Backbone sentence example

backbone
  • He was the backbone for all of us.  I think we all feel his absence.
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  • His fingers were gently massaging the muscles on either side of her backbone - warm and relaxing.
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  • The Southern Alps, the backbone of the South Island, rest on a foundation of coarse gneisses and schists, that are quite unrepresented in the North Island.
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  • In the tectonic structure of Asia the Kuen-lun forms, as it were, the backbone of the continent.
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  • extremity of the island rises the backbone of a ridge which extends E.N.E.
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  • - Along the Dalmatian border, and through the centre of Bosnia, runs the backbone of the Dinaric Alps, which attain their greatest altitudes (6000-750o ft.) near Travnik, Serajevo and Mostar.
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  • The ordinal name for the genera and species of Amphioxus is Cephalochorda, the term referring to the extension of the primary backbone or notochord to the anterior extremity of the body; the family name is Branchiostomidae.
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  • - the Albert Victor Mountains, the Sir Arthur Gordon range, and the Bismarck Mountains form a backbone united probably with the Sneeuw (Snowy) Mts., where perpetual snow was found by Dr. Lorentz in 1909 at 14,635 ft., and the height of Mt.
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  • Next come the Presbyterians, the backbone of the maritime provinces.
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  • They form the backbone of the island, and crop out on the surface at intervals along the mountain chain which runs parallel to the west coast.
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  • The upper town is built on the western slope of a low ridge, the backbone of the peninsula, and rises from the edge of the bluffs to altitudes of 200 to 260 ft.
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  • The backbone or main water-divide of the Hindu Kush continues to form the boundary between Afghanistan and those semi-independent native states which fringe Kashmir in this mountain region, until it reaches Kafiristan.
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  • The geology of Borneo is very imperfectly known The mountain range which lies between Sarawak and the Dutch possessions, and may be looked upon as the backbone of the island, consists chiefly of crystalline schists, together with slates, sandstones and limestones.
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  • In both ranges, too, some of the highest summits stand on spurs of the main range, not on the main range itself; as Mont Perdu and Maladetta lie south of the main backbone of the Pyrenees, so Mount Elbruz and Kasbek, Dykh-tau, Koshtan-tau, Janga-tau and Shkara - all amongst the loftiest peaks of the Caucasus - stand on a subsidiary range north of the principal range or on spurs connecting the two.
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  • But the backbone of the island lies east of them, extending S.
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  • Archilochus described Thasos as "an ass's backbone crowned with wild wood," and the description still suits the mountainous island with its forests of fir.
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  • The two rivers run nearly parallel, inclosing the backbone of the Ghilzai plateau.
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  • Ministers and people with few exceptions - the most notable being the Scotch Highlanders who had settled in the valley of the Mohawk in New York and on Cape Fear river in North Carolina - sided with the patriot or Whig party: John Witherspoon was the only clergyman in the Continental Congress of 1776, and was otherwise a prominent leader; John Murray of the Presbytery of the Eastward was an eloquent leader in New England; and in the South the Scotch-Irish were the backbone of the American partisan forces, two of whose leaders, Daniel Morgan and Andrew Pickens, were Presbyterian elders.
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  • The Code forms the backbone of the skeleton sketch which is here reconstructed.
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  • is a continuation of one of the ranges of northern Siam, which, extending still farther southward, ultimately forms the backbone of the Malay Peninsula.
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  • The backbone of the Scandinavian peninsula is a range, or series of masses, of mountains (in Swedish Kolen, 1 the keel) extending through nearly the whole length of the peninsula towards the western side.
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  • The backbone of the region is the Sailughem or Silyughema mountains, also known as Kolyvan Altai, which stretch north-eastwards from 4 9 ° N.
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  • India-rubber springs were made to extend between the inner posterior parts of the wings and the frame, corresponding to the backbone of the bird.
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  • The backbone was a light but very rigid tube of aluminium steel, 15 ft.
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  • 4° N., is the southern extension of the low mountainous chain forming the backbone of the Isthmus of Panama, and may be considered the southern termination of the great North American system.
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  • It forms an irregular square, extending for about sixty miles in each direction, and this area, which is for the most part level, is enclosed by well-marked boundaries - by the Cambunian Mountains on the north, and by Othrys on the south, while on its western side runs the massive chain of Pindus, which is the backbone of this part of Greece, and towards the east Ossa and Pelion stand in a continuous line; at the north-eastern angle is Olympus, the keystone of the whole mountain system.
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  • For, as in the legend of Sigurd the Volsung, the plot had turned upon the love and vengeance of Brunhild, so in the song of the Nibelungs it is the love and vengeance of Kriemhild, the Gudrun of the northern saga, that forms the backbone of the story and gives it from first to last an artistic unity which the V olsungasaga lacks.
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  • Among the national newspapers in the UK today only the Star and the Sport don't have a solid backbone of serious news.
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  • Ethernet backbone in the house.
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  • He suspected it was because the same mettle lining Dusty's backbone lined hers.
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  • A range of granite mountains forms a backbone which divides the peninsula into two unequal portions, the larger of which lies to the east and the smaller to the west of the chain.
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  • 3, 4a): the keepers of the house (the arms and hands) tremble, the strong men (the legs and perhaps the backbone) are bent, the grinding women (the teeth) cease to work, those that look out of the windows (the eyes) are darkened, the street-doors are shut, the sound of the mill being low (apparently a summary statement of the preceding details: communication with the outer world through the senses is cut off, the performance of bodily functions being feeble); the rest of v.
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  • 16 1920); (b) about 40,000 owners of small holdings, averaging from 26 to 150 ac., formed the backbone of the Lettish middle class, and the liberal professions (nicknamed the " grey barons ") were partly supported by about 10,000 tenants of small farms; (c) the owners of very small holdings in Latgalia and Courland numbered some 10,600.
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  • Had the Austrians attacked on both flanks forthwith, the Prussian central (I.) army could have reached neither wing in time to avert defeat, and the political consequences of the Austrian victory might have been held to justify the risks involved, for even if unsuccessful the Austrians and Saxons could always retreat into Bavaria and there form a backbone of solid troops for the 95,000 South Germans.
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  • In the War of Independence the Aetolians by their stubborn defence, culminating in the sieges of Missolonghi, formed the backbone of the rebellion.
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  • This is the very backbone of the Breviary, the groundwork of the Catholic prayer-book; out of it have grown the antiphons, responsories and versicles.
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  • Their descendants, the Atherstones, Bowkers, Barbers, Woods, Whites, Turveys, and a number of other well-known frontier families, are to-day the backbone of the eastern district of the Cape, and furnish the largest portion of the progressive element in that province.
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  • Among them were some of those men of mark who made the backbone of the American character: the sturdy Puritan, Peter Bulkeley, sometime rector of Odell in Bedfordshire, and afterward pastor of the church in the wilderness at Concord, New Hampshire; the zealous evangelist, Father Samuel Moody of Agamenticus in Maine, who pursued graceless sinners even into the alehouse; Joseph Emerson of Malden, "a heroic scholar," who prayed every night that no descendant of his might ever be rich; and William Emerson of Concord, Mass., the patriot preacher, who died while serving in the army of the Revolution.
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  • The axis, or backbone, of Pamir formation is the great meridional mountain chain of Sarikol - the ancient Taurus of tradition and history - on which stands the highest peak north of the Himalaya, the Murtagh Ata (25,000 ft.).
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  • A p penninus - in both cases used in the singular), a range of mountains traversing the entire peninsula of Italy, and forming, as it were, the backbone of the country.
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  • backbone amide hydrogens preferentially exchange for deuterium in D 2 O if solvent exposed.
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  • The b -sheet adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site is colored magenta; light chains are displayed as b -sheet adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site is colored magenta; light chains are displayed as backbone, in green & red.
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  • backbone of the economy.
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  • backbone of the molecule, while the nitrogenous bases interact to form base pairs.
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  • by the ranges of Grammos and Pindus; the entire chain, a prolongation of the Alpine systems of Bosnia and Dalmatia, may be described as the backbone of the peninsula; it forms the watershed between the Aegean and the Adriatic, and culminates in the lofty peak of Liubotrn, near Kalkandele, one of the highest summits in south-eastern Europe (8858 ft.).
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  • of the great plateau formation of the old continent - the backbone of Asia - which stretches with decreasing altitude and width from of Asia.
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  • The execution of its orders in the departments was carried out by omnipotent representatives on mission in the armies, by popular societiesveritable missionaries of the Revolutionand by the revolutionary committees which were its backbone.
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  • Her pain was raw, yet there was mettle in her backbone if she'd gone to Sean's funeral, fully knowing her own father killed the Guardian.
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  • The fool doesn.t have the backbone to kill me as he probably should.
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  • For a long time Torquemada had tried to get the royal consent to a general expulsion; but the sovereigns hesitated, and, as the victims were the backbone of the commerce of the country, proposed a ransom of 300,000 ducats instead.
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  • Upolu is long and narrow; it has a backbone of mountains whose flanks are scored with lovely valleys, at the foot of which are flat cultivable tracts.
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  • The ordinary Mahrattas, who form the backbone of the nation, have plain features, an uncouth manner, short stature, a small but wiry frame.
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  • The eastern division of the Atlas, which forms the backbone of Algeria and Tunisia, is adequately known with the exception of the small portion in Morocco forming the province of Er-Rif.
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  • This range forms the true backbone of the maritime mountainous belt and rises from the plateau itself, while the Coast Range rises on its eastern margin and forms a rim to the plateau.
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  • This authority sums up the geology of Japan briefly and succinctly as follows (in Things Japanese, by Professor Chamberlain): The backbone of the country consists of primitive gneiss and schists.
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  • The height and regularity of the mountain backbone increase the diversity.
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  • While the prices in krans of agricultural produce, and hence the profits of the landowners and the wages and profits of artisans and tradesmen, were in1907-1908more than double what they were in 1876, the maliat, the backbone of the revenue, has hardly increased at all, being 50,000,000 krans (~1,ooo,ooo) against 43,200,000 krans (~1,6oo,ooo) in 1876, and showing a decrease of over 37% in sterling money.
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  • Long before England was ripe to welcome deistic thought Lord Herbert of Cherbury earned the name "Father of Deism" by laying down the main line of that religious philosophy which in various forms continued ever after to be the backbone of deistic systems. He based his theology on a comprehensive, if insufficient, survey of the nature, foundation, limits and tests of human knowledge.
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  • France was, as ever, the backbone of the Scots resistance; men and money poured into Edinburgh to assist Mary of Guise and the French faction.
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  • Among domestic statesmen he was felt, however, to be the backbone of the party in power.
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  • backbone of the American fleet in the late 1940s and early 1950s.
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  • These were people who had for decades formed the backbone of the SPD in the trade union movement.
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  • First years often constitute the backbone of the MCR committee.
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  • To enable individual data networks to utilize best the new high-speed backbone through the application of switching technology.
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  • This means that layers of ATM and SDH systems sit between devices and the optical backbone.
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  • backbone torsion angle restraints, and Watson-Crick restraints.
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  • backbone conformation during the simulation occur as peaks in the plot.
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  • backbone routers are required to maintain complete routing information for the Internet.
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  • backbone atoms are tricky for a number of reasons.
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  • backbone nitrogen of the tryptophan.
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  • The enzyme DNA polymerase joins the new nucleotides to each other by strong covalent bonds, forming the sugar-phosphate backbone.
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  • The most significant chromophore for proteins is the amide group of the polypeptide backbone.
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  • That the phosphate backbone was on the outside, bases on the inside.
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  • I didn't ask about installing an Ethernet backbone in the house.
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  • The geometry of the polypeptide hydrogen bonds involving the peptide backbone atoms were also analyzed and shown to be fairly independent of sidechain influences.
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  • Whatever the working environment we can deliver structured cabling (Cat5e & Cat6 copper ), fiber optic backbone cabling.
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  • boxer twins have traditionally formed the backbone of the BMW motorcycle line-up.
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  • bureaucracy of the trade unions is the backbone of British imperialism.
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  • If the input model has an alpha carbon at the origin a rough backbone trace of map regions matching the fragment may be obtained.
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  • carbonyl oxygen atoms point toward backbone amino N atoms of the adjacent strand.
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  • Note how, within the plane of the sheet, backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms point toward backbone amino N atoms of the adjacent strand.
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  • backbone cleavages of [M H] anions of peptides.
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  • conformance with the access policies for the original NSFnet backbone time servers.
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  • The small hydrogen side chain of the glycine amino acids permits the backbone torsion angles to adopt unusual conformations.
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  • Large changes in backbone conformation during the simulation occur as peaks in the plot.
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  • ma dissertations can often form the backbone of MPhil/PhD research.
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  • dissonant noises begin each song, forming a solid backbone for pretty, tinkling guitars and grinding swirls of feedback.
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  • esterifyriacylglycerol has a glycerol backbone to which are esterified 3 fatty acids.
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  • evocative soundscape, The Devil's Backbone is packaged and stylishly delivered with total accomplishment.
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  • fantasize about but do their job well and offer a solid backbone to the storytelling.
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  • The first stage was the popular uprising under Wallace and Andrew Moray, whose backbone was an armed peasantry led by minor gentry.
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  • glycerol backbone.
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  • The backbone of the country is the Andean highlands, made up of two mountainous chains and over 30 volcanoes.
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  • The largely hydrophobic R-groups of a membrane-spanning a -helix contact the hydrophobic membrane core, while the more polar peptide backbone is buried.
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  • Iraq's Sunni minority was dominant under Saddam and is believed to make up the backbone of the country's insurgency.
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  • The example to the right shows four star access networks interconnected by a cycle backbone network.
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  • Flowing orchestral sounds and simple piano lines provide the backbone, while the occasional highlight is provided by short guitar interjections.
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  • interlinked to form the backbone.
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  • national liberation The backbone of the movement against British occupation was made up of ordinary people.
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  • Now click on the backbone nitrogen of the tryptophan.
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  • polypeptide backbone follows a helical path.
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  • proxy servers keep down the loading of our backbone.
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  • Much of this expanse is due to electric charge repulsion between the negatively charged phosphate groups in the DNA backbone.
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  • Needs permanent injection of backbone but resists all lawyer's efforts to strengthen resolve.
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  • The island is nearly a mile long and looks, with its deeply serrated backbone, like a dragon hanging on to Hirta.
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  • To butterfly chicken, use poultry shears or a sharp knife to split the bird lengthways along one side of the backbone.
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  • I was sent to see a specialist who told me that I had spondylitis, an inflammation of the vertebrae in the backbone.
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  • Their oral testimony is for me the backbone of the book.
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  • Table III shows these core domain substitutions together with the backbone torsion angles of the parent structure.
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  • The Arka-tagh 1 is the true backbone of the Kuen-lun system, and in Central Asia is exceeded in elevation only by the Tang-la, a long way farther south, this last being probably an eastern wing of the Karakorum Mountains of the Pamirs region.
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  • The backbone of the region is the Sailughem or Silyughema mountains, also known as Kolyvan Altai, which stretch north-eastwards from 4 9 ° N.
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  • 4° N., is the southern extension of the low mountainous chain forming the backbone of the Isthmus of Panama, and may be considered the southern termination of the great North American system.
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  • Needs permanent injection of backbone but resists all lawyer 's efforts to strengthen resolve.
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  • Its name, which means ' Dragon Mountains ' in Afrikaans, stems from the jagged backbone of saw-toothed peaks.
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  • The backbone or spinal column protects the spinal cord.
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  • And, as everyone knows, measuring is the backbone of any remodeling project.
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  • Their Buddist practices were supposedly the backbone to their "solid" relationship.
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  • They are the backbone of the glamorizing tendencies of contemporary consumer culture, as critics such as John Berger first pointed out.
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  • Ralph Lauren: Time honored classics are the backbone of the elegant Ralph Lauren collection.
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  • Ska music (a form of Jamaican music) is the inspirational backbone for this British up and coming artist.
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  • Your decision about how long to store your wines should be based on the type of wine, its sugar content, and its tannic backbone.
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  • Well-balanced, dexterous, slick, the Four Kings shows a solid backbone and finesse.
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  • Well made with a bright berry nose, a bit of brush and hints of vanilla oak, the palate is laden with blueberry and red berry fruit that is balanced with a soft roundness and a solid acid backbone.
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  • Red, red raspberries jumped out at me with some nice backbone of spice and herbs.
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  • Backbone is a description that is synonymous with full-bodied and refers to wines that are well balanced.
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  • The amount of tannins in the wine is known as the wine's backbone or structure, and some wine collectors age well-structured Cabernet Sauvignon wines for decades before the wine is ready to drink.
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  • These laws and rules become the backbone for all right and wrong actions.
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  • This procedure is most helpful in assessing abnormalities of the skull and backbone associated with Chiari malformation.
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  • By the end of the fifth week, the embryo has doubled in size and has grown a tail-like structure that becomes the coccyx (lowermost tip of the backbone).
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  • The positions are the backbone of ballet because of the opportunity they provide for dancers to work on their technique.
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  • This dare-to-bare swimsuit features a thong back with a little bit of coverage at the top of the backbone, instead of a thong back that only includes a tiny string detail.
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  • Shared faith can create a stronger bond, and that is the backbone of Christian dating.
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  • Italian inspired designer, Italian leather, and striking hardware are the backbone of these sophisticated bags.
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  • The backbone of the show is Viki Lord Carpenter played by Erika Slezak.
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  • The backbone of this soap opera is family.
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  • While Erica was abandoned by her father, and took it out on her long-suffering mother, Mona (Frances Heflin), it really formed the backbone of Erica's reliance on family.
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  • Word of Mouth - Personal referrals are the backbone of any service industry.
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  • However, if the backbone is flawed by unethical activities, our economy can be crippled.
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  • Good cheers and chants are the backbone of any great cheer squad.
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  • The cheers for the pitcher are the backbone of support coming from the dugout.
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  • The second part of a web host is the "pipe" to the Internet - the size of the connection to the "Internet backbone."
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  • HTML remains the first step to becoming a skilled web designer, and is the backbone of all text and images that you see online.
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  • Fixity of all the parts was secured by a tubular mast extending upwards and downwards through about the middle of the craft, and from its extremities ran stays of aluminium wire to the tips of the aeroplanes and the end of the tubular backbone.
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  • The north-west highlands of Donegal and the Ox Mountains, with their axes of folding running north-east and south-west, invite comparison with the great chain of Leinster, but also with the Grampians and the backbone of Scandinavia.
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  • The backbone or spinal column protects the spinal column protects the spinal cord.
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