, Bar Harbor and other coast ports.

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  • The first of his controversial works was Three Letters to the Bishop of Bangor (1717), which were considered by friend and foe alike as one of the most powerful contributions to the Bangorian controversy on the high church side.

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  • BANGOR (formerly Bangor Fawr, as distinguished from several other towns of this name in Wales, Ireland, Brittany, &c.), a city, municipal (1883) and contributory parliamentary borough (Carnarvon district), seaport and market-town of Carnarvonshire, N.

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  • The Myvyrian Archaeology (408-484) gives the three principal bangor (college) institutions as follows: - the bangor of Illtud Farchawg at Caer Worgorn (Wroxeter); that of Emrys (Ambrosius) at Caer Caradawg; bangor wydrin (glass) in the glass isle, Afallach; bangor Illtud, or Llanilltud, or Llantwit major (by corruption), being a fourth.

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  • The bishops denounced sentence of excommunication against all transgressors, and soon after Howel himself went to Rome attended by the archbishop of St David's, the bishops of Bangor and St Asaph and thirteen other personages.

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  • BANGOR, a city, port of entry, and the county-seat of Penobscot county, Maine, U.S.A., at the confluence of the Kenduskeag stream with the Penobscot river, and at the head of navigation on the Penobscot, about 60 m.

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  • long) across the Penobscot connects Bangor with Brewer (pop. in 1900, 4835).

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  • Bangor is served directly by the Maine Central railway, several important branches radiating from the city, and by the Eastern Steamship line; the Maine Central connects near the city with the Bangor & Aroostook railway (whose general offices are here) and with the Washington County railway.

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  • The Eastern Maine Music Festival is held in Bangor in October of each year.

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  • Bangor is one of the largest lumber depots in the United States, and also ships considerable quantities of ice.

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  • Bangor has various manufactures, the most important of which (other than those dependent upon lumber) are boots and shoes (including moccasins); among others are trunks, valises, saws, stoves, ranges and furnaces, edge tools and cant dogs, saw-mill machinery, brick, clothing, cigars, flour and dairy products.

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  • The municipality owns and operates the water-works (the water-supply being drawn from the Penobscot by the Holly system) and an electric-lighting plant; there is also a large electric plant for generation of electricity for power and for commercial lighting, and in Bangor and the vicinity there were in 1908 about 60 m.

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  • Bangor has been identified by some antiquarians as the site of the mythical city of Norumbega, and it was reported in 1656 that Fort Norombega, built by the French, was standing here; but the authentic history of Bangor begins in 1769 when the first settlers came.

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  • In 1791 the town was incorporated, and through the influence of the Rev. Seth Noble, the first pastor, the name was changed to Bangor, the name of one of his favourite hymn-tunes.

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  • During the war of 1812 a British force occupied Bangor for several days (in September 1814), destroying vessels and cargoes.

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  • Bangor was chartered as a city in 1834.

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  • In 1836 a railway from Bangor to Old Town was completed; this was the first railway in the state; Bangor had, also, the first electric street-railway in Maine (1889), and one of the first iron steamships built in America ran to this port and was named "Bangor."

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  • Bangor >>

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  • south-south-west of Bangor.

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  • I-Iere he came under the influence of the new Methodist preachers, and in 1757 took orders, being ordained by the bishop of Bangor.

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  • pp. 141-142) thus describes the method and extent of the employment of incense at the mass prior to the Reformation: "According to the use of Sarum (and Bangor) the priest, after being himself censed by the deacon, censed the altar before the Introit began.

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  • The middle of the altar was censed, according to Sarum, Bangor and Hereford, before the reading of the Gospel.

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  • According to Sarum and Bangor, the thurible, as well as the lights, attended the Gospel to the lectern.

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  • In the Sarum and Bangor, the priest censed the oblations after offering them; then the space between himself and the altar.

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  • He was then, at Sarum, censed by the deacon, and an acolyte censed the choir; at Bangor the Sinistrum Cornu of the altar and the relics were censed instead.

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  • from Bangor, by a branch of the London & North-Western railway.

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  • After being professor of sacred literature in the Bangor Theological Seminary for three years, he was president of Bowdoin College from 1839 to 1866, and introduced there many important reforms. From June 1867 to September 1868 Dr Woods worked in London and Paris for the Maine Historical Society, collecting materials for the early history of Maine; he induced J.

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  • In 1707 he published a Discourse on Church Government, and he took a prominent part in the controversy with Benjamin Hoadly, bishop of Bangor.

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  • From 1859 to 1869 he was pastor of the Independent Congregational (Unitarian) church at Bangor, Maine.

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  • Of these Whitehouse and White Abbey are the principal on the western shore, and on the eastern, Holywood, which ranks practically as a suburb of Belfast, and, at the entrance to the lough, Bangor.

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  • Bangor, Ireland >>

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  • During the next few years he actively opposed the amalgamation of the sees of St Asaph and Bangor.

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  • "SIR JOHN RHYS (1840-1915), British archaeologist and Celtic scholar, was born in Cardiganshire, the son of a yeoman farmer, and educated at the Bangor Normal College and Jesus College, Oxford.

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  • He graduated at Bowdoin College in 1834; studied theology at Andover, where his health failed, at Bangor, and, after a year (1836-1837) as librarian and tutor in Greek at Bowdoin, in Germany at Halle, where he became personally intimate with Tholuck and Ulrici, and in Berlin, under Neander and Hengstenberg.

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  • The following are the seminaries founded since 1800: Andover (1808), Bangor (1816), Hartford (1834), the theological school of Oberlin College (1835), Chicago (1858), Pacific (1869; now at Berkeley, Cal.), and Atlanta (Georgia), 1901.

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  • In 1715 he was appointed chaplain to the king, and the same year he obtained the bishopric of Bangor.

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  • Although the Sarum Use prevailed far the most widely, yet there were separate Uses of York and Hereford, and also to a less degree of Lincoln, Bangor, Exeter, Wells, St Paul's, and probably of other dioceses and cathedral churches as well.

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  • It says: " And whereas heretofore there hath been great diversity in saying and singing in Churches within this Realm; some following Salisbury Use, some Hereford Use, and some the Use of Bangor, some of York, some of Lincoln; now from henceforth all the whole Realm shall have but one Use."

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  • from Bangor.

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  • The suspension bridge carries the Holyhead road from Bangor.

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  • He died at Bangor, Maine, on the 4th of July 1891.

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  • Its name - of which Maroy and Mourie are older variants - does not, as is often supposed, commemorate the Virgin, but St Maelrubha, who came from Bangor in Ireland in 671 and founded a monastery at Applecross and a chapel (now in ruins) on Isle Maree.

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  • The island is divided into the four communes of Le Palais, Bangor, Sauzon and Locmaria.

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  • Later in his reign, probably in 614, he defeated the Welsh in a great battle at Chester and massacred the monks of Bangor who were assembled to aid them by their prayers.

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  • The following towns had each in 1901 a population exceeding 10,000: Cardiff, Ystradyfodwg, Swansea, Merthyr Tydfil, Aberdare, Pontypridd, Llanelly, Ogmore and Garw, Pembroke, Caerphilly, Maesteg, Wrexham, Penarth, Neath, Festiniog, Bangor, Holyhead, Carmarthen.

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  • Only four towns in North Wales are included in these eighteen, and the combined populations of these four - Wrexham (14,966), Festiniog (11,435), Bangor (11,269) and Holyhead (10,079) - fall far below that of Merthyr Tydfil (69,228), the fourth largest town in Glamorganshire.

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  • Slate quarries are very numerous throughout the Principality, the finest quality of slate being obtained in the neighbourhood of Bangor and Carnarvon, where the Penrhyn and Bethesda quarries give employment to many thousands of workmen.

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  • The two principal railways serving the Principality are the London & North-Western, which passes along the North Wales coast-line by way of Conway and Bangor, crosses the Menai Strait and has its terminus at Holyhead; and the Great Western, which traverses South Wales by way of Cardiff, Landore, Llanelly and Carmarthen, and has its principal terminal station at Fishguard Harbour.

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  • The diocese of Bangor consists of the counties of Anglesea, Carnarvon and large portions of Merioneth and Montgomery.

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  • It is interesting to note that the existing four Welsh sees of Bangor, St Asaph, St Davids and Llandaff correspond in the main with the limits of these four tribal divisions.

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  • In 1169 Owen Gwynedd died and was buried in Bangor cathedral after a reign of 33 years, wherein he had successfully defended his own realm and had done much to bring about that union of all Wales which his grandson was destined to complete.

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  • With the accession of Elizabeth a novel and vigorous ecclesiastical policy on truly national lines was now inaugurated in Wales itself, chiefly through the instrumentality of Richard Davies, nominated bishop of St Asaph in 1559 and translated thence to St Davids in 1561, who was mainly responsible for the act of parliament of 1563, commanding the bishops of St Davids, Llandaff, Bangor, St Asaph and Hereford to prepare with all speed for public use Welsh translations of the Scriptures and the Book of Common Prayer.

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  • The University College of Wales was founded at Aberystwyth in 1872; that of South Wales at Cardiff in 1883; and of North Wales at Bangor in 1884.

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  • The Antiphonary of Bangor proves that Ireland accepted the Gallican version in the 7th century, and the English Church did so in the loth.

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  • On his return from Lismore, Malachy undertook the government of the decayed monastery of Bangor (in Co.

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  • Near Wrexham, but in a detached portion of Flintshire, to the S.E., is Bangor-is-coed (Bangor yn Maelor), the site of the most ancient monastery in the kingdom, founded before r80; some 1200 monks were slain here by IEthelfrith of Northumbria, who also spoiled the monastery.

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  • Lewiston leads in the manufacture of cotton goods; Auburn, Bangor and Augusta, in the manufacture of boots and shoes; Bath, in ship and boat building; Eastport and Lubec, in canning " sardines."

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  • - The south-western part of the state, including the manufacturing, the quarrying, and much of the older agricultural district, early had fairly satisfactory means of transportation either by water or by rail; for the coast has many excellent harbours, the Kennebec river is navigable for coast vessels to Augusta, the Penobscot to Bangor, and railway service was soon supplied for the villages of the south-west, but it was not until the last decade of the 19th century that the forests, the farming lands, and the summer resorts of Aroostook county were reached by a railway, the Bangor & Aroostook.

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  • The first railway in the state, from Bangor to Old Town, was completed in 1836, and the state's railway mileage increased from 12 m.

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  • The principal railway systems are the Maine Central, which enters every county but one, the Boston & Maine, the Bangor & Aroostook, the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific. Lines of steamboats ply regularly between the largest cities of the state and Boston, between Portland and New York, and between Portland and several Canadian ports.

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  • Fish, canned goods, potatoes, granite, lime, paper, and boots and shoes are also exported to foreign countries to some extent, but they are shipped in larger quantities to other states of the Union, from which Maine receives in return cotton, coal, iron, oil, &c. The ports of entry in Maine are Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk, Machias, Portland, Wiscasset and York.

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  • The principal cities of the state are: Portland, pop. (1900), 50,145; Lewiston, 23,761; Bangor, 21,850; Biddeford, 16,145; Auburn, 12,951; Augusta, 11,683; Bath, 10,477; Waterville, 9,477; and Rockland, 8,150.

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  • When it sits as a law court, at least five of its justices must be present, and it holds three such sessions annually: one at Augusta, one at Bangor, and one at Portland.

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  • The charitable institutions maintained by the state are: the military and naval orphan asylum at Bath, the Maine institution for the blind at Portland, the Maine school for the deaf (established in 1876, and taken over by the state in 1897) at Portland, the Maine insane hospital at Augusta, the Eastern Maine insane hospital at Bangor, and a school for the feeble-minded (established in 1907) at West Pownal, each of which is governed by trustees appointed by the governor and council, with the exception of a part of those of the orphan asylum, who are appointed by the corporation.

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  • It embraces a college of arts and sciences, a college of agriculture, a college of technology (including a department of forestry), a college of law (at Bangor), and a college of pharmacy.

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  • In1908-1909the university had 104 instructors and 884 students, of whom 113 were in the college of law at Bangor and 420 in the college of technology.

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  • The embargo and non-intercourse laws from 1807 to 1812 were a severe blow to Maine's shipping, and in the War of 1812 Eastport, Castine, Hampden, Bangor and Machias fell into the hands of the British.

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  • Wales, practically equidistant by rail from Bangor (292 m.) and Chester (30(30 m.), and 209 m.

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  • According to his own statements, which often tend to exaggeration, he was offered both the sees of Bangor and Llandaff, but refused them.

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  • Down), founded by another Findian, c. 540; Clonmacnoise, founded by Kieran, 54 1; Derry, founded by Columba, 546; Clonfert, founded by Brendan, 552; Bangor, founded in 558 by Comgall; Durrow, founded by Columba, c. 553.

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  • 543), went forth from Bangor, accompanied by twelve companions, to preach the Gospel on the continent of Europe.

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  • When St Maelmaedoc in the first half of the 12th century thought of building a stone oratory at Bangor it was deemed a novelty by the people, who exclaimed, " we are Scotti not Galli."

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  • In 1663 he was prebendary of Ripon, in 1667 prebendary of Salisbury, in 1668 archdeacon of Merioneth, in 1672 dean of Bangor and prebendary of St Paul's, London, in 1680 bishop of St Asaph, in 1689 lord-almoner, in 1692 bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, and in 1699 bishop of Worcester.

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  • The samples have been analyzed at the University of Bangor in Wales and found to contain americium, cesium and cobalt.

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  • Its slow approach to Valley is seen in the second shot awaiting clearance to proceed onward to Bangor.

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  • She previously taught criminology at University of Wales, Bangor to criminology undergraduates and trainee probation officers.

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  • Kara, a rhythmic gymnast from Bangor, joined the Institute in September.

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  • When the then municipal authority, Bangor Boro Council, acquired the Castle and grounds, the music saloon became the Council Chamber.

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  • Bangor cathedral had only two prebends, but a number of persons called ' canons ' of Bangor have been found.

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  • prior of the huge monastery at Irish Bangor.

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  • stabled in the sidings at Bangor between turns.

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  • Despite the best efforts of the painters, why does Bangor always manage to look tatty?

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  • At present, wastewater from Bangor, Donaghadee and Millisle is pumped, largely untreated, out to sea.

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  • LANDMARKS Getting to Bangor presents the cruising yachtsman with a challenge.

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  • Benjamin Hoadly, the newly-appointed bishop of Bangor, scented the opportunity and wrote a speedy and able reply, Preservative against the Principles and Practices of Non-Jurors, in which his own Erastian position was recommended and sincerity proposed as the only test of truth.

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  • of Bangor.

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  • In Portland, as in Bangor, the Maine Music Festival (begun in 1897) is held every year in October, three concerts being given by a chorus composed of local choruses trained in different cities of the state for the festival.

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  • COLUMBAN (543-615), Irish saint and writer, was born in Leinster in 543, and was educated in the monastery of Bangor, Co.

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  • BANGOR, a seaport and market-town of Co.

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  • Bangor was incorporated by James I.

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  • Bangor, Maine >>

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  • and is served by an interurban electric line and by steamboat lines to Portland, Boston, Bangor, Bar Harbor and other coast ports.

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  • The first of his controversial works was Three Letters to the Bishop of Bangor (1717), which were considered by friend and foe alike as one of the most powerful contributions to the Bangorian controversy on the high church side.

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  • BANGOR (formerly Bangor Fawr, as distinguished from several other towns of this name in Wales, Ireland, Brittany, &c.), a city, municipal (1883) and contributory parliamentary borough (Carnarvon district), seaport and market-town of Carnarvonshire, N.

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  • The Myvyrian Archaeology (408-484) gives the three principal bangor (college) institutions as follows: - the bangor of Illtud Farchawg at Caer Worgorn (Wroxeter); that of Emrys (Ambrosius) at Caer Caradawg; bangor wydrin (glass) in the glass isle, Afallach; bangor Illtud, or Llanilltud, or Llantwit major (by corruption), being a fourth.

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  • The bishops denounced sentence of excommunication against all transgressors, and soon after Howel himself went to Rome attended by the archbishop of St David's, the bishops of Bangor and St Asaph and thirteen other personages.

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  • BANGOR, a city, port of entry, and the county-seat of Penobscot county, Maine, U.S.A., at the confluence of the Kenduskeag stream with the Penobscot river, and at the head of navigation on the Penobscot, about 60 m.

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  • long) across the Penobscot connects Bangor with Brewer (pop. in 1900, 4835).

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  • Bangor is served directly by the Maine Central railway, several important branches radiating from the city, and by the Eastern Steamship line; the Maine Central connects near the city with the Bangor & Aroostook railway (whose general offices are here) and with the Washington County railway.

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  • Bangor is the seat of three state institutions - the Eastern Maine general hospital, the Eastern Maine insane hospital and the law school of the University of Maine - and of the Bangor Theological Seminary (Congregational), incorporated in 1814, opened at Hampden in 1816, removed to Bangor in 1819, and empowered in 1905 to confer degrees in divinity.

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  • The Eastern Maine Music Festival is held in Bangor in October of each year.

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  • Bangor is one of the largest lumber depots in the United States, and also ships considerable quantities of ice.

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  • Bangor has various manufactures, the most important of which (other than those dependent upon lumber) are boots and shoes (including moccasins); among others are trunks, valises, saws, stoves, ranges and furnaces, edge tools and cant dogs, saw-mill machinery, brick, clothing, cigars, flour and dairy products.

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  • The municipality owns and operates the water-works (the water-supply being drawn from the Penobscot by the Holly system) and an electric-lighting plant; there is also a large electric plant for generation of electricity for power and for commercial lighting, and in Bangor and the vicinity there were in 1908 about 60 m.

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  • Bangor has been identified by some antiquarians as the site of the mythical city of Norumbega, and it was reported in 1656 that Fort Norombega, built by the French, was standing here; but the authentic history of Bangor begins in 1769 when the first settlers came.

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  • In 1791 the town was incorporated, and through the influence of the Rev. Seth Noble, the first pastor, the name was changed to Bangor, the name of one of his favourite hymn-tunes.

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  • During the war of 1812 a British force occupied Bangor for several days (in September 1814), destroying vessels and cargoes.

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  • Bangor was chartered as a city in 1834.

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  • In 1836 a railway from Bangor to Old Town was completed; this was the first railway in the state; Bangor had, also, the first electric street-railway in Maine (1889), and one of the first iron steamships built in America ran to this port and was named "Bangor."

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  • south-south-west of Bangor.

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  • I-Iere he came under the influence of the new Methodist preachers, and in 1757 took orders, being ordained by the bishop of Bangor.

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  • pp. 141-142) thus describes the method and extent of the employment of incense at the mass prior to the Reformation: "According to the use of Sarum (and Bangor) the priest, after being himself censed by the deacon, censed the altar before the Introit began.

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  • The middle of the altar was censed, according to Sarum, Bangor and Hereford, before the reading of the Gospel.

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  • According to Sarum and Bangor, the thurible, as well as the lights, attended the Gospel to the lectern.

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  • In the Sarum and Bangor, the priest censed the oblations after offering them; then the space between himself and the altar.

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  • He was then, at Sarum, censed by the deacon, and an acolyte censed the choir; at Bangor the Sinistrum Cornu of the altar and the relics were censed instead.

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  • from Bangor, by a branch of the London & North-Western railway.

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  • After being professor of sacred literature in the Bangor Theological Seminary for three years, he was president of Bowdoin College from 1839 to 1866, and introduced there many important reforms. From June 1867 to September 1868 Dr Woods worked in London and Paris for the Maine Historical Society, collecting materials for the early history of Maine; he induced J.

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  • In 1707 he published a Discourse on Church Government, and he took a prominent part in the controversy with Benjamin Hoadly, bishop of Bangor.

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  • From 1859 to 1869 he was pastor of the Independent Congregational (Unitarian) church at Bangor, Maine.

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  • Of these Whitehouse and White Abbey are the principal on the western shore, and on the eastern, Holywood, which ranks practically as a suburb of Belfast, and, at the entrance to the lough, Bangor.

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  • Bangor, Ireland >>

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  • During the next few years he actively opposed the amalgamation of the sees of St Asaph and Bangor.

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  • "SIR JOHN RHYS (1840-1915), British archaeologist and Celtic scholar, was born in Cardiganshire, the son of a yeoman farmer, and educated at the Bangor Normal College and Jesus College, Oxford.

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  • He graduated at Bowdoin College in 1834; studied theology at Andover, where his health failed, at Bangor, and, after a year (1836-1837) as librarian and tutor in Greek at Bowdoin, in Germany at Halle, where he became personally intimate with Tholuck and Ulrici, and in Berlin, under Neander and Hengstenberg.

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  • The following are the seminaries founded since 1800: Andover (1808), Bangor (1816), Hartford (1834), the theological school of Oberlin College (1835), Chicago (1858), Pacific (1869; now at Berkeley, Cal.), and Atlanta (Georgia), 1901.

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  • In 1715 he was appointed chaplain to the king, and the same year he obtained the bishopric of Bangor.

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  • Although the Sarum Use prevailed far the most widely, yet there were separate Uses of York and Hereford, and also to a less degree of Lincoln, Bangor, Exeter, Wells, St Paul's, and probably of other dioceses and cathedral churches as well.

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  • It says: " And whereas heretofore there hath been great diversity in saying and singing in Churches within this Realm; some following Salisbury Use, some Hereford Use, and some the Use of Bangor, some of York, some of Lincoln; now from henceforth all the whole Realm shall have but one Use."

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  • from Bangor.

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  • The suspension bridge carries the Holyhead road from Bangor.

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  • He died at Bangor, Maine, on the 4th of July 1891.

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  • Its name - of which Maroy and Mourie are older variants - does not, as is often supposed, commemorate the Virgin, but St Maelrubha, who came from Bangor in Ireland in 671 and founded a monastery at Applecross and a chapel (now in ruins) on Isle Maree.

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  • The island is divided into the four communes of Le Palais, Bangor, Sauzon and Locmaria.

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  • Later in his reign, probably in 614, he defeated the Welsh in a great battle at Chester and massacred the monks of Bangor who were assembled to aid them by their prayers.

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  • The following towns had each in 1901 a population exceeding 10,000: Cardiff, Ystradyfodwg, Swansea, Merthyr Tydfil, Aberdare, Pontypridd, Llanelly, Ogmore and Garw, Pembroke, Caerphilly, Maesteg, Wrexham, Penarth, Neath, Festiniog, Bangor, Holyhead, Carmarthen.

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  • Only four towns in North Wales are included in these eighteen, and the combined populations of these four - Wrexham (14,966), Festiniog (11,435), Bangor (11,269) and Holyhead (10,079) - fall far below that of Merthyr Tydfil (69,228), the fourth largest town in Glamorganshire.

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  • Slate quarries are very numerous throughout the Principality, the finest quality of slate being obtained in the neighbourhood of Bangor and Carnarvon, where the Penrhyn and Bethesda quarries give employment to many thousands of workmen.

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  • The two principal railways serving the Principality are the London & North-Western, which passes along the North Wales coast-line by way of Conway and Bangor, crosses the Menai Strait and has its terminus at Holyhead; and the Great Western, which traverses South Wales by way of Cardiff, Landore, Llanelly and Carmarthen, and has its principal terminal station at Fishguard Harbour.

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  • The diocese of Bangor consists of the counties of Anglesea, Carnarvon and large portions of Merioneth and Montgomery.

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  • It is interesting to note that the existing four Welsh sees of Bangor, St Asaph, St Davids and Llandaff correspond in the main with the limits of these four tribal divisions.

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  • In 1169 Owen Gwynedd died and was buried in Bangor cathedral after a reign of 33 years, wherein he had successfully defended his own realm and had done much to bring about that union of all Wales which his grandson was destined to complete.

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  • With the accession of Elizabeth a novel and vigorous ecclesiastical policy on truly national lines was now inaugurated in Wales itself, chiefly through the instrumentality of Richard Davies, nominated bishop of St Asaph in 1559 and translated thence to St Davids in 1561, who was mainly responsible for the act of parliament of 1563, commanding the bishops of St Davids, Llandaff, Bangor, St Asaph and Hereford to prepare with all speed for public use Welsh translations of the Scriptures and the Book of Common Prayer.

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  • The University College of Wales was founded at Aberystwyth in 1872; that of South Wales at Cardiff in 1883; and of North Wales at Bangor in 1884.

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  • The Antiphonary of Bangor proves that Ireland accepted the Gallican version in the 7th century, and the English Church did so in the loth.

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  • On his return from Lismore, Malachy undertook the government of the decayed monastery of Bangor (in Co.

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  • Near Wrexham, but in a detached portion of Flintshire, to the S.E., is Bangor-is-coed (Bangor yn Maelor), the site of the most ancient monastery in the kingdom, founded before r80; some 1200 monks were slain here by IEthelfrith of Northumbria, who also spoiled the monastery.

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  • Lewiston leads in the manufacture of cotton goods; Auburn, Bangor and Augusta, in the manufacture of boots and shoes; Bath, in ship and boat building; Eastport and Lubec, in canning " sardines."

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  • - The south-western part of the state, including the manufacturing, the quarrying, and much of the older agricultural district, early had fairly satisfactory means of transportation either by water or by rail; for the coast has many excellent harbours, the Kennebec river is navigable for coast vessels to Augusta, the Penobscot to Bangor, and railway service was soon supplied for the villages of the south-west, but it was not until the last decade of the 19th century that the forests, the farming lands, and the summer resorts of Aroostook county were reached by a railway, the Bangor & Aroostook.

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  • The first railway in the state, from Bangor to Old Town, was completed in 1836, and the state's railway mileage increased from 12 m.

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  • The principal railway systems are the Maine Central, which enters every county but one, the Boston & Maine, the Bangor & Aroostook, the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific. Lines of steamboats ply regularly between the largest cities of the state and Boston, between Portland and New York, and between Portland and several Canadian ports.

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  • Fish, canned goods, potatoes, granite, lime, paper, and boots and shoes are also exported to foreign countries to some extent, but they are shipped in larger quantities to other states of the Union, from which Maine receives in return cotton, coal, iron, oil, &c. The ports of entry in Maine are Bangor, Bath, Belfast, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Houlton, Kennebunk, Machias, Portland, Wiscasset and York.

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  • The principal cities of the state are: Portland, pop. (1900), 50,145; Lewiston, 23,761; Bangor, 21,850; Biddeford, 16,145; Auburn, 12,951; Augusta, 11,683; Bath, 10,477; Waterville, 9,477; and Rockland, 8,150.

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  • When it sits as a law court, at least five of its justices must be present, and it holds three such sessions annually: one at Augusta, one at Bangor, and one at Portland.

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  • The charitable institutions maintained by the state are: the military and naval orphan asylum at Bath, the Maine institution for the blind at Portland, the Maine school for the deaf (established in 1876, and taken over by the state in 1897) at Portland, the Maine insane hospital at Augusta, the Eastern Maine insane hospital at Bangor, and a school for the feeble-minded (established in 1907) at West Pownal, each of which is governed by trustees appointed by the governor and council, with the exception of a part of those of the orphan asylum, who are appointed by the corporation.

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  • It embraces a college of arts and sciences, a college of agriculture, a college of technology (including a department of forestry), a college of law (at Bangor), and a college of pharmacy.

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  • In1908-1909the university had 104 instructors and 884 students, of whom 113 were in the college of law at Bangor and 420 in the college of technology.

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  • The embargo and non-intercourse laws from 1807 to 1812 were a severe blow to Maine's shipping, and in the War of 1812 Eastport, Castine, Hampden, Bangor and Machias fell into the hands of the British.

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  • Wales, practically equidistant by rail from Bangor (292 m.) and Chester (30(30 m.), and 209 m.

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  • According to his own statements, which often tend to exaggeration, he was offered both the sees of Bangor and Llandaff, but refused them.

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  • Down), founded by another Findian, c. 540; Clonmacnoise, founded by Kieran, 54 1; Derry, founded by Columba, 546; Clonfert, founded by Brendan, 552; Bangor, founded in 558 by Comgall; Durrow, founded by Columba, c. 553.

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  • 543), went forth from Bangor, accompanied by twelve companions, to preach the Gospel on the continent of Europe.

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  • When St Maelmaedoc in the first half of the 12th century thought of building a stone oratory at Bangor it was deemed a novelty by the people, who exclaimed, " we are Scotti not Galli."

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  • In 1663 he was prebendary of Ripon, in 1667 prebendary of Salisbury, in 1668 archdeacon of Merioneth, in 1672 dean of Bangor and prebendary of St Paul's, London, in 1680 bishop of St Asaph, in 1689 lord-almoner, in 1692 bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, and in 1699 bishop of Worcester.

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  • DMUs were (and still are) stabled in the sidings at Bangor between turns.

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  • Despite the best efforts of the painters, why does Bangor always manage to look tatty?

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  • At present, wastewater from Bangor, Donaghadee and Millisle is pumped, largely untreated, out to sea.

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  • LANDMARKS Getting to Bangor presents the cruising yachtsman with a challenge.

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  • The Bangor Dyslexia Conference, University of Bangor, North Wales (July 2003).

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  • She was born in 1842 on New Year's Day in an English town called Bangor.

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