Balfour sentence example

balfour
  • Balfour, and succeeded to the title in 1873.
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  • Julius Kaftan - Balfour's German editor, and a highly influential theologian, occupying a position of modified Ritschlianism - is also a very thoroughgoing empiricist.
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  • Balfour put forward the view that the polyp was the more primitive type, and that the medusa is a special modification of the polyp for reproductive purposes, the result of division of labour in a polypcolony, whereby special reproductive persons become detached and acquire organs of locomotion for spreading the species.
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  • Haeckel, on the other hand, is in accordance with Balfour in regarding a Siphonophore as a medusome, that is to say, as a colony composed of medusoid persons or organs entirely.
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  • Statistics.See Wyatt, Agricultural Ledger (Calcutta, 1895), p. 71; Balfour, The Agricuttural Pests of India (1887), p. 13; Eriksson and Henning, Die Getreideroste; the publications of the U.S. Agricultural Department; the Kew Bulletin; Zeitschrift fr Pjlanzeiikrankheiten, and elsewhere.
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  • "ALEXANDER HUGH BRUCE, BALFOUR OF BURLEIGH Loth (or 6TH) Baron (1849-1921), British politician, was born at Kennet, Alloa, Jan.
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  • He was educated at Loretto, Eton and Oriel College, Oxford, and in 1869 was restored by Act of Parliament to the barony of Balfour of Burleigh, to which he was entitled by his descent from the 5th baron, who was attainted after the Jacobite rebellion of 1715.
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  • Lord Balfour, who received hon.
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  • Towards the end of 1901 a departmental committee of the Board of Trade was formed to consider the Light Railways Act, and in 1902 the president of the Board of Trade (Mr Gerald Balfour) stated that as a result of the deliberations of this committee, a new bill had been drafted which he thought would go very far to meet all the reasonable objections that had been urged against the present powers of the local authorities.
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  • Tait collaborated with Balfour Stewart in the Unseen Universe, which was followed by Paradoxical Philosophy.
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  • (From Balfour, after Fol.) foot.
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  • He determined to treat prisoners captured from submarines, in view of their breaches of the laws of war, with more severity than ordinary prisoners; but the Germans retaliated harshly on the most noteworthy English prisoners in their hands, and Mr. Balfour, on succeeding Mr. Churchill, gave up this discrimination.
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  • Balfour and Henry Sidgwick, in the Academy (xxviii.
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  • William Balfour Baikie >>
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  • Milner, who was then spending a brief holiday in Europe, was urged by Mr Balfour to take the vacant post of secretary of state for the colonies.
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  • ROBERT LEWIS BALFOUR STEVENSON (1850-1894), British essayist, novelist and poet, was the only child of Thomas Stevenson, civil engineer, and his wife, Margaret Isabella Balfour.
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  • From about the age of eighteen he dropped his baptismal names of Lewis Balfour and called himself Robert Louis, but was mostly known to his relatives and intimate friends as "Louis."
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  • See the Letters of Stevenson to his Family (1899), with the critical and biographical preface by Mr Sidney Colvin; Vailima Letters, to Sidney Colvin (1895), and the Life of Robert Louis Stevenson by Graham Balfour (1901).
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  • Embryology: - Balfour, " Development of the Araneina," Q.
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  • This institution has undergone four changes of site since its foundation in 1670 by Sir Andrew Balfour and Sir Robert Sibbald, and now occupies an area of 34 acres in Inverleith Row.
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  • On July 25 at the London Mansion House Mr. Balfour publicly indorsed the full Yugoslav programme, as formulated by the Serbian minister, Mr. Jovanovic: but the latter's full report to his home Government was answered by a severe snub, and during the winter he too was dismissed for his Yugoslav sentiments.
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  • Balfour, and produced the profoundest modifications in classification.
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  • The capacity of existing sources, however, was deemed sufficient by a Royal Commission under Lord Balfour of Burleigh in 1893, and this opinion was endorsed by a further Commission under Lord Llandaff.
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  • Other public buildings include the municipal buildings, the sheriff court and county buildings, Balfour hospital, and the fever hospital.
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  • who puts the expression into the mouth of the Baron of Bradwardine in Waverley, chap. lvii., and also of Balfour of Burley in Old Mortality.
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  • He left the army in 1887, married Sibell Mary, daughter of the gth Earl of Scarbrough, widow of Earl Grosvenor, mother of the 2nd Duke of Westminster, and became private secretary to Mr. Balfour, at the time Irish Secretary, a position which he held till 1892.
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  • Balfour's Foundations of Belief (8th ed., 1901).
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  • The garden at Edinburgh was founded by Sir Andrew Balfour and Sir Robert Sibbald in 1670, and, under the name of the Physic Garden, was placed under the superintendence of James Sutherland, afterwards professor of botany in the university.
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  • It should be added that the process of development, the gastrulation as it is termed, may be shortened by the immigration of cells taking place C From Balfour, after Kowalewsky.
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  • The results obtained in the years1862-1866were discussed in two memoirs, entitled "Researches on Solar Physics," published by De la Rue, in conjunction with Professor Balfour Stewart and Mr B.
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  • Balfour's Defence of Philosophic Doubt (1879).
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  • Balfour, Defence of Philosophic Doubt (1879).
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  • He accepted the chairmanship of the Royal Commission on Ritualistic Practices in the Church, and he did valuable work as 'an arbitrator; and though when the fiscal controversy arose he became a member of the Free-food League, his parliamentary loyalty to Mr Balfour did much to prevent the Unionist free-traders from precipitating a rupture.
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  • When Mr Balfour resigned in 1905 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount St Aldwyn.
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  • - English Law: Balfour Browne and Allan, Compensation (2nd ed., London, 1903); Cripps, Compensation (5th edition, London, 1905); Hudson, Compensation (London, 1906); Boyle and Waghorn, Compensation (London, 1903); Lloyd, Compensation (6th ed.
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  • ROBERT BALFOUR (known also as Balforeus) (1550?- 1625?), Scottish philosopher, was educated at St Andrews and the university of Paris.
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  • His great work is his Commentarii in Organum Logicum Aristotelis (Bordeaux, 1618); the copy in the British Museum contains a number of highlyeulogistic poems in honour of Balfour, who is described as Graium aemulus acer.
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  • Balfour was one of the scholars who contributed to spread over Europe the fame of the praefervidum ingenium Scotorum.
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  • Balfour Castle, a mansion in the Scottish Baronial style built in 1848, is situated near the south-western extremity of the island.
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  • It dates from the 15th century or even earlier, and was at one time the property of Sir Gilbert Balfour, the Master of Queen Mary's Household.
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  • 1797), the hydrographer; Malcolm Laing (1762-1818), author of the History of Scotland from the Union of the Crowns to the Union of the Kingdoms; Mary Brunton (1778-1818), author of Self-Control, Discipline and other novels; Samuel Laing (1780-1868), author of A Residence in Norway, and translator of the Heimskringla, the Icelandic chronicle of the kings of Norway; Thomas Stewart Traill (1781-1862), professor of medical jurisprudence in Edinburgh University and editor of the 8th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Samuel Laing (1812-1897), chairman of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, and introducer of the system of "parliamentary" trains with fares of one penny a mile; Dr John Rae (1813-1893), the Arctic explorer; and William Balfour Baikie (1825-1864), the African traveller.
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  • Balfour, Odal Rights and Feudal Wrongs (1860); J.
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  • (From Balfour.) Both figures represent the glochidium stage.
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  • Balfour, and a useful bibliographical summary, appeared in 1897-1898.
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  • It is termed the " velum," and is frequently drawn out (From Balfour, after Bobretzky.) FIG.
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  • While Balfour Stewart's work on the theory of exchanges was too easily understood and therefore too easily ignored, the weak points in Kirchhoff's developments are only now beginning to be perceived.
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  • The investigations both of Balfour Stewart and of Kirchhoff are based on the idea of an enclosure at uniform temperature and the general results of the reasoning centre in the conclusion that the introduction of any body at the same temperature as the enclosure can make no difference to the streams of radiant energy which we imagine to traverse the enclosure.
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  • This result, which, accepting the possibility of having an absolutely opaque enclosure of uniform temperature, was clearly proved by Balfour Stewart for the total radiation, was further extended by Kirchhoff, who applied it (though not with mathematical rigidity as is sometimes supposed) to the separate wave-lengths.
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  • Balfour.
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  • Balfour, in The Foundations of Belief, being Notes Introductory to the Study of Theology (1895), begins by maintaining A.
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  • Balfour, however, having from unproved assumptions denied the evidence of the senses, and the rational power of using them to infer things beyond oneself, has to look out for other, and non-rational, foundations of belief.
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  • It is fair, however, to add that Balfour has a further foundation for the belief in Nature, the survival of the fittest, by which those only would survive who possessed and could transmit the belief.
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  • Balfour says, given that men believe in Nature, they will survive; but he fails to show how they come to believe in it.
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  • The result of undermining this sure foundation emerges in Balfour's attitude to the beliefs themselves.
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  • Such is the modern " Acatalepsia," which arises from denying the evidence of the senses, and from citing the transfigured realism of Spencer instead of the original realism of Aristotle, about whom Balfour speaks as follows: " It would be difficult, perhaps impossible, to sum up our debts to Aristotle.
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  • One cannot but feel regret at seeing the Reformed Churches blown about by every wind of doctrine, and catching at straws now from Kant, now from Hegel, and now from Lotze, or at home from Green, Caird, Martineau, Balfour and Ward in succession, without ever having considered the basis of their faith; while the Roman Catholics are making every effort to ground a Universal Church on a sane system of metaphysics.
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  • ARTHUR JAMES BALFOUR (1848-), British statesman, eldest son of James Maitland Balfour of Whittingehame, Haddingtonshire, and of Lady Blanche Gascoyne Cecil, a sister of the third marquess of Salisbury, was born on the 25th of July 1848.
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  • Belonging, however, to a class in which the responsibilities of government are a traditional duty, Mr Balfour divided his time between the political arena and the study.
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  • In these sallies, however, Mr Balfour had no direct share.
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  • That these views were not shared by Lord Salisbury was sufficiently shown by the fact that in his first administration (June 1885-January 1886) he made Mr Balfour president of the Local Government Board, and in forming his second administration (July 1886) secretary for Scotland with a seat in the cabinet.
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  • These offices gave few opportunities for distinction, and may be regarded merely as Mr Balfour's apprenticeship to departmental responsibilities.
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  • The debates on the Crimes Bill and the Irish Land Bill quickly undeceived them, and the steady and even remorseless vigour with which the government of Ireland was conducted speedily convinced the House of Commons and the country that Mr. Balfour was in his right place as chief secretary.
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  • Mr Balfour's work in this office covered one of the most turbulent and most exciting periods in modern parliamentary history and Irish administration.
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  • In 1888 Mr Balfour served on the Gold and Silver Commission, currency problems from the standpoint of bimetallism being among the more academic subjects which had engaged his attention.
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  • For the next three years Mr Balfour led the opposition with great skill and address.
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  • But after the opening session matters proceeded more smoothly, and Mr Balfour regained his old position in the estimation of the House and the country.
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  • His championship of the voluntary schools, his adroit parliamentary handling of the problems opened up by the so-called "crisis in the Church" caused by the Protestant movement against ritualistic practices, and his pronouncement in favour of a Roman Catholic university for Ireland - for which he outlined a scheme that met with much adverse criticism both from his colleagues and his party, - were the most important aspects of Mr Balfour's activity during these years.
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  • Mr Balfour's inability to get the maximum amount of work out of the House was largely due to the situation in South Africa, which absorbed the intellectual energies of the House and of the country and impeded the progress of legislation.
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  • The principal achievements of the long session of 1902 (which extended to the autumn) were the passing of the Education Act, - entirely reorganizing the system of primary education, abolishing the school boards and making the county councils the local authority; new rules of procedure; and the creation of the Metropolitan Water Board; and on all these questions, and particularly the two first, Mr Balfour's powers as a debater were brilliantly exhibited.
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  • On Lord Salisbury's resignation on the 11th of July 1902, Mr Balfour succeeded him as prime minister, with the cordial approval of all sections of the Unionist party.
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  • Within a few weeks Mr Balfour had reconstituted the cabinet.
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  • Wyndham as chief secretary for Ireland was included in the cabinet; Lord Selborne remained at the admiralty, Mr St John Brodrick (afterwards Lord Midleton) war minister, Lord George Hamilton secretary for India, and Mr Akers-Douglas, who had been first commissioner of works, became home secretary; Lord Balfour of Burleigh remained secretary for Scotland, Lord Dudley succeeded Lord Cadogan as lord lieutenant of Ireland, and Lord Londonderry became president of the Board of Education (with Sir William Anson as parliamentary secretary in the House of Commons).
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  • Mr Balfour's brother Gerald (b.
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  • From this moment it is only necessary here to realize Mr Balfour's position.
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  • Mr Balfour was anxious to avoid a rupture, doubtful of the feeling of the country, uncertain of the details by which Mr Chamberlain's scheme could be worked out.
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  • From the middle of May, when Mr Chamberlain began to press the matter, Mr Balfour had a difficult hand to play, so long as it was uncertain how the party would follow the new lead.
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  • On the 16th of September Mr Balfour published a pamphlet on "Insular Free Trade," and on the 18th it was announced that Lord George Hamilton and Mr Ritchie had resigned, Lord Balfour of Burleigh and Mr Arthur Elliot following a day or two later.
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  • The correspondence between Mr Chamberlain and Mr Balfour (September 9th and 16th) was published, and presented the latter in the light of a sympathizer with some form of fiscal union with the colonies, if practicable, and in favour of retaliatory duties, but unable to believe that the country was yet ready to agree to the taxation of food required for a preferential tariff, and therefore unwilling to support that scheme; at the same time he encouraged Mr Chamberlain to test the feeling of the public and to convert them by his missionary efforts outside the government.
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  • Mr Chamberlain on his side emphasized his own parliamentary loyalty to Mr Balfour.
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  • This manifesto was at first taken, not only as the platform of the government, but also as that from which its resigning free-trade members had dissented; and the country was puzzled by a statement from Lord George Hamilton that Mr Balfour had circulated among his colleagues a second and different document, in fuller agreement with Mr Chamberlain.
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  • On October 1st Mr Balfour spoke at Sheffield, reiterating his views as to free-trade and retaliation, insisting that he "intended to lead," and declaring that he was prepared at all events to reverse the traditional fiscal policy by doing away with the axiom that import duties should only be levied for revenue purposes.
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  • But the free-traders did not like Mr Balfour's formula as to reversing the traditional fiscal policy of import taxes for revenue only.
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  • Next day the duke of Devonshire resigned, a step somewhat bitterly resented by Mr Balfour, who clearly thought that his sacrifices in order to conciliate the duke had now been made in vain.
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  • During this critical fortnight the duke had apparently acquiesced in Mr Balfour's compromise, and had co-operated in reconstituting the ministry; his nephew and heir had been made financial secretary to the treasury, while Mr Alfred Lyttelton was appointed colonial secretary, Mr Austen Chamberlain chancellor of the exchequer, Mr Brodrick secretary for India, Mr H.
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  • They rejected Mr Chamberlain's food-taxes, discredited his statistics, and, while admitting the theoretical orthodoxy of retaliation, criticized Mr Balfour's attitude and repudiated his assumption that retaliation would be desirable.
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  • Minor changes were made in the ministry in 1903, Mr Brodrick going to the India office and Mr Arnold-Forster becoming minister for war; but Mr Balfour's personal influence remained potent, the government held together, and in 1904 the Licensing Bill was successfully carried.
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  • Though a few Unionists transferred their allegiance, notably Mr. Winston Churchill, and by-elections went badly, Mr Balfour still commanded a considerable though a dwindling majority, and the various contrivances of the opposition for combining all free-traders against the government were obstructed by the fact that anything tantamount to a vote of censure would not be supported by the "wobblers" in the ministerial party, while the government could always manage to draft some "safe" amendment acceptable to most of them.
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  • On the 3rd of October Mr Balfour spoke at Edinburgh on the fiscal question.
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  • The more aggressive protectionists among Mr Chamberlain's supporters had lately become very confident, and Mr Balfour plainly repudiated "protection" in so far as it meant a policy aiming at supporting or creating home industries by raising home prices; but he introduced a new point by declaring that an Imperial Conference would be called to discuss with the colonies the question of preferential tariffs if the Unionist government obtained a majority at the next general election.
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  • But, though Mr Chamberlain declared his desire for an early appeal to the electors, he maintained his parliamentary loyalty to Mr Balfour.
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  • It was not till the 28th that Mr Balfour, speaking at Southampton, was able to announce that the Russian government had expressed regret, and that an international commission would inquire into the facts with a view to the responsible persons being punished.
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  • The opposition were determined to raise debates in the House of Commons on the fiscal question, and Mr Balfour was no less determined not to be caught in their trap. These tactics of avoidance reached their culminating point when on one occasion Mr Balfour and his supporters left the House and allowed a motion hostile to tariff reform to be passed nem.
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  • The end came in November 1905, precipitated by a speech made by Mr Balfour at Newcastle on the 14th, appealing for unity in the party and the sinking of differences, an appeal plainly addressed to Mr Chamberlain, whose supporters - the vast majority of the Unionists - were clamouring for a fighting policy.
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  • On the 21st of November at Bristol he insisted on his programme being adopted, and Mr Balfour was compelled to abandon the position he had held with so much tactical dexterity for two years past.
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  • While Mr Chamberlain had a signal personal triumph in all the divisions of Birmingham, Mr Balfour himself was defeated by a large majority in Manchester.
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  • Being in a miserable minority in parliament (1S7 Unionists against 379 Liberals, 51 Labour members, and 83 Nationalists), some form of consolidation among the Unionists was immediately necessary, and negotiations took place between Mr Balfour and Mr Chamberlain which resulted in the patching up of an agreement (expressed in a correspondence dated February 14th), and its confirmation at a meeting of the party at Lansdowne House a few days later.
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  • The new compact was indicated in Mr Balfour's letter, in which he declared that "fiscal reform is, and must remain, the first constructive work of the Unionist party; its objects are to secure more equal terms of competition for British trade and closer commercial union with the colonies; and while it is at present unnecessary to prescribe the exact methods by which these objects are to be attained, and inexpedient to permit differences of opinion as to these methods to divide the party, though other means are possible, the establishment of a moderate general tariff on manufactured goods, not imposed for the purpose of raising prices, or giving artificial protection against legitimate competition, and the imposition of a small duty on foreign corn, are not in principle objectionable, and should be adopted if shown to be necessary for the attainment of the ends in view or for purposes of revenue."
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  • Mr Balfour's leadership of the whole party was now confirmed; and a seat was found for him in theCity of London by the retirement of Mr Gibbs.
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  • The result was an electoral defeat which indicated, no doubt, a pronounced weakening of Mr Balfour's position in public confidence.
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  • Mr Balfour had never spoken more brilliantly, nor shone more as a debater, than in these years when he had to confront a House of Commons three-fourths of which was hostile.
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  • Mr Balfour himself was elected for the City of London by an enormous majority.
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  • Mr Balfour's other publications, not yet mentioned, include Essays and Addresses (1893) and The Foundations of Belief, being Notes introductory to the Study of Theology (1895).
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  • Francis Maitland Balfour >>
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  • He was president of the Chemical Society in 1897, and of the British Association in 1902, served on the Balfour Commission on London Water Supply (1893-1894), and as a member of the Committee on Explosives (1888-1891) invented cordite jointly with Sir Frederick Abel.
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  • is Kennet House, the seat of Lord Balfour of Burleigh, another member of the Bruce family.
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  • Balfour Paul, Lyon King of Arms, in the Scottish Historical Review (July 1908).
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  • Professor Bayley Balfour, F.R.S., the Regius Keeper of the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh, has described an arboretum as a living collection of species and varieties of trees and shrubs arranged after some definite method - it may be properties, or uses, or some other principle - but usually after that of natural likeness.
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  • WILLIAM BALFOUR BAIKIE (1824-1864), Scottish explorer, naturalist and philologist, eldest son of Captain John Baikie, R.N., was born at Kirkwall, Orkney, on the 21st of August 1824.
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  • Everett on Balfour Stewart's authority.
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  • Balfour's Foundations of Belief by A.
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  • 25 and his mastery of statistical detail and argument made his appointment as chancellor of the exchequer part of the natural order of things when in December 1905 Mr Balfour resigned and Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (q.v.) became prime minister.
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  • Balfour and Lord Randolph Churchill.
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  • From the moment the apparent recrudescence of the Liberal split over this question seemed to have misled Mr Balfour, who resigned office on the 4th of December, into thinking that difficulties would arise over the formation of a Liberal cabinet; but, whether or not the rumour was correct that a blunder had been made at Stirling and that explanations had ensued which satisfied Mr Asquith and Sir Edward Grey, this anticipation proved unjustified.
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  • Lethington had not left her, but he was overlooked; Lennox and the impracticable Darnley were neglected; and the dangerous earl of Morton, a Douglas, had to tremble for his lands and office as chancellor, while Mary rested on her foreign secretary, the upstart David Riccio; on Sir James Balfour, noted for falseness even in that age; and on Bothwell.
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  • Morton, with Angus, attacked the Hamiltons, whose chiefs fled the country, accompanied by the worst of traitors, Sir James Balfour.
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  • Sir James Balfour secretly returned from France with his information, and Morton was accused and arrested on the last day of 1580.
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  • Acland, Some Account of the Origin and Objects of the New Oxford Examinations for the Title of Associate in Arts (London, 1858); Matthew Arnold, Higher Schools and Universities in Germany (1874); Graham Balfour, The Educational Systems of Great Britain and Ireland (2nd ed., Oxford, 1903); W.
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  • Professor Bayley Balfour made an investigation in 1880, expeditions were headed by Drs Riebeck and Schweinfurth in 1881, by Theodore Bent in 1897, and by Dr H.
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  • Balfour, Botany of Socotra (Edinburgh, 1888); G.
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  • He married again in 1892 Edith Sophy, daughter of Archibald Balfour, who, with a son and daughter, survived him.
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  • It gave him great satisfaction to serve his apprenticeship to politics under the leadership of Mr. Arthur Balfour, to whom he was personally much attached.
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  • When Chamberlain resigned in 1903 in order to carry on his Tariff Reform campaign unhampered by office, Lyttelton was selected by Mr. Balfour, after Lord Milner's refusal, for the vacant secretaryship for the Colonies.
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  • Balfour, The Foundations of Belief (1897); J.
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  • See also Balfour Stewart, Report of the British Association, Aberdeen, 1859, 200, a description of the type of instrument used in the older observatories; E.
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  • BALFOUR STEWART (1828-1887), Scottish physicist, was born in Edinburgh on the 1st of November 1828, and was educated at the university of that city.
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  • Helen Tongue, preface by Henry Balfour (Oxford, 1909), reproductions in colours; D.
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  • From Balfour, after Claus.
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  • In 1896 a special royal commission was appointed, under the chairmanship of Lord Balfour of Burleigh, to consider the problems of the rates; it made several elaborate reports, the final one appearing in 1901.
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  • The " black body " is an ideal body with surface so constituted as to reflect no part of any radiations that fall upon it; in the case of such a body Kirchhoff and Balfour Stewart showed that unless energy were to be lost the rate of emission and absorption must be in fixed ratio for each specific wave-length.
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  • Arnold-Forster (1855-1909), the well-known Liberal-Unionist member of parliament, who eventually became a member of Mr Balfour's cabinet; he was secretary to the admiralty (1900-1903), and then secretary of state for war (1903-1905), and was the author of numerous educational books published by Cassell & Co., of which firm he was a director.
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  • The speech so much impressed Mr. Balfour that he introduced Mr. Law into his Government as Parliamentary Secretary of the Board of Trade; and Mr. Joseph Chamberlain's Tariff Reform movement, which was started in the following year, showed how right Mr. Law was in his diagnosis of the future.
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  • There is no doubt that he chafed, in these years, at the slow rate at which his chief, Mr. Balfour, moved in the direction of Tariff Reform; but, though he would have preferred a more whole-hearted acceptance of Mr. Chamberlain's programme, he remained loyal to the Prime Minister.
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  • But he kept aloof from the " Diehard " movement, and warmly defended his leader, Mr. Balfour, from the reproaches cast upon him.
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  • This loyal attitude, no doubt, was one of the reasons, and his strong Tariff Reform programme was another, which recommended him to his party as Mr. Balfour's successor in the leadership when the claims of Mr. Austen Chamberlain and Mr. (afterwards Lord) Long appeared to divide the Unionists pretty evenly.
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  • He was very trenchant in his criticism of the Government; thus giving satisfaction to ardent spirits in the Unionist ranks, but causing ministerial speakers to contrast his bitterness and violence with Mr. Balfour's quieter methods.
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  • 1912 that they no longer held themselves bound, by the policy advocated by Mr. Balfour before the second election of 1910, to submit the first Tariff Reform budget to a referendum.
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  • He brought seven of his colleagues into the Cabinet with him - Lord Lansdowne, Mr. Balfour, Mr. Austen Chamberlain, D'Ir.
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  • These arrangements lasted till 1891, when, on Smiths death, the treasury and the lead of the Commons were entrusted to Lord Salisburys nephew, Mr Arthur Balfour, who had made a great reputation as chief secretary for Ireland.
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  • Balfour, Mr J.
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  • Mr Balfour (q.v.), who became prime minister in 1902 on Lord Salisburys retirement, resigned, and was succeeded by Sir H.
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  • The Unionist party in the country had, meanwhile, been recovering from the Tariff Reform divisions of 1903, and was once more solid under Mr Balfour in favor of its new and imperial policy; but the campaign against the House of Lords started by Mr Lloyd George and the Liberal leaders, who put in the forefront the necessity of obtaining statutory guarantees for the passing into law of measures deliberately adopted by the elected Chamber, resulted in the return of Mr Asquiths government to office at the election of January 1910.
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  • 1760) Robert Rogers, who had been sent to Detroit to occupy the French posts in the West, dispatched Captain Henry Balfour with a force of British and Colonial troops to garrison Mackinac and the Wisconsin posts which had been dismantled and were almost deserted.
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  • In 1843 Captain (afterwards Sir) George Balfour was appointed British consul, and it was on his motion that the site of the present English settlement, which is bounded on the N.
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  • J.Angstrom in 1853, by Balfour Stewart in 1858; while Sir George Stokes held the solution of the problem in the irchhoff.
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  • JOHN SKINNER (1721-1807), Scottish author, son of John Skinner, a parish schoolmaster, was born at Balfour, Aberdeenshire, on the 3rd of October 1721.
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  • It was at his suggestion and with his help that Miss Clough opened a house of residence for students; and when this had developed into Newnham College, and in 1880 the North Hall was added, Mr Sidgwick, who had in 1876 married Eleanor Mildred Balfour (sister of A.
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  • Balfour), went with his wife to live there for two years.
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  • Hicks-Beach resigned on account of illness, and Mr Arthur Balfour became chief secretary.
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  • The steady administration of the Crimes Act by Mr Balfour gradually quieted the country.
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  • The principal Irish measure passed in 1891 was Mr Balfour's Purchase Act, to extend and modify the operation of the Ashbourne acts.
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  • The Purchase Act was not the only one relied on by Mr Balfour.
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  • The Unionist party had adopted a policy of local government for Ireland while opposing legislative independence, and a bill was introduced into the House of Commons by Mr Balfour in February 1892.
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  • Next day the visitors were entertained by Lord Salisbury at Hatfield, the duke of Devonshire, Mr Balfour, Mr Goschen and Mr Chamberlain being present.
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  • Lord Cadogan became lord-lieutenant of Ireland, and Mr Gerald Balfour - who announced a policy of " killing Home Rule by kindness " - chief secretary.
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  • The scheme for a Roman Catholic University - of which Mr Arthur Balfour, speaking for himself and not for the government, made himself a prominent champion - was much canvassed in 1899, but it came to nothing.
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  • The general election later in the year made no practical Act difference in the strength of parties, but Mr George Wyndham took Mr Gerald Balfour's place as chief secretary, without a seat in the Cabinet.
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  • career in India (1865-1901) Sir Antony had never concealed his Nationalist proclivities, but his appointment, about the form of which there was nothing peculiar, was favoured by Lord Lansdowne and Lord George Hamilton, and ultimately sanctioned by Mr Balfour, who had been prime minister since Lord Salisbury's resignation in July.
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  • This policy, which was called Devolution, found little support anywhere, and was ultimately repudiated both by Mr Wyndham and by Mr Balfour.
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  • Mr Balfour resigned in December 1905 and was succeeded by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, Lord Aberdeen becoming lord-lieutenant for the second time, with Mr James Bryce as chief secretary.
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  • When Mr Arthur Balfour succeeded Lord Salisbury as prime minister in July 1902, Mr Chamberlain agreed to serve loyally under him, and the friendship between the two leaders was indeed one of the most marked features of the political situation.
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  • Hicks Beach, they were convinced free-importers on purely economic grounds; and Mr Balfour (q.v.), as premier, managed to hold his colleagues and party together by taking the line that particular opinions on economic subjects should not be made a test of party loyalty.
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  • The public had its first intimation of impending events in the appearance on September 16th of Mr Balfour's Economic Notes on Insular Free Trade, which had been previously circulated as a cabinet memorandum.
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  • Letters in cordial terms were published, which had passed between Mr Chamberlain(September 9) and Mr Balfour (September 16).
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  • Mr Chamberlain pointed out that he was committed to a preferential scheme involving new duties on food, and could not remain in the government without prejudice while it was excluded from the party programme; remaining loyal to Mr Balfour and his general objects, he could best promote this course from outside, and he suggested that the government might confine its policy to the "assertion of our freedom in the case of all commercial relations with foreign countries."
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  • Mr Balfour, while reluctantly admitting the necessity of Mr Chamberlain's taking a freer hand, expressed his agreement in the desirability of a closer fiscal union with the colonies, but questioned the immediate practicability of any scheme; he was willing to adopt fiscal reform so far as it covered retaliatory duties, but thought that the exclusion of taxation of food from the party programme was in existing circumstances necessary, so long as public opinion was not ripe.
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  • From the turning-point of Mr Chamberlain's resignation, it is not necessary here to follow in detail the discussions and dissensions in the party as a whole in its relations with the prime minister (see Balfour, A.
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  • It is sufficient to say that while Mr Balfour's sympathetic "send off" appeared to indicate his inclination towards Mr Chamberlain's programme, if only further support could be gained for it, his endeavour to keep the party together, and the violent opposition which gathered against Mr Chamberlain's scheme, combined to make his real attitude during the next two years decidedly obscure, both sections of the party - free-traders and tariff reformers - being induced from time to time to regard him as on their side.
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  • In his own words, he went in front of the Unionist army as a pioneer, and if his army was attacked he would go back to it; in no conceivable circumstances would he allow himself to be put in any sort of competition, direct or indirect, with Mr Balfour, his friend and leader, whom he meant to follow (October 6).
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  • But he would make no move which would embarrass Mr Balfour in parliament, and adhered to his promise of loyalty.
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  • Mr Balfour's introduction of his promise (at Edinburgh on October 3) to convene an imperial conference after the general election if the Unionists came back to power, in order to discuss a scheme for fiscal union, represented an academic rather than a practical advance, since the by-elections showed that the Unionists were certain to be defeated.
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  • Speaking at the Albert Hall in July Mr Chamberlain pushed somewhat further than before his "embrace" of Mr Balfour; and in the autumn, when foreign affairs no longer dominated the attention of the government, the crisis rapidly came to a head.
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  • In reply to Mr Balfour's appeal for the sinking of differences (Newcastle, November 14), Mr Chamberlain insisted at Bristol (November 21) on the adoption of his fiscal policy; and Mr Balfour resigned on December 4, on the ground that he no longer retained the confidence of the party.
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  • Amid the wreck of the party - Mr Balfour and several of his colleagues themselves losing their seats - he had the consolation of knowing that the tariff reformers won the only conspicuous successes of the election.
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  • But he had no desire to set himself up as leader in Mr Balfour's place, and after private negotiations with the ex-prime minister, a common platform was arranged between them, on which Mr Balfour, for whom a seat was found in the City of London, should continue to lead the remnant of the party.
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  • The formula was given in a letter from Mr Balfour of February 14th (see Balfour, A.
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  • But while his enemies taunted him with having twice wrecked his party - first the Radical party under Mr Gladstone, and secondly the Unionist party under Mr Balfour - no well-informed critic doubted his sincerity, or failed to recognize that in leaving the cabinet and embarking on his fiscal campaign he showed real devotion to an idea.
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  • But from the purely party point of view he was entitled to say that he followed the path of loyalty to Mr Balfour which he had marked out from the moment of his resignation, and that he persistently refused to be put in competition with him as leader.
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  • The leg (1) has the form of a truncated cone, the broad end of which is attached to (After Balfour.) (After Balfour.) FIG.
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  • coi (After Balfour.) FIG.
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  • 8); the walls (After Balfour.) FIG.
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  • (After Balfour.) FIG.
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  • All the above parts lie in the central (After Balfour.) PIG.
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  • The Annelidan features are: (I) the paired nephridia in every segment of the body behind the first two (Saenger, Balfour); (2) the presence of cilia in the generative tracts (Gaffron).
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  • Balfour, "The Anatomy and Development of P. capensis," posthumous memoir, edited by H.
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  • Clerk Maxwell, Balfour Stewart and Fleeming Jenkin as members of that committee.
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  • The Gills report this worked for a while, and Balfour Beatty complied and had white boiler suits for their staff.
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  • On 31 August, during a wet, stormy night, Sir William Balfour broke through the Royalist lines with about 2,000 parliamentarian cavalry.
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  • Scapa Flow diver hospitalized A diver was taken to Balfour Hospital on Monday after suffering suspected decompression sickness in Scapa Flow.
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  • Balfour: Gosh that sounds ghastly, what could you be referring to?
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  • Mr Balfour owned the first gramophone seen or heard in East Lothian and also the first car.
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  • Balfour so ill-advised as to make himself their echo.
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  • pronounced dead on arrival at the Balfour Hospital in Kirkwall.
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  • Balfour Beatty is the UK's leading road widening specialist.
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  • tally of 13 medals included three for Kirsty Balfour, who we caught up with for this month's Total Swimming interview.
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  • Balfour Beatty specializes in healthcare, education and road and rail transportation.
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  • whispering hoarsely: TITLE: " The man sitting facing us is Roger Balfour!
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  • Balfour's Foundations of Belief, welcomed in Germany by Julius Kaftan (see below).
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  • In " Some Consequences of (naturalistic) Belief," Balfour argues that the results of " naturalism " are unbearable.
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  • He was accordingly little seen in Parliament for the next year or more, though he was in his place to criticize the navy estimates of his successor Mr. Balfour, to reproach him for want of energy, and to recommend the recall of Lord Fisher.
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  • BEATON (or [[Bethune), David]], (c. 1 494-1546), Scottish cardinal and archbishop of St Andrews, was a younger son of John Beaton of Balfour in the county of Fife, and is said to have been born in the year 1494.
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  • 9 Mr. Balfour officially recognized the Czechoslovak National Council as " trustee of the future Czechoslovak Government," he was ready to extend a similar recognition to the Yugoslav cause, but as a preliminary condition he very reasonably insisted upon unanimity between those who claimed to represent the two groups of Yugoslays.
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  • The government held on, but collapse was only a question of time (see the articles on [[Balfour, A.
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  • Sir Henry's rather petulant intolerance of Unionist opposition, shown at the opening of the 1906 session in his dismissal of a speech by Mr Balfour with the words "Enough of this foolery!"
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  • By the Irish Nationalists it was received with contemptuous ridicule, for none suspected Mr Balfour's immense strength of will, his debating power, his ability in attack and his still greater capacity to disregard criticism.
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  • The downfall of Mr Balfour's administration, and the necessity of reorganizing the Unionist forces on the basis of the common platform now adopted, naturally represented a fresh departure under his leadership, the conditions of which to some extent depended on the opportunities given to the new opposition by the proceedings of the Radical government (see Campbell Bannerman, Sir H.; and Asquith, H.
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  • Knowing all the secrets of Darnley's murder, Balfour revenged himself by raking up Morton's foreknowledge of the deed; and here he was helped by the influence exercised over the young king by his cousin Esme Stuart d'Aubigny (a son of Darnley's paternal uncle, John), who came to Scotland from France in September 1579.
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  • The natural history of Sokotra, unravelled by the study of its geology and biology, has been summarized by Professor Balfour as follows: "During the Carboniferous epoch there was in the region of Sokotra a shallow sea, in which was deposited, on the top of the fundamental gneisses of this spot, ...
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  • The tariff reform movement itself was now, however, outside the purely official programme, and Mr Chamberlain (backed by a majority of the Unionist members) threw himself with impetuous ardour into a crusade on its behalf, while at the same time supporting Mr Balfour in parliament, and leaving it to him to decide as to the policy of going to the country when the time should be ripe.
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  • Even in the absence of the new issue, defeat was foredoomed for Mr Balfour's administration by the ordinary course of political events; and it might fairly be claimed that "Chinese slavery," "passive resistance," and labour irritation at the Taff Vale judgment (see Trade Unions) were mainly responsible for the Unionist collapse.
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  • Balfour Juniors focused on using their Nemo models created in their arts week to recreate scenes from the movie Finding Nemo.
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  • Balfour Beatty is the UK 's leading road widening specialist.
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  • Britain 's tally of 13 medals included three for Kirsty Balfour, who we caught up with for this month 's Total Swimming interview.
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  • Kirsty Balfour was Britain 's other two-time gold medallist, winning the 100m and 200m breaststroke.
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  • Sir James indicates off, whispering hoarsely: TITLE: The man sitting facing us is Roger Balfour !
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  • Balfour has a "history of quality and choice" when it comes to class rings.
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  • Police arrested William Balfour in connection with the murders.
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  • Balfour, who was once married to Jennifer's sister Julia, was released from prison in 2006 after serving a seven-year sentence for attempted murder and other charges.
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  • Hudson's seven-year-old nephew, Julian King, was believed to be with Balfour, but was not at the time of his arrest and remains missing.
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  • Police have issued a nationwide Amber Alert for the boy and are reportedly questioning acquaintances of Balfour's in hopes of finding and returning the boy safely to his mother.
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  • What better souvenir of your high school, college or military days is there than attractive Balfour rings?
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  • Balfour has been helping generations of students and military personnel commemorate school or military days with these special rings.
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  • The combination of a wide selection of rings and affordable prices has made Balfour one of the leading producers of class rings today.
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  • Balfour began almost a century ago in 1913, when the enterprising Lloyd Balfour saw a niche market developing as more and more young people chose to enter college and join fraternities and sororities.
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  • When the price of gold rose over 2300% in the 1970s, Balfour responded by developing rings made from alloys in order to keep prices down for its customers.
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  • Balfour makes both men's and women's rings and boasts four different types of rings - college, high school, military and championship.
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  • Balfour offers a selection of metals, from budget-wise celestrium to 18K white or yellow gold.
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  • Balfour even has a handy ring sizer that can be printed out and wrapped around the finger to determine what size ring to buy.
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  • Balfour has made championship rings for over 60 years.
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  • From the winners of the NHL's Stanley Cup to the state high school basketball champs, generations of athletes have proudly displayed their Balfour rings.
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  • Head to the Balfour website to select the ring of your choosing.
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  • The website will then allow you to browse through the numerous ring styles that Balfour offers.
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  • In addition to rings, Balfour offers a variety of products to choose from.
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  • Balfour has helped several generations to honor the institutions that have been pivotal in their lives.
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  • Balfour rings are very often not just rings, but reminders of cherished memories.
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  • The stunning news was followed by the arrest of her brother-in-law, William Balfour, who has been charged with the murders.
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  • The fact - assumed without any attempt at justification by argument - that, in spite of the multitude of logical reasons for scepticism, we do know, truth and beauty, makes Balfour a theist.
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