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bailiffs

bailiffs Sentence Examples

  • (1297) gave a grant of pontage in aid of the bridge, which was almost broken down; similar grants to the "bailiffs and good men of Maydenhithe" were made by succeeding sovereigns.

    12
    0
  • The constitution of Wareham underwent a change during the years 1326-1338, when the governing body of the bailiffs and commonalty were replaced by the mayor and bailiffs.

    11
    0
  • In the final recension of Tschudi's Chronicle (1734-36), which, however, differs in many particulars from the original draft still preserved at Zurich, we are told how Albert of Austria, with the view of depriving the Forest lands of their ancient freedom, sent bailiffs (among them Gessler) to Uri and Schwyz, who committed many tyrannical acts, so that finally on 8th November 1307, at the Riitli, Werner von Stauffacher of Schwyz, Walter Fiirst of Uri, Arnold von Melchthal in Unterwalden, each with ten companions, among whom was William Tell, resolved on a rising to expel the oppressors, which was fixed for New Year's Day 1308.

    11
    0
  • on his accession incorporated them under the title of bailiffs and burgesses, granted them the town at a fee-farm of 1'24, 3s.

    10
    4
  • Until the beginning of the 14th century Berwick was one of the four royal boroughs of Scotland, and although it possesses no charter granted before that time, an inquisition taken in Edward III.'s reign shows that it was governed by a mayor and bailiffs in the reign of Alexander III., who granted the town to the said mayor and the commonalty for an annual rent.

    7
    0
  • The continual disputes between the two boroughs led to the passing of an act of union in 1571, the new borough being incorporated under the title of the "Mayor, Bailiffs and Burgesses" by James I.

    4
    1
  • The corporation, which in 1298 included a mayor, barons and bailiffs, was dissolved by an act of 1883.

    4
    2
  • The former courts, under their bailiffs, gradually absorbed the separate courts which the Syrians had at first been permitted to enjoy under their own refs; and the bailiff with his 6 assessors (4 Syrians and 2 Franks) thus came to judge both commercial cases and cases in which Syrians were involved.

    4
    3
  • In 1581 Queen Elizabeth granted a confirmatory charter to the mayor and bailiffs direct without reference to the lord of the castle.

    3
    1
  • In medieval times Droitwich was governed by two bailiffs and twelve jurats, the former being elected every year by the burgesses; Queen Mary granted the incorporation charter in 1554 under the name of the bailiffs and burgesses.

    3
    3
  • Charters were granted by subsequent sovereigns down to Charles I., who reincorporated the town under the title of the mayor, jurats, bailiffs and burgesses of Queenborough.

    1
    0
  • The governing charter in 1835 was that of Charles II., incorporating it under the title of the bailiffs and commonalty of the borough of Tamworth in the counties of Stafford and Warwick.

    1
    1
  • By that line they were sold in 1384, with Thun, to the town of Bern, whose bailiffs ruled in the castle till 1798.

    1
    1
  • The town was incorporated by Elizabeth in 1582 under the government of two bailiffs and a common council of 24 burgesses, and her .charter was confirmed by James I.

    1
    1
  • The town is governed by a mayor, sheriff, senior and junior bailiffs, 13 aldermen, and 39 councillors.

    1
    1
  • The bailiffs of Ilchester are mentioned before 1230.

    1
    1
  • The town was evidently governed by bailiffs in 1401, when the "bailiffs and good men" received a grant of pontage for the repair of the bridge called "Assheconbrigge," but the town was never incorporated and never sent members to parliament.

    1
    1
  • In 1205 Farnham had bailiffs, and in 1207 it was definitely a mesne borough under the bishops of Winchester.

    1
    1
  • Bishop Waynflete is said to have confirmed the original charter in 1452, and in 1566 Bishop Horne granted a new charter by which the burgesses elected 2 bailiffs and 12 burgesses annually and did service at their own courts every three weeks, the court leet being held twice a year.

    1
    1
  • From the letters patent addressed to the bailiffs of Padstow demanding the survey and delivery of ships for foreign service, the appointment of a king's butler for the port, and the frequent recourse which was had to the king's courts for the settlement of disputes of shipping, Padstow appears to have been a port of considerable repute in the 14th century.

    1
    1
  • in 1284 granted to the town a charter making it a free borough, with a merchant gild, and in the same year the mayor and bailiffs are mentioned.

    1
    1
  • in 1189 granted the burghers leave to choose their bailiffs and a justice to hold the pleas of the crown within the borough, freedom from the obligation of duel, freedom of passage and pontage through England, free warren, fishery and custom as in the time of Henry I., and other privileges.

    1
    1
  • granted a fresh charter, which replaced the bailiffs by a mayor, and in 1653 Cromwell altered it to secure a permanent majority for his party on the corporation.

    1
    1
  • granted the first charter in 1252-1253, making the town a free borough and granting the burgesses the right to hold it at the ancient fee farm with an increase of 40s., and to choose two bailiffs to answer at the exchequer for the farm.

    1
    1
  • Close by is the castle, built in the early 15th century by the bishops, later the residence of the Bernese bailiffs and now the seat of the various branches of the administration of the canton of Vaud.

    1
    1
  • The town was governed until the 19th century by two bailiffs, chosen annually at a court le g it of the royal manor o Wimborne borough, part of the manor of Kingston Lacy.

    1
    1
  • During this period the king's mandates were addressed to the bailiffs or to the mayor and bailiffs, and no charter of incorporation appears to have been granted until the reign of James II.

    1
    1
  • The borough was governed by two bailiffs, both elected at the court leet of the lord of the manor, one by his steward, the other by a borough.

    1
    1
  • While the war with Scotland dragged on through the early years of the reign of Edward II., the fortification of Berwick was a matter of importance, and in 1317 the mayor and bailiffs undertook to defend it for the yearly sum of 6000 marks; but in the following year, "owing to their default," the Scots entered and occupied it in spite of a truce between the two kingdoms. After Edward III.

    1
    1
  • Many details are given of the oppressions of the bailiffs: we hear of Gessler, of the meeting of Stoupacher of Schwyz, Furst of Uri, and a man of.

    1
    1
  • Now Hagenbach is known to have committed many cruelties like those attributed to the bailiffs in the legend, and it has been plausibly conjectured that his case has really given rise to these stories, especially when we find that the Confederates had a hand in his capture and execution, that in a document of 1358 Hagenbachs and Gesslers appear side by side as witnesses, and that the Hagenbachs had frequent transactions with the Habsburgs and their vassals.

    1
    1
  • In 1503 the French king ceded it to Uri, Schwyz and Unterwalden, which henceforth ruled it very harshly through their bailiffs till 1798.

    1
    1
  • in 1372 granted that the burgesses should be sued only before the mayor and bailiffs, and Richard II.

    1
    1
  • The governing charter in 1835 was that of Charles II., incorporating it under the title of the bailiffs and commonalty of the borough of Tamworth in the counties of Stafford and Warwick.

    1
    1
  • granted the first charter in 1252-1253, making the town a free borough and granting the burgesses the right to hold it at the ancient fee farm with an increase of 40s., and to choose two bailiffs to answer at the exchequer for the farm.

    1
    1
  • The town was governed until the 19th century by two bailiffs, chosen annually at a court le g it of the royal manor o Wimborne borough, part of the manor of Kingston Lacy.

    1
    1
  • Individual summonses must be sent to the prelates and greater barons, while the lesser barons hill be called together through the sheriffs and bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • in1307-1308granted that its men might elect for themselves two bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • Queenborough Castle was built about 1361 by Edward III., who named the town after Queen Philippa and made it a free borough, with a governing body of a mayor and two bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • to Henry VI., that of 1401 (2 Henry IV.) granting further to the mayor and bailiffs cognisance of all pleas to be held in the Gildhall (guyhalda).

    0
    0
  • in 1445, under which the town was governed by a mayor, 2 bailiffs and burgesses, while by charter of 1447 the neighbouring district was amalgamated with the new borough as a distinct county under the title of "the town and county of the town of Southampton."

    0
    0
  • In the 13th century twelve liberties in Kent claimed to have separate bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • With the papal see, since his visit to Avignon in 1364, he had been on the best of terms. His ecclesiastic patronage was immense, and throughout the land he had planted strong castles surely held by the royal bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • In 1381 Edward III., while inspecting former charters, granted that the burgesses might hold the borough with fairs, markets and free customs at a fee-farm of £70, and that every year they might choose a mayor and four bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • The inhabitants were plainly as various - a few of them great nobles and wealthy landowners, others small farmers or possibly bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • An undated charter from Hamo de Massey, lord of the barony, in the reign of Edward I., constituted Altrincham a free borough, with a gild merchant, the customs of Macclesfield, the right to elect reeves and bailiffs for the common council and other privileges.

    0
    0
  • No charter of incorporation is extant, but in 1563 contests were carried on under the name of the bailiffs, burgesses and commonalty, and a list of borough accounts exists for 1696.

    0
    0
  • granted an incorporation charter in 1605 under the title of bailiffs, assistants and commonalty, but under the Municipal Reform Act of 1835 the corporation was changed to a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors.

    0
    0
  • The burgesses were given the right to elect annually their mayor, who with the commonalty should elect four bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • also granted the burgesses the privilege of electing a mayor and bailiffs every year.

    0
    0
  • Glamorgan and the county palatine of Pembroke had hitherto been the only portions of the country subject to English shire law, but now Edward parcelled out the ancient territory of the princes of Gwynedd and of Deheubarth into six new counties, with sheriffs, coroners and bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • The major rural divisions are the fOgderier, under bailiffs, a subdivision of which is the lansmansdistrikt under a lansman.

    0
    0
  • The Improvement Commissioners constituted by this act included the mayor, bailiffs and four aldermen of Liverpool, under whose care the main streets were laid out on a regular plan, intersecting one another at right angles; and the first iron tramway in England was laid down.

    0
    0
  • An act of 1489 incorporated the bailiffs and commonalty of the town and exempted them from harbour dues.

    0
    0
  • The history of Reuss stretches back to the times when the German kings appointed vogts, or bailiffs (advocati imperii), to administer their lands.

    0
    0
  • of Amstel built a castle there, Amsterdam was a fishing hamlet held in fee by the lords of Amstel of the bishops of Utrecht, for whom they acted as bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • dated 1622 instituted two bailiffs, fourteen capital burgesses, four justices of the peace, a high steward and under steward, two serjeantsat-mace and a court of record.

    0
    0
  • An important charter of Edward V., as prince of Wales and lord of Haverford, enacted that the town should be incorporated under a mayor, two sheriffs and two bailiffs, duly chosen by the burgesses.

    0
    0
  • There are notaries and clerks, auditors for each parish elected by the heads of families, police agents and bailiffs, chosen and sworn in, like all the above officers, by the Council General.

    0
    0
  • Poole is first mentioned in a writ of 1224, addressed to the bailiffs and good men of La Pole, ordering them to retain all ships within their port.

    0
    0
  • The mayor, bailiffs and good men are first mentioned in 1311 and were required to provide two ships for service against Robert de Brus.

    0
    0
  • In the countryside the insurrection was accompanied by wholesale burnings of manor-rolls, the hunting down of unpopular bailiffs and landlords, and a special crusade against the commissioners of the poll-tax and the justices who had been enforcing the Statute of Laborers.

    0
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  • Brooks, however, refused these conditions, saying that he could not reach the place designated "without running the gauntlet of mobs and assassins, prisons and penitentiaries, bailiffs and constables."

    0
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  • in 1332 confirmed the charter of Henry III., and granted further that the town should be a free borough governed by four bailiffs, that it should be enclosed by a wall and that the burgesses should have a gild merchant.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes a court for view of frankpledge, called in some places a mickleton, whereat the mayor or the bailiffs presided, was held for the whole borough; in other cases the borough was divided into wards, or into leets, each of which had its separate court.

    0
    0
  • The royal bailiffs were to answer at the exchequer for rents of assize and all the perquisites which they made in their offices, and apparently the duty of enforcing this provision was entrusted to the justices.

    0
    0
  • The corporation included 2 bailiffs, 10 capital and 24 inferior burgesses, until the Municipal Corporations Act 1883.

    0
    0
  • The government was by the steward and bailiffs of the bishop of Winchester, assisted by constables, wardmen and other officers.

    0
    0
  • Henry IV., by a charter obtained in 1402, vested the government of the town in a mayor and two bailiffs to be elected annually.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth in 1580 confirmed all previous charters and incorporated the freeholders under the designation of "the mayor, bailiffs and burgesses of the borough of Tenby."

    0
    0
  • Instead of communicating directly with the margrave through his burgraves and bailiffs, or vogts, the village communities came to be represented by the nobles who had obtained possession of their lands.

    0
    0
  • Before 1482 the burgesses were holding the town at a fee farm rent of twenty marks, but the abbot still had practical control of the town, and his steward presided over the court at which the bailiffs were chosen.

    0
    0
  • The judge found that Mr King had committed two assaults on bailiffs of the court.

    0
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  • We can: instruct bailiffs to act on our behalf to include the Council's bailiff.

    0
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  • Alternatively they may appoint bailiffs to claim possession of goods which can be sold to pay off the debt.

    0
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  • I'll send the bailiffs down to retrieve the case files.

    0
    0
  • Local Authorities use private bailiffs to execute the warrant.

    0
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  • bailiffs madagans.

    0
    0
  • If you would like to go with your jury bailiffs once more and return to your jury room.

    0
    0
  • Along with the agency they have developed an evening for club bailiffs to be held at the Halfway in on 29 th April.

    0
    0
  • The municipal authorities are a mayor, one justice, and two bailiffs, all elected annually by the resident burgesses.

    0
    0
  • instruct bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • There was also a Reeve and Bailiffs, who organized the estate for the lord and collected rents, taxes and fines.

    0
    0
  • This attracted a great crowd of people, who, thinking it the work of the bailiffs, became rowdy.

    0
    0
  • On 1 March the bailiffs visited Mr X and levied distress by taking possession of a van and a three-piece suite of furniture.

    0
    0
  • The ordinary business of the ports was conducted in two courts known respectively as the court of brotherhood and the court of brotherhood and guestling, - the former being composed of the mayors of the seven principal towns and a number of jurats and freemen from each, and the latter including in addition the mayors, bailiffs and other representatives of the corporate members.

    0
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  • Individual summonses must be sent to the prelates and greater barons, while the lesser barons hill be called together through the sheriffs and bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • After the dissolution in 1538 the town sank into decay, and in 1555, on a representation of its pitiable condition, Queen Mary granted a charter establishing it as a free borough corporate with a common council consisting of a mayor, two bailiffs, twelve chief burgesses, and sixteen secondary burgesses, the mayor to be clerk of the market, coroner and a justice of the peace.

    0
    0
  • be made bailiffs or farmers of the seaport.

    0
    0
  • The constitution of Wareham underwent a change during the years 1326-1338, when the governing body of the bailiffs and commonalty were replaced by the mayor and bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • The former courts, under their bailiffs, gradually absorbed the separate courts which the Syrians had at first been permitted to enjoy under their own refs; and the bailiff with his 6 assessors (4 Syrians and 2 Franks) thus came to judge both commercial cases and cases in which Syrians were involved.

    0
    0
  • The corporation, which in 1298 included a mayor, barons and bailiffs, was dissolved by an act of 1883.

    0
    0
  • In 1581 Queen Elizabeth granted a confirmatory charter to the mayor and bailiffs direct without reference to the lord of the castle.

    0
    0
  • In medieval times Droitwich was governed by two bailiffs and twelve jurats, the former being elected every year by the burgesses; Queen Mary granted the incorporation charter in 1554 under the name of the bailiffs and burgesses.

    0
    0
  • in1307-1308granted that its men might elect for themselves two bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • The continual disputes between the two boroughs led to the passing of an act of union in 1571, the new borough being incorporated under the title of the "Mayor, Bailiffs and Burgesses" by James I.

    0
    0
  • Queenborough Castle was built about 1361 by Edward III., who named the town after Queen Philippa and made it a free borough, with a governing body of a mayor and two bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • Charters were granted by subsequent sovereigns down to Charles I., who reincorporated the town under the title of the mayor, jurats, bailiffs and burgesses of Queenborough.

    0
    0
  • By that line they were sold in 1384, with Thun, to the town of Bern, whose bailiffs ruled in the castle till 1798.

    0
    0
  • The town was incorporated by Elizabeth in 1582 under the government of two bailiffs and a common council of 24 burgesses, and her .charter was confirmed by James I.

    0
    0
  • The town is governed by a mayor, sheriff, senior and junior bailiffs, 13 aldermen, and 39 councillors.

    0
    0
  • to Henry VI., that of 1401 (2 Henry IV.) granting further to the mayor and bailiffs cognisance of all pleas to be held in the Gildhall (guyhalda).

    0
    0
  • in 1445, under which the town was governed by a mayor, 2 bailiffs and burgesses, while by charter of 1447 the neighbouring district was amalgamated with the new borough as a distinct county under the title of "the town and county of the town of Southampton."

    0
    0
  • The bailiffs of Ilchester are mentioned before 1230.

    0
    0
  • The town was evidently governed by bailiffs in 1401, when the "bailiffs and good men" received a grant of pontage for the repair of the bridge called "Assheconbrigge," but the town was never incorporated and never sent members to parliament.

    0
    0
  • In the 13th century twelve liberties in Kent claimed to have separate bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • With the papal see, since his visit to Avignon in 1364, he had been on the best of terms. His ecclesiastic patronage was immense, and throughout the land he had planted strong castles surely held by the royal bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • In 1205 Farnham had bailiffs, and in 1207 it was definitely a mesne borough under the bishops of Winchester.

    0
    0
  • Bishop Waynflete is said to have confirmed the original charter in 1452, and in 1566 Bishop Horne granted a new charter by which the burgesses elected 2 bailiffs and 12 burgesses annually and did service at their own courts every three weeks, the court leet being held twice a year.

    0
    0
  • In 1381 Edward III., while inspecting former charters, granted that the burgesses might hold the borough with fairs, markets and free customs at a fee-farm of £70, and that every year they might choose a mayor and four bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • From the letters patent addressed to the bailiffs of Padstow demanding the survey and delivery of ships for foreign service, the appointment of a king's butler for the port, and the frequent recourse which was had to the king's courts for the settlement of disputes of shipping, Padstow appears to have been a port of considerable repute in the 14th century.

    0
    0
  • in 1284 granted to the town a charter making it a free borough, with a merchant gild, and in the same year the mayor and bailiffs are mentioned.

    0
    0
  • In the following January the bailiffs were given freedom from pleading without the borough, freedom from toll and privileges implying considerable foreign trade; the importance of the port is also evident from the demand of two ships for the king's service in 1311.

    0
    0
  • The inhabitants were plainly as various - a few of them great nobles and wealthy landowners, others small farmers or possibly bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • in 1189 granted the burghers leave to choose their bailiffs and a justice to hold the pleas of the crown within the borough, freedom from the obligation of duel, freedom of passage and pontage through England, free warren, fishery and custom as in the time of Henry I., and other privileges.

    0
    0
  • granted a fresh charter, which replaced the bailiffs by a mayor, and in 1653 Cromwell altered it to secure a permanent majority for his party on the corporation.

    0
    0
  • Close by is the castle, built in the early 15th century by the bishops, later the residence of the Bernese bailiffs and now the seat of the various branches of the administration of the canton of Vaud.

    0
    0
  • During this period the king's mandates were addressed to the bailiffs or to the mayor and bailiffs, and no charter of incorporation appears to have been granted until the reign of James II.

    0
    0
  • An undated charter from Hamo de Massey, lord of the barony, in the reign of Edward I., constituted Altrincham a free borough, with a gild merchant, the customs of Macclesfield, the right to elect reeves and bailiffs for the common council and other privileges.

    0
    0
  • No charter of incorporation is extant, but in 1563 contests were carried on under the name of the bailiffs, burgesses and commonalty, and a list of borough accounts exists for 1696.

    0
    0
  • granted an incorporation charter in 1605 under the title of bailiffs, assistants and commonalty, but under the Municipal Reform Act of 1835 the corporation was changed to a mayor, 4 aldermen and 12 councillors.

    0
    0
  • on his accession incorporated them under the title of bailiffs and burgesses, granted them the town at a fee-farm of 1'24, 3s.

    0
    0
  • The borough was governed by two bailiffs, both elected at the court leet of the lord of the manor, one by his steward, the other by a borough.

    0
    0
  • Until the beginning of the 14th century Berwick was one of the four royal boroughs of Scotland, and although it possesses no charter granted before that time, an inquisition taken in Edward III.'s reign shows that it was governed by a mayor and bailiffs in the reign of Alexander III., who granted the town to the said mayor and the commonalty for an annual rent.

    0
    0
  • The burgesses were given the right to elect annually their mayor, who with the commonalty should elect four bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • While the war with Scotland dragged on through the early years of the reign of Edward II., the fortification of Berwick was a matter of importance, and in 1317 the mayor and bailiffs undertook to defend it for the yearly sum of 6000 marks; but in the following year, "owing to their default," the Scots entered and occupied it in spite of a truce between the two kingdoms. After Edward III.

    0
    0
  • It is probably to this ballad that Melchior Russ of Lucerne (who began his Chronicle in 1482) refers when, in his account (from Justinger) of the evil deeds of the bailiffs in the Forest districts, he excuses himself from giving the story.

    0
    0
  • We first hear of the cruelties of Austrian bailiffs in the Forest districts in the Bernese Chronicle of Conrad Justinger (1420).

    0
    0
  • Many details are given of the oppressions of the bailiffs: we hear of Gessler, of the meeting of Stoupacher of Schwyz, Furst of Uri, and a man of.

    0
    0
  • In the final recension of Tschudi's Chronicle (1734-36), which, however, differs in many particulars from the original draft still preserved at Zurich, we are told how Albert of Austria, with the view of depriving the Forest lands of their ancient freedom, sent bailiffs (among them Gessler) to Uri and Schwyz, who committed many tyrannical acts, so that finally on 8th November 1307, at the Riitli, Werner von Stauffacher of Schwyz, Walter Fiirst of Uri, Arnold von Melchthal in Unterwalden, each with ten companions, among whom was William Tell, resolved on a rising to expel the oppressors, which was fixed for New Year's Day 1308.

    0
    0
  • The levying of these tolls gave rise to various disputes between the men of Uri and the bailiffs of the dukes of Austria, and by 1319 (if not already in 1309) the claim to levy them was silently given up. These facts show (what could not hitherto be proved) that at the time when legend places the rising of Uri, Tell exploit, &c., the dukes of Austria really had disputes with Uri.

    0
    0
  • Now Hagenbach is known to have committed many cruelties like those attributed to the bailiffs in the legend, and it has been plausibly conjectured that his case has really given rise to these stories, especially when we find that the Confederates had a hand in his capture and execution, that in a document of 1358 Hagenbachs and Gesslers appear side by side as witnesses, and that the Hagenbachs had frequent transactions with the Habsburgs and their vassals.

    0
    0
  • claim the support of authentic history, while his attempt to find room for the atrocities of the wicked bailiffs elsewhere than at Altdorf consists only in suggesting an intricate series of possibilities, none of which are supported by any positive evidence.

    0
    0
  • In 1503 the French king ceded it to Uri, Schwyz and Unterwalden, which henceforth ruled it very harshly through their bailiffs till 1798.

    0
    0
  • The king in 1224 required the bailiffs and good men of Dartmouth to keep all ships in readiness for his service, and in 1302 they were to furnish two ships for the Scottish expedition, an obligation maintained throughout the century.

    0
    0
  • in 1372 granted that the burgesses should be sued only before the mayor and bailiffs, and Richard II.

    0
    0
  • also granted the burgesses the privilege of electing a mayor and bailiffs every year.

    0
    0
  • Glamorgan and the county palatine of Pembroke had hitherto been the only portions of the country subject to English shire law, but now Edward parcelled out the ancient territory of the princes of Gwynedd and of Deheubarth into six new counties, with sheriffs, coroners and bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • The major rural divisions are the fOgderier, under bailiffs, a subdivision of which is the lansmansdistrikt under a lansman.

    0
    0
  • The Improvement Commissioners constituted by this act included the mayor, bailiffs and four aldermen of Liverpool, under whose care the main streets were laid out on a regular plan, intersecting one another at right angles; and the first iron tramway in England was laid down.

    0
    0
  • An act of 1489 incorporated the bailiffs and commonalty of the town and exempted them from harbour dues.

    0
    0
  • The history of Reuss stretches back to the times when the German kings appointed vogts, or bailiffs (advocati imperii), to administer their lands.

    0
    0
  • of Amstel built a castle there, Amsterdam was a fishing hamlet held in fee by the lords of Amstel of the bishops of Utrecht, for whom they acted as bailiffs.

    0
    0
  • dated 1622 instituted two bailiffs, fourteen capital burgesses, four justices of the peace, a high steward and under steward, two serjeantsat-mace and a court of record.

    0
    0
  • An important charter of Edward V., as prince of Wales and lord of Haverford, enacted that the town should be incorporated under a mayor, two sheriffs and two bailiffs, duly chosen by the burgesses.

    0
    0
  • There are notaries and clerks, auditors for each parish elected by the heads of families, police agents and bailiffs, chosen and sworn in, like all the above officers, by the Council General.

    0
    0
  • Poole is first mentioned in a writ of 1224, addressed to the bailiffs and good men of La Pole, ordering them to retain all ships within their port.

    0
    0
  • The mayor, bailiffs and good men are first mentioned in 1311 and were required to provide two ships for service against Robert de Brus.

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  • In the countryside the insurrection was accompanied by wholesale burnings of manor-rolls, the hunting down of unpopular bailiffs and landlords, and a special crusade against the commissioners of the poll-tax and the justices who had been enforcing the Statute of Laborers.

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  • Brooks, however, refused these conditions, saying that he could not reach the place designated "without running the gauntlet of mobs and assassins, prisons and penitentiaries, bailiffs and constables."

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  • in 1332 confirmed the charter of Henry III., and granted further that the town should be a free borough governed by four bailiffs, that it should be enclosed by a wall and that the burgesses should have a gild merchant.

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  • Sometimes a court for view of frankpledge, called in some places a mickleton, whereat the mayor or the bailiffs presided, was held for the whole borough; in other cases the borough was divided into wards, or into leets, each of which had its separate court.

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  • The royal bailiffs were to answer at the exchequer for rents of assize and all the perquisites which they made in their offices, and apparently the duty of enforcing this provision was entrusted to the justices.

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  • The corporation included 2 bailiffs, 10 capital and 24 inferior burgesses, until the Municipal Corporations Act 1883.

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  • (1297) gave a grant of pontage in aid of the bridge, which was almost broken down; similar grants to the "bailiffs and good men of Maydenhithe" were made by succeeding sovereigns.

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  • The government was by the steward and bailiffs of the bishop of Winchester, assisted by constables, wardmen and other officers.

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  • Henry IV., by a charter obtained in 1402, vested the government of the town in a mayor and two bailiffs to be elected annually.

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  • Elizabeth in 1580 confirmed all previous charters and incorporated the freeholders under the designation of "the mayor, bailiffs and burgesses of the borough of Tenby."

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  • Instead of communicating directly with the margrave through his burgraves and bailiffs, or vogts, the village communities came to be represented by the nobles who had obtained possession of their lands.

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  • Before 1482 the burgesses were holding the town at a fee farm rent of twenty marks, but the abbot still had practical control of the town, and his steward presided over the court at which the bailiffs were chosen.

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  • There was also a Reeve and Bailiffs, who organized the estate for the lord and collected rents, taxes and fines.

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  • This attracted a great crowd of people, who, thinking it the work of the bailiffs, became rowdy.

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  • The amount of debt being chased by Britain 's bailiffs has soared by 70% over the last 2 years.

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  • On 1 March the bailiffs visited Mr X and levied distress by taking possession of a van and a three-piece suite of furniture.

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  • It is probably to this ballad that Melchior Russ of Lucerne (who began his Chronicle in 1482) refers when, in his account (from Justinger) of the evil deeds of the bailiffs in the Forest districts, he excuses himself from giving the story.

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  • We first hear of the cruelties of Austrian bailiffs in the Forest districts in the Bernese Chronicle of Conrad Justinger (1420).

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  • The king in 1224 required the bailiffs and good men of Dartmouth to keep all ships in readiness for his service, and in 1302 they were to furnish two ships for the Scottish expedition, an obligation maintained throughout the century.

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  • The ordinary business of the ports was conducted in two courts known respectively as the court of brotherhood and the court of brotherhood and guestling, - the former being composed of the mayors of the seven principal towns and a number of jurats and freemen from each, and the latter including in addition the mayors, bailiffs and other representatives of the corporate members.

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  • claim the support of authentic history, while his attempt to find room for the atrocities of the wicked bailiffs elsewhere than at Altdorf consists only in suggesting an intricate series of possibilities, none of which are supported by any positive evidence.

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  • be made bailiffs or farmers of the seaport.

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