Baltimore sentence example

baltimore
  • It was too late to get a non-stop flight so I have you going out of Allentown and changing planes in Baltimore.
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  • As soon as the plane left the runways they were enveloped in clouds, and neither ground nor sky visible during the entire one-hour flight to Baltimore.
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  • The Baltimore & Ohio railway leads in trackage: it enters the state with several lines at its northern end; its main line crosses this portion of the state from east to west, striking the Ohio at Parkersburg, and one of its lines (Ohio River railway) extends nearly the length of the state from Wheeling in the north through Parkersburg to Kenova in the south.
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  • Glasgow, History of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in America (Baltimore, 1888).
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  • Belleville is served by the Illinois Central, the Louisville & Nashville, and the Southern railways, also by extensive interurban electric systems; and a belt line to O'Fallon, Illinois, connects Belleville with the Baltimore & Ohio South Western railway.
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  • Prominent among a great variety of song-birds and insectivorous birds are the robin, blue bird, cat bird, sparrows, meadow-lark, bobolink, thrushes, chickadee, wrens, brown thrasher, gold finch, cedar wax-wing, flycatchers, nuthatches, flicker (golden-winged woodpecker), downy and hairy woodpeckers, rose-breasted grosbeak, Baltimore oriole, barnswallow, chimney swift, purple martin, purple finch (linnet), vireos and several species of warblers.
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  • One tablet records that in 1631 two Algerine pirate crews landed in Ireland, sacked Baltimore, and carried off its inhabitants to slavery; another recalls the romantic escape of Ida M'Donnell, daughter of Admiral Ulric, consulgeneral of Denmark, and wife of the British consul.
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  • In the United States, the 3rd plenary council of Baltimore in 1884 provided that one rector out of ten should be irremovable (Smith, op. cit.
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  • Louis, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Ohio, the Ohio Central, the Norfolk & Western, the Hocking Valley, and the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus (Pennsylvania system) railways, and by nine interurban electric lines.
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  • In 1831 the Baltimore & Ohio Company offered a prize of $4000 for an American engine weighing 32 tons, able to draw 15 tons at 15 m.
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  • The guarantee for this activity may be illustrated by a single fact: the combined building operations, in 1908, of San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, Spokane and Salt Lake City exceeded the combined building operations of Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Kansas City, Boston, Baltimore and Cincinnati during the same year.
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  • The Baltimore & Ohio railroad was built to protect and further the commercial interests of the city of Baltimore; the Cincinnati Southern railway is still owned by the city of Cincinnati, which built the line in the 'seventies for commercial protection against Louisville, Ky.
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  • In America the long open double-bogie passenger cars, as originally introduced by Ross Winans on the Baltimore & Ohio railway, are universally in use.
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  • Parkersburg is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, and the Little Kanawha railways, by electric railway to Marietta, Ohio, and by passenger and freight boats to Pittsburg, Cincinnati, intermediate ports, and ports on the Little Kanawha.
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  • Studies," Baltimore, 1897); Henry Adams, Documents relating to New England Federalism, 1800-1815 (Boston, 1878); A.
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  • It was under his control that the Wabash system became transcontinental and secured an Atlantic port at Baltimore; and it was he who brought about a friendly alliance between the Gould and the Rockefeller interests.
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  • Bassett, Constitutional Beginnings of North Carolina (Baltimore, 1894); The Regulators of North Carolina (Washington, 1894); and Slavery in the State of North Carolina (Baltimore, 1899), are all trustworthy.
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  • Weeks deals with the religious history in his Religious Development in the Province of North Carolina (Baltimore, 1892), Church and State in North Carolina (Baltimore, 1893) and Southern Quakers and Slavery (Baltimore, 1896); he is anti-Anglican, but judicial.
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  • Sikes, The Transition of North Carolina from Colony to Commonwealth (Baltimore, 1898), based on the public records, is accurate, though dull.
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  • Dr Coke was ordained at Bristol, England, in September, and in the following December, in a conference of the churches in America at Baltimore, he ordained and consecrated Asbury, who refused to accept the position until Wesley's choice had been ratified by the conference.
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  • In 1785, at Abingdon, Maryland, he laid the corner-stone of Cokesbury College, the project of Dr Coke and the first Methodist Episcopal college in America; the college building was burned in 1795, and the college was then removed to Baltimore, where in 1796, after another fire, it closed, and in 1816 was succeeded by Asbury College, which lived for about fifteen years.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railways.
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  • Maryland Maryland had imposed a tax upon the Baltimore branch of the Bank of the United States.
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  • He was made acting-lieutenant in the West Indies in the same year, and the rank was confirmed in 1744 During the Jacobite rising of 1745 he commanded the "Baltimore" sloop in the North Sea, and was dangerously wounded in the head while co-operating with a frigate in an engagement with two strong French privateers.
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  • In order to strengthen this compact, he arranged a marriage between the daughter of the king of Bavaria and Eugene Beauharnais; and he united the daughter of the Elector of Wurttemberg in marriage to Jerome Bonaparte, who had now divorced his wife, formerly Miss Paterson of Baltimore, at his brother's behests.
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  • Among the railways are the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the New York, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania), the Pittsburgh, Ft.
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  • In 1817 he removed to Baltimore, where he became the professional associate of Luther Martin, William Pinkney and Roger B.
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  • deep. Railway rates have also been a matter of vital importance in recent years; Boston, like New York, complaining of discriminations in favour of Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans and Galveston.
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  • Levermore, Town and City Government of New Haven, and The Republic of New Haven (Baltimore, 1886); E.
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  • (Boston, Mass., 1904); P. Haupt, Ecclesiastes (Baltimore, 1905).
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  • In September 1831 the party at a national convention in Baltimore nominated as its candidates for the presidency and vice-presidency William Wirt of Maryland and Amos Ellmaker (1787-1851) of Pennsylvania; and in the election of the following year it secured the seven electoral votes of the state of Vermont.
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  • At the Democratic Convention for the nomination of a presidential candidate held at Baltimore in 1912, he led on 27 ballots, and had a clear majority on eight, but he was finally defeated by Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey.
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  • It is the eastern terminus of the Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore, the Central of New Jersey, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Northern of New Jersey (operated by the Erie), the Erie, the New York, Susquehanna & Western, and the New Jersey & New York (controlled by the Erie) railways, the first three using the Pennsylvania station; and of the little-used Morris canal.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Wabash, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Pennsylvania railways, and is connected by an electric line with Byesville (pop. in 1900, 1267), about 7 m.
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  • In 1843 Congress passed the long-delayed appropriation, steps were at once taken to construct a telegraph from Baltimore to Washington, and on the 24th of May 1844 it was used for the first time.
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  • Waite, Doctrine and Literature of the Kabbalah (London, 1902); Fliigel, Philosophy, Kabbala, eec. (Baltimore, 1902); D.
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  • Callahan, Cuba and International Relations (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 1898), which supplement each other.
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  • Soc. of Baltimore), ed.
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  • The city is served by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern; the New York, Chicago & St Louis; the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis; the Pennsylvania; the Erie; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways; by steamboat lines to the principal ports on the Great Lakes; and by an extensive system of inter-urban electric lines.
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  • In May 1835 Van Buren was unanimously nominated by the Democratic convention at Baltimore.
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  • Journal of Mathematics, Baltimore, Md.
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  • Bond, jun., Monroe's Mission to France, 1794-1796 (Baltimore, 1907); Henry Adams, History of the United States (9 vols., New York, 1889-1891), containing a full but unsympathetic account of Monroe's career as a diplomatist; and James Schouler, History of the United States, vols.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways, and is connected by an interurban electric system with all the important cities and towns within a radius of 50 m.
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  • About 1828 he built the Canton Iron Works in Baltimore, Maryland, the foundation of his great fortune.
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  • The Baltimore & Ohio railway was to cross his property, and, after various inventions aiming to do away with the locomotive crank and thus save two-fifths of the steam, in 1830 he designed and constructed (largely after plans made two years before) the first steam locomotive built in America; though only a small model it proved the practicability of using steam power for working that line.
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  • Selling his Baltimore works, he built, in 1836, in partnership with his brother Thomas, a rolling mill in New York; in 1845 he removed it to Trenton, New Jersey, where iron structural beams were first made in 1854 and the Bessemer process first tried in America in 1856; and at Philippsburg, New Jersey, he built the largest blast furnace in the country at that time.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic (which has shops here), and the New York, Philadelphia && Norfolk railways, and by steamers on the Wicomico river, which has a channel 9 ft.
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  • Vallandigham (Baltimore, 1872); and J.
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  • Laos, A Handbook of Peru for Investors and Immigrants (Baltimore, 1903); C. R.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley (Pennsylvania Lines), the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Erie, the Northern Ohio, and the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus railways, by inter-urban electric lines and by the Ohio Canal.
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  • The borough is built on nearly level ground in the fertile valley of the Conewago, at the point of intersection of the turnpike roads leading to Baltimore, Carlisle, York and Frederick, from which places the principal streets - sections of these roads - are named.
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  • Its railway mileage in January 1907 was J33.6 m.; the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Philadelphia (Baltimore & Ohio system), and the Wilmington & Northern (Philadelphia & Reading system) cross the northern part of the state, while the Delaware railway (leased by the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington) runs the length of the state below Wilmington, and another line, the Maryland, Delaware & Virginia (controlled by the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic railway, which is related to the Pennsylvania system), connects Lewes, Del., with Love Point, Md., on the Chesapeake Bay.
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  • part of the state, connecting Delaware river and Chesapeake Bay, and thus affords transportation by water from Baltimore to Philadelphia.
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  • A protracted boundary dispute with Maryland, which colony at first claimed the whole of Delaware under Lord Baltimore's charter, was not settled until 1767, when the present line separating Delaware and Maryland was adopted.
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  • See the Life by John Johns (Baltimore, 1867).
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  • Portsmouth is served by the Baltimore & 1 See Captain G.
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  • In 1860 he presided over the National Democratic Convention which met first at Charleston and later at Baltimore, until he joined those who seceded from the regular convention; he then presided also over the convention of the seceding delegates, who nominated John C. Breckinridge for the presidency.
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  • Shambaugh, History of the Constitution of Iowa (Des Moines, 1902); Jesse Macy, Institutional Beginnings in a Western State in Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science (Baltimore, 1894); H.
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  • Alexandria is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Southern and the Washington Southern railways; by the Washington, Alexandria & Mount Vernon electric railway; and by several lines of river and coasting steamboats.
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  • When the war broke out it was her troops who first received hostile fire in Baltimore, and turning their mechanical training to account opened the obstructed railroad to Washington.
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  • In the United States a similar system prevails in New York, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New Haven and many other large towns.
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  • At the Johns Hopkins School at Baltimore twelve scholarships of $roo and $120 each are awarded annually; graduate nurses are paid $360 (£72) a year.
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  • At Baltimore he fell in love with Miss Elizabeth Patterson, and,though a minor, married her.
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  • The Bonapartes Of Baltimore are a branch of the family settled in America, descended from Jerome Bonaparte (VII.) by his union with Elizabeth (b.
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  • 1785), daughter of William Patterson, a Baltimore merchant, probably descended from the Robert Paterson who was the original of Sir Walter Scott's "Old Mortality."
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  • The marriage took place at Baltimore on the 24th of December 1803, but it was greatly disliked by Napoleon, who refused to recognize its legality.
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  • Nevertheless Jerome was forced by his brother to separate himself from his wife, whom he had brought to Europe, and after a stay in England Madame Patterson, or Madame Bonaparte, as she was usually called, returned to Baltimore.
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  • Jerome's only child by this marriage was Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte (1805-1870), who was born in England, but resided chiefly in Baltimore, and is said to have shown a marked resemblance to his uncle, the great emperor.
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  • Born at Baltimore on the 9th of June 1851 and educated at Harvard University, he became a lawyer in 1874 and has been president of the National Municipal League and has filled other public positions.
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  • Olney is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-western, the Illinois Central, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways, and is a terminus of the Ohio River Division of the last.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South Western and the Cincinnati, Lebanon and Northern railways, and by interurban electric railways.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Illinois Central and the Chicago & Eastern Illinois railways.
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  • The main railway continues south to Baltimore, and a light railway runs to the pleasant seaside village of Skull (or Schull), 15 m.
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  • Hollander, The Cincinnati Southern Railway; A Study in Municipal Activity (Baltimore, 1894), one of the Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science; and The Founding of the Cincinnati Southern Railway, with an Autobiographical Sketch by E.
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  • the Erie, the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western (Baltimore & Ohio system), the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Norfolk & Western, the Louisville & Nashville, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cincinnati Northern (New York Central system), the Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley (Pennsylvania system), and the Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern (Pennsylvania system).
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  • On the East Shore to the north is a marly loam overlying a yellowish-red clay sub-soil, to the south is a soil quite stiff with light coloured clay, while here and there, especially in the middle and south, are considerable areas both of light sandy soils and tidal marsh loams. On the West Shore the soils range from a light sandy loam in the lower levels south from Baltimore to rather heavy loarns overlying a yellowish clay on the rolling uplands and on the terraces along the Potomac and Patuxent.
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  • Baltimore is still the great manufacturing centre, but of the state's total product the percentage in value of that manufactured there decreased from 82.5 in 1890 to 66.5 in 1900, and to 62.3 (of the factory product) in 1905.
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  • However, on the same day that ground was broken for this canal, ground was also broken for the Baltimore & Ohio railway, of which 15 m.
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  • The more important railway lines are the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (controlled by the Pennsylvania and a consolidation of the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore, and the Baltimore & Potomac), the Western Maryland, the West Virginia Central & Pittsburg (leased by the Western Maryland), the Northern Central, the Maryland electric railways (including what was formerly the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line), and the Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis electric railway.
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  • Baltimore is the chief railway centre and its harbour is one of the most important in the country.
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  • In 1900 there were 1,094,110 native born to 93,934 foreign-born, and of the foreign-born 44,990 were natives of Germany and 68,600 were residents of the city of Baltimore.
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  • The chief cities are Baltimore, pop. (1910) 55 8, 4 8 5, Cumberland 21,839, Hagerstown 16,507, Frederick 10,411 and Annapolis 8609.
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  • In 1908 the General Assembly passed a law providing for annual direct primary elections (outside of Baltimore; and making the Baltimore special primary law applicable to state as well as city officials), but, as regards state officers, making only a slight improvement upon previous conditions inasmuch as the county or district is the unit and the vote of county or district merely " instructs " delegates to the party's state nominating convention, representation in which is not strictly in proportion to population, the rural counties having an advantage over Baltimore; no nomination petition is required.
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  • In the same year a separate law was passed providing for primary elections for the choice of United States senators; but here also the method is not that of nomination by a plurality throughout the state, but by the vote of counties and legislative districts, so that this measure, like the other primary law, is not sufficiently direct to give Baltimore a vote proportional to its population.
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  • Senators are elected, one from each of the twentythree counties and one from each of the four legislative districts of the city of Baltimore, for a term of four years, the terms of one-half expiring every two years.
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  • Delegates are elected for a term of two years, from each county and from each legislative district of Baltimore, according to population, as follows: for a population of 18,000 or less, two delegates; 18,000 to 28,000, three; 28,000 to 40,000, four; 40,000 to 55,000, five; 55,000 and upwards, six.
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  • Each legislative district of Baltimore is entitled tc -he number of delegates to which the largest county shall or may be entitled under the foregoing apportionment, and the General Assembly may from time to time alter the boundaries of Baltimore city districts in order to equalize their population.
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  • This system of apportionment gives to the rural counties a considerable pplitical advantage over the city of Baltimore, which, with 42.8% of the total population according to the census of 1900, has only 4 out of 27 members of the Senate and only 24 out of tot members of the House of Delegates.
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  • Justice, &c. - The administration of justice is entrusted to a court of appeals, circuit courts, special courts for the city of Baltimore, orphans' courts, and justices of the peace.
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  • Exclusive of the city of Baltimore, the state is divided into seven judicial circuits, in each of which are elected for a term of fifteen years one chief judge and two associate judges, who at the time of their election must be members of the Maryland bar, between the ages of thirty and seventy, and must have been residents of the state for at least five years.
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  • The seven chief judges so elected, together with one elected from the city of Baltimore, constitute the court of appeals, the governor with the advice and consent of the senate designating one of the eight as chief judge of that court.
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  • Three other judges are elected for four-year terms, in each county and in the city of Baltimore to constitute an orphans' court.
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  • A compulsory education law of 1902 - to operate, however, only in the city of Baltimore and in Allegany county - requires the attendance for the whole school year of children between the ages of eight and twelve and also of those between the ages of twelve and sixteen who are not employed at home or elsewhere.
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  • One of the normal schools was opened in Baltimore in 1866, the other at Frostburg in 1904.
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  • There is no provision for a general periodic assessment, but a state tax commissioner appointed by the governor, treasurer and comptroller assesses the corporations, and the county commissioners (in the counties) and the appeal tax court (in the city of Baltimore) revise valuations of real property every two years.
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  • The first bank of the state was established in 1790, and by 1817 there was one in each of twelve counties and several in Baltimore; in1818-1820and in1837-1839there were several serious bank failures, but there have been no serious failures since.
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  • to grant a charter conveying almost unlimited territorial and governmental rights therein to George Calvert, first Lord Baltimore (1580?-1632), and styling him its absolute lord and proprietor.
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  • The territory now forming the state of Delaware was within the boundaries defined by the Maryland charter, but in 1682 it was transferred by the duke of York to William Penn and in 1685 Lord Baltimore's claim to it was denied by an order in council, on the ground that it had been inhabited by Christians before the Maryland charter was granted.
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  • Four delegates were chosen from each county and two each from Baltimore and Annapolis, the same as under the proprietary government, population not being taken into account.
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  • The system of representation that, with the rapid growth of population in the north-east sections, especially in the city of Baltimore, placed the government in the hands of a decreasing minority also began to be attacked about this time; but the fear of that minority which represented the tobacco-raising and slave-holding counties of south Maryland, with respect to the attitude of the majority toward slavery prevented any changes until 1837, when the opposition awakened by the enthusiasm over internal improvements effected the adoption of amendments which provided for the election of the governor and senators by a direct vote of the people, a slight increase in the representation of the city of Baltimore and the larger counties, and a slight decrease in that of the smaller counties.
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  • The result was the new constitution of 1851, which fully established representation in the counties on the basis of population and further increased that of Baltimore.
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  • In the War of 1812 Frederick, Havre de Grace, and Frenchtown were burned by the British; but particularly noteworthy were the unsuccessful movements of the enemy by land and by sea against Baltimore, in which General Robert Ross (c. 1766-1814), the British commander of the land force, was killed before anything had been accomplished and the failure of the fleet to take Fort McHenry after a siege of a day and a night inspired the song The Star-spangled Banner, composed by Francis Scott Key who had gone under a flag of truce to secure from General Ross the release of a friend held as a prisoner by the British and during the attack was detained on his vessel within the British lines.
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  • The proprietors of Maryland were: Cecilius Calvert, second Lord Baltimore (1605[?]-1675) from 1632 to 1675; Charles Calvert, third Lord Baltimore (1629-1715) from 1675 to 1715; Benedict Leonard Calvert, fourth Lord Baltimore (1684?-1715) 1715; Charles Calvert, fifth Lord Baltimore (1699-1751) from 1715 to 1751; Frederick Calvert, sixth and last Lord Baltimore (1731-1771) from 1751 to 1771; Henry Harford, from 1771 to 1776.
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  • Charles Calvert, third Lord Baltimore.
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  • Charles Calvert, third Lord Baltimore Benedict Leonard Calvert (titular) and council (real).
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  • Harry, The Mar y land Constitution of 1851, Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science (Baltimore, 1902), contains an account of the agitation from 1835 to 1850 for constitutional reform; B.
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  • Adams, Taxation in Maryland, Johns Hopkins University Studies (Baltimore, 1900), an historical account of the sources of the state's revenue and administration of its taxing system; A.
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  • Bryan, History of State Banking in Maryland, Johns Hopkins University Studies (Baltimore, 1899), a careful study of the state's experience with banks from 1790 to 1864; J.
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  • Bozman, History of Maryland from 1633 to 1660 (Baltimore, 1837), a compilation of much of the more important material relating to the early history of the province; J.
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  • McMahon, An Historical View of the Government of Maryland from its Colonization to the Present Day (Baltimore, 1833), an able treatment of the subject by a learned jurist; J.
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  • Scharf, History of Maryland (Baltimore, 1879), the most extensive general history of the state, but it contains numerous errors and the arrangement is poor; W.
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  • C. Steiner, Maryland during the English Civil War (2 vols., Baltimore, 1906-190.7), one of the Johns Hopkins University Studies.
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  • Baltimore was the scene of a bloody riot as the first Northern regiment (6th Mass.) passed through on its way to Washington on the 19th of April, and, until troops could be spared to protect the railway through Maryland, all reinforcements for the national capital had to be brought up to Annapolis by sea.
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  • This promptitude was not only dictated by the necessity of preserving West Virginia, but imposed by the necessity of holding the Baltimore & Ohio railway, which, as the great link between east and west, was essential to the Federal armies.
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  • Hall's Williams MS. (Baltimore, 1886); in the European editions of the Syriac Bible so far as the minor Catholic epistles are concerned; in Hermathena, vol.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, the Toledo & Ohio Central (Ohio Central Lines), and the Hocking Valley railways.
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  • known as the Paris Psalter (Baltimore, 1894).
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  • of Baltimore.
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  • It is served by the Cambridge branch of the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington railway (Pennsylvania railway), which connects with the main line at Seaford, 30 m.
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  • distant, and with the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic at Hurlock, 16 m.
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  • distant; and by steamers of the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic railway company.
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  • In January 1852 the legislature of New Hampshire proposed him as a candidate for the presidency, and when the Democratic national convention met at Baltimore in the following June the Virginia delegation brought forward his name on the thirty-fifth ballot.
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  • UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST, 1 an American religious sect which originated in the last part of the 18th century under the leadership of Philip William Otterbein (1726-1813), pastor of the Second Reformed Church in Baltimore, and Martin Boehm (1725-1812), a Pennsylvanian Mennonite of Swiss descent.
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  • Otterbein and Boehm licensed some of their followers to preach and did a great work, especially through class-meetings of a Wesleyan type; 2 in 1789 they held a formal conference at Baltimore, and in 1800, at a conference near Frederick City, Maryland, the Church was organized under its present name, and Otterbein and Boehm were chosen its first bishops or superintendents.
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  • Wit continued decrease of altitude south-eastward, the crystalline belt dips under the coastal plain, near a line marked by the Delaware river from Trenton to Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, and thence south-south-westward through Maryland and Virginia past the cities of Baltimore, Washington and Richmond.
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  • It has few distinctive species, but within its borders the southern mole and cotton-tail rabbit of the South meet the northern star-nosed and Brewers moles and the varying hare of the North, and the southern bobwhite, Baltimore oriole, bluebird, catbird, chewink, thrasher and wood thrush are neighbors of the bobolink, solitary vireo and the hermit and Wilson s thrushes.
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  • The American clipper ships that were constructed at Baltimore and elsewhere during the last three decades before the Civil War were doubtless the swiftest sailers that have ever been built.
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  • New York, New Orleans, Boston, Galveston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, San Francisco and Puget Sound are, in order, the leading customs districts of the country in the value of their imports and exports.
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  • In Boston, St Louis, Baltimore, and some few other cities, the police board (or commissioner) is appointed by the governor because police matters had been mismanaged by the municipal authorities and occasionally allowed to become a means of extortion and a door to corruption.
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  • The American Political Science Review (Baltimore, 1907 sqq.) is especially useful for a comparative study of the state governments.
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  • Howards Introduction to the Local Constitutional History of the United States (Baltimore, 1889) is of use, although the authors theories, are questionable.
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  • (Baltimore, 1890); F.
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  • It is served by the Kanawha & Michigan (Ohio Central Lines) and the Hocking Valley railways, and (at Gallipolis Ferry, West Virginia, across the Ohio) by the Baltimore & Ohio railway.
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  • Chillicothe is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western (which has railway shops here), and other railways.
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  • It is served by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the New York, Chicago & St Louis and the Baltimore & Ohio railways, and by electric lines to Cleveland, Fairport and Ashtabula.
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  • Martin's Internal Improvements in Alabama (Baltimore, 1902; Johns Hopkins University Studies, series 20, No.
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  • Mount Vernon is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus, railways.
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  • It is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio and the Baltimore & Ohio railways.
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  • Newport News is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, of which it is a terminus; by river boats to Richmond and Petersburg, Va.; by coastwise steamship lines to Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Providence; by foreign steamship lines to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Dublin, Belfast, Rotterdam, Hamburg and other ports; and by electric lines to Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Portsmouth.
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  • 'GIBBONS, JAMES (1834-), American Roman Catholic cardinal and archbishop, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on the 23rd of July 1834, and was educated at St Charles College, Ellicott City, Maryland, and St Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, where he finished his theological training and was ordained priest on the 30th of June 1861.
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  • After a short time spent on the missions of Baltimore, he was called to be secretary to Archbishop Martin J.
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  • When in 1866 the Second Plenary Council of Baltimore considered the matter of new diocesan developments, he was selected to organize the new Vicariate Apostolic of North Carolina; and was consecrated bishop in August 1868.
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  • Bayley) of Baltimore.
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  • in 1883 selected him to preside over the Third Plenary Council in Baltimore (1884), and on the 30th of June 1886 created him a cardinal priest, with the title of Santa Maria Trastevere.
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  • For many years an ardent advocate of the establishment of a Catholic university, at the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore (1884) he saw the realization of his desires in the establishment of the Catholic University of America at Washington, of which he became first chancellor and president of the board of trustees.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Chesapeake & Ohio railways, and by several lines of river steamboats.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Pittsburg, Ft Wayne & Chicago Division), the Baltimore & Ohio and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways.
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  • The son graduated at Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, in 1837, and from the law department of the university of Virginia in 1841, and began the practice of law in Alexandria, Virginia, but in 1850 removed to Baltimore, Maryland, where he won a high position at the bar.
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  • He was not a candidate for re-election to Congress in 1864, and died in Baltimore, Maryland, on the 30th of December 1865.
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  • Chambers, Constitutional History of Hawaii (Baltimore, 1896), in Johns Hopkins University Studies; W.
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  • His "Dead Christ" (Cathedral, Baltimore) obtained a medal in 1817, and this success was followed up by a long series of works, of which the following are the more noteworthy: "Christ on the knees of the Virgin" (1819); "Anchises and Venus" (1822) (formerly in Luxembourg); "Ulysses and Minerva" (1824) (Musee de Rennes); "the Holy Family" (1829) (Cathedral, Toulon); and "Saint Catherine" (1838)(St Roch).
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  • The principal railways are the lines operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company from New York to Washington through Philadelphia; from Philadelphia to Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago and St Louis through Harrisburg and Pittsburg; from Baltimore, Maryland, to Sodus Point on Lake Ontario (Northern Central) through Harrisburg and Williamsport; from Williamsport to Buffalo and to Erie, and from Pittsburg to Buffalo; the Philadelphia & Reading; the Lehigh Valley; the Erie; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg.
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  • The annexation of Texas, achieved just before the close of his administration, seemed to commend him for a second term on that issue, and in May 1844 he was renominated by a convention of Democrats, irregularly chosen, at Baltimore.
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  • Tyler accepted the Baltimore nomination, but on the 20th of August withdrew from the contest.
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  • Seaboard Air Line, the Chesapeake & Ohio and the New York, Philadelphia && Norfolk (Pennsylvania system), the Southern, and the Norfolk & Western railways, by steamboat lines to Washington, Baltimore, New York, Providence and Boston, by ferries to Norfolk, and by electric lines to numerous suburbs.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Evansville & Terre Haute, and the Vandalia railways.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western railroad and by the East Saint Louis & Suburban Electric line.
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  • He was about to go on leave of absence in order to be married in Baltimore when he received his nomination to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, Grant's and Sherman's old army, which was to take part under Sherman's supreme command in the campaign against Atlanta (1864).
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  • south of Toledo; but both militias disbanded when Richard Rush, of Philadelphia, and Benjamin C. Howard, of Baltimore, appeared at Toledo as peace emissaries, appointed by President Jackson.
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  • A subsequent attack on Baltimore, in which General Ross was killed (September 12, 1814), was a failure.
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  • On the "Heights" are many fine residences with beautiful gardens; the Monastery and Academy (for girls) of Visitation, founded in 1799 by Leonard Neale, second archbishop of Baltimore; and the college and the astronomical observatory (1842) of Georgetown University.
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  • Wilmington is served by the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line railways, and by steamboat lines to New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore and to ports on the Cape Fear and Black rivers, and is connected by an electric line with Wrightsville Beach, a pleasure resort 12 m.
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  • 9, io); (Baltimore, 1908).
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  • He was a leader of the Anti-Masons in Pennsylvania, and was prominent in the national Anti-Masonic Convention at Baltimore in 1831.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Pittsburg and Lake Erie, and the Baltimore & Ohio railways, and by the interurban electric system of the West Penn Railway Co., which has a large power plant near Connellsville.
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  • He received the brevets of major for Cerro Gordo, lieut.- colonel for Contreras-Churubusco and colonel for Chapultepec. After the war he was employed in engineer work at Washington and Baltimore, during which time, as before the war, he resided on the great Arlington estate, near Washington, which had come to him through his wife.
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  • Pop. (1890) 3470; (1900) 5422, of whom 939 were foreign-born., It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Pennsylvania' railways, and by the Ohio canal, and is connected with Cleveland by an inter-urban electric line.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio railway, which crosses the Potomac here, by the Winchester & Potomac railway (Baltimore & Ohio) of which it is a terminus, and by boats on the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, which passes along the Maryland side of the Potomac. Across the Potomac on the north rise the Maryland Heights; across the Shenandoah, on the West Virginia side, the Virginia or Loudoun Heights; and behind the town to the W.
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  • Adams, Village Communities of Cape Ann and Salem (Baltimore, 1883); Eleanor Putnam (the pen-name of Mrs Arlo Bates), Old Salem (Boston, 1886); C. H.
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  • A rhetorical study of the types of character in the orations of Lysias (Baltimore, 1892).
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  • His mother first set him to learn the trade of a shoemaker, first at Newburyport, and then, after 1815, at Baltimore, Maryland, and, when she found that this did not suit him, let him try his hand at cabinet-making (at Haverhill, Mass.).
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  • Lundy was then publishing in Baltimore a small monthly paper, entitled The Genius of Universal Emancipation, and he resolved to go to Bennington and invite Garrison to join him in the editorship. With this object in view he walked from Boston to Bennington, through the frost and snow of a New England winter, a distance of 125 m.
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  • In pursuance of this plan he went to Baltimore in the autumn of 1829, and thenceforth the Genius was published weekly, under the joint editorship of the two men.
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  • Baltimore was then one of the centres of the domestic slave trade, and upon this traffic Garrison heaped the strongest denunciations.
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  • A vessel owned in Newburyport having taken a cargo of slaves from Baltimore to New Orleans, he characterized the transaction as an act of "domestic piracy," and avowed his purpose to "cover with thick infamy" those engaged therein.
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  • He was sure, after his experiences at Baltimore, that a movement against slavery resting upon any less radical foundation than this would be ineffectual.
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  • It is served by four divisions of the Baltimore & Ohio railway, which maintains extensive car shops here.
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  • Bruce, The Anglo-Saxon Version of the Book of Psalms, Baltimore, 1894.) (C. PL.)
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  • Allegheny is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Pittsburg & Western railways, by the Pittsburg, Ft.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio (the Cleveland, Lorain & Wheeling Division), and the Pennsylvania (Cleveland & Pittsburgh Division) railways, and by an inter-urban electric system.
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  • It is the principal petroleum-distributing centre on the Atlantic seaboard, the enormous refineries and storehouses of the Standard Oil Company, among the largest in the world, being located here; there are connecting pipe lines with the Ohio and Pennsylvania oil fields, and with New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia and Washington.
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  • He returned to his law practice in Baltimore, but on the 28th of December 1835 was nominated Chief-Justice of the United States Supreme Court to succeed John Marshall.
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  • The delivering of this opinion, on circuit, in Baltimore, in May 1861, was one of the judge's last public acts.
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  • An authoritative biography is Samuel Tyler's Memoir of Roger Brooke Taney (Baltimore, 1872).
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  • Three years later he was appointed professor of mathematics in the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, stipulating for an annual salary of $5000, to be paid in gold.
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  • At Baltimore he gave an enormous impetus to the study of the higher mathematics in America, and during the time he was there he contributed to the American Journal of Mathematics, of which he was the first editor, no less than thirty papers, some of great length, dealing mainly with modern algebra, the theory of numbers, theory of partitions and universal algebra.
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  • From 1778 to 1805 he was attorney-general of Maryland; in1814-1816he was chief judge of the court of Oyer and Terminer for the city of Baltimore; and in1818-1822he was attorney-general of Maryland.
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  • See the biographical sketch by Henry P. Goddard, Luther Martin, the Federal Bull-Dog (Baltimore, 1887), No.
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  • From 1876 almost until his death he was connected with the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, being in turn a fellow, an associate in history (1878-1883), an associate professor (1883-1891) and after 1891 professor of American and institutional history.
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  • Adams: Tributes of Friends (Baltimore, 1902), extra volume (xxiii.) of "Studies in Historical and Political Science."
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  • Weeden, Indian Money as a Factor in New England Civilization (Baltimore, 1884); E.
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  • Havana has frequent steam-boat communication with New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Tampa, Mobile, New Orleans and other ports of the United States; and about as frequent with several ports in England, Spain and France.
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  • Hazen, Contemporary American opinion of the French Revolution (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 1897).
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  • The boundary between Virginia and Maryland, according to the Baltimore grant, was the south shore.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania and the Baltimore & Ohio railways.
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  • He resigned his commission in May 1865, and became editor of a German journal in Baltimore, Maryland.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville, the Southern Indiana, and (for freight from the Wallner quarries about 5 m.
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  • from Baltimore and 45 m.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Northern Central railways, and by two interurban electric lines.
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  • Frederick, so named in honour of Frederick Calvert, son and afterward successor of Charles, Lord Baltimore, was settled by Germans in 1733, and was laid out as a town in 1745, but was not incorporated until 1817.
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  • Whitney (both of Lowell), whose regiment was mobbed in Baltimore on the 19th of April 1861 while marching to Washington; and a bronze figure of Victory (after one by Rauch in the Valhalla at Ratisbon), commemorating the Northern triumph in the Civil War.
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  • of Baltimore, 135 m.
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  • Seven railways enter the city: the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington division of the Pennsylvania System, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Southern, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis, the Washington Southern and the Washington, Alexandria & Mt Vernon.
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  • There is also an hourly ferry service to Alexandria, and at irregular intervals there are boats direct to Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York and Boston.
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  • (Baltimore, 1885); C. Howard, Washington as a Center of Learning (Washington, 1904); Tindall, Origin and Government of the District of Columbia (ibid., 1903); A.
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  • Spofford, The Founding of Washington City (Baltimore, 1881); and Glenn Brown, Papers on Improvement of Washington City (Washington, 1901).
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  • part of the state is entered by the Baltimore & Ohio, which has a line down the Shenandoah Valley to Lexington.
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  • Connexion between Richmond and Washington is by a union line (Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac and Washington Southern railways) operated jointly by the Southern, Atlantic Coast line, Seaboard Air line, Chesapeake & Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore & Ohio railways.
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  • C. Ballagh, A History of Slavery in Virginia (Baltimore, 1902); B.
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  • When Archbishop Bayley was transferred to the see of Baltimore in 1873, Pius IX.
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  • The English colony of Maryland, planned by the Catholic George Calvert (1st Lord Baltimore), and founded (1634) by his son the Catholic Cecilius Calvert (2nd Lord Baltimore), and Pennsylvania, founded (1681) by the tolerant Quaker William Penn, first permitted the legal existence of Catholicism in English-speaking communities of the New World.
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  • In 1790 Father Carroll was made bishop of the see of Baltimore, and given charge of all the Catholic interests in the United States.
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  • In the following year Baltimore found itself the first metropolitan see of the United States, with New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Bardstown as suffragans.
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  • The principal religious events in the recent history of the Church were the holding of the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore (1884), the Catholic Congress (1889).
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  • (Baltimore, 1886).
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  • When the Democratic national convention met in Baltimore in 1844 he was mentioned as a possible candidate for the vice-presidency but was suddenly brought forward as a "dark horse" and selected to head the ticket.
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  • per ton of copper higher under the series than it is under the multiple system; but against this, it must be remembered that the new works of the Baltimore Copper Smelting and Rolling Company, which are as large as those of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, are using the Hayden process, which is the chief representative of the several series systems. In this system rolled copper anodes are used; these, being purer than many cast anodes, having flat surfaces, and being held in place by guides, dissolve with great regularity and require a space of only a in.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Pittsburg & Lake Erie and the Pennsylvania railways.
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  • He commanded the "Baltimore" in Rear-Admiral George Brown's squadron off the coast of Chile in 1891.
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  • C. Hanson, editor of the Baltimore Federal Republican, which had opposed the war, received grave injuries, from which he never recovered.
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  • He was educated for the medical profession, but entered the Sulpician Seminary of Paris in November 1803, was ordained priest in 1808, refused the post of chaplain to Napoleon, was professor of theology in the Diocesan Seminary at Rennes in 1808-1810, and in August 1810 settled in Baltimore, Maryland, whither his long general interest in missions, and particularly his acquaintance with Bishop Flaget of Kentucky, had drawn him.
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  • After teaching for two years (1810-1812) in Baltimore, he was sent to Mount St Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Maryland, where he remained until 1815, acting both as teacher and as pastor.
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  • He next visited France in the interest of American missions, and on his return in November 1815, became president of St Mary's College, Baltimore.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, South-Western (which has repair shops here), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Southern Indiana railways, and by the Indianapolis, Columbus & Southern and the Indianapolis & Louisville interurban electric lines.
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  • He upheld American rights in Samoa, pursued a vigorous diplomacy with Italy over the lynching of eleven Italians, all except three of them American naturalized citizens, in New Orleans on the 14th of May 1891, held a firm attitude during the strained relations between the United States and Chile (growing largely out of the killing and wounding of American sailors of the U.S. ship "Baltimore" by Chileans in Valparaiso on the 16th of October 1891), and carried on with Great Britain a resolute controversy over the seal fisheries of Bering Sea, - a difference afterwards settled by arbitration.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Philadelphia & Reading railways, by the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington division of the Pennsylvania system, and by steamboat lines.
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  • "Baltimore" having been given liberty on shore, an argument arose between some of them and a group of Chilean sailors in a drinking den in Valparaiso.
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  • He then set out to complete his education by travel, and on the 28th of October 1792 arrived in Baltimore, Maryland, where he finally decided to enter the priesthood.
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  • His impulsive objection to some of Bishop Carroll's instructions was sharply rebuked, and he was recalled to Baltimore.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, by an electric line to Wheeling, and by boats to Pittsburg, Cincinnati and intermediate ports.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington, the Philadelphia & Reading, and the Northern Central railways, and by interurban electric railways.
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  • Newark is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.
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  • He delivered a course of six Lowell lectures in Boston, and visited New York, New Haven, Baltimore, &c., spending the winter at Washington.
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  • Winchester is served by the Baltimore & Ohio and the Cumberland Valley railways.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, and the Burlington (Chicago, Burlington & Quincy) railways, and by steamboats plying between it and St Louis.
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  • Among the monographic contributions are Austin Scott's Influence of the Proprietors in Founding the State of New Jersey (Baltimore, 1885) and H.
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  • Cooley's Study of Slavery in New Jersey (Baltimore, 1896).
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  • The first society for worship was formed in Baltimore in 1792 (reorganized 1798), though a short-lived one had preceded it at Halifax, N.S., in 1791.
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  • In 1835 he and Benjamin C. Howard, of Baltimore, Maryland, were sent by President Jackson to prevent an outbreak of hostilities in the Ohio-Michigan boundary dispute.
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  • At the time of the Baltimore riot which opened the Civil War, Butler, as a brigadier-general in the state militia, was sent by Governor John A.
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  • Washington is served by the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio, the Chartiers Valley branch of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system) and the Waynesburg & Washington railways and a connecting line for freight service, and by electric railway to Pittsburg.
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  • Pittsburg is served by the Pennsylvania (several divisions), the Baltimore & Ohio, the Pittsburg & Lake Erie (controlled by the New York Central System), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (controlled by the Pennsylvania Company), the Pittsburg, Chartiers & Youghiogheny (controlled jointly by the two preceding railways; 21 m.
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  • As early as the year of its incorporation as a borough Philadelphia and Baltimore merchants had established an important trade with it.
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  • Their goods were carried in Conestoga wagons to Shippensburg and Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and Hagerstown, Maryland, taken from there to Pittsburg on pack horses, and exchanged for Pittsburg products; these products were carried by boat to New Orleans, where they were exchanged for sugar, molasses, &c., and these were carried through the gulf and along the coast to Baltimore and Philadelphia.
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  • After the capture of Fort Donelson (February 16, 1862) he was promoted to major-general (March 21, 1862), was engaged at Shiloh (April 7, 1862), and afterwards commanded the Eighth Corps with headquarters at Baltimore.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Cleveland & Pittsburg Division), the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash System) railways, and by several steamboat lines.
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  • Finally, in 1876, he became the first occupant of the chair of physics at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, a position which he retained until his premature death on the 16th of April 1901.
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  • In the interval between his election and the assumption of his duties at Baltimore, he studied physics under Helmholtz at Berlin, and carried out a well-known research on the effect of an electrically charged body in motion, showing it to give rise to a magnetic field.
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  • As soon as he was settled at Baltimore, two important pieces of work engaged his attention.
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  • In the Democratic convention at Baltimore, in 1852, Marcy was a prominent candidate for the presidential nomination, and from 1853 to 1857 he was secretary of state in the cabinet of President Pierce.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Pittsburg, Ft Wayne & Chicago division), the Erie, and the Baltimore & Ohio railways.
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  • In 1861 he strongly supported the anti-slavery party, and was forced to leave Baltimore where he then ministered.
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  • England has its council of Westminster (1852), the United States their plenary councils of Baltimore (1852, 1866, 1884), mentioning the diocesan synods; and Ot h er 4) g co u the whole of Latin America is ruled by the special law of its plenary council, held at Rome in 1899.
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  • BALTIMORE, a city and seaport, and the metropolis of Maryland, U.S.A., the sixth city in population in the United States.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (the Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line, the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic; the Northern Central; the Western Maryland and the Maryland & Pennsylvania railways; and by steamship lines running directly to all the more important ports on the Atlantic coast of the United States, to ports in the West Indies and Brazil, to London, Liverpool, Southampton, Bristol, Leith, Glasgow, Dublin, Belfast, Havre, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Bremen, Hamburg and other European ports.
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  • extremity of Locust Point, an irregular peninsula extending S.E., on which are grain-elevators and a number of wharves, including those of the Baltimore & Ohio railway.
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  • of Jones's Falls is known as East Baltimore, and is in turn nominally divided into Fells' Point to the S.
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  • In the Old Town still remain a few specimens of eighteenth century architecture, including several old-fashioned post-houses, which used to furnish entertainment for travellers starting for the Middle West by way of the old Cumberland Road beginning at Fort Cumberland, and from Baltimore to Fort Cumberland by a much older turnpike.
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  • from the centre of the city, Baltimore Street, running E.
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  • from Baltimore Street and E.
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  • Baltimore Street is the chief business thoroughfare; S.
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  • through East Baltimore, there are many small but busy retail shops.
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  • through the middle of East Baltimore, are good examples of wide streets, having squares in the middle, adorned with lawns, flower-beds and fountains.
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  • Fayette Street in almost the exact centre of the city, are three of Baltimore's most imposing buildings, and all of them narrowly escaped destruction by the great fire.
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  • high - Baltimore being the seat of a Roman Catholic archbishopric, the highest in rank in the United States; the First Presbyterian church (decorated Gothic), with a spire 250 ft.
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  • high; the Grace Episcopal church - Baltimore being the seat of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric; the First Methodist Episcopal church; and the synagogues of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation and the Oheb Shalom Congregation.
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  • Other notable buildings are the custom-house, the Masonic Temple, the Maryland Clubhouse, the Mount Royal station of the Baltimore & Ohio railway, and the buildings of the Johns Hopkins hospital.
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  • To this monument and the one in honour of Washington, Baltimore owes the name " The Monumental City," frequently applied to it.
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  • Patterson Park in the extreme S.E., of 125.79 acres, is a favourite resort for the inhabitants of East Baltimore.
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  • Baltimore ranks high as an educational centre.
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  • The Peabody Institute, founded in 1859 by George Peabody, who was for some years a resident of Baltimore, is an important factor in the promotion of science, literature and the fine arts.
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  • The charitable institutions of Baltimore are numerous.
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  • A representative list includes: - the Charity Organization Society, the primary object of which is to organize the work of the others; the Baltimore Association for the Improvement of the Condition of the Poor, which seeks to discourage indiscriminate alms-giving; the Bay View asylum or city poorhouse; the Children's Aid Society; the Thomas Wilson Fuel-Saving Society, for furnishing coal at low rates; the Woman's Industrial Exchange, for assisting women in need to support themselves; Johns Hopkins hospital, noted for the excellence of its equipment especially for heating and ventilating; Saint Joseph's general hospital; hospital for the women of Maryland of Baltimore city; nursery and child's hospital; Baltimore eye, ear and throat charity hospital; Maryland hospital for the - insane; the Sheppard asylum, intended especially for the cure of the insane; the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt hospital; the Baltimore orphan asylum; Saint Vincent's infant asylum; the Thomas Wilson sanatorium for children, intended for children under three years of age, who are suffering from disease, during the warm summer months; the Free Summer Excursion Society, for affording a change of air to the indigent sick; home for the incurables; homes for the aged; homes for friendless children; institutions for the blind; and institutions for the deaf and dumb.
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  • That Baltimore has grown rapidly as a manufacturing city since 1880 is seen from the fact that in that year there were but 3683 manufacturing establishments, with a total annual product valued at $78,417,304, as compared with 6359 establishments (of which 2274 were under the factory system) in 1900 producing commodities valued at $161,249,240 ($135,107,626 under the factory system); in 1905 there were 2163 establishments under the factory system with a total annual product valued at $151,546,580, an increase of 12.2% in the five years.
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  • Baltimore is noted particularly as the most important centre in the United States of the canning and preserving industry.
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  • What seems to have been the first oyster-canning establishment in America was built in Baltimore (by a Thomas Kensett) in 1820, and oyster-canning as a distinct industry on a permanent footing was begun here in 1850.
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  • side of the Chesapeake Bay, above the mouth of the Potomac. Up to 1900, after which year oyster canneries began to be built in the southern states, especially in Mississippi, Baltimore was the centre of the oyster-canning industry.
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  • Baltimore is also a well-known centre for the manufacture of clothing, in which in 1905 ($22,684,656) it ranked fourth among the cities of the United States; for cigar and cigarette-making (1905, $4,360,366); for the manufacture of foundry and machine shop products (1905, $6,572,925), of tinware (1905, $5,705,980), of„shirts (1905, $5,710,783), of cotton-duck (the output of sailduck being about three-fourths of the total for the United States), bricks (about 150,000,000 annually), and fertilizers; it also manufactures furniture,malt liquors,and confectionery, and many other commodities in smaller amounts.
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  • Although the charter under which Baltimore is governed came into effect as late as 1898, it is only the second one for the city, the first one having been in force for ioi years.
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  • Baltimore was named in honour of the Lords Baltimore, the founders of the province of Maryland, but no settlement was made here until nearly ioo years after the planting of the colony; meanwhile at least two other townsites, on which it was hoped permanent towns might be established, had received the same name, but nothing came of either.
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  • side of the Patapsco and lay it out in sixty equal lots as the town of Baltimore.
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  • About the same time the resources of the interior, for which Baltimore was to become a trade centre, were being rapidly developed by the Germans.
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  • Prior to 1752, in which year there were only twenty-five houses with two hundred inhabitants, the growth of the city had indeed been slow; but only a year or two later wheat loaded in its harbour was for the first time shipped to Scotland; during the war between the French and the English at this time some of the unfortunate Acadians found new homes here; in 1767 Baltimore was made the county seat; by the beginning of the War of Independence its population had grown to 6755; and in 1780 it was made a port of entry.
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  • The city early became an important shipping centre; during both the War of Independence and the War of 1812 many privateers were sent out from it, and in the interval between these wars, the ship-owners of Baltimore had their share in the world's carrying trade, the ” Baltimore clippers " becoming famous.
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  • In 1797 Baltimore received its first charter, having been governed until then from Annapolis and through commissions with very limited powers; at the same time the Fells' Point settlement, founded about 1730 by William Fells, a ship carpenter, was annexed.
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  • Baltimore Street near Liberty Street; during the same war also fortifications were first erected on the site of the present Fort M`Henry.
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  • At the outbreak of the Civil War on the 19th of April 1861, the Sixth Massachusetts regiment, while passing through Baltimore, was attacked by a mob and several men were killed on both sides; in the following month the city was subjected to military rule and so continued until the close of the war.
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  • From 1856 to 1860 Baltimore was under the control of the American or Know-Nothing party, and suffered greatly from election riots and other disorders, until as a remedy the control of the police system was taken from the mayor and council and exercised by the state government.
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  • Hollander, Guide to the City of Baltimore (Baltimore, 1893); T.
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  • P. Thomas, " The City Government of Baltimore " (in Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science, Baltimore, 1896); St G.
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  • Sioussat, "Baltimore, the Monumental City " (in L.
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  • Scharf, Chronicles of Baltimore (Baltimore, 1874).
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  • present Washington county, was originally marked with milestones brought from England, every fifth of which bore on one side the arms of Baltimore and on the opposite side those of Penn; but the difficulties in transporting them to the westward were so great that many of them were not set up. Owing to the removal of the stone marking the north-east corner of Maryland, this point was again determined and marked in1849-1850by Lieut.-Colonel J.
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  • See Heinrich Jacques, Alexis de Tocqueville; ein Lebensand Geistesbild (Vienna, 1876); James Bryce, The Predictions of Tocqueville (Baltimore, 1887); Count de Puymaigre, Les Souvenirs d'Alexis de Tocqueville (1893); and Correspondance entre Alexis de Tocqueville et Arthur de Gobineau (1908).
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Pennsylvania, and the Ohio River & Western railways.
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  • George Calvert Baltimore >>
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  • of Johns Hopkins University Studies (Baltimore, 1899); F.
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  • Churches were established in New York, Baltimore, Washington, Charleston and elsewhere during this period.
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  • His sermon on "Unitarian Christianity," preached at Baltimore in 1819, at the ordination of Jared Sparks, and that at New York in 1821, on "Unitarian Christianity most favourable to Piety," made him its interpreter.
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  • of Baltimore and about 153 m.
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  • Cumberland is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Western Maryland, the Pennsylvania, the Cumberland & Pennsylvania (from Cumberland to Piedmont, Virginia), and the George's Creek & Cumberland railways, the last a short line extending to Lonaconing (19 m.); by an electric line extending to Western Port, Maryland; and by the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, of which it is a terminus.
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  • Most of this wheat goes by way of the lakes through the Sault Sainte Marie canal to Buffalo, where it is shipped by rail or inland canal to New York, Philadelphia or Baltimore.
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  • He was rector of St John's Church, Hartford, in 1843-1854, of Grace Church, Baltimore, in 1854-1863, and of Calvary Church, New York City, in 1863.
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  • The city is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Louisville, Henderson & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Chicago, Indiana & Louisville, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Southern and the Louisville & Nashville railways; by steamboat lines to Memphis, Cairo, Evansville, Cincinnati and Pittsburg; by an extensive system of inter-urban electric lines; and by ferries to Jeffersonville and New Albany, Indiana, two attractive residential suburbs.
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  • 5 (Baltimore, 1909); S.
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  • Warren is served by the Erie, the Pennsylvania, and the Baltimore & Ohio railways.
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  • (Baltimore, 1895); B.
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  • 12 (Baltimore, 1883); Colyer Meriwether, History of Higher Education in South Carolina (Washington, 1889), in Circulars of Information of the United States Bureau of Education, No.
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  • Whitney, Government of the Colony of South Carolina (Baltimore, 1895), based too exclusively on the statutes; D.
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  • (Baltimore, 1890); and John P. Hollis, The Early Period of Reconstruction in South Carolina (Baltimore, 1905), containing an excellent discussion of the period from 1865 to 1868.
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  • The convention adjourned to Baltimore, where the Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky and Maryland delegations left it, and where Douglas was nominated for the presidency by the Northern Democrats; he campaigned vigorously but hopelessly, boldly attacking disunion, and in the election, though he received a popular vote of 1,376,957, he received an electoral vote of only 12 - Lincoln receiving 180.
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  • See also C. C. Marden, The Phonology of the Spanish Dialect of Mexico City (Baltimore, 1896); J., Sanchez Somoano, Modismos, locuciones y trm/nos mexicanos (Madrid, 1892), and F.
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  • from Baltimore and about the same distance E.
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  • Annapolis is served by the Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis (electric) and the Maryland Electric railways, and by the Baltimore & Annapolis steamship line.
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  • The Maryland Gazette, which became an important weekly journal, was founded by Jonas Green in 1745; in 1769 a theatre was opened; during this period also the commerce was considerable, but declined rapidly after Baltimore, in 1780, was made a port of entry, and now oyster-packing is the city's only important industry.
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  • Ridgely, Annals of Annapolis from 1649 until the War of 1812 (Baltimore, 1841); S.
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  • Baltimore, for example, had in 1904 nearly 70% more inhabitants (estimated), while its area at that time was a little less and in 1907 was nearly one-quarter less than that of Detroit.
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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Marietta Division), the Baltimore & Ohio (Marietta & Parkersburg, Marietta & Zanesville, and Ohio River divisions) and the Marietta, Columbus & Cleveland railways, and by steamboat lines to several river ports; a bridge across the Ohio connects it with Williamstown, West Virginia.
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  • Much of his time was given to writing and revising the lectures on the wave theory of light which he had delivered at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, in 1884, but which were not finally published till 1904.
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  • In addition to the Baltimore lectures, he published with Professor P. G.
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  • (Baltimore, 1900).
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  • In 1631 a Flemish renegade, known as Murad Reis, sacked Baltimore in Ireland, and carried away a number of captives who were seen in the slave-market of Algiers by the French historian Pierre Dan.
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  • Andrews " The River Towns of Connecticut " in The Johns Hopkins University Studies (Baltimore, 1886 and1889) should be consulted for the institutions of the colonial period.
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  • In 1873 the Archiv fiir experimentelle Pathologie and Pharmakologie first appeared, in 1895 the Archives Internationales de Pharmakodynamie, and in 1909 The Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics (published at Baltimore, U.S.A.), all of which are chiefly or entirely devoted to pharmacology.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Pennsylvania, the Chicago, Indiana & Southern and (for freight only) the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern, the Chicago Terminal Transfer, and the Indiana Harbour Belt railways; and is connected with Chicago and with the surrounding XXVIII.
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  • By potential subscribers such as receipt maryland Baltimore county wrong or unfairduring.
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  • Boris Ford, Baltimore, 1961 ), writes that the novel leaves the impression of a " general unselective distaste.
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  • This island endemic is very similar to our Baltimore Oriole.
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  • Improve access to care welfare policy maryland baltimore county of reputable insurers.
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  • A few years ago church officials in Baltimore noticed a growing number of people lined up outside their downtown soup kitchens.
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  • Baltimore Oriole Icterus galbula joined the melee of Kingbirds and Mockingbirds in a small area of scrub.
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  • Polly klaas a true love lost business by baltimore has put.
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  • While in Baltimore, while on the way to the inauguration, Pinkerton foiled a plot to assassinate the president.
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  • America's first railroad, the Baltimore and Ohio, used the 4 foot 8.5 inches standard.
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  • As Lord Kelvin has shown (Baltimore Lectures, p. 304, 1904) (16) may also be obtained by the consideration of the mean density of the altered medium.
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  • Sella, reference may be made to Lord Kelvin's Baltimore Lectures, p. 317, where a higher estimate of the value of n is favoured.
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  • The yearly meetings of Baltimore and Philadelphia have not adopted the pastoral system; the latter contains a very strong conservative element, and, contrary to the practice of London and the other " orthodox " yearly meetings, it officially regards the meetings of " the smaller body " (see above) as meetings of the Society of Friends.
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  • Political Science Quarterly (New York, 1904); Charles Snavely, A History of the City Government of Cleveland (Baltimore, 1902); C. C. Williamson, The Finances of Cleveland (New York, 1907); "The Government of Cleveland, Ohio," by Lincoln Steffens, in McClure's Magazine, vol.
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  • 1813) for seditious libel in 1800, drove the lawyers for the defence from the court, and evoked the wrath of the Republicans, who were stirred to action by a political harangue on the evil tendencies of democracy which he delivered as a charge to a grand jury at Baltimore in 1803.
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  • Baltimore, vol.
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  • Stevenson, The Southern Side; or, Andersonville Prison (Baltimore, 1876).
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  • It is marked off from the Piedmont Plateau by a " Fall Line " extending from Washington (D.C.) north-east through Baltimore to a point a little south of the north-east corner of the state, and is divided by the Chesapeake Bay into two parts known as the East Shore and the West Shore.
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  • - Publications of the Maryland Geological Survey (Baltimore, 1897); Maryland Weather Service Climatology and Physical Features, biennial reports (Baltimore,1892-); United States Census; Reports of the U.S. Fish Commissioner and Bureau of Fisheries (Washington, 1871); State Department, Maryland Manual, a Compendium of Legal, Historical and Statistical Information (Baltimore, 1900-); B.C. Steiner, Citizenship and Suf f rage in Maryland (Baltimore, 1895), an historical review of the subject; J.
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  • Two uncles on the father's side having settled in America, he visited Maryland in 1763, with the view, it is said, of assisting to recover a tract of land of some extent about which a dispute had arisen, and was in this way induced to commence practice as a lawyer at Baltimore, where for a time he met with much success.
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  • Zanesville is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Pennsylvania, the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus, the Ohio River & Western, the Wheeling & Lake Erie, the Zanesville & Western, and the Ohio & Little Kanawha (B.
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  • concerning the aboriginal history of America (Baltimore, 1829); Albert Gallatin, "Synopsis of the Indian Tribes," in Archaeologia americana, vol.
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  • One day some men were sitting by the door of a hotel in Baltimore.
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  • My parents at once determined to take me to Baltimore to see if anything could be done for my eyes.
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  • When we arrived in Baltimore, Dr. Chisholm received us kindly: but he could do nothing.
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  • How different this journey was from the one I had made to Baltimore two years before!
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  • I hear there is a deaf and blind child being educated at the Baltimore Institution.
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  • America 's first railroad, the Baltimore and Ohio, used the 4 foot 8.5 inches standard.
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  • The outlet malls are usually located not too far from many of the major cities, and are often found in the suburbs of places like Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Dallas, Seattle and San Francisco.
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  • Most of these offices are located in large cities, such as Baltimore and Los Angeles.
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  • Anne Markstein Interiors: Offering complete design help for home and office, Anne Markstein Interiors has been recognized in Better Homes and Gardens and the Baltimore Sun.
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  • Anne Markstein is past president of Baltimore's IFDA chapter.
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  • As such, it's a popular ski area for Pennsylvania, Washington DC and Baltimore residents who want to learn to ski or snowboard.
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  • One of the longest-running ski resorts in the region, Wisp is less than a three-hour drive from Washington D.C. and Baltimore and two hours from Pittsburgh.
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  • It is also 100 miles from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and 171 miles from Baltimore, Maryland.
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  • The Poconos are accessible by millions of people living in the cities of Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington D.C. and has many options for individuals and families who love to hit the slopes.
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  • Yet in 1960, a mother sued the school system in Baltimore, Maryland, feeling that her son was being forced into the prayer ritual.
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  • Soon she moved to Baltimore and worked for WJZ-TV as a news anchor.
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  • David Michael Hasselhoff was born on July 17, 1952, in Baltimore, Maryland.
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  • They take in a homeless foster child, Michael Oher, who goes on to become a first-round draft pick for the Baltimore Ravens.
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  • Students can attend Community College of Baltimore County classes in several locations throughout the city of Baltimore.
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  • All the major Florida ports - Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Port Canaveral and Tampa - offer an assortment of Bahamas and Caribbean voyages, while other itineraries are available from New Orleans, Galveston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Boston.
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  • Norwegian Cruise Line is based in Miami, FL, but sails from a wide variety of ports, including Baltimore, MD; New York, NY; New Orleans, LA; Boston, MA; Los Angeles, CA; and Honolulu, HI.
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  • A Baltimore cruise to nowhere is ideal for travelers who prefer to take a mini-holiday from a port that is not as crowded as Miami or New York.
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  • A cruise to nowhere from Baltimore oozes serenity.
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  • The vessel departs from Baltimore, goes out to sea, but has no set destination or end port.
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  • The historic port of Baltimore is quickly becoming one of the nation's most popular cruise hot spots.
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  • What's more, the city recently spent millions of dollars creating a new Baltimore Cruise Terminal, located near the Inner Harbor site.
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  • In the past Royal Caribbean has offered cruises to nowhere from Baltimore.
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  • Fortunately, the company says it plans to resume its Baltimore cruise to nowhere in the future.
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  • A cruise to nowhere from Baltimore focuses on passenger enjoyment.
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  • Low price: Taking a cruise to nowhere from Baltimore will cost you much less than taking a trip to the Caribbean or other island paradise.
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  • Cruises to nowhere from Baltimore cater to families traveling with kids of all ages, and include onboard games, projects and other fun activities to keep children busy and parents happy.
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  • For example, where I live in Wisconsin, clients are looking to sail from East Coast ports such as New York, New Jersey, Boston or Baltimore.
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  • Located in a suburb of Baltimore called Middle River, Ivy Hall is not far from the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Johns Hopkins Bayview, St. Joseph, Franklin Square Hospital Center and the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center.
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  • RLTV began on September 5, 2006, when it was launched in Baltimore, Maryland.
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  • A fun fact about Tom Clancy is that he is part-owner of the Baltimore Orioles and sits at the Vice Chairman of their Community Activities and Public Affairs.
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  • The game begins after his escape, after arriving in Baltimore.
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  • Originally only serving the Baltimore and Washington, DC areas, Cellular One has since gone on to expanding its service to 35 different states.
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  • Baltimore: Brookes Publishing Co., 2001.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000.
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  • Child Abuse: Medical Diagnosis and Management, 2nd ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins, 2001.
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  • Agricultural Research Service, USDA, National Agricultural Library, Room 105, 10301 Baltimore Boulevard, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351.
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  • Young Children's Behavior: Practical Approaches for Caregivers and Teachers, 2nd ed. Baltimore, MD: Paul H.
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  • In 2004, the A-T Clinical Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore also started a clinical study.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005.
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  • Chester Building, Suite 382;8600 LaSalle Road; Baltimore, MD 21286-2044. (410) 296-0232 or (800) 222-3123.
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  • American Urological Association. 1120 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, 2003.
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  • SIDS Alliance. 1314 Bedord Ave., Suite 210, Baltimore, MD 21208.
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  • American Foundation for Urologic Disease. 1128 North Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21201.
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  • Medicine (Baltimore) 82 (November 2003): 373-84.
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  • American Urological Association. 1120 North Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21201.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2004.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2003.
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  • Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2002.
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  • The first FAO Schwarz, then called Schwarz Toy Bazaar, opened in Baltimore.
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  • Individuals and businesses can make a donation to the organization by visiting the local facility in Baltimore, MD. The organization then sells the materials to the public at a discounted price.
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  • Ms. Smith is a graduate of the University of Chicago and is a social worker in Baltimore, Maryland.
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  • Mr. Brown graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law and is employed with Williams and Associates.
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  • Jane Jones and Mr. Tim Jones announce the engagement of Ms. Jones' daughter..." or "The engagement of Ms. Amy Smith of Baltimore to Ben Brown is annouced by her parents, Mr. John Smith of Naperville and Ms. Tim Jones of Chicago.
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  • Or more formally, "Amy Smith, a graduate of the University of Chicago, and Ben Brown, a graduate of the University of Baltimore School of Law, are pleased to announcetheir engagement...
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  • A Volunteer Steering Committee of the center runs the Baltimore Area Celiac Support Group for Maryland residents.
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  • An affinity for baseball and a fastball that was clocked at 93 miles per hour got Moore drafted by both the Boston Red Sox and the Baltimore Orioles, but his mother convinced him to go to college before embarking on a sports career.
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  • The Union Station project was conceived by the Pennsylvania, Baltimore, and Ohio Railroad in 1901 to accommodate the growing number of rail passengers heading for the nation's capital.
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  • The administration is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland and employs a staff of more than 65,000 people.
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  • Now, because of Rohr's efforts, that same style and luxury can be found in the United States through her Baltimore, Maryland, boutique and her online store.
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  • Tori Amos' first single was a song called "Baltimore", which was about the Baltimore Orioles.
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  • Mike Rowe started out as a singer with the Baltimore Opera company but soon moved into radio and television work.
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  • Mike Rowe was born in Baltimore, Maryland, where his parents were teachers in the Baltimore County schools.
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  • Mike Rowe landed a job with the Baltimore Opera as a baritone.
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  • Where did he go after the Baltimore opera?
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  • Lisa Joyner was born on December 31, 1966, in Baltimore, Maryland.
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  • The Baltimore Science Fiction Society, for instance, will be hosting its 40th Balticon convention in 2006.
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  • Dean found himself able to predict for instance, it was time to visit Baltimore again, and a week or two later, Byrne would travel there.
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  • The trip between Baltimore and Norfolk was in a much small­er aircraft than the first leg of the journey.
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  • Assoc., Baltimore, 1889); cf.
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  • Patrick (Baltimore, 1889).
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  • or Reconstruction and its Results (Baltimore, 1890).
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  • Among the most representative are: the Popular Science Monthly, New York; the monthly Boston Journal of Education; the quarterly American Journal of Mathematics, Baltimore; the monthly Cassier's Magazine (1891), New York; the monthly American Engineer (1893), New York; the monthly House and Garden, Philadelphia; the monthly Astrophysical Journal, commenced as Sidereal Messenger (1882), Chicago; the monthly American Chemical Journal, Baltimore; the monthly American Naturalist, Boston; the monthly American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Philadelphia; the monthly Outing, New York; the weekly American Agriculturist, New York; the quarterly Metaphysical Magazine (1895) New York; the bi-monthly American Journal of Sociology, Chicago; the bi-monthly American Law Review, St Louis; the monthly Banker's Magazine, New York; the quarterly American Journal of Philology (1880), Baltimore; the monthly Library Journal (1876), New York; the monthly Public Libraries, Chicago; Harper's.
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  • Walter (Baltimore, 1841), by T.
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