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bailiff

bailiff

bailiff Sentence Examples

  • This state of affairs appears to have continued until the accession of James I., and in 1595 the bailiff and constables of Hexham were removed as being "infected with combination and toleration of thieves."

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  • This state of affairs appears to have continued until the accession of James I., and in 1595 the bailiff and constables of Hexham were removed as being "infected with combination and toleration of thieves."

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  • In 1539 a charter incorporated the bailiff and inhabitants.

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  • The high bailiff refused to make a return, and the confirmation of Fox's election was delayed by the somewhat mean action of the ministry.

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  • It was formerly the capital of Vogtland, or Voigtland, a territory governed by the imperial vogt, or bailiff, and this name still clings in popular speech to the hilly district in which the town lies.

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  • No charter granting self-government to Wiveliscombe has been found, and the only evidence for the traditional existence of a borough is that part of the town is called "the borough," and that until the middle of the 19th century a bailiff and a portreeve were annually chosen by the court leet.

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  • No charter granting self-government to Wiveliscombe has been found, and the only evidence for the traditional existence of a borough is that part of the town is called "the borough," and that until the middle of the 19th century a bailiff and a portreeve were annually chosen by the court leet.

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  • In 1667 Theophile de Besiade, marquis d'Avaray, obtained the office of grand bailiff of Orleans, which was held by several of his descendants after him.

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  • In 1667 Theophile de Besiade, marquis d'Avaray, obtained the office of grand bailiff of Orleans, which was held by several of his descendants after him.

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  • His father, Michael Maier, was a peasant and bailiff (Amtmann) of the village.

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  • It provided that the burgesses might elect a bailiff from amongst themselves every year.

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  • The bailiff likewise holds the office of recorder, but has neither duties nor emoluments.

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  • In the 16th century it was governed by an alderman, bailiff and constable.

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  • there is evidence that the town was governed by a bailiff elected annually in the borough-court.

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  • In the 16th century it was governed by an alderman, bailiff and constable.

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  • He was afterwards appointed to the important post of ruwaard or governor of the land of Putten and bailiff of Beierland.

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  • In 1504 the bailiff and inhabitants of Boroughbridge received a grant of two fairs, and Charles II.

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  • It was governed by a bailiff, elected annually, until the office lapsed, probably early in the 19th century.

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  • The bishop's bailiff (schout), with his nominated assessors (scabini), continued to exercise jurisdiction, but members of the Raad sat on the bench with him, and an appeal lay from his court to the Raad itself.

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  • Until the 19th century it was governed by a bailiff appointed by the bishop. The mention of dyers in the Boldon Book and Hatfield's Survey probably indicates the existence of woollen manufacture.

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  • Until the 19th century it was governed by a bailiff appointed by the bishop. The mention of dyers in the Boldon Book and Hatfield's Survey probably indicates the existence of woollen manufacture.

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  • The bailiff was to be chosen annually by the burgesses, but his election seems to have depended entirely upon the lord of the manor, and, after a contest in 1821 between Lord Forester and Sir W.

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  • He had resided chiefly at Tripoli, and under him Antioch was left to be governed by its bailiff and commune.

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  • In particular, while in his first draft he speaks of the bailiff as Gryssler - the usual name up to his time, except in the White Book and in Stumpff's Chronicle of 1548 - in his final recension he calls him Gessler, knowing that this was a real name.

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  • In particular, while in his first draft he speaks of the bailiff as Gryssler - the usual name up to his time, except in the White Book and in Stumpff's Chronicle of 1548 - in his final recension he calls him Gessler, knowing that this was a real name.

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  • His grandfather was a maltster in that town, an energetic and prosperous man, almost always the bailiff or chief magistrate, and taking rather a notable part in county matters.

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  • SIR EDMUND ANDROS (1637-1714), English colonial governor in America, was born in London on the 6th of December 1637, son of Amice Andros, an adherent of Charles I., and the royal bailiff of the island of Guernsey.

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  • The bailiff was to be chosen every year in the Moot Hall and to be assisted by fourteen principal burgesses and a recorder.

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  • The first charter of incorporation, granted in 1636, appointed a bailiff and 12 capital burgesses forming a common council.

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  • It has been pointed out above that with two exceptions the bailiff is always called Gryssler or Grissler, and it was Tschudi who popularized the name of Gessler, though Grissler occurs as late as 1765.

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  • Now Gessler is the name of a real family, the history of which from 1250 to 1513 has been worked out by Rochholz, who shows in detail that no member ever played the part attributed to the bailiff in the legend, or could have done so, and that the Gesslers could not have owned or dwelt at the castle of Kiissnacht; nor could they have been called Von B runeck.

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  • His grandfather was a maltster in that town, an energetic and prosperous man, almost always the bailiff or chief magistrate, and taking rather a notable part in county matters.

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  • SIR EDMUND ANDROS (1637-1714), English colonial governor in America, was born in London on the 6th of December 1637, son of Amice Andros, an adherent of Charles I., and the royal bailiff of the island of Guernsey.

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  • The former courts, under their bailiffs, gradually absorbed the separate courts which the Syrians had at first been permitted to enjoy under their own refs; and the bailiff with his 6 assessors (4 Syrians and 2 Franks) thus came to judge both commercial cases and cases in which Syrians were involved.

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  • It was incorporated under the name of "Bailiff, Burgesses and Commonalty" by Edward IV.

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  • in r521, and by Elizabeth in 1590, the Tudor queen's original charter being still extant and in the possession of the corporation, which is officially styled "the bailiff and burgesses of the borough of Llanymtheverye, otherwise Llandovery."

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  • The liberties of the burghers were, however, still restrained by the presence of a royal advocatus (Vogt) and bailiff.

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  • It thus formed part of the common farm and was cultivated by the villeins and their oxen under the superintendence of a bailiff.

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  • In the end he recovered damages from the high bailiff.

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  • The first mention of the cloth trade for which Kidderminster was formerly noted occurs in 1334, when it was enacted that no one should make woollen cloth in the borough without the bailiff's seal.

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  • The general result has been to show that a mythological marksman and an impossible bailiff bearing the name of a real family have been joined with confused and distorted reminiscences of the events of 1245-47, in which the names of many real persons have been inserted and many unauthenticated acts attributed to them.

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  • In the Urnerspiel the name of the bailiff's servant who guarded the hat on the pole is given as Heintz VOgely, and we know that Friedrich VOgeli was the name of one of the chief military officers of Peter von Hagenbach, who from 1469 to 1474 administered for Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, the lands (Alsace, &c.) pledged to him by Sigismund of Habsburg.

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  • In a short time, however, the latter appears to have been assisted by a council, consisting of 13 consules (burgomasters) and 13 scabini (assessors), who collectively formed the governing and administrative body under the presidency of the bailiff.

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  • By this charter the burgesses acquired the right of nominating annually two of their number for the office of portreeve so that the lord's steward might select one of them to exercise the office, an arrangement which continued till 1835; the bailiff's functions were defined and curtailed, and the lord's chancery was to be continually kept open for all requiring writs, and in Gower - not wherever the lord might happen to be.

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  • He studied law and history at Leiden from 1606 to 1609, and in June of the latter year received from Prince Maurice of Orange the appointment of steward of Muiden, bailiff of Gooiland, and lord of Weesp, a joint office of great emolument.

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  • The steward of the court acted as judge, presiding wholly in a judicial character, the ministerial acts being executed by the bailiff.

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  • It was governed by a bailiff elected by the burgesses at the court leet of the lord of the manor, and never received a charter of incorporation.

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  • the interview of Heracles with the bailiff of Augeas and his recital to Phyleus, son of Augeas, of the story of the Nemean lion.

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  • It established the usual type of government under a bailiff (schout) and judicial assessors (scabini, or schoppenen), the overlord's supremacy being guarded, and an appeal lying from the court of the scabini, in case of their disagreement, to Utrecht.

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  • In 1554, by a charter from Queen Mary, bestowed as a reward for fidelity during the rebellion of the duke of Northumberland, Aylesbury was constituted a free borough corporate, with a common council consisting of a bailiff, 10 aldermen and 12 chief burgesses.

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  • Its incorporation under a bailiff, of which there is evidence in the 15th century, may have been due to the archbishop or to the court of Shepway, but it was not incorporated by the crown until 1885, when, by a charter under the Municipal Acts, the last bailiff was elected the first mayor.

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  • In 1494 a grant was made to the bailiff, jurats and commonalty of a yearly fair on the 12th.

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  • He was for some time bailiff of the cathedral chapter and then provost of Cambrai.

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  • The bailiff was to be chosen by the lord from six men elected by the burgesses, and was to hold pleas for breach of measures and assizes.

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  • A royal court took the place of the Althing courts; the local business of the local things was carried out by the (hreppstjori) bailiff, a subordinate of the sheriff; and the g050r5, things, quarter-courts, trial by jury, &c., were swept away by these innovations.

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  • Loughborough was at first governed by a bailiff, afterwards by a local board, and was finally incorporated in 1888 under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • After several unsuccessful attempts to re-establish the gild merchant, the government in 1592 was vested in the bailiff of the lord of the manor.

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  • The more powerful of the two fleets which it sent out was despatched into the eastern Mediterranean under Carlo Zeno, the bailiff and captain of Negropont.

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  • After the Dissolution the manor with the markets and fairs and other privileges was granted to Sir Philip Hoby, who increased his power over the town by persuading the burgesses to agree that, after they had nominated six candidates for the office of bailiff, the steward of the court instructed by him should indicate the two to be chosen.

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  • We can: instruct bailiffs to act on our behalf to include the Council's bailiff.

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  • In 1686 he was elected a Justice of the Peace; later he was elected bailiff.

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  • You can complain to the County Court about a certificated bailiff.

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  • bailiff employed by the courts will usually levy distress.

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  • bailiff B that a unit has been despatched.

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  • Bailiff action Once your account has been issued to the bailiff action Once your account has been issued to the bailiff, you should make any payments directly to them.

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  • bailiff law.

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  • bailiff cannot take items on hire purchase or rented.

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  • Walter Cook, the farm bailiff said deceased was perfectly sober.

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  • The county court bailiff will serve an order to attend the hearing.

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  • Tickets must be produced to the water bailiff or Club members on demand.

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  • bailiff's warrant.

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  • bailiff of the town in 1427, and is described as such in April 1428 when his house was robbed.

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  • Barbless hooks / micro barbless hooks / micro barbs ONLY Please report any breaking of the rules or problem s to the bailiff immediately.

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  • In the 14th century they included a hall, bailiff's chamber, granary, stable, byre, and two granges.

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  • Published: 29 August 2006 ' You need your very own personal bailiff; tough, no nonsense, short on social chitchat.

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  • defiance in the face of the bastard bailiff can succeed.

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  • It was in its beginning a hiring fair, and was under the control of the bailiff.

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  • The book includes a foreword written by the Bailiff of Guernsey, the Island's senior judge.

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  • The worried merchant stood up and bowed low before the bailiff.

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  • The bailiff is legally obligated to get a fair price.

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  • And the Count's bailiff has surprisingly sharp eyes.

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  • In September 1545 Tylcock was elected Junior Bailiff, and in October 1547 he contributed a shilling toward Dame Margaret Northern's coffer.

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  • Walter Cook, the farm bailiff said deceased was perfectly sober.

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  • At 12.30pm, after the Easter Bonnet Parade, the High Bailiff will unveil a large piece of dressed stonework at the Heritage Center.

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  • warrant of execution, the bailiff cannot levy on tools of the trade or on the van.

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  • In the case of a commune the concessions included generally the right of inheritance, justice, taxation, use of wood, water, &c. The lord's representative, entitled " justiciary " (schout) of " bailiff " (baljuw), presided over the administration of justice and took the command of the town levies in war.

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  • There was a gild merchant and also a town bailiff, but the latter office was of little real significance and was soon dropped.

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  • prevents a bailiff from compelling an accused man to submit to the ordeal without the approval of credible witnesses.

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  • in 1553, by which the town was incorporated under the title of the bailiff and burgesses, who were to bear the name of aldermen.

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  • The liberties of the burghers were, however, still restrained by the presence of a royal advocatus (Vogt) and bailiff.

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  • He was afterwards appointed to the important post of ruwaard or governor of the land of Putten and bailiff of Beierland.

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  • It thus formed part of the common farm and was cultivated by the villeins and their oxen under the superintendence of a bailiff.

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  • He had resided chiefly at Tripoli, and under him Antioch was left to be governed by its bailiff and commune.

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  • The former courts, under their bailiffs, gradually absorbed the separate courts which the Syrians had at first been permitted to enjoy under their own refs; and the bailiff with his 6 assessors (4 Syrians and 2 Franks) thus came to judge both commercial cases and cases in which Syrians were involved.

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  • (1162-1174), had a civil jurisdiction in admiralty cases, and, like the cours de la fonde, they were composed of a bailiff and his assessors.

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  • It was incorporated under the name of "Bailiff, Burgesses and Commonalty" by Edward IV.

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  • The bailiff was to be chosen annually by the burgesses, but his election seems to have depended entirely upon the lord of the manor, and, after a contest in 1821 between Lord Forester and Sir W.

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  • Its most important early charter was that granted in 1340 by Hugh le Despenser, whereby the burgesses acquired the right to nominate persons from whom the constable of the castle should select a bailiff and other officers, two ancient fairs, held on the 29th of June and, 9th of September, were confirmed, and extensive trading privileges were granted, including the right to form a merchant gild.

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  • The first charter of incorporation was granted by Queen Mary in 1553, and instituted a common council consisting of a bailiff, 12 aldermen and 12 chief burgesses; a court of record, one justice of the peace, a Thursday market and two annual fairs.

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  • It was formerly the capital of Vogtland, or Voigtland, a territory governed by the imperial vogt, or bailiff, and this name still clings in popular speech to the hilly district in which the town lies.

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  • The chief official was the royal bailiff (Schultheiss), who is first mentioned in 1193, and whose powers were subsequently enlarged by the abolition, in 1219, of the office of the royal Vogt or advo- catus.

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  • The deputy receives and opens in the sheriff's name all writs, the return or execution of which belongs to the bailiff of the liberty, and issues to the bailiff the warrant required for the due execution of such writs.

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  • The high bailiff refused to make a return, and the confirmation of Fox's election was delayed by the somewhat mean action of the ministry.

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  • In the end he recovered damages from the high bailiff.

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  • In 1415 Baden (with the Aargau) was conquered by the Eight Swiss Confederates, whose bailiff inhabited the other castle, on the right bank of the Limmat, which defends the ancient bridge across that river.

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  • It was governed by a portreeve and bailiff, elected annually at the court leet held by the lord of the manor.

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  • The head of the house (paterfamilias) is the natural priest and has control of the domestic worship: he is assisted by his sons as acolytes (camilli) and deputes certain portions of the ritual to his wife and daughters and even to his bailiff (vilicus) and his bailiff's wife.

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  • The magistrates, the Schout or high bailiff and his assessors, the Schepenen (scabini, echevins), were nominated by the burgrave from the order of knights.

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  • p-r-s-t), a district embracing the rich lowlands on the Mediterranean coast from the neighbourhood 1 " Philistine," as a term of contempt, hostility or reproach, appears first in English, in a sense equivalent to " the enemy," as early as the beginning of the 17th century, and later as a slang term for a bailiff or a sheriff's officer, or merely for drunken or vicious people generally.

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  • It was governed by a bailiff, elected annually, until the office lapsed, probably early in the 19th century.

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  • King John by charter of 1204 granted the bailiff of Boston sole jurisdiction in the town.

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  • L'AUBESPINE, a French family which sprang from Claude de l'Aubespine, a lawyer of Orleans and bailiff of the abbey of St Euverte in the beginning of the 16th century, and rapidly acquired distinction in offices connected with the law.

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  • MORMAOR, or Mormaer (from two Gaelic words mor, great, and maor, a steward or bailiff), a title used to designate the rulers of the seven provinces into which Celtic Scotland, i.e.

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  • It provided that the burgesses might elect a bailiff from amongst themselves every year.

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  • The first account of the borough and its privileges is contained in an inquisition taken in 1333 after the death of Anthony, bishop of Durham, which shows that the burgesses held the town with the markets and fairs at a fee-farm rent of 40 marks yearly, and that they had two reeves who sat in court with the bishop's bailiff to hear the disputes of the townspeople.

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  • Its affairs were entrusted to a reeve or bailiff acting in conjunction with the principal men of the town.

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  • In 1539 a charter incorporated the bailiff and inhabitants.

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  • According to tradition, Daventry was created a borough by King John, but there is no extant charter before that of Elizabeth in 1576, by which the town was incorporated under the name of the bailiff, burgesses and commonalty of the borough of Daventry.

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  • The bailiff was to be chosen every year in the Moot Hall and to be assisted by fourteen principal burgesses and a recorder.

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  • The bishop's bailiff (schout), with his nominated assessors (scabini), continued to exercise jurisdiction, but members of the Raad sat on the bench with him, and an appeal lay from his court to the Raad itself.

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  • As a royal possession it appears to have enjoyed various privileges in the 12th century, among them the right of choosing a bailiff to collect the toll and render it to the king, and to elect six burgesses and send them to the view of frankpledge twice a year.

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  • The first charter of incorporation, granted in 1636, appointed a bailiff and 12 capital burgesses forming a common council.

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  • The first mention of the cloth trade for which Kidderminster was formerly noted occurs in 1334, when it was enacted that no one should make woollen cloth in the borough without the bailiff's seal.

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  • in r521, and by Elizabeth in 1590, the Tudor queen's original charter being still extant and in the possession of the corporation, which is officially styled "the bailiff and burgesses of the borough of Llanymtheverye, otherwise Llandovery."

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  • The bailiff likewise holds the office of recorder, but has neither duties nor emoluments.

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  • The burgomaster is entirely dependent upon the police and the chief of the district, and has to discharge all sorts of functions (bailiff, policeman, &c.) which have nothing to do with municipal affairs.

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  • In 1643 he succeeded by reversion from his uncle, Sir Philip Carteret, to the post of bailiff of Jersey, and in the same year was appointed by the king lieutenant-governor of the island.

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  • The town government during this period was by the bishop's bailiff, and the holders of the burgages composed the juries of the bishop's courts leet and baron.

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  • The bishop appointed the last borough bailiff in 1681, and though the inhabitants in 1772 petitioned for a bailiff the town remained under a steward and grassmen until the 19th century.

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  • Hexham was a borough by prescription, and governed by a bailiff at least as early as 1276, and the same form of government continued until 1853.

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  • Compurgation, the ordeal, and trial by battle began to yield to Visnet, Jugement del Pais, the " good men of the country," giving their verdict, while sentence was passed by the judge, sheriff, alderman or bailiff.

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  • TELL The story of William Tell's skill in shooting at and striking the apple which had been placed on the head of his little son by order of Gessler, the tyrannical Austrian bailiff of Uri, is so closely bound up with the legendary history of the origin of the Swiss Confederation that they must be considered together.

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  • There is no mention made of the names of the bailiff or of his master, or of the hat placed on a pole.

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  • He steers it towards a shelf of rock, called in Russ's time Tell's Platte, springs on shore, shoots the bailiff dead with his crossbow, and goes back to Uri, where he stirs up the great strife which ended in the battle of Morgarten.

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  • To give an instance of tyranny in Uri, the author tells us the story of the refusal of "der Than" to do reverence to the hat placed on a pole, of his feat of skill, and of his shooting the bailiff, Gessler, from behind a bush in the "hollow way" near Kussnacht.

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  • (It is worthy of notice that the same meaning is attributed to the name of Tokko, the hero of a similar legend in Gheysmer's abridgment of the Historia Danica of Saxo Grammaticus, which may, somehow, have influenced the Swiss version.) The only other known instances of the Uri version of the legend relating to the origin of the Confederation are the Latin hexameters of Glareanus (1515), in which Tell is compared to Brutus as "assertor patriae, vindex ultorque tyrannum," and the Urnerspiel (composed in 1511-12), a play acted in Uri, in which Russ's version is followed, though the bailiff, who is unnamed, but announces that he has been sent by Albert of Austria, is slain in the "hollow way."

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  • The general result has been to show that a mythological marksman and an impossible bailiff bearing the name of a real family have been joined with confused and distorted reminiscences of the events of 1245-47, in which the names of many real persons have been inserted and many unauthenticated acts attributed to them.

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  • It has been pointed out above that with two exceptions the bailiff is always called Gryssler or Grissler, and it was Tschudi who popularized the name of Gessler, though Grissler occurs as late as 1765.

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  • Now Gessler is the name of a real family, the history of which from 1250 to 1513 has been worked out by Rochholz, who shows in detail that no member ever played the part attributed to the bailiff in the legend, or could have done so, and that the Gesslers could not have owned or dwelt at the castle of Kiissnacht; nor could they have been called Von B runeck.

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  • In the Urnerspiel the name of the bailiff's servant who guarded the hat on the pole is given as Heintz VOgely, and we know that Friedrich VOgeli was the name of one of the chief military officers of Peter von Hagenbach, who from 1469 to 1474 administered for Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, the lands (Alsace, &c.) pledged to him by Sigismund of Habsburg.

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  • He is well acquainted with all the researches that have been made, but tries to save Tell's refusal to do reverence to the hat, his leap from the boat in the lake, and his slaying of the bailiff in the "hollow way."

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  • In 1504 the bailiff and inhabitants of Boroughbridge received a grant of two fairs, and Charles II.

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  • In a short time, however, the latter appears to have been assisted by a council, consisting of 13 consules (burgomasters) and 13 scabini (assessors), who collectively formed the governing and administrative body under the presidency of the bailiff.

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  • He related his dream to the farm bailiff under whom he worked, and was conducted by him to the neighbouring monastery at Streanashalch (now called Whitby).

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  • His father, Michael Maier, was a peasant and bailiff (Amtmann) of the village.

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  • incorporated it by the name of a "Bailiff and Commonalty," and united it to Rye.

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  • On the 10th of February 1360, when another French invasion was feared, the bailiff of Sandwich was ordered to send all the lead he had to Wykeham for the works at Dover.

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  • there is evidence that the town was governed by a bailiff elected annually in the borough-court.

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  • By this charter the burgesses acquired the right of nominating annually two of their number for the office of portreeve so that the lord's steward might select one of them to exercise the office, an arrangement which continued till 1835; the bailiff's functions were defined and curtailed, and the lord's chancery was to be continually kept open for all requiring writs, and in Gower - not wherever the lord might happen to be.

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  • He studied law and history at Leiden from 1606 to 1609, and in June of the latter year received from Prince Maurice of Orange the appointment of steward of Muiden, bailiff of Gooiland, and lord of Weesp, a joint office of great emolument.

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  • The steward of the court acted as judge, presiding wholly in a judicial character, the ministerial acts being executed by the bailiff.

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  • It was governed by a bailiff elected by the burgesses at the court leet of the lord of the manor, and never received a charter of incorporation.

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  • the interview of Heracles with the bailiff of Augeas and his recital to Phyleus, son of Augeas, of the story of the Nemean lion.

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  • It established the usual type of government under a bailiff (schout) and judicial assessors (scabini, or schoppenen), the overlord's supremacy being guarded, and an appeal lying from the court of the scabini, in case of their disagreement, to Utrecht.

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  • In 1554, by a charter from Queen Mary, bestowed as a reward for fidelity during the rebellion of the duke of Northumberland, Aylesbury was constituted a free borough corporate, with a common council consisting of a bailiff, 10 aldermen and 12 chief burgesses.

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  • Its incorporation under a bailiff, of which there is evidence in the 15th century, may have been due to the archbishop or to the court of Shepway, but it was not incorporated by the crown until 1885, when, by a charter under the Municipal Acts, the last bailiff was elected the first mayor.

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  • In 1494 a grant was made to the bailiff, jurats and commonalty of a yearly fair on the 12th.

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  • He was for some time bailiff of the cathedral chapter and then provost of Cambrai.

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  • The bailiff was to be chosen by the lord from six men elected by the burgesses, and was to hold pleas for breach of measures and assizes.

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  • A royal court took the place of the Althing courts; the local business of the local things was carried out by the (hreppstjori) bailiff, a subordinate of the sheriff; and the g050r5, things, quarter-courts, trial by jury, &c., were swept away by these innovations.

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  • Loughborough was at first governed by a bailiff, afterwards by a local board, and was finally incorporated in 1888 under a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.

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  • After several unsuccessful attempts to re-establish the gild merchant, the government in 1592 was vested in the bailiff of the lord of the manor.

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  • The more powerful of the two fleets which it sent out was despatched into the eastern Mediterranean under Carlo Zeno, the bailiff and captain of Negropont.

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  • After the Dissolution the manor with the markets and fairs and other privileges was granted to Sir Philip Hoby, who increased his power over the town by persuading the burgesses to agree that, after they had nominated six candidates for the office of bailiff, the steward of the court instructed by him should indicate the two to be chosen.

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  • He examined the bailiff's accounts of the village in Ryazan which belonged to his wife's nephew, wrote two business letters, and walked over to the granaries, cattle yards and stables before dinner.

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  • And the Count 's bailiff has surprisingly sharp eyes.

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  • In September 1545 Tylcock was elected Junior Bailiff, and in October 1547 he contributed a shilling toward Dame Margaret Northern 's coffer.

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  • At 12.30pm, after the Easter Bonnet Parade, the High Bailiff will unveil a large piece of dressed stonework at the Heritage Center.

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  • If he issues a warrant of execution, the bailiff cannot levy on tools of the trade or on the van.

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  • The chief official was the royal bailiff (Schultheiss), who is first mentioned in 1193, and whose powers were subsequently enlarged by the abolition, in 1219, of the office of the royal Vogt or advo- catus.

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  • The deputy receives and opens in the sheriff's name all writs, the return or execution of which belongs to the bailiff of the liberty, and issues to the bailiff the warrant required for the due execution of such writs.

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  • The first account of the borough and its privileges is contained in an inquisition taken in 1333 after the death of Anthony, bishop of Durham, which shows that the burgesses held the town with the markets and fairs at a fee-farm rent of 40 marks yearly, and that they had two reeves who sat in court with the bishop's bailiff to hear the disputes of the townspeople.

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  • Its affairs were entrusted to a reeve or bailiff acting in conjunction with the principal men of the town.

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  • As a royal possession it appears to have enjoyed various privileges in the 12th century, among them the right of choosing a bailiff to collect the toll and render it to the king, and to elect six burgesses and send them to the view of frankpledge twice a year.

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  • The burgomaster is entirely dependent upon the police and the chief of the district, and has to discharge all sorts of functions (bailiff, policeman, &c.) which have nothing to do with municipal affairs.

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  • In 1643 he succeeded by reversion from his uncle, Sir Philip Carteret, to the post of bailiff of Jersey, and in the same year was appointed by the king lieutenant-governor of the island.

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  • The town government during this period was by the bishop's bailiff, and the holders of the burgages composed the juries of the bishop's courts leet and baron.

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  • The bishop appointed the last borough bailiff in 1681, and though the inhabitants in 1772 petitioned for a bailiff the town remained under a steward and grassmen until the 19th century.

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  • Hexham was a borough by prescription, and governed by a bailiff at least as early as 1276, and the same form of government continued until 1853.

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  • TELL The story of William Tell's skill in shooting at and striking the apple which had been placed on the head of his little son by order of Gessler, the tyrannical Austrian bailiff of Uri, is so closely bound up with the legendary history of the origin of the Swiss Confederation that they must be considered together.

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  • There is no mention made of the names of the bailiff or of his master, or of the hat placed on a pole.

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  • He steers it towards a shelf of rock, called in Russ's time Tell's Platte, springs on shore, shoots the bailiff dead with his crossbow, and goes back to Uri, where he stirs up the great strife which ended in the battle of Morgarten.

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  • (It is worthy of notice that the same meaning is attributed to the name of Tokko, the hero of a similar legend in Gheysmer's abridgment of the Historia Danica of Saxo Grammaticus, which may, somehow, have influenced the Swiss version.) The only other known instances of the Uri version of the legend relating to the origin of the Confederation are the Latin hexameters of Glareanus (1515), in which Tell is compared to Brutus as "assertor patriae, vindex ultorque tyrannum," and the Urnerspiel (composed in 1511-12), a play acted in Uri, in which Russ's version is followed, though the bailiff, who is unnamed, but announces that he has been sent by Albert of Austria, is slain in the "hollow way."

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  • He is well acquainted with all the researches that have been made, but tries to save Tell's refusal to do reverence to the hat, his leap from the boat in the lake, and his slaying of the bailiff in the "hollow way."

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  • He related his dream to the farm bailiff under whom he worked, and was conducted by him to the neighbouring monastery at Streanashalch (now called Whitby).

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  • incorporated it by the name of a "Bailiff and Commonalty," and united it to Rye.

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  • On the 10th of February 1360, when another French invasion was feared, the bailiff of Sandwich was ordered to send all the lead he had to Wykeham for the works at Dover.

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  • There was a gild merchant and also a town bailiff, but the latter office was of little real significance and was soon dropped.

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  • in 1553, by which the town was incorporated under the title of the bailiff and burgesses, who were to bear the name of aldermen.

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  • Its most important early charter was that granted in 1340 by Hugh le Despenser, whereby the burgesses acquired the right to nominate persons from whom the constable of the castle should select a bailiff and other officers, two ancient fairs, held on the 29th of June and, 9th of September, were confirmed, and extensive trading privileges were granted, including the right to form a merchant gild.

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  • The bailiff then becomes liable for non-execution, mis-execution or insufficient return of any writs, and in the case of non-return of any writ, if the sheriff returns that he has delivered the writ to a bailiff of a liberty, the sheriff will be ordered to execute the writ notwithstanding the liberty, and must cause the bailiff to attend before the high court of justice and answer why he did not execute the writ.

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  • In 1415 Baden (with the Aargau) was conquered by the Eight Swiss Confederates, whose bailiff inhabited the other castle, on the right bank of the Limmat, which defends the ancient bridge across that river.

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  • It was governed by a portreeve and bailiff, elected annually at the court leet held by the lord of the manor.

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  • p-r-s-t), a district embracing the rich lowlands on the Mediterranean coast from the neighbourhood 1 " Philistine," as a term of contempt, hostility or reproach, appears first in English, in a sense equivalent to " the enemy," as early as the beginning of the 17th century, and later as a slang term for a bailiff or a sheriff's officer, or merely for drunken or vicious people generally.

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  • King John by charter of 1204 granted the bailiff of Boston sole jurisdiction in the town.

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  • According to tradition, Daventry was created a borough by King John, but there is no extant charter before that of Elizabeth in 1576, by which the town was incorporated under the name of the bailiff, burgesses and commonalty of the borough of Daventry.

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  • The bailiff then becomes liable for non-execution, mis-execution or insufficient return of any writs, and in the case of non-return of any writ, if the sheriff returns that he has delivered the writ to a bailiff of a liberty, the sheriff will be ordered to execute the writ notwithstanding the liberty, and must cause the bailiff to attend before the high court of justice and answer why he did not execute the writ.

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  • (1162-1174), had a civil jurisdiction in admiralty cases, and, like the cours de la fonde, they were composed of a bailiff and his assessors.

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  • The first charter of incorporation was granted by Queen Mary in 1553, and instituted a common council consisting of a bailiff, 12 aldermen and 12 chief burgesses; a court of record, one justice of the peace, a Thursday market and two annual fairs.

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  • The magistrates, the Schout or high bailiff and his assessors, the Schepenen (scabini, echevins), were nominated by the burgrave from the order of knights.

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  • L'AUBESPINE, a French family which sprang from Claude de l'Aubespine, a lawyer of Orleans and bailiff of the abbey of St Euverte in the beginning of the 16th century, and rapidly acquired distinction in offices connected with the law.

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  • The head of the house (paterfamilias) is the natural priest and has control of the domestic worship: he is assisted by his sons as acolytes (camilli) and deputes certain portions of the ritual to his wife and daughters and even to his bailiff (vilicus) and his bailiff's wife.

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