This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

bacterium

bacterium

bacterium Sentence Examples

  • applies only to the bacterium or toxin used in its production.

    34
    25
  • In ordinary arable soil there exist motile rod-like bacteria, Bacterium radicicola.

    10
    2
  • In ordinary arable soil there exist motile rod-like bacteria, Bacterium radicicola.

    10
    3
  • Bacterium vermiforme, B.

    9
    7
  • The formation of the blue mud is largely aided by the putrefaction of organic matter, and as a result the water deeper than 120 fathoms is extraordinarily deficient in dissolved oxygen and abounds in sulphuretted hydrogen, the formation of which is brought about by a special bacterium, the only form of life found at depths greater than 120 fathoms in the Black Sea.

    8
    8
  • It should be mentioned that different genera require different races of the bacterium for the production of nodules.

    5
    4
  • These oxidations are brought about by the vital activity of several bacteria, of which four-- Bacterium aceti, B.

    5
    6
  • One bacterium might thus produce in twenty-four hours a number of segments amounting to many millions of millions.

    4
    3
  • Each bacterium capable of growth gives rise to a colony visible to the naked eye, and if the colonies are sufficiently apart, an inoculation can be made from any one to a tube of culture-medium and a pure culture obtained.

    4
    3
  • These are found to contain large numbers of a bacterium termed Bacillus radicicola or Pseudomonas radicicola.

    4
    6
  • The growth of an ordinary bacterium consists in uniform elongation of the rodlet until its length is doubled, followed by division by a median septum, then by the simul- Measure- taneous doubling in length of each daughter cell, again ment of followed by the median division, and soon (figs.

    3
    3
  • only three or four times as long as broad (Bacterium), or longer (Bacillus); the biscuitshaped ones are Bacteria in the early stages of division.

    3
    4
  • A pathogenic bacterium present may invade the body, and may be obtained in pure culture from the internal organs.

    3
    4
  • Such an effect may be demonstrated outside the body by making a (actiopsonic suitable mixture of (a) a suspension of the particular bacterium, (b) the serum to be tested, and (c) leucocytes of a normal animal or person.

    3
    4
  • The occurrence of a starch-like substance which stains deep blue with iodine has been clearly shown in some forms even where the bacterium is growing on a medium containing no starch, as shown by Ward and others.

    2
    2
  • With regard to the subject of infection the chief factor is susceptibility; with regard to the bacterium virulence is allimportant.

    2
    3
  • A second method is by injection of the bacterium in the dead condition, whereby immunity against the living organism may be produced.

    2
    3
  • The bacterium, being a complex organic substance, may thus give rise to more than one antagonistic or combining substance.

    2
    3
  • a particular bacterium had a special action in bringing about phagocytosis of that organism, and it had been found that this property was retained when the serum was heated at 55° C. It is now generally admitted that at least two distinct classes of substances are concerned in opsonic action, that thermostable immune opsonins are developed as a result of active immunization and these possess the specific properties of anti-substances in general, that is, act only on the corresponding bacterium.

    2
    3
  • Then as regards natural powers of destroying bacteria, phagocytosis aided by chemiotaxis plays a part, and it can be understood that an animal whose phagocytes are attracted by a particular bacterium will have an advantage over one in which this action is absent.

    2
    3
  • The bacterium, being a complex organic substance, may thus give rise to more than one antagonistic or combining substance.

    2
    3
  • The Bacterium acidi lacti described by Pasteur decomposes milk sugar into lactic acid.

    2
    4
  • The bacterium, Clostridium pasteurianum, common in most soils, is able to utilize free nitrogen under anaerobic conditions, and an organism known as Azotobacter chroococcum and some others closely allied to it, have similar powers which they can exercise under aerobic conditions.

    2
    4
  • By immunity is meant non-susceptibility to a given disease, or to experimental inoculation with a given bacterium or toxin.

    2
    4
  • All these terms, including the usual one of bacteria, are unsatisfactory; for " bacterium," " bacillus " and " micrococcus " have narrow technical meanings, and the other terms are too vague to be scientific. The most satisfactory designation is that proposed by Nageli in 1857, namely " schizomycetes," and it is by this term that they are usually known among botanists; the less exact term, however, is also used and is retained in this article since the science is commonly known as " bacteriology."

    1
    2
  • The supposed constancy of forms in Cohn's species and genera received a shock when Lankester in 1873 pointed out that his Bacterium rubescens (since named Beggiatoa roseo-persicina, Zopf) passes through conditions which would have been described by most observers influenced by the current doctrine as so many separate " species " or even " genera," - that in fact forms known as Bacterium, Hicrococcus, Bacillus, Leptothrix, &c., occur as phases in one life-history.

    1
    2
  • In 1870 Pasteur had proved that a disease of silkworms was due to an organism of the nature of a bacterium; and in 1871 Oertel showed that a Micrococcus already known to exist in diphtheria is intimately concerned in producing that disease.

    1
    2
  • Egg-shaped mass of zoogloea of Beggiatoa roseo-persicina (Bacterium rubescens of Lankester); the gelatinous swollen walls of the large crowded cocci are fused into a common gelatinous envelope.

    1
    2
  • Zoogloea of Bacterium merismopedioides, Zopf, containing cocci arranged in tablets.

    1
    2
  • Formerly regarded as a distinct genus - the natural fate of all the various ' Brefeld has observed that a bacterium may divide once every half-hour, and its progeny repeat the process in the same time.

    1
    2
  • Nencki showed, however, that if both these organisms occur together, the resulting products contain large quantities of normal butyl alcohol, a substance neither bacterium can produce alone.

    1
    2
  • The microscope magnifies the distance traversed as well as the organism, and although a bacterium which covers 9 - ro cm.

    1
    2
  • (i) the discovery of a bacterium in the affected tissues by means of the microscope; (2) the obtaining of the bacterium in pure culture; and (3) the production of the disease by inoculation with a pure culture.

    1
    2
  • The full description of a particular bacterium implies an account not only of its microscopical characters, but also of its growth characters in various culture media, its biological properties, and the effects produced in animals by inoculation.

    1
    2
  • For example, various sugars - lactose, glucose, saccharose, &c. - are added to test the fermentative action of the bacterium on these substances; litmus is added to show changes in reaction, specially standardized media being used for estimating such changes; peptone solution is commonly employed for testing whether or not the bacterium forms indol; sterilized milk is used as a culture medium to determine whether or not it is curdled by the growth.

    1
    2
  • Sometimes a bacterium can be readily recognized from one or two characters, but not infrequently a whole series of tests must be made before the species is determined.

    1
    2
  • It may be stated that the introduction of a particular bacterium into the tissues of the body leads to certain properties appearing in the serum, which are chiefly exerted towards this particular bacterium.

    1
    2
  • One great drawback in certain cases is that such animals are not susceptible to a given bacterium, or that the disease is different in character from that in the human subject.

    1
    2
  • It may also be mentioned that many toxins have now been obtained by growing the particular organism in a proteid-free medium, a fact which shows that if the toxin is a proteid it may be formed synthetically by the bacterium as well as by modification of proteid already present.

    1
    2
  • But this has not been proved, and hitherto no enzyme has been separated from a pathogenic bacterium capable of forming, by digestive or other action, the toxic bodies from proteids outside the body.

    1
    2
  • The result of the entrance of a virulent bacterium into the tissues of an animal is not a disease with hard and fast characters, but varies greatly with circumstances.

    1
    2
  • Sometimes also the virulence of a bacterium for a particular kind of animal becomes lessened on passing it through the body of one of another species.

    1
    2
  • In order that the immunity may reach a high degree, either the bacterium in a very virulent state or a large dose of toxin must ultimately be used in the injections.

    1
    2
  • So far as bacterial immunity is concerned, the anti-serum exerts its action either on the toxin or on the bacterium itself; that is, its action is either antitoxic or anti-bacterial.

    1
    2
  • " the production of a change in the corresponding bacterium whereby it becomes granular, swells up and ultimately may undergo dissolution.

    1
    2
  • Pfeiffer was the first to show that this occurred when the bacterium was injected into the peritoneal cavity of the animal immunized against it, and also when a little of the serum of such an animal was injected with the bacterium into the peritoneum of a fresh, i.e.

    1
    2
  • By this is meant the aggregation into clumps of the bacteria uniformly distributed (natiai n an indifferent fluid; if the bacterium is motile its movement is arrested during the process.

    1
    2
  • the serum of an animal immunized against the bacterium) was added to a fluid culture of this bacillus, growth formed a sediment instead of a uniform turbidity.

    1
    2
  • Gruber and Durham showed that sedimentation occurred when a small quantity of the homologous serum was added to an emul:_on of the bacterium in a small test-tube, and found that this obtained in all cases where Pfeiffer's lysogenic action could be demonstrated.

    1
    2
  • All these terms, including the usual one of bacteria, are unsatisfactory; for " bacterium," " bacillus " and " micrococcus " have narrow technical meanings, and the other terms are too vague to be scientific. The most satisfactory designation is that proposed by Nageli in 1857, namely " schizomycetes," and it is by this term that they are usually known among botanists; the less exact term, however, is also used and is retained in this article since the science is commonly known as " bacteriology."

    1
    2
  • Egg-shaped mass of zoogloea of Beggiatoa roseo-persicina (Bacterium rubescens of Lankester); the gelatinous swollen walls of the large crowded cocci are fused into a common gelatinous envelope.

    1
    2
  • If the particle enveloped by the protoplasm be of an organic nature, such as a bacterium, it undergoes digestion, and ultimately becomes destroyed, and accordingly the term " phagocyte " is now in common use to indicate cells having the above properties.

    1
    3
  • The ketone is also obtained when Bertrand's sorbose bacterium acts on glycerol; this medium also acts on other alcohols to yield ketoses; for example: erythrite gives erythrulose, arabite arabinulose, mannitol fructose, &c.

    1
    3
  • l-Arabinulose obtained from arabite and Bertrand's sorbium bacterium is a ketose.

    1
    3
  • It appears from the observations of Maze that the bacterium can even absorb free nitrogen when grown in cultures FIG.

    1
    3
  • In the case of any bacterium discovered, observation must be made in a long series of instances in order to determine its invariable presence.

    1
    3
  • The simplest case is that in which only one variety of bacterium is present, and a " pure culture " may then be obtained at once.

    1
    3
  • Though the causal relationship of a bacterium to a disease may be completely established by the methods given, another very important part of bacteriology is concerned with the poisons or toxins formed by bacteria.

    1
    3
  • A third method is by injections of the separated toxins of a bacterium, the resulting immunity being not only against the toxin, but, so far as present knowledge shows, also against the living organism.

    1
    3
  • A third method is by injections of the separated toxins of a bacterium, the resulting immunity being not only against the toxin, but, so far as present knowledge shows, also against the living organism.

    1
    3
  • Lister for isolating a pure culture of lactic acid bacterium.

    0
    0
  • This method did not give very certain results, for it could not be guaranteed that the growth in the inoculated flask was necessarily derived from a single bacterium.

    0
    0
  • a Bacterium.

    0
    0
  • the bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Wright and his co-workers to control the treatment of bacterial infections by vaccines; that is, by injections of varying amounts of a dead culture of the corresponding bacterium.

    0
    0
  • For example, genes from the bacterium bacillus thuringiensis produce a toxin that kills certain insects.

    0
    0
  • bacteriology testing proved positive for the strangles bacterium, Streptococcus equi.

    0
    0
  • bacterium DNA should transfer to bacteria in the human gut is not at all unexpected.

    0
    0
  • A fluorescent, Gram-negative bacterium was consistently isolated from diseased tissues onto King's B medium.

    0
    0
  • bacterium clostridium botulinum, which occurs naturally in the soil.

    0
    0
  • bacterium mycobacterium tuberculosis, although there are various other Mycobacterium species that can cause different forms of TB.

    0
    0
  • bacterium staphylococcus aureus, healthcare settings and the risk of MRSA, causes, treatment, and prevention and control measures.

    0
    0
  • caused by a bacterium or a virus?

    0
    0
  • caused by a bacterium or a virus?

    0
    0
  • Welcome to Herbal Fusion - Botox is made from ' botulinum toxin ', a poison produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum.

    0
    0
  • What makes a bacterium an endophyte and why are plant defense mechanisms not activated?

    0
    0
  • Dr. Wilcox recently chaired a working party looking at diarrhoeal infections caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, spread primarily in hospitals.

    0
    0
  • fate of free DNA and transformation of the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii DL1 by plasmid DNA in human saliva.

    0
    0
  • Plague infected fleas lured from mice were used to produce a bacterium that was injected in to prisoners.

    0
    0
  • This includes legionnaire 's disease, caused by a bacterium, and SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) caused by a virus.

    0
    0
  • Infection with the Leptospira bacterium is called leptospirosis or Weil's Disease.

    0
    0
  • The team showed that this changes the bacterium's ability to cause disease, making lipoproteins a possible route for creating a vaccine.

    0
    0
  • meningitis bacterium without any ill effect to themselves or others.

    0
    0
  • meningococcus bacterium is the cause of this acute meningitis, which can kill in a matter of hours.

    0
    0
  • An average bacterium would be about 1.0 micron by 0.5 micron or cover an area of 0.5 square microns.

    0
    0
  • Tryptophan produced in a genetically modified bacterium was linked to an epidemic called eosinophilia myalgia syndrome in 1989.

    0
    0
  • neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium tetani.

    0
    0
  • Some of these forms of bacterium live freely in the soil others live in root nodules.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium contains a section of DNA called a plasmid in addition to its usual component of DNA.

    0
    0
  • pneumococcus bacterium.

    0
    0
  • pylorusd half the population carry the bacterium Helicobacter pylori which causes most cases.

    0
    0
  • Vulnerable strains of bacterium were replaced by resistant strains.

    0
    0
  • streptococcus pyogenes bacterium, may be severe and are treatable with antibiotics.

    0
    0
  • The foam inside the camera was found to have a strain of the bacterium streptococcus mitis still living inside it.

    0
    0
  • tularemia bacterium instead of the non-infectious one typically used.

    0
    0
  • white celltions prevent the bacterium from being attacked and destroyed by the white blood cells of the host (Gould, 1987 ).

    0
    0
  • Lister for isolating a pure culture of lactic acid bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Lister determined the number of bacteria present in a drop of the liquid under examination by counting, and then diluted this with a sufficient quantity of sterilized water so that each drop of the mixture should contain, on an average, less than one bacterium.

    0
    0
  • This method did not give very certain results, for it could not be guaranteed that the growth in the inoculated flask was necessarily derived from a single bacterium.

    0
    0
  • The Bacterium acidi lacti described by Pasteur decomposes milk sugar into lactic acid.

    0
    0
  • If the particle enveloped by the protoplasm be of an organic nature, such as a bacterium, it undergoes digestion, and ultimately becomes destroyed, and accordingly the term " phagocyte " is now in common use to indicate cells having the above properties.

    0
    0
  • The ketone is also obtained when Bertrand's sorbose bacterium acts on glycerol; this medium also acts on other alcohols to yield ketoses; for example: erythrite gives erythrulose, arabite arabinulose, mannitol fructose, &c.

    0
    0
  • l-Arabinulose obtained from arabite and Bertrand's sorbium bacterium is a ketose.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium, Clostridium pasteurianum, common in most soils, is able to utilize free nitrogen under anaerobic conditions, and an organism known as Azotobacter chroococcum and some others closely allied to it, have similar powers which they can exercise under aerobic conditions.

    0
    0
  • These are found to contain large numbers of a bacterium termed Bacillus radicicola or Pseudomonas radicicola.

    0
    0
  • The formation of the blue mud is largely aided by the putrefaction of organic matter, and as a result the water deeper than 120 fathoms is extraordinarily deficient in dissolved oxygen and abounds in sulphuretted hydrogen, the formation of which is brought about by a special bacterium, the only form of life found at depths greater than 120 fathoms in the Black Sea.

    0
    0
  • a Bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Bacterium vermiforme, B.

    0
    0
  • The supposed constancy of forms in Cohn's species and genera received a shock when Lankester in 1873 pointed out that his Bacterium rubescens (since named Beggiatoa roseo-persicina, Zopf) passes through conditions which would have been described by most observers influenced by the current doctrine as so many separate " species " or even " genera," - that in fact forms known as Bacterium, Hicrococcus, Bacillus, Leptothrix, &c., occur as phases in one life-history.

    0
    0
  • In 1870 Pasteur had proved that a disease of silkworms was due to an organism of the nature of a bacterium; and in 1871 Oertel showed that a Micrococcus already known to exist in diphtheria is intimately concerned in producing that disease.

    0
    0
  • The occurrence of a starch-like substance which stains deep blue with iodine has been clearly shown in some forms even where the bacterium is growing on a medium containing no starch, as shown by Ward and others.

    0
    0
  • Zoogloea of Bacterium merismopedioides, Zopf, containing cocci arranged in tablets.

    0
    0
  • only three or four times as long as broad (Bacterium), or longer (Bacillus); the biscuitshaped ones are Bacteria in the early stages of division.

    0
    0
  • Formerly regarded as a distinct genus - the natural fate of all the various ' Brefeld has observed that a bacterium may divide once every half-hour, and its progeny repeat the process in the same time.

    0
    0
  • One bacterium might thus produce in twenty-four hours a number of segments amounting to many millions of millions.

    0
    0
  • The growth of an ordinary bacterium consists in uniform elongation of the rodlet until its length is doubled, followed by division by a median septum, then by the simul- Measure- taneous doubling in length of each daughter cell, again ment of followed by the median division, and soon (figs.

    0
    0
  • It appears from the observations of Maze that the bacterium can even absorb free nitrogen when grown in cultures FIG.

    0
    0
  • It should be mentioned that different genera require different races of the bacterium for the production of nodules.

    0
    0
  • These oxidations are brought about by the vital activity of several bacteria, of which four-- Bacterium aceti, B.

    0
    0
  • - Ginger-beer plant, showing yeast (Saccharomyces pyrifor7nis) entangled in the meshes of the bacterium (B.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium with and without its gelatinous sheaths (cf.

    0
    0
  • Nencki showed, however, that if both these organisms occur together, the resulting products contain large quantities of normal butyl alcohol, a substance neither bacterium can produce alone.

    0
    0
  • The microscope magnifies the distance traversed as well as the organism, and although a bacterium which covers 9 - ro cm.

    0
    0
  • (i) the discovery of a bacterium in the affected tissues by means of the microscope; (2) the obtaining of the bacterium in pure culture; and (3) the production of the disease by inoculation with a pure culture.

    0
    0
  • In the case of any bacterium discovered, observation must be made in a long series of instances in order to determine its invariable presence.

    0
    0
  • The simplest case is that in which only one variety of bacterium is present, and a " pure culture " may then be obtained at once.

    0
    0
  • Each bacterium capable of growth gives rise to a colony visible to the naked eye, and if the colonies are sufficiently apart, an inoculation can be made from any one to a tube of culture-medium and a pure culture obtained.

    0
    0
  • A pathogenic bacterium present may invade the body, and may be obtained in pure culture from the internal organs.

    0
    0
  • The full description of a particular bacterium implies an account not only of its microscopical characters, but also of its growth characters in various culture media, its biological properties, and the effects produced in animals by inoculation.

    0
    0
  • For example, various sugars - lactose, glucose, saccharose, &c. - are added to test the fermentative action of the bacterium on these substances; litmus is added to show changes in reaction, specially standardized media being used for estimating such changes; peptone solution is commonly employed for testing whether or not the bacterium forms indol; sterilized milk is used as a culture medium to determine whether or not it is curdled by the growth.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes a bacterium can be readily recognized from one or two characters, but not infrequently a whole series of tests must be made before the species is determined.

    0
    0
  • It may be stated that the introduction of a particular bacterium into the tissues of the body leads to certain properties appearing in the serum, which are chiefly exerted towards this particular bacterium.

    0
    0
  • One great drawback in certain cases is that such animals are not susceptible to a given bacterium, or that the disease is different in character from that in the human subject.

    0
    0
  • Though the causal relationship of a bacterium to a disease may be completely established by the methods given, another very important part of bacteriology is concerned with the poisons or toxins formed by bacteria.

    0
    0
  • It may also be mentioned that many toxins have now been obtained by growing the particular organism in a proteid-free medium, a fact which shows that if the toxin is a proteid it may be formed synthetically by the bacterium as well as by modification of proteid already present.

    0
    0
  • But this has not been proved, and hitherto no enzyme has been separated from a pathogenic bacterium capable of forming, by digestive or other action, the toxic bodies from proteids outside the body.

    0
    0
  • The result of the entrance of a virulent bacterium into the tissues of an animal is not a disease with hard and fast characters, but varies greatly with circumstances.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the subject of infection the chief factor is susceptibility; with regard to the bacterium virulence is allimportant.

    0
    0
  • the bacterium.

    0
    0
  • By immunity is meant non-susceptibility to a given disease, or to experimental inoculation with a given bacterium or toxin.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes also the virulence of a bacterium for a particular kind of animal becomes lessened on passing it through the body of one of another species.

    0
    0
  • A second method is by injection of the bacterium in the dead condition, whereby immunity against the living organism may be produced.

    0
    0
  • In order that the immunity may reach a high degree, either the bacterium in a very virulent state or a large dose of toxin must ultimately be used in the injections.

    0
    0
  • applies only to the bacterium or toxin used in its production.

    0
    0
  • So far as bacterial immunity is concerned, the anti-serum exerts its action either on the toxin or on the bacterium itself; that is, its action is either antitoxic or anti-bacterial.

    0
    0
  • " the production of a change in the corresponding bacterium whereby it becomes granular, swells up and ultimately may undergo dissolution.

    0
    0
  • Pfeiffer was the first to show that this occurred when the bacterium was injected into the peritoneal cavity of the animal immunized against it, and also when a little of the serum of such an animal was injected with the bacterium into the peritoneum of a fresh, i.e.

    0
    0
  • In all cases the important action is the binding of complement to the bacterium by means of the corresponding immune body; whether or not death of the bacterium occurs, will depend upon its susceptibility to the action of the particular complement, the latter acting like a toxin or digestive ferment.

    0
    0
  • This latter complement may not suit the immune body, that is, may not be fixed to the bacterium by means of it, or if the latter event does occur, may fail to bring about the death of the bacteria.

    0
    0
  • By this is meant the aggregation into clumps of the bacteria uniformly distributed (natiai n an indifferent fluid; if the bacterium is motile its movement is arrested during the process.

    0
    0
  • the serum of an animal immunized against the bacterium) was added to a fluid culture of this bacillus, growth formed a sediment instead of a uniform turbidity.

    0
    0
  • Gruber and Durham showed that sedimentation occurred when a small quantity of the homologous serum was added to an emul:_on of the bacterium in a small test-tube, and found that this obtained in all cases where Pfeiffer's lysogenic action could be demonstrated.

    0
    0
  • The development of all antagonistic substances which confer the special character on antimicrobic sera, as well as antitoxins, may be expressed as the formation of bodies with specific combining affinity for the organic substance introduced into the system - toxin, bacterium, red corpuscle, &c., as the case may be.

    0
    0
  • Such an effect may be demonstrated outside the body by making a (actiopsonic suitable mixture of (a) a suspension of the particular bacterium, (b) the serum to be tested, and (c) leucocytes of a normal animal or person.

    0
    0
  • a particular bacterium had a special action in bringing about phagocytosis of that organism, and it had been found that this property was retained when the serum was heated at 55° C. It is now generally admitted that at least two distinct classes of substances are concerned in opsonic action, that thermostable immune opsonins are developed as a result of active immunization and these possess the specific properties of anti-substances in general, that is, act only on the corresponding bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Wright and his co-workers to control the treatment of bacterial infections by vaccines; that is, by injections of varying amounts of a dead culture of the corresponding bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Then as regards natural powers of destroying bacteria, phagocytosis aided by chemiotaxis plays a part, and it can be understood that an animal whose phagocytes are attracted by a particular bacterium will have an advantage over one in which this action is absent.

    0
    0
  • Around half the population carry the bacterium Helicobacter pylori which causes most cases.

    0
    0
  • Vulnerable strains of bacterium were replaced by resistant strains.

    0
    0
  • Some, caused by the streptococcus pyogenes bacterium, may be severe and are treatable with antibiotics.

    0
    0
  • The foam inside the camera was found to have a strain of the bacterium Streptococcus mitis still living inside it.

    0
    0
  • The workers had handled a live strain of the tularemia bacterium instead of the non-infectious one typically used.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium, introduced into a normal stomach, has the ability to survive the acid pH because of an intense urease activity.

    0
    0
  • These actions prevent the bacterium from being attacked and destroyed by the white blood cells of the host (Gould, 1987).

    0
    0
  • The bacterium attaches itself to the surfaces of red blood cells.

    0
    0
  • When the immune system detects the infection, it begins to systematically destroy the red blood cells that carry the bacterium.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium can often be found in the bloodstream of healthy cats.

    0
    0
  • It is only when there is a weakness in the autoimmune system, such as with Feline Leukemia, that the bacterium is able to take over.

    0
    0
  • Since the bacterium disintegrates the cell wall of the red blood cell, it cannot be detected by culturing a blood sample.

    0
    0
  • A specific bacterium that lives in the soil produces a sugar by-product that is used to create selamectin.

    0
    0
  • The soil is harvested for the bacterium, which is grown for the sugar by-product under lab conditions.

    0
    0
  • This bacterium can be spread to the meat during the process of skinning and removing the entrails.

    0
    0
  • Most often, the genetic modification in question is the incorporation of genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt for short.

    0
    0
  • Your goal is to thaw the meat quickly and cook it as fast as you can before the bacterium grows.

    0
    0
  • Goggles can block sharp instruments or glass, preservation chemicals used in dissections, bodily fluids, dust, splatters, bacterium, or flying objects-all things you are likely to find in one type of science class or lab or another.

    0
    0
  • It is thought that an infectious organism of some kind is the cause of Kawasaki disease, although no specific virus or bacterium has been identified as of 2004.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singular, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • A culture is used to learn what type of bacterium is causing infection.

    0
    0
  • Trachoma, also called granular conjunctivitis or Egyptian ophthalmia, is a contagious, chronic inflammation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.

    0
    0
  • The first stage is active infection of the conjunctiva by the bacterium C. trachomatis.

    0
    0
  • A small percentage of people with CF have infections caused by Burkholderia cepacia, a bacterium which was resistant to most antibiotics as of 2004.

    0
    0
  • Whooping cough-An infectious disease of the respiratory tract caused by a bacterium, Bordetella pertussis.

    0
    0
  • Pseudomonas-A bacterium which can cause ulcers in contact lens wearers.

    0
    0
  • A culture is used to learn what type of bacterium is causing infection.

    0
    0
  • Early in the infection, the blood is far more likely to positively show a presence of the salmonella bacterium when a sample is grown on a nutrient substance (culture) for identification purposes.

    0
    0
  • Whooping cough-An infectious disease of the respiratory tract caused by a bacterium, Bordetella pertussis.

    0
    0
  • Impetigo caused by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (also known as staph) affects children of all ages.

    0
    0
  • The medications given for lymphadenitis vary according to the bacterium or virus that causes it.

    0
    0
  • Cat scratches and bites are also capable of transmitting the Bartonella henselae bacterium, which can lead to cat-scratch disease, an unpleasant but usually not life-threatening illness.

    0
    0
  • The Hib vaccine is an injection that helps protect children from contracting infections due to Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), a bacterium that is capable of causing serious illness and potential death in children under age five.

    0
    0
  • Gonococcal-Refers to the bacterium Neisseria gonorrheae.

    0
    0
  • This bacterium causes gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted infection of the genitals and urinary tract.

    0
    0
  • Cat-scratch disease (also called cat-scratch fever) is caused by the Bartonella henselae bacterium, which is found in cats around the world and is transmitted from cat to cat by fleas.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium, which remains in a cat's bloodstream for several months after infection, seems to be harmless to most cats, and normally an infected cat will not display any symptoms.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singluar, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singluar, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • Cholera-An infection of the small intestine caused by a type of bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Microorganism-An organism that is too small to be seen with the naked eye, such as a bacterium, virus, or fungus.

    0
    0
  • Organism-A single, independent unit of life, such as a bacterium, a plant, or an animal.

    0
    0
  • Plague-A serious, potentially life-threatening infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis.

    0
    0
  • Typhoid fever-A severe infection caused by a bacterium, Salmonella typhi.

    0
    0
  • Tetanus-A potentially fatal infection caused by a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium tetani.

    0
    0
  • It is caused by toxins (poisons) produced by the bacterium Clostridium tetani.

    0
    0
  • Tetanus occurs when the body is infected with spores of the bacterium C. tetani.

    0
    0
  • This bacterium is found worldwide in soil and animal manure.

    0
    0
  • Pinta is a skin infection caused by the bacterium Treponema carateum, a relative of the bacterium that causes syphilis.

    0
    0
  • Pinta is caused by an infection with the bacterium Treponema carateum.

    0
    0
  • Microorganism-An organism that is too small to be seen with the naked eye, such as a bacterium, virus, or fungus.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singular, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • Streptococcus pyogenes, the bacterium that causes "strep" throat, is the most common bacterial agent responsible for tonsillitis.

    0
    0
  • Streptococcus pyogenes-A common bacterium that causes strep throat and can also cause tonsillitis.

    0
    0
  • Lyme disease-An acute, recurrent, inflammatory disease involving one or a few joints, and transmitted by the bite of ticks carrying the spiral-shaped bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

    0
    0
  • A bacterium that is considered resistant is one that can no longer be treated effectively using the antibiotics that are commonly prescribed for that type of infection.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singular, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • A culture is used to learn what type of bacterium is causing infection.

    0
    0
  • C. botulinum's common food-borne form is an anaerobic bacterium that can only live and reproduce in the absence of oxygen.

    0
    0
  • A culture is used to learn what type of bacterium is causing infection.

    0
    0
  • Spore-A dormant form assumed by some bacteria, such as anthrax, that enable the bacterium to survive high temperatures, dryness, and lack of nourishment for long periods of time.

    0
    0
  • Infectious disease-A disease caused by a virus or a bacterium.

    0
    0
  • UTIs in men are most likely to be caused by E. coli or another gram-negative bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singular, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • A culture is used to learn what type of bacterium is causing infection.

    0
    0
  • Tetanus-A potentially fatal infection caused by a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium tetani.

    0
    0
  • If it is believed a bacterium is causing the labyrinthitis, blood tests may be done, or any fluid draining from the ear may be analyzed to help determine what type of bacteria is present.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis is the cause of the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the United States, causing more than 4 million infections each year.

    0
    0
  • The meningococcal meningitis vaccine is given by injection (shots) to provide immunization against meningococcal disease and meningitis caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitides.

    0
    0
  • Hemophilus infections, most of which are due to Haemophilus influenzae infections, are a group of contagious diseases that are caused by a bacterium and affect only humans.

    0
    0
  • Hemophilus infections are primarily caused by Haemophilus influenzae, a bacterium that is capable of spreading from the nasal tissues and upper airway, where it is usually found, to the chest, throat, or middle ear.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium can be grown on chocolate agar or identified by blood cultures or Gram stain of body fluids.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singular, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • Toxins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the main culprit in botulism.

    0
    0
  • A culture is used to learn what type of bacterium is causing infection.

    0
    0
  • Spore-A dormant form assumed by some bacteria, such as anthrax, that enable the bacterium to survive high temperatures, dryness, and lack of nourishment for long periods of time.

    0
    0
  • Lyme disease is an inflammatory disease transmitted through the bite of a deer tick carrying the spiral-shaped bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

    0
    0
  • Borrelia burgdorferi, the spiral-shaped bacterium called a spirochete, that causes Lyme disease, was not discovered until 1981 by Willy Burgdorfer.

    0
    0
  • Lyme disease is transmitted when a tick carrying the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium bites a human to feed on blood.

    0
    0
  • The bacterium is transferred from the intestines of the tick through the mouthparts and into the bloodstream while the tick is feeding.

    0
    0
  • Lyme disease is caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Spirochete-A type of bacterium with a long, slender, coiled shape.

    0
    0
  • Microorganism-An organism that is too small to be seen with the naked eye, such as a bacterium, virus, or fungus.

    0
    0
  • Comvax-Hib-HepB, a combination vaccine that protects against the Haemophilus influenzae type B bacterium and the hepatitis B virus.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singular, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • Bacillus-A rod-shaped bacterium, such as the diphtheria bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria-Singular, bacterium; tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections.

    0
    0
  • Microorganism-An organism that is too small to be seen with the naked eye, such as a bacterium, virus, or fungus.

    0
    0
  • Organism-A single, independent unit of life, such as a bacterium, a plant, or an animal.

    0
    0
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a microscopic, rod-shaped bacterium.

    0
    0
  • Listeriosis is an illness caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes that is acquired by eating contaminated food.

    0
    0
  • Listeriosis is caused by an infection with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes.

    0
    0
  • Cat-scratch disease is caused by Bartonella henselae, a bacterium that is carried in cat saliva; infection may be transmitted by a bite or scratch.

    0
    0
  • A culture is used to learn what type of bacterium is causing infection.

    0
    0
  • Microorganism-An organism that is too small to be seen with the naked eye, such as a bacterium, virus, or fungus.

    0
    0
  • In small amounts, this innocent bacterium is peaceful and beneficial to our immune system.

    0
    0
  • Skip desserts, which are heavy in the stomach and may ferment when eaten with other foods, causing bacterium to alter them to alcohols, vinegars and acetic acids.

    0
    0
  • Unless you've been living in a cave the last 10 years, you probably already know that Botox is a therapeutic agent derived from the bacterium Clostridium Botulinum, which in certain strains is botulism, a dangerous paralytic illness.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →