Babylon sentence example

babylon
  • Alexander returns to Babylon, is crowned with much pomp and mass is celebrated.
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  • Epiphanius (Vitae prophetarum) says that he came up from Babylon while still young, prophesied the return, witnessed the building of the temple and received an honoured burial near the priests.
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  • Occidental geographers, however, have followed the Greek use, and so to-day we call the river of Babylon or Nahr Sura the Euphrates and the older westerly channel the Hindieh canal.
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  • Under the Arabs the old designation again prevailed and the Euphrates is always described by the Arabian geographers as the river which flows direct to Kufa, while the present stream, passing along the ruins of Babylon to Hillah and Diwanieh, has been universally known as the Nahr Sura.
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  • Many of the villages of Mesopotamia are built of second-hand bricks of a very good quality, obtained from the ruins of Babylon, and the cement on them is older and probably harder still.
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  • The right arm was the original bed, and the left arm, on which Babylon was built, the artificial deviation, as is clear from the cuneiform inscriptions.
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  • But when tradition preserves some recollection of an offence for which Manasseh was taken to Babylon to explain his conduct (2 Chron.
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  • The judges at Babylon seem to have formed a superior court to those of provincial towns, but a defendant might elect to answer the charge before the local court and refuse to plead at Babylon.
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  • Alexander died at Babylon in 323 B.C., and the fleet was dispersed without making the voyage.
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  • Before the rise of the First Dynasty of Babylon, however, Elam had recovered its independence, and in 2280 B.C. the Elamite king Kutur-Nakhkhunte made a raid in Babylonia and carried away from Erech the image of the goddess Nana.
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  • It was, however, reserved for the genius of Khammurabi to make Babylon his metropolis and weld together his vast empire by a uniform system of law.
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  • Below the bifurcation the river of Babylon was again divided into several streams, and indeed the most famous of all the ancient canals was the Arakhat (Archous of the Greeks and Serrat and Nil of the Arabs), which left that river just above Babylon and ran due east to the Tigris, irrigating all the central part of the Jezireh, and sending down a branch through Nippur and Erech to rejoin the Euphrates a little above the modern Nasrieh.
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  • The fact also that many of the most ancient of these ruins, like Ur, Lagash (Sirpurla), Larsa, Erech, Nippur, Sippara and Babylon, were situated on the banks of the great canals would indicate that the control of the waters of the rivers by a system of canalization and irrigation was one of the first achievements of civilization.
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  • Cyrus on entering Babylon had even restored the gods to the cities to which they belonged.
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  • In commercial matters, payment in kind was still common, though the contracts usually stipulate for cash, naming the standard expected, that of Babylon, Larsa, Assyria, Carchemish, &c. The Code enacted, however, that a debtor must be allowed to pay in produce according to statutory scale.
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  • ABEDNEGO, the name given in Babylon to Azariah, one of the companions of Daniel.
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  • Layard, Nineveh and Babylon (1853); W.
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  • These events shook the whole Persian empire; Babylon and other subject states rose in revolt, and to the Jews it seemed that Persia was tottering and that the Messianic era was nigh.
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  • He explored the remains of Babylon, and projected a geographical and statistical account of the pashalic of Bagdad.
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  • Harper, The Code of Hammurabi, King of Babylon about 2250 B.C. (Chicago, 1904); S.
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  • The prophets who had marked in the past the advent of Assyrians and Chaldeans now fixed their eyes upon the advance of Cyrus, confident that the fall of Babylon would bring the restoration of their fortunes.
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  • Winckler, " Die Gesetze Hammurabis Kiinigs von Babylon urn 2250 v.
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  • In Egypt, moreover, in Babylon and in Persia individual Jews had responded to the influences of their environment and won the respect of the aliens whom they despised.
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  • In the spring of 323 he moved down to Babylon, receiving on the way embassies from lands as far as the confines of the known world, for the eyes of all nations were now turned with fear or wonder to the figure which had appeared with so superhuman an effect upon the world's stage.
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  • The latter enterprise Alexander designed to conduct in person; under his supervision was prepared in Babylon an immense fleet, a great basin dug out to contain 1000 ships, and the watercommunications of Babylonia taken in hand.
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  • Such a remnant, amongst whom might be members of the priestly and royal families, would gather strength and boldness as the troubles of Babylon See the note on Ps.
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  • This appears actually to be the case in the period of the First Dynasty of Babylon and also in the 7th century in Assyria, where early Babylonian customs were kept up conservatively.
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  • Cromwell, however, persevered, reminding Fortescue, who was left in command, that the war was one against the" Roman Babylon,"that they were" fighting the Lord's battles "; and he sent out reinforcements under Sedgwick, offering inducements to the New Englanders to migrate to Jamaica.
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  • During this period he made a second excursion to Babylon, and in 1820 undertook an extensive tour to Kurdistan - from Bagdad north to Sulimania, eastward to Sinna, then west to Nineveh, and thence down the Tigris to Bagdad.
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  • The pax Babylonica is so assured that private individuals do not hesitate to ride in their carriage from Babylon to the coast of the Mediterranean.
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  • Susa once more became a capital, and on the establishment of the Persian empire remained one of the three seats of government, its language, the Neo-Susian, ranking with the Persian of Persepolis and the Semitic of Babylon as an official tongue.
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  • 3-9, where the two brothers carried off to Egypt and Babylon respectively would seem to be Jehoahaz and his nephew Jehoiachin).
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  • Babylon speedily fell (539 B.C.) and a fresh era opened.
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  • The city of Babylon came to the fore as metropolis about 2285 B.C. under Khammurabi.
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  • The results of his work at Babylon appeared first in the Vienna serial Mines de l'orient, and in 1815 in England, under the title Narrative of a Journey to the Site of Babylon in 1811.
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  • When Alexander had won the victory of Arbela, and occupied Babylon and Susa, he met (in the spring of 330) with strong resistance in Persia, where the satrap Ariobarzanes tried to stop his progress at the "Persian gates," the pass leading up to Persepolis.
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  • In Egypt and in Babylon he appeared as the restorer of the native religions to honour after the unsympathetic rule of the Persians.
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  • His sons were slain before his eyes, and he himself was blinded and carried off to Babylon after a reign of eleven years.
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  • Babylonia was politically unsettled, the representative of the Davidic dynasty had descendants; if Babylon was assured of the allegiance of Judah further acts of clemency may well have followed.
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  • Ezekiel says that Nebuchadrezzar and his host had no reward for their heavy service against Tyre, and the presumption is that the city capitulated on favourable terms; for Ithobal's reign ends with the close of the siege, and the royal family is subsequently found in Babylon.
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  • He has worked on Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Babylon 5, Heroes and The X Factor.
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  • This site also has schematics for Star Trek and Babylon 5.
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  • People forget how groundbreaking it was that Joe Straczynski used the online forums to create fan interest in Babylon 5.
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  • Ship schematics is a web site devoted to the designs of ships from multiple series such as Star Trek, Babylon 5, Battlestar Galactica and Starblazers.
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  • Besides Star Trek, this site offers blueprints for Babylon 5, Battlestar Galactica, and a Japanese program called Space Battleship Yamato.
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  • From Star Trek to Lost in Space to Babylon 5 and Star Wars, the ships are characters in their own rights, representing safety and security for the entire crew.
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  • The White Star is a highly specialized vessel created from human, Mimbari and Vorlon technology during the third year of the Babylon 5 . The ship was a gift from Delenn to Captain John Sheridan in their war against the Shadows.
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  • In Babylon 5, the Psi-Corps took children as soon as they were identified as having telepathic ability, no matter how small and raised them in the Corp.
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  • The second book continues the history of his conquests, and the third contains the victory over Porus, the relations with the Brahmins, the letter to Aristotle on the wonders of India, the histories of Candace and the Amazons, the letter to Olympias on the marvels of Farther Asia, and lastly the account of Alexander's death in Babylon.
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  • The exiles dwelt at Tell-abib (" Hill of the flood "), one of the mounds or ruins made by the great floods that devastated the country,1 near the " river " Chebar (Kebar), probably a large canal not far south of the city of Babylon.
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  • This, then, was Ezekiel's political creed - destruction of Jerusalem and its inhabitants, restoration of the exiles, and meantime submission to Babylon.
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  • increased and her vigilance was relaxed, and might receive from Babylon and other lands both refugees and some account at least of the writings of Ezekiel and the Second Isaiah.
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  • Apart from the weighty objections that the Edomites would have frustrated such a recrudescence of the remnant Jews as has been described, it must be remembered that the main stream of Jewish life and thought had been diverted to Babylon.
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  • A number of the principal inhabitants were carried captive to Babylon, and Jerusalem was reduced to the position of an insignificant town.
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  • As a residence, however, for the rulers of the empire, a remote place in a difficult alpine region was far from convenient, and the real capitals were Susa, Babylon and Ecbatana.
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  • de Morgan's excavations at Susa have thrown a flood of light on the early history of Elam and its relations to Babylon.
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  • EUPHRATES (Babylon.
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  • 185) that in his day the river was a frequented route followed by merchants on their way from the Mediterranean to Babylon.
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  • Although Palestine had not been depopulated, and many of the exiled Jews remained in Persia, the standpoint is that of those who returned from Babylon.
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  • Similarly, the " book of the Law of Moses," brought from Babylon by Ezra (Ezra vii.; Neh.
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  • What book Ezra really brought from Babylon is uncertain; the writer, it seems, is merely narrating the introduction of the Law ascribed to Moses, even as a predecessor has recounted the discovery of the Book of the Law, the Deuteronomic code subsequently included in the Pentateuch.
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  • The importance which the biblical writers attach to the return from Babylon in the reign of Artaxerxes forms a starting-point for several interesting inquiries.
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  • And out of one of them came forth a little horn (Antiochus Epiphanes) which waxed exceeding great towards the south (Egypt) and towards the East (Babylon) and towards the beauteous land (the land of Israel)."
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  • nasi, prince, chief) was given to the head of the sanhedrim in Palestine, and is sometimes, though wrongly, applied to the " exilarch," a head of the Jewish college at Babylon.
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  • In the 9th and 8th centuries B.C. they became the chief power within their sphere and the suzerain of their parent Babylon.
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  • But they succumbed before the advance of the Medo-Persian power in 606 B.C., whereas it was not till 555 that Cyrus took Babylon.
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  • Assyria, being essentially a military power, disappeared with the destruction of Nineveh, but Babylon continued to exercise an influence on culture and religion for many centuries after the Persian conquest.
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  • They destroyed Nineveh in alliance with the Babylonians, and half a century later Cyrus took Babylon and founded the great dynasty of the Achaemenidae.
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  • Owing to its position, the Persian state, when it from time to time became a conquering empire, overlapped Asia Minor, Babylon and India, and hence acted as an intermediary for transmitting art and ideas, sending for instance Greek sculpture to India and the cult of Mithra to western Europe.
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  • Babylon long continued to be a Jewish centre whence the Jews radiated to other countries.
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  • and Cambyses I., "kings of Anshan," and the same title is given to him in the inscriptions and in the chronicle of Nabonidus of Babylon before his victory over Astyages.
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  • The original sources are very scanty, besides the cylinder containing his proclamation to the Babylonians we possess only a great many dated private documents from Babylon.
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  • Soon after the conquest of the Median empire, Cyrus was attacked by a coalition of the other powers of the East, Babylon, Egypt and Lydia, joined by Sparta, the greatest military power of Greece.
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  • The army of Nabonidus was defeated; Babylon itself attempted no resistance, but surrendered on the 16th Tishri (loth of October) 539, to the Persian general Gobryas (Gaubaruva, see the chronicle of the reign of Nabonidus; the name Gobryas is preserved also by Xenophon, Cyrop. vii.
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  • February 528; for in Babylon the first year of Cyrus began in the spring of 538.
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  • When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 (the "Partition of Babylon") Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch (Gr.
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  • His return to Babylon in that year was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid empire.
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  • Manda d'hayye and his image Hibil Ziva with his incarnations clearly correspond to the old Babylonian Marduk, Merodach, the "first-born" son of Ea, with his incarnations, the chief divinity of the city of Babylon, the mediator and redeemer in the old religion.
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  • So strong was his hostility to some of the delegates that he described Basel as a western Babylon.
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  • southeast of Babylon, or Forath or Charax close to the Persian Gulf (NSI.
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  • Herodotus describes the oil pits near Ardericca (near Babylon), and the pitch spring of Zacynthus (Zante), whilst Strabo, Dioscorides and Pliny mention the use of the oil of Agrigentum, in Sicily, for illumination, and Plutarch refers to the petroleum found near Ecbatana (Kerkuk).
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  • In his Sylva sylvarum (1627), Francis Bacon states that " the original concretion of bitumen is a mixture of a fiery and watery substance," and observes that flame " attracts " the naphtha of Babylon " afar off."
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  • The great German excavations at Babylon 35 and Assur (Qal°at Shergat), 36 under the direction of Koldewey and Andrae, will probably not be resumed for many years.
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  • In Egypt the succession to the work of the Deutsch-Orient Gesellschaft, which excavated Babylon and Assur, has fallen to the Egypt Exploration Society, which has taken up the excavation at Tell el Amarna where it was laid down by the Germans at the outbreak of war, after they had recovered from the houseruins several wonderfully fine examples of the art of the period of Akhenaton, now in Berlin.
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  • Fund Quarterly Statement, April 1 9 21, p. 73; (35) Koldewey, Das wiedererstehende Babylon (1913); Excavations at Babylon, 1914; (36) Andrae, Festungswerken v.
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  • [i] p. 14), and Harpalus over the whole finances of the empire, with his seat in Babylon.
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  • Again the garrisons in the chief cities, such as Sardis, Babylon, Memphis Pelusium and Susa, were under commands distinct from those of the provinces.
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  • The temple of Marduk in Babylon which had fallen began to rise again at his command.
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  • A far more radical remodelling of the army was undertaken at Babylon in 323, by which the old phalanx system was to be given up for one in which the unit was to be composed of Macedonians with pikes and Asiatics with missile arms in combination - a change calculated to be momentous both from a military point of view in the coming wars, and from a political, in the close fusion of Europeans and Asiatics.
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  • The resettlement of dignities made in Babylon in 32 3, while it left the eastern commands practically undisturbed as well as that of Antipater in Europe, placed Perdiccas (whether as regent or as chiliarch) in possession of the kings' persons, and this was a position which the other Macedonian lords could not suffer.
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  • The title Belit was naturally transferred to the great mother-goddess Ishtar after the decline of the cult at Nippur, and we also find the consort of Marduk, known as Sarpanit, designated as Belit, for the sufficient reason that Marduk, after the rise of the city of Babylon as the seat of his cult, becomes the Bel or "lord" of later days.
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  • It is possible that these primitive efforts of American Indians might have been further developed, but the Spanish conquest put a stop to all progress, and for a consecutive history of the map and map-making we must turn to the Old World, and trace this history from Egypt and Babylon, through Greece, to our own age.
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  • The term "day star" (so rendered in the Revised Version) was used poetically by Isaiah for the king of Babylon: "How art thou fallen from heaven, 0 Lucifer, son of the morning!
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  • Ragozin, The Story of Media, Babylon and Persia (New York, 1888); Dosabhai Framji Karaka, History of the Parsis (2 vols., London, 1884).
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  • All the buildings, both public and private, are constructed of furnaceburnt bricks of a yellowish-red colour, principally derived from the ruins of other places, chiefly Madain (Ctesiphon), Wasit and Babylon, which have been plundered at various times to furnish materials for the construction of Bagdad.
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  • Inscribed bricks found in the neighbourhood seem to connect this ruin with Kurigalzu, king of Babylon about 1300 B.C..
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  • Within the limits of the city itself, on the west bank of the Tigris, are the remains of a quay, first observed by Sir Henry Rawlinson, at a period of low water, in 1849, built of bricks laid in bitumen, and bearing an inscription of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon.
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  • Like old Babylon, also, Bagdad was celebrated throughout the world for its brilliantcoloured textile fabrics.
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  • His worship spread with the empire of the Persians throughout Asia Minor, and Babylon was an important centre.
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  • Such an enthusiasm of militant piety, plainly based on actual successes of Israel and the house of Aaron, can only be referred to the first victories of the Maccabees, culminating in the purification of the Temple in 164 B.C. This restoration of the worship of the national sanctuary, under circumstances that inspired religious feelings very different from those of any other generation since the return from Babylon, might most naturally be followed by an extension of the Temple psalmody; it certainly was followed by some liturgical innovations, for the solemn service of dedication on the 25th day of Chisleu was made the pattern of a new annual feast (that mentioned in John x.
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  • Layard, Discoveries in the Ruins of Nineveh and Babylon (1853); G.
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  • The latter view is not so strange as it may at first appear, for the new book has this peculiarity, that Babylon and Cyrus are not mentioned in it at all.
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  • [True, there was not so much said about Babylon as we should have expected even in the first book; the paucity of references to the local characteristics of Babylonia is in fact one of the negative arguments urged by older scholars in favour of the Isaianic origin of the prophecy.] Israel himself, with all his inconsistent qualities, becomes the absorbing subject of the prophet's meditations.
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  • These two oracles agree in the elaborateness of their description of the fearful fate of the enemies of Yahweh (Babylon and Edom are merely representatives of a class), and also in their view of the deliverance and restoration of Israel as an epoch for the whole human race.
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  • It is the ode on the fall of the king of Babylon in chap. xiv.
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  • Isaiah has been the discovery of two cuneiform texts relative to the fall of Babylon and the religious policy of Cyrus.
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  • When, with the political rise of Babylon as the centre of a great empire, Nippur yielded its prerogatives to the city over which Marduk presided, the attributes and the titles of En-lil were transferred to Marduk, who becomes the "lord" or Bel of later days.
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  • 183), frankincense to the amount of 1000 talents' weight was offered every year, during the feast of Bel, on the great altar of his temple in Babylon.
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  • The Arakhtu, or " river of Babylon," flowed past the southern side of the city, and to the south-west of it on the Arabian bank lay the great inland freshwater sea of Nejef, surrounded by red sandstone cliffs of considerable height, 40 m.
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  • Eastward of the Euphrates and southward of Sippara, Kutha and Babylon were Kis (Uhaimir, 9 m.
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  • The marshes in the south like the adjoining desert were frequented by Aramaic tribes; of these the most famous were the Kalda or Chaldaeans who under Merodach-baladan made themselves masters of Babylon and gave their name in later days to the whole population of the country.
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  • The three chief of them carried off the waters of the Euphrates to the Tigris above Babylon, - the Zabzallat canal (or Nahr Sarsar) running from Faluja to Ctesiphon, the Kutha canal from Sippara to Madain, passing Tell Ibrahim or Kutha on the way, and the King's canal or Ar-Malcha between the other two.
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  • The account of Babylon given by Herodotus is not that of an eye-witness, and his historical notices are meagre and untrustworthy.
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  • Another German expedition, on a large scale, was despatched by the Orientgesellschaft in 1899 with the object of exploring the ruins of Babylon; the palace of Nebuchadrezzar and the great processional road were laid bare, and Dr W.
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  • At all events he gives 30 years of reign to Sinmuballidh instead of the 20 assigned to him in a list of dates drawn up at the time of Ammi-zadok's accession, 55 years to Khammurabi instead of 43, and 35 years to Samsu-iluna instead of 38, while he omits altogether the seven years' reign of the Assyrian king TukultiIn-aristi at Babylon.
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  • fought with Merodach-nadin-akhi (Marduk-nadin-akhe) of Babylon 418 years before the campaign of 689 B.C.; while, according to Tiglath-pileser I., the high-priest Samas-Hadad, son of IsmeDagon, built the temple of Anu and Hadad at Assur 701 years before his own time.
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  • While Babylon seems to have been a colony of Eridu, Ur, the immediate neighbour of Eridu, must have been colonized from Nippur, since its moon-god was the son of El-lil of Nippur.
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  • A recollection of his former power survived, however, at Babylon, where Bel-Merodach adopted the king before his right to rule was allowed.
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  • Temples and palaces were repaired or erected at Lagash and elsewhere, the town of Nina - which probably gave ' They are also called high-priests of Gunammide and a contracttablet speaks of " Te in Babylon," but this was probably not the Te of the seal.
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  • After a reign of 14 years Sumuabi was succeeded by his son Sumu-la-ilu, in the fifth year of whose reign the fortress of Babylon was built, and the city became for the first time a capital.
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  • The Elamites, under their king Kudur-Lagamar or Chedorlaomer, seem to have taken Babylon and destroyed the temple of Bel-Merodach; but Khammurabi retrieved his fortunes, and in, .
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  • The next two years were occupied in adding Larsa and Yamutbal to his dominion, and in forming Babylonia into a single monarchy, the head of which was Babylon.
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  • A great literary revival followed the recovery of Babylonian independence, and the rule of Babylon was obeyed as far as the shores of the Mediterranean.
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  • One of the most important works of this " First Dynasty of Babylon," as it was called by the native historians, was the compilation of a code of laws (see Babylonian Law).
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  • Babylon, however, remained the capital of the kingdom and the holy city of western Asia, where the priests were all-powerful, and the right to the inheritance of the old Babylonian empire could alone be conferred.
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  • His son Tukulti-In-aristi conquered Babylon, putting its king Bitilyasu to death, and thereby made Assyria the mistress of the oriental world.
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  • For 7 years Tukulti-In-aristi ruled at Babylon with the old imperial title of " king of Sumer and Akkad."
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  • Babylon was occupied and the country reduced to vassalage.
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  • When he ascended the throne of Babylon in 747 B.C. Assyria was in the throes of a revolution.
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  • In 729 B.C. the summit of his ambition was attained, and he was invested with the sovereignty of Asia in the holy city of Babylon.
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  • He was never crowned at Babylon, which was in a perpetual state of revolt until, in 691 B.C., he shocked the religious and political conscience of Asia by razing the holy city of Babylon to the ground.
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  • One of his first acts was to restore Babylon, to send back the image of Bel-Merodach (Bel-Marduk) to its old home, and to re-people the city with such of the priests and the former population as had survived massacre.
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  • Then he was solemnly declared king in the temple of Bel-Merodach, which had again risen from its ruins, and Babylon became the second capital of the empire.
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  • After several years of struggle, during which Egypt recovered its independence, Babylon was starved into surrender, and the rebel viceroy and his supporters were put to death.
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  • He was still reigning in Babylonia in his seventh year, as a contract dated in that year has been discovered at Erech, and an inscription of his, in which he speaks of restoring the ruined temples and their priests, couples Merodach of Babylon with Assur of Nineveh.
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  • Nabopolassar was followed by his son Nebuchadrezzar II., whose reign of 43 years made Babylon once more the mistress of the civilized world.
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  • Nabonidus fled to Babylon, whither he was pursued by Gobryas, the governor of Kurdistan, and on the 16th of Tammuz, two days after the capture of Sippara, " the soldiers of Cyrus entered Babylon without fighting."
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  • Gobryas was now made governor of the province of Babylon, and a few days afterwards the son of Nabonidus, according to the most probable reading, died.
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  • Cyrus now claimed to be the legitimate successor of the ancient Babylonian kings and the avenger of Bel-Merodach, who was wrathful at the impiety of Nabonidus in removing the images of the local gods from their ancestral shrines to his capital Babylon.
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  • Nabonidus, in fact, had excited a strong feeling against himself by attempting to centralize the religion of Babylonia in the temple of Merodach (Marduk) at Babylon, and while he had thus alienated the local priesthoods the military party despised him on account of his antiquarian tastes.
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  • The feeling was still strong that none had a right to rule over western Asia until he had been consecrated to the office by Bel and his priests; and from henceforth, accordingly, Cyrus assumed the imperial title of " king of Babylon."
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  • A year before his death, in 529 B.C., he associated his son Cambyses in the government, making him king of Babylon, while he reserved for himself the fuller title of " king of the (other) provinces " of the empire.
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  • Darius, in fact, entered Babylon as a conqueror; after the murder of the Magian it had recovered its independence under Nidinta-Bel, who took the name of Nebuchadrezzar III., and reigned from October 521 B.C. to August 520 B.C., when the Persians took it by storm.
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  • A few years later, probably 514 B.C., Babylon again revolted under the Armenian Arakha; on this occasion, after its capture by the Persians, the walls were partly destroyed.
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  • Second Dynasty of Babylon.
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  • First Dynasty of Babylon.
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  • Bel-ebus of Babylon Assur-nadin-sumi, son of Sennacherib 700 Nergal-yusezib 694 Musezib-Merodach.
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  • 693 Sennacherib destroys Babylon.
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  • 556 Cyrus conquers Babylon.
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    1
  • Arik-den-ilu, his son Hadad-nirari I., his son Shalmaneser I., his son (built Calah) Tiglath-In-aristi I., his son, conquers Babylon cir.
    0
    1
  • Layard, Nineveh and Babylon (1853); E.
    0
    1
  • Up to certain points no difference of opinion exists upon the dates to be assigned to the later kings who ruled in Babylon and in Assyria.
    0
    1
  • II.) gives a list of the Babylonian, Assyrian and Persian kings who ruled in Babylon, together with the number of years each of them reigned, from the accession of Nabonassar in 747 B.C. to the conquest of Babylon by Alexander the Great in 331 B.C. The accuracy of this list is confirmed by the larger List of Kings and by the principal Babylonian Chronicle; the latter, like the Canon, begins with the reign of Nabonassar, who, it has been suggested, may have revised the calendar and have inaugurated a new epoch for the later chronology.
    0
    1
  • In its original form this document gave a list, arranged in dynasties, of the Babylonian kings, from the First Dynasty of Babylon down to the Neo-Babylonian period.
    0
    1
  • In addition to the Kings' List, other important chronological data consist of references in the classical authorities to the chronological system of Berossus; chronological references to earlier kings occurring in the later native inscriptions, such as Nabonidus's estimate of the period of Khammurabi (or Hammuribi); synchronisms, also furnished by the inscriptions, between kings of Babylon and of Assyria; and the early Babylonian date-lists.
    0
    1
  • ' These three dynasties are usually known as the First Dynasty of Babylon, the Dynasty of Sisku or Uruku, and the Kassite Dynasty; _see sect.
    0
    1
  • of the Kings' List never occupied the throne of Babylon, but ruled only in the extreme south of 1 See Lehmann-Haupt, Zwei Hauptprobleme (1898).
    0
    1
  • of the Kings' List; that in the reign of Samsu-ditana, the last king of Dynasty I., Hittites from Cappadocia raided and captured Babylon, which in her weakened state soon fell a prey to the Kassites (Dynasty III.); and that later on southern Babylonia, till then held by Dynasty II.
    0
    1
  • of the Kings' List, thus enabling us to trace the history of Assyria back beyond the rise of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • New data have also been discovered bearing upon the period before the rise of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • But even by postulating the highest possible dates for he Dynasties of Babylon and Ur, enormous gaps occurred in he scheme of chronology, which were unrepresented by any ro al name or record.
    0
    1
  • The latter was an ally of Katashmanturgu of Babylon, 2 The "Niobe " statue near Manisa was not definitely known for " Hittite " till 3882, when G.
    0
    1
  • Babylon; a bowl and a stela of storm-god, both with incised inscriptions; doubtless spoil of war or tribute brought from Syria.
    0
    1
  • Sculptured stelae, honorific or funerary, all with pyramidal or slightly rounded upper ends, and showing a single regal or divine figure or two figures, have come to light at Bor, Marash, Sinjerli, Jerablus, Babylon, &c. These, like most of the rock-panels, are all marked as Hittite by accompanying pictographic inscriptions.
    0
    1
  • inscribed basalt bowl found at Babylon) and fragments of ware painted with dark ornament on light body-clay, or in polychrome on a cream-white slip, or black burnished, found on N.
    0
    1
  • So far, the majority of our Hittite inscriptions, like those first found at Hamah, are in relief (cameo); but the incised characters, first observed in the Tyana district, have since been shown, by discoveries at Marash, Babylon, &c., to have had a wider range.
    0
    1
  • That certain prophecies relating to the coming kingdom of God had clearly not been fulfilled was a matter of religious difficulty to the returned exiles from Babylon.
    0
    1
  • from the university of Oxford, Layard returned to Constantinople as attache to the British embassy, and, in August 1849, started on a second expedition, in the course of which he extended his investigations to the ruins of Babylon and the mounds of southern Mesopotamia.
    0
    1
  • His record of this expedition, Discoveries in the Ruins of Nineveh and Babylon, which was illustrated by another folio volume, called A Second Series of the Monuments of Nineveh, was published in 1853.
    0
    1
  • The Syrians submitted to Rome at the synod of Dampier in 1599, but it was a forced submission, and in 1653 when the Portuguese arrested the Syrian bishop just sent out by the catholicus of Babylon, the rebellion broke out.
    0
    1
  • Jews from Babylon have brought gold and silver to Jerusalem; of these the prophet mist make a crown designed for the " branch " who is to build Yahweh's house and sit king on the throne, but retain a good understanding with the high priest.
    0
    1
  • His reconquest of Babylon in 520 may, in particular, have seemed the prelude to the Messianic age (Wellhausen, Gesch., p. 161 n.).
    0
    1
  • Another difficulty lies in the words "and thou shalt come even to Babylon" in iv.
    0
    1
  • p. 38, Arsamos; in the canon of Ptolemy, Aroges (by Elias of Nisibis, Piruz); in a chronological tablet from Babylon (Brit.
    0
    1
  • The Bethmann Museum owes its celebrity principally to Dannecker's " Ariadne," but it also possesses the original plaster model of Thorwaldsen's " Entrance of Alexander the Great into Babylon."
    0
    1
  • Greece, Persia and probably Babylon, knew of four such ages. ?
    0
    1
  • After the death of Ninus, Semiramis, who was accused of causing it, erected to him a temple-tomb, nine stades high and ten stades broad, near Babylon.
    0
    1
  • But this was a modification of the Deuteronomic law naturally called for under the circumstances of the return from Babylon, and Neh.
    0
    1
  • It is not, however, to be regarded as a reproduction in written form of a Palestinian translation, but rather as an official translation of the Law, in the Judaean dialect, which was carried out in Babylon, probably about the 4th century A.D.: in its final form, according to Dalman (l.c.) it cannot be earlier than the 5th century.
    0
    1
  • The Hebrew text used by the translators appears to have been practically identical with the Massoretic. The version was held in high esteem in Babylon, and, later, in Palestine, and a special Massora was made for it.
    0
    1
  • Having taken Farama (Pelusium), he advanced to Misr, north of the ancient Memphis, and besieged it and the strong fortress of Babylon for seven months.
    0
    1
  • Berossus, a priest of Belus living at Babylon in the 3rd century B.C., added to his historical account of Babylonia chronological list of its kings, which he claimed to have compiled from genuine archives preserved in the temple.
    0
    1
  • The records of kings whose names hitherto were known to us only through Bible references have been found in the ruins of Nineveh and Babylon, and personages hitherto but shadowy now step forth as clearly into the light of history as an Alexander or a Caesar.
    0
    1
  • and Sennacherib, kings of Assyria, of Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon, and of Cyrus, king of Persia, all contain direct references to Hebrew history.
    0
    1
  • One of the most striking instances of the way in which mistakes of chronology may lead to the perversion of historical records is shown in the Book of Daniel in connexion with the familiar account of the capture of Babylon by Cyrus.
    0
    1
  • When the annalistic tablet of Cyrus was translated, it was made to appear, to the consternation of Bible scholars, that the city of Babylon had capitulated to the Persian - or more properly to the Elamite - conqueror without a struggle.
    0
    1
  • It appeared, further, that the king ruling in Babylon at the time of the capitulation was named not Belshazzar, but Nabonidos.
    0
    1
  • The explanation is found, so the Assyriologist assures us, in the fact that both Hebrew and Greek historians, writing at a considerable interval after the events, and apparently lacking authentic sources, confused the peaceful occupation of Babylon by Cyrus with its siege and capture by a successor to that monarch, Darius Hystaspes.
    0
    1
  • The era of the Seleucidae dates from the time of the occupation of Babylon by Seleucus Nicator, 311 years before Christ, in the year of Rome 44 2, and twelve years after the death of Alexander the Great.
    0
    1
  • erected images of Anaitis in Babylon, Susa, Ecbatana, Persepolis, Bactra, Damascus, Sardis.
    0
    1
  • 6 sqq.), and the decree which had been sought in Babylon is found at Ecbatana.
    0
    1
  • Thus Joachim of Floris in his Expositio magni abbatis I oachimi in Apoc. teaches that Babylon is Rome, the Beast from the Sea Islam, the False Prophet the heretical sects of the day, and that on the close of the present age which was at hand the millennium would ensue.
    0
    1
  • Io The great Babylon.
    0
    1
  • His empire extended over the three Indies, including that Farther India, where lay the body of St Thomas, to the sun-rising, and back again down the slope to the ruins of Babylon and the tower of Babel.
    0
    1
  • BABEL, the native name of the city called Babylon by the Greeks, the modern Hillah.
    0
    1
  • The tower was no doubt suggested by one of the temple towers of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • The event was afterwards localized in Babylon.
    0
    1
  • He undertook the long and perilous journey from Sardis to the Persian capital Susa, visited Babylon, Colchis, and the western shores of the Black Sea as far as the estuary of the Dnieper; he travelled in Scythia and in Thrace, visited Zante and Magna Graecia, explored the antiquities of Tyre, coasted along the shores of Palestine, saw Gaza, and made a long stay in Egypt.
    0
    1
  • The travels of Herodotus seem to have been chiefly accomplished between his twentieth and his thirty-seventh year (464-447 B.C.).1 It was probably in his early manhood that as a Persian subject he visited Susa and Babylon, taking advantage of the Persian system of posts which he describes in his fifth book.
    0
    1
  • Meyer inclines to put all the longer journeys, except the Scythian, between 440 and 430 B.C. The journey to Susa and Babylon is put by C. F.
    0
    1
  • His travels in Asia Minor, in European Greece, and among the islands of the Aegean, probably belong to this period, as also his journey to Susa and Babylon.
    0
    1
  • In tracing the growth of Persia from a petty subject kingdom to a vast dominant empire, he has occasion to set out the histories of Lydia, Media, Assyria, Babylon, Egypt, Scythia, Thrace, and to describe the countries and the peoples inhabiting them, their natural productions, climate, geographical position, monuments, &c.; while, in noting the contemporaneous changes in Greece, he is led to tell of the various migrations of the Greek race, their colonies, commerce, progress in the arts, revolutions, internal struggles, wars with one another, legislation, religious tenets and the like.
    0
    1
  • The explanation formerly adopted and embodied in the name Chaldee is that the change took place in Babylon.
    0
    1
  • That the so-called Biblical Chaldee, in which considerable portions of the books of Ezra and Daniel are written, was really the language of Babylon was supposed to be clear from Dan.
    0
    1
  • The next year Tiglath-Pileser entered Babylonia, but it was not until 729 B.C. that the Chaldaean prince Ukin-zer (Chinzirus) was driven from Babylon and Tiglath-Pileser acknowledged as its legitimate ruler.
    0
    1
  • 62 (Babylon).
    0
    1
  • The honour paid by them to the serpent is connected with the old mythologies of Babylon and Egypt as well as with the popular cults of Greece and the Orient.
    0
    1
  • Modern Arabic tradition likewise ascribes the ruins, like those of Birs Nimrud, near Babylon, to Nimrod, because they are the most prominent ruins of that region.
    0
    1
  • Our chief source of information is Zimmern's Beitreige zur Kenntniss der Babylon: Religion, pp. 81-95, from which Lagrange in his Etudes sur les religions semitiques 2 has chiefly derived his materials (ch.
    0
    1
  • - lxvi., however, are not by Isaiah, but are the work of a prophet who wrote about 540 B.C., shortly before the conquest of Babylon by Cyrus, and whose aim was to encourage the Israelites in exile, and assure them of the certainty of their approaching restoration to Canaan.
    0
    1
  • 1to, looking forward similarly to the approaching fall of Babylon; chs.
    0
    1
  • But the chronological disorder of the book, and other indications, show that Baruch could not have been the compiler of the book, but that the prophecies and narratives contained in it were collected together gradually, and that it reached its present form by a succession of stages, which were not finally completed till long after Israel's return from Babylon.
    0
    1
  • 58), announcing the approaching fall of Babylon, is not by Jeremiah, and cannot have been written till shortly before 538 B.C.
    0
    1
  • The most remarkable of these was made outside the Church - a significant indication of the adverse effect of the conditions within; the Neo-platonist philosopher Porphyry 2 in the 3rd century A.D., untrammelled by church tradition and methods, anticipated one of the clearest and most important conclusions of modern criticism: he detected the incorrectness of the traditional ascription of Daniel to the Jewish captivity in Babylon and discerned that the real period of its composition was that of Antiochus Epiphanes, four centuries later.
    0
    1
  • " As for Kings and Chronicles, " besides the places which mention such monuments as, the writer saith, remained till his own days " (Hobbes here cites thirteen from Kings, two from Chron.), " it is argument sufficient that they were written after the captivity in Babylon, that the history of them is continued till that time.
    0
    1
  • and 126th, whereby it is manifest that the psalter was compiled and put into the form it now hath, after the return of the Jews from Babylon."
    0
    1
  • He concludes: " But considering the inscriptions, or titles of their books, it is manifest enough that the whole Scripture of the Old Testament was set forth in the form we have it after the return of the Jews from their captivity in Babylon and before the time of Ptolemaeus Philadelphus."
    0
    1
  • Now one of the kings, who corresponds with Amenhotep IV., is Burnaburiash (Burna-buryas), king of Babylon, and Egyptologists and Assyriologists are agreed that the date of these monarchs was c. 1400 B.C. The conquest of Canaan, consequently, could not have taken place till after 1400 B.C. (ii.) It is stated in Ex.
    0
    1
  • Death of Alexander in Babylon.
    0
    1
  • The lengths of the reigns of Nebuchadrezzar and his successors on the throne of Babylon, and also, after the conquest of Babylon, of Cyrus and the following Persian kings, are known from the " Canon of Ptolemy," referred to above, the particulars in which, for the earlier part of this period, are also confirmed by the testimony of the monuments.
    0
    1
  • The name "Babylonian foot" used by Böckh (2) is only a theory of his, from which to derive volumes and weights; and no evidence for this name, or connexion with Babylon, is to be found.
    0
    1
  • The temples were called teocalli or " god's house," and rivalled in size as they resembled in form the temples of ancient Babylon.
    0
    1
  • In its prime it ranked beside Nineveh and Babylon in its colossal proportions - its four walls, each 16 m.
    0
    1
  • 3) that Nineveh stood on the Euphrates; the Arabic geographer Yaqut places a Nineveh on the lower Euphrates near Babylon, and this may be a colony from the great Nineveh, or possibly the Nina.
    0
    1
  • Sennacherib made Nineveh his court residence and, after his destruction of Babylon and the influx of the enormous booty brought back from his conquests, it must have been the most magnificent and wealthiest city of the East.
    0
    1
  • Esarhaddon began to rebuild Babylon and so departed from his father's purpose to make Nineveh the metropolis of the empire, but he did not altogether neglect the city.
    0
    1
  • The seat of the Manichaean pope was for centuries in Babylon, at a later period in Samarkand.
    0
    1
  • BEROSSUS, a priest of Bel at Babylon, who translated into Greek.
    0
    1
  • All that seems certain is that Berossus arranged his history so that it should fill the astronomical period of 36,000 years, beginning with the first man and ending with the conquest of Babylon by Alexander the Great.
    0
    1
  • Here Sarapis has a temple at Babylon and is of such importance that he alone is named a being consulted on behalf of the dying king.
    0
    1
  • It would considerably alter our conception of the dead Apis if we were to find that a travelling shrine of his divinity accompanied Alexander on his expedition or was set up for him in Babylon.
    0
    1
  • On the other hand, the principal god of Babylon was Zeus Belus (Bel Marduk), and it is difficult to see why he should have been called Sarapis on this occasion.
    0
    1
  • As a rule the prophets directly connect the final restoration with the removal of the sins of their own age; to Isaiah the last troubles are those of Assyrian invasion, to Jeremiah the restoration follows on the exile to Babylon, to Daniel on the overthrow of the Greek monarchy.
    0
    1
  • In 41 B.C. he was practically superseded by Antony's appointment of Herod and Phasael to be tetrarchs of Judaea; and in the following year he was taken prisoner by the Parthians, deprived of his ears that he might be permanently disqualified for priestly office, and carried to Babylon.
    0
    1
  • The writings of Edward Irving published during his lifetime were For the Oracles of God, Four Orations (1823); For Judgment to come (1823); Babylon and Infidelity foredoomed (1826); Sermons, &c. (3 vols., 1828); Exposition of the Book of Revelation (1831); an introduction to a translation of Ben-Ezra; and an introduction to Horne's Commentary on the Psalms. His collected works were published in 5 volumes, edited by Gavin Carlyle.
    0
    1
  • It is not improbable that the incorporation of this Mesopotamian kingdom with Babylon was the work of Khammurabi himself.
    0
    1
  • Possibly the rulers of Babylon had a freer hand in a city that they apparently raised to a dominant position than the Semitic rulers of Asshur, who seem to have succeeded to men of the stock which we have hitherto called Mitanni, if we may judge ' On the theory that it was climatic changes in Arabia that drove the Semites to seek new homes along the route mentioned above, see L.
    0
    1
  • The earlier Kassite kings of Babylon still maintained the Amorite claim to "the four quarters;" but it is improbable that there was much force behind the claim, although we have a document from Khana dated under Kashtiliash.
    0
    1
  • When Mitanni fell Babylon no doubt adhered to its older claims on Mesopotamia; but the Kassite kings could do little to contest the advance of Assyria, although several rectifications of the boundary between their spheres are reported.
    0
    1
  • established more direct relations between Mesopotamia and Babylon, his work was presently undone by the vigorous campaigns of Tiglath-pileser I., who seems to have even won Egypt's sanction of his succession to the Hittite claims. The newly recovered (1909) tablet of Tukulti-Ninib, the grandfather of Shalmaneser II., is interesting from its account of an expedition down the course of the Tharthar to Hit = Id (river and town now first mentioned in cuneiform sources) and up the Euphrates to the Khabur district.
    0
    1
  • Now that Mesopotamia had passed out of the hands of Babylon, all that the later kings could do was to encourage local Mesopotamian rulers in their desire for independence (Nabuapluiddin).
    0
    1
  • e.), apart from what such cities in Mesopotamia as held by its last kings suffered through the invasion, first perhaps of Nabopolassar, who in 609 B.C. claims to be lord of Shubaru, and then of the Medes, would be a matter of comparative indifference; tribute paid to Babylon was just as hard to find as if it were going to Nineveh.
    0
    1
  • He was defeated by Nebuchadrezzar at Carchemish (605 B.C.), and Mesopotamia was confirmed to Babylon.
    0
    1
  • Under the Seleucids Babylon was moved across the Hellenism.
    0
    1
  • Layard, Nineveh and Babylon (1849-1851), pp. 230-242; at Tell Khalaf: M.
    0
    1
  • Not that they forgot their own tongue in the Captivity and learnt Aramaic in Babylon, as used to be supposed.
    0
    1
  • When The exiles returned from Babylon they probably brought back with them the practice of keeping the festival.
    0
    1
  • 13); and as he is writing from Rome ("Babylon," since Paul's death and the change of policy it implied), this forms a link between the New Testament and early tradition, which speaks of Mark as an Evangelist writing his Gospel under the influence of Peter's preaching (in Rome).
    0
    1
  • Cyrus himself, in his proclamation to the Babylonians after the conquest of Babylon, does not mention his name.
    0
    1
  • 2306, 2423; for Babylon, M.
    0
    1
  • It is not improbable that Assyria and Babylon, with their splendid rivers, the Euphrates and Tigris, may have taken the idea from the Nile, and that Carthage and Phoenicia as well as Greece and Italy may have followed the same example.
    0
    1
  • The earliest witness to a residence of Peter in Rome is probably I Peter, for (see Peter, Epistles Of) it is probable that the reference to Babylon ought to be interpreted as meaning Rome.
    0
    1
  • The stratagem of Sextus is that practised by Zopyrus is the case of Babylon, while the episode of the poppy-heads is borrowed from the advice given by Thrasybulus to Periander (Herodotus iii.
    0
    1
  • Already in the 7th century B.C., when Hellenism was still in a rudimentary stage, the citizens of the Greek city-states had been known to the courts of Babylon and Egypt as admirable soldiers, combining hardihood with discipline, and Greek mercenaries came to be in request throughout the Nearer East.
    0
    1
  • It superseded Babylon as the industrial focus of Babylonia and counted some 600,000 inhabitants (plebs urbana) according to Pliny, N.H.
    0
    1
  • on the east bank of the Nile, stretching north from the old Roman fortress of Babylon, and covers an area of about 8 sq.
    0
    1
  • Most important of the quarters of Masr-el-Atika is that of Kasr-esh-Shama (Castle of the Candle), built within the outer walls of the Roman fortress of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • In the Der Abu Sephin, to the north of Babylon, is a Coptic church of the 10th century, possessing magnificent carved screens, a pulpit with fine mosaics and a semi-circle of marble steps.
    0
    1
  • The most ancient known settlement in the immediate neighbourhood of the present city was the town called Babylon.
    0
    1
  • Babylon is said by Strabo to have been founded by emigrants from the 'ancient city of the same name in 525 B.C., i.e.
    0
    1
  • The church of Babylon mentioned in r Peter v.
    0
    1
  • The town of Babylon disappeared, but the strong walls of the fortress in part remain, and the name survived, " Babylon of Egypt," or " Babylon " simply, being frequently used in medieval writings as synonymous with Cairo or as denoting the successive Mahommedan dynasties of Egypt.
    0
    1
  • For the fortress of Babylon and its churches consult A.
    0
    1
  • The first group is contemporary with the XVIIIth and XIXth Dynasties and consists in the first place of the Tell ci .Amarna tablets with others related to them, containing the reports of governors of the Syrian possessions of Egypt, and the correspondence of the kings of Babylon, Assur, Mitanni and Khntti (the Hittites) with the Pharaohs.
    0
    1
  • Here he stayed to hunt a herd of 120 elephants, and then, marching westwards, received the tribute of Naharina and gifts from the Hittites in Asia Minor and from the king of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • Assurbani-pals energies throughout this crisis were entirely occupied with revolts nearer home, in Babylon, Elam and Arabia.
    0
    1
  • The fall of Nineveh and the division of the spoil gave to Nabopolasser, king of Babylon, the inheritance of the Assyrians in the west, and he at once despatched his son Nebuchadrezzar to fight Necho.
    0
    1
  • forces met at Carchemish (605), and the rout of the latter was so complete that Necho relinquished Syria and might have lost Egypt as well had not the death of Nabopolasser recalled the victor to Babylon.
    0
    1
  • Amr recrossed the river and joined it, but presently was confronted by a Roman army, which he defeated at the battle of Heliopolis (July 640); this victory was followed by the siege of Babylon, which after some futile attempts at negotiation was taken partly by storm and partly by capitulation.
    0
    1
  • The interval was spent by him in founding the city Fostat (Fustat), near the modern Cairo, and called after the camp (Fossatum) occupied by him while besieging Babylon.; and in reducing those coast towns that still offered resistance.
    0
    1
  • During the siege of Babylon he had been recalled and exiled, but after the death of Heraclius had been reinstated as patriarch by Heraclonas, and been welcomed back to Alexandria with general rejoicing in September 641.
    0
    1
  • It is possible that he was summoned to Babylon to explain his conduct (Jer.
    0
    1
  • He professed to rest all upon Scripture, yet accepted from the Babylon of Rome a baptism neither scriptural nor primitive, nor fulfilling the chief conditions of admission into a visible brotherhood of saints, to wit, repentance, faith, spiritual illumination and free surrender of self to Christ.
    0
    1
  • 29, 37, confirmed by a stele of Nabonidus found in Babylon: Scheil in Recueil de travaux, xviii.; Messerschmidt, "Die Inschrift der Stele Nabonaids," in Mitteilungen der vorderasiatischen Gesellschaft, i., 1896).
    0
    1
  • According to Berossus he was allied with Nabopolassar of Babylon, whose son Nebuchadrezzar married Amyitis, the daughter of the Median king (who is wrongly called Astyages).
    0
    1
  • Syennesis of Cilicia and Nebuchadrezzar (in Herodotus named Labynetus) of Babylon interceded and effected a peace, by which the Halys was fixed as frontier between the two empires, and Alyattes's daughter married to Cyaxares's son Astyages (Herod.
    0
    1
  • of Babylon (3 0 95' N., 46° 5' E.), about 6 m.
    0
    1
  • Jeremias, Babylon im Neuen Test.
    0
    1
  • Unfortunately the events of his age are shrouded in obscurity, but one can recognize the return of exiles from Babylon to Jerusalem and its environs - now half-Edomite - and various internal rivalries which culminate in the Samaritan schism.'
    0
    1
  • Old priestly rivalries between Cutha and Babylon may explain why the mixed Samaritans became known as Cuthaeans; according to the prevailing theory their predecessors, the " ten tribes " had been exiled in the 8th century.
    0
    1
  • He had seen his figure in a dream; and so he sacrificed to God according to his direction, inspected the book of Daniel, and gave them - and at their request the Jews of Babylon and Media - leave to follow their own laws.
    0
    1
  • Herodotus, Athenaeus and other Greek and Roman writers have recorded the enormous number of colossal statues and other works of art for which Babylon and Nineveh were so famed.
    0
    1
  • Classical: Layard, Nineveh and Babylon (1853); Pliny, Natural History, bk.
    0
    1
  • It is supposed that sea-going merchants, mostly Dravidians, and not Aryans, availing themselves of the monsoons, traded in the 7th century B.C. from the south-west ports of India to Babylon, and that there they became acquainted with a Semitic alphabet, which they brought back with them, and from which all the alphabets now used in India, Burma, Siam and Ceylon have been gradually evolved.
    0
    1
  • In that year Seleucus, 'having recovered Babylon, proceeded to re-establish his authority in Bactria (q.v.) and the Punjab.
    0
    1
  • He also contributed papers to Archaeologia on the site of Babylon, the island of St Paul's shipwreck, and the landing-place of Caesar in Britain.
    0
    1
  • Mild attempts, to be sure, to group the chief deities associated with the most important religious and political centres into a regular pantheon were made - notably in Nippur and later in Ur - but such attempts lacked the enduring quality which attaches to Khammurabi's avowed policy to raise Marduk - the patron deity of the future capital, Babylon - to the head of the entire Babylonian pantheon, as 1 Even in the case of the "Semitic" name of the famous Sargon I., whose full name is generally read Sharru-kenu-sha-ali, and interpreted as "the legitimate king of the city," the question has recently been raised whether we ought not to read "` Sharru-kenushar-ri" and interpret as "the legitimate king rules" - an illustration of the vacillation still prevailing in this difficult domain of research.
    0
    1
  • Babylon itself came to be recognized as the real centre of the entire Euphrates valley.
    0
    1
  • The older incantations, associated with Ea, were re-edited so as to give to Marduk the supreme power over demons, witches and sorcerers; the hymns and lamentations composed for the cult of Bel, Shamash and of Adad were transformed into paeans and appeals to Marduk, while the ancient myths arising in the various religious and political centres underwent a similar process of adaptation to changed conditions, and as a consequence their original meaning was obscured by the endeavour to assign all mighty deeds and acts, originally symbolical of the change of seasons or of occurrences in nature, to the patron deity of Babylon - the supreme head of the entire Babylonian pantheon.
    0
    1
  • predominance of the city of Babylon served to maintain for Marduk recognition even on the part of the Assyrian rulers, who,.
    0
    1
  • gave the Assyrians trouble; and when in 689 B.C. Sennacherib, whose patience had been exhausted by the difficulties encountered in maintaining peace in the south, actually besieged and destroyed the city of Babylon, he removed the statue of Marduk to Nineveh as a symbol that the god's rule had come to an end.
    0
    1
  • His grandson Assur-bani-pal, with a view of reestablishing amicable relations, restored the statue to the temple E-Saggila in Babylon and performed the time-honoured ceremony of "taking the hand of Bel" as a symbol of his homage to the ancient head of the Babylonian pantheon.
    0
    1
  • We thus obtain four periods in the development of the Babylonian-Assyrian religion: (i) the oldest period from_ C. 3500 B.C. to the time of Khammurabi (c. 2250 B.C.); (2) the post-Khammurabic period in Babylonia; (3) the Assyrian period (c. 2000 B.C.) to the destruction of Nineveh in 606 B.C.; (4) the neo-Babylonian period beginning with Nabopolassar (625-604 B.C.), the first independent ruler under whom Babylonia inaugurates a new though short-lived era of power and prosperity, which ends with Cyrus's conquest of Babylon and Babylonia in 539 B.C., though since the religion proceeds on its undisturbed course for several centuries after the end of the political independence, we might legitimately carry this period to the Greek conquest of the Euphrates valley (331 B.C.), when new influences began to make themselves felt which gradually led to the extinction of the old cults.
    0
    1
  • C. Thompson, The Reports of the Magicians and Astrologers of Nineveh and Babylon (London, 1900); A.
    0
    1
  • in Jastrow's work (German and English edition), Carl Bezold's Ninive and Babylon (Bielefeld, 1905), chapters vi.
    0
    1
  • With the establishment of the Babylonian empire, under Khammurabi, early in the 2nd preChristian millennium, the religious as well as the political centre of influence was transferred to Babylon, Marduk became the Bel or lord of the pantheon, many of En-lil's attributes and myths were transferred to him, and E-kur was to some extent neglected.
    0
    1
  • But while Nippur has been more fully explored than any other old Babylonian city, except Babylon and Lagash, still only a small part of the great ruins of the ancient site had been examined in 1909.
    0
    1
  • Layard, Nineveh and Babylon (1853); John P. Peters, Nippur (1897); H.
    0
    1
  • A fragment of one such version belongs to the period of the First Dynasty of Babylon, 2 and part of a still earlier Semitic version of another portion of the Gilgamesh Epic has also been recovered.
    0
    1
  • It has already been noted that the earliest deluge-fragment previously recovered dates from the latter half of the First Dynasty of Babylon, when the Western Semites had succeeded in establishing their authority throughOut the greater part of the country.
    0
    1
  • In some instances, as in the great Creation Series of Babylon, the later scribes subjected the different versions to processes of editing, with the result that the earlier forms gave place to the redactions of a militant priesthood.
    0
    1
  • The possibility that Hebrew traditions were subject to Babylonian influence from the period of the Canaanite conquest has long been recognized, and to the Exilic and post-Exilic Jew the mythology of Babylon may well have presented many familiar features.
    0
    1
  • In ancient times, and especially in Egypt, Babylon and Greece, he went on to develop reason into science or the systematic investigation of definite subjects, e.g.
    0
    1
  • In the downfall of Jerusalem, the experiences of the exile in Babylon, and the return to Judaea, the nation was transformed into a church.
    0
    1
  • We have seen that at Babylon itself the Aramaic language and character were well known.
    0
    1
  • Amongst them are homilies "on the burden of Babylon in Isaiah"; three books "on spiritual friendship"; a life of Edward the Confessor; an account of miracles wrought at Hexham, and the tract called Relatio de Standardo.
    0
    1
  • The lesser patriarchates are those of Babylon (Chaldaic), Cilicia (Armenian), the East Indies (Latin), Lisbon (Latin), Venice (Latin) and the West Indies (Latin).
    0
    1
  • i Ahasuerus is the father of Darius the Mede, who "was made king over the realm of the Chaldeans" after the conquest of Babylon and death of Belshazzar.
    0
    1
  • Darius may possibly have acted under Cyrus as governor of Babylon, but this view is not favoured by Dan.
    0
    1
  • Cyrus did, on ascending the throne of Babylon, appoint a governor of the province, but his name was Gobryas, the son of Mardonius.
    0
    1
  • It finally lost its independence under Samsu-iluna, son of Khammurabi, c. 1900 B.C., and from that time until the close of the Babylonian period it was a subject city of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • Bacher, Agada der Babylon.
    0
    1
  • The two great empires, Assyria and Babylon, which grew up on the banks of the Tigris and Euphrates, can be separated as little historically as geographically.
    0
    1
  • But whereas Assyria takes the first place in the classical accounts to the exclusion of Babylonia, the decipherment of the inscriptions has proved that the converse was really the case, and that, with the exception of some seven or eight centuries, Assyria might be described as a province or dependency of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • Ashur rises into majestic sovereignty as the " Ruler of all the gods," the supreme religious form of Assyrian sway: when the empire falls beneath the revived power of Babylon, he fades away and disappears.
    0
    1
  • In 1723 the chapter of Utrecht, in order to preserve the canonical succession of the Dutch clergy, elected Cornelius Steenoven archbishop. He was consecrated (15th October 1724) by Dominique Varlet, bishop of Babylon in partibus, who, having been deposed by the pope for Jansenism, had settled in Amsterdam in 1720.
    0
    1
  • Undeterred by this, the chapter, on the death of Steenoven, elected as archbishop Cornelis Jan Burchman, who was consecrated by the bishop of Babylon on the 30th of September 1725.
    0
    1
  • Only the evil serpent Azhi Dahaka (Azhdahak) is domiciled by the Avesta in Babylon (Bawri) and depicted on the model of Babylonian gods and demons: he is a king in human form with a serpent growing from either shoulder and feeding on the brains of men.
    0
    1
  • In these traits are engrained the general conditions of history and culture, under which the Iranians lived: on the one hand, the contrast between Iranian and Turanian; on the other, the dominating position of Babylon, which influenced most strongly the civilization and religion of Iran.
    0
    1
  • We cannot deduce from them a conquest of Iran from Babylon: for the Babylonians never set foot in Iran and even the Assyrians merely conquered the western portior of Media.
    0
    1
  • A little supplementary information may be gleanec from the inscriptions of King Nabonidus of Babylon (.5539
    0
    1
  • After this a peace was arranged by Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon and Syennesis of Cilicia, recognizing the Halys as the borderline.
    0
    1
  • Of the states which arose out of the shattered Assyrian Empire (Media, Babylon, Egypt, Cilicia and Lydia), Media was by far the strongest.
    0
    1
  • At first Nabonidus of Babylon hailec the fall of the Medes with delight and utilized the opportunit) by occupying Harran (Carrhae).
    0
    1
  • Cyrus and hi~ Persians paid little heed to the treaties which the Median kink had concluded with the other powers; and the result was I great coalition against him, embracing Nabonidus of Babylon Amasis of Egypt, Croesus of Lydia, and the Spartans, whosi highly efficient army seemed to the Oriental states of great value In the spiing of 546 B.C., Croesus opened the attack.
    0
    1
  • The usurpation of Smerdis (522521 nc.) and his death at the hands of Darius was the signal for numerous insurrections in Babylon, Susiana, Persis, Media, Armenia and many of the Eastern provinces.
    0
    1
  • The winter months the kings chiefly spent in Babylon: the hot summer, in the cooler situation of Ecbatana, where Darius and Xerxes built a residence on Mt Elvend, south of the city.
    0
    1
  • Within the empire, the two great civilized states incorporated by Cyrus and Cambyses, Babylon and Egypt, occupied a position of their own.
    0
    1
  • In Babylon his procedure was presumably similar, though here we possess no local evidence.
    0
    1
  • This proceeding led to two insurrections in Babylon (probably in 484 and 479 n.c.), which were speedily repressed.
    0
    1
  • Thus there has been discovered in Babylon a copy of the Behistun (qv.) inscription preserved on a block of dolerite (Weissbach, Babylonische Miscellen.
    0
    1
  • Within these, again, there might lie large town settlements whose internal affairs were controlled by the elders or the officials of the community: as, for instance, Babylon, Jerusalem, the Egyptian cities, Tarsus, Sardis and others.
    0
    1
  • Thus Cyrus himself gave the exiled Jews in Babylon permission to return and rebuildJerusalem.
    0
    1
  • The gorgeous cult of the gods of civilization (especially of Babylon), with their host of temples, images and festivals, exercised a corresponding influence on the mother-country.
    0
    1
  • 5, 65), first erected statues to Anaitis in Persepolis, Ecbatana, Bactria, Susa, Babylon, Damascus and Sardis.
    0
    1
  • Other gods, who come into prominence, are the dragon-slayer Verethraghna (Artagnes) and the Good Thought (Vohumano, Omanos); and even the Sacaean festival is adopted from Babylon (Berossus Jr. 3; Ctes., Jr. 16; Strabo xi.
    0
    1
  • They also contain much that is admittedly fabulous: for instance, the stories of Cyrus and Croesus, the conquest of Babylon, &c. Forty years later (c. 390 B.C.), the physician Ctesias of Cnidus, who for 17 years (414398 B.C.) remained in the service of the Great King, composed a great work on the Persian history, known to us from an extract in Photius and numerous fragments.
    0
    1
  • Berossuss history of Babylon contained much valuable and trustworthy information, but next to nothing has survived.
    0
    1
  • of Salamis and Plataea definitely shattered the offensive powe of the empire; that the centre of gravity in the worlds history had shifted from Susa and Babylon to the Aegean Sea; and that the Persians were conscious that in spite of all their courage they were henceforward in the presence of an enemy, superior in arms as well as in intellect, whom they could not hope to subdue by their own strength.
    0
    1
  • At that point Alexander died in Babylon on the I3th of June 323 B.C.
    0
    1
  • had striven to win the kingdom of Alexander for himselfwas detained by the war with his rivals in the west, Seleucus, with Babylon as his headquarters, conquered the whole of Iran as far as the Indus.
    0
    1
  • Shortly after his conquest of Babylonia, Seleucus had founded a new capital, Seleucia, on the Tigris: his intention being at once to displace the ancient Babylon from its former central position, and to replace it by a Greek city.
    0
    1
  • Soter (161I 50) succeeded in suppressing (159) a revolt of Timarchus of Miletus, governor of Babylon, who had occupied Media, assumed the title of great king, and had been recognized by the Romans (Appian, Syr.
    0
    1
  • Another of his foundations was Vologesias (the Arabian Ullaish), situated near Hira on the Euphrates, south of Babylon, which did appreciable damage to the commerce of Seleucia and is often.
    0
    1
  • In consequence of revolt it was made an Assyrian province in 708 B.C. When the Assyrian empire passed through the hands of Babylon and Persia into those of the successors of Alexander, Samosata was the capital of Kummukh, called in Greek Commagene.
    0
    1
  • Many of the houses in the town are built of brick, not a few bearing an inscription of Nebuchadrezzar, obtained from the ruins of Babylon, which lie less than an hour away to the north.
    0
    1
  • Rich, Babylon and Persepolis (1839); J.
    0
    1
  • of Babylon and io m.
    0
    1
  • Borsippa was the sister city of Babylon, and is often called in the inscriptions Babylon II., also the "city without equal."
    0
    1
  • Like Babylon Borsippa is not mentioned in the oldest inscriptions, but comes into importance first after Khammurabi had made Babylon the capital of the whole land, somewhere before 2000 B.C. He built or rebuilt the temple E-Zida at this place, dedicating it, however, to Marduk (Bel-Merodach).
    0
    1
  • Each new year his image was taken to visit his father, in Babylon, who in his turn gave him escort homeward, and his temple was second in wealth and importance only to E-Saggila, the temple of Marduk in Babylon.
    0
    1
  • As with Babylon, so with Borsippa, the time of Nebuchadrezzar was the period of its greatest!prosperity.
    0
    1
  • In general Borsippa shared the fate of Babylon, falling into decay after the time of Alexander, and finally in the middle ages into ruins.
    0
    1
  • Jastrow, Religion of Babylonia and Assyria (Boston, 1898); see also BABYLON, BABEL.
    0
    1
  • The township until 1872 included the present township of Babylon to the S., along the Great South Bay.
    0
    1
  • But thanks in some measure to the intestine troubles in Elam, the Babylonian army and its allies were defeated and driven into Babylon, Sippara, Borsippa and Cutha.
    0
    1
  • One by one the cities fell, Babylon being finally starved into surrender (648 B.C.) after Samas-sum-yukin had burnt himself in his palace to avoid falling into the conqueror's hands.
    0
    1
  • It was now the turn of the Arabs, some of whom had been in Babylon during the siege, while others had occupied themselves in plundering Edom, Moab and the Hauran.
    0
    1
  • When Alexander died in 323 the resettlement of the empire at Babylon is said to have been made at Ptolemy's instigation.
    0
    1
  • He was compelled to surrender to Nebuchadrezzar and was carried off to Babylon (597 B.C.).
    0
    1
  • died (562 B.C.) and Evil-Merodach (Amil-Marduk) his successor released the unfortunate captive and gave him precedence over the other subjugated kings who were kept prisoners in Babylon.
    0
    1
  • It is reasonable to conjecture that southern Babylonia, the home of the old culture, supplied Babylon and other important cities with priests, who from their descent were correctly called "Chaldaeans."
    0
    1
  • After the latter's death she gave birth at Babylon to a son (Alexander IV.), who was accepted by the generals as joint-king with Arrhidaeus.
    0
    1
  • A note for a wedding ring baked into the clay of Babylon has been preserved, while the history of the greatest events has perished.
    0
    1
  • Egypt was of interest only as it came into Israelite history, Babylon and Nineveh were to illustrate the judgments of Yahweh, Tyre and Sidon to reflect the glory of Solomon.
    0
    1
  • From the first year of Ninus' reign until the rebuilding of Babylon by Semiramis there were sixty-four years; the same between the first of Procas and the building of Rome.
    0
    1
  • Eleven hundred and sixty-four years after each city was built, it was tak.en, - Babylon by Cyrus, Rome by Alaric, and Cyrus' conquest took place just when Rome began the Republic. But before Rome becomes a world empire, Macedon and Carthage intervene, gL.ardians of Rome's youth (tutor curatorque).
    0
    1
  • The Jewish texts, once the infallible basis of history, are now tested by the libraries of Babylon, from which they were partly drawn, and Hebrew history sinks into its proper place in the wide horizon of antiquity.
    0
    1
  • 39); his gardens in Babylon, with the best species of palms, are mentioned by Theophrastus (Hist.
    0
    1
  • even if some old passages were repeated yet the setting was new), and the burden of the prophecy was " The king of Babylon shall come and destroy this land."
    0
    1
  • There can be no doubt that the author of Daniel thought that Belshazzar (q.v.), who has now been identified beyond all question with Belg ar-uzur, the son of Nabonidus, the last Semitic king of Babylon, was the son of Nebuchadrezzar, and that Belshazzar attained the rank of king.'
    0
    1
  • Nabonidus, the father of Belshazzar, was the son of a nobleman Nabu-baladsu-igbi, who was in all probability not related to any of the preceding kings of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • This school has also endeavoured to prove that the author of Daniel did not mean to imply Belshazzar's kingship of Babylon at all by his use of the word "king," but they suggest that the writer of Daniel believed Belshazzar to have been co-regent.
    0
    1
  • If Belshazzar had ever held such a position, which is extremely unlikely in the absence of any evidence from the cuneiform documents, he would hardly have been given the unqualified title "king of Babylon" as occurs in Daniel.
    0
    1
  • 2 For example, Cambyses, son of Cyrus, was undoubtedly co-regent and bore the title "king of Babylon" during his father's lifetime, but, in a contract which dates from the first year of Cambyses, it is expressly stated that Cyrus was still "king of the lands."
    0
    1
  • 1, where reference is made to the "third year of Belshazzar, king of Babylon" without any allusion to another over-ruler.
    0
    1
  • 1) that a monarch "Darius the Mede" received the kingdom of Babylon after the fall of the native Babylonian house, although it is evident, from i.
    0
    1
  • The fact that in no other scriptural passage is mention made of any Median ruler between the last Semitic king of Babylon and Cyrus, and the absolute silence of the authoritative ancient authors regarding such a king, make it apparent that the late author of Daniel is again in error in this particular.
    0
    1
  • It is known that Cyrus became master of Media by conquering Astyages, and that the troops of the king of Persia capturing Babylon took Nabonidus prisoner with but little difficulty.
    0
    1
  • There is not only no room in history for this Median king of the Book of Daniel, but it is also highly likely that the interpolation of "Darius the Mede" was caused by a confusion of history, due both to the destruction of the Assyrian capital Nineveh by the Medes, sixty-eight years before the capture of Babylon by Cyrus, and also to the fame of the later king, Darius Hystaspis, a view which was advanced as early in the history of biblical criticism as the days of the Benedictine monk, Marianus Scotus.
    0
    1
  • Darius the Mede entered into possession of Babylon after the death of Belshazzar; Darius Hystaspis conquered Babylon 1 Prince, Dan.
    0
    1
  • 2 Certain tablets published by Strassmaier, bearing date continuously from Nabonidus to Cyrus, show that neither Belshazzar nor "Darius the Mede" could have had the title "king of Babylon."
    0
    1
  • 2), seem to coincide exactly with the duration of the Babylon exile, i.e.
    0
    1
  • of a letter addressed to the diodario or diwadar of Syria, lieutenant of the sultan of Babylon (Babylon meaning according to a usage of that time Cairo).
    0
    1
  • The tribe of Levi had also been miraculously guided, from near Babylon, to Havila, where they were enclosed and protected by the mystic river Sambation or Sabbation, which on the Sabbath, though calm, was veiled in impenetrable mist, while on other days it ran with a fierce untraversable current of stones and sand.
    0
    1
  • Its foundation is mythically ascribed to Kaiomurs, the Persian Romulus; and it is at least certain that, at a very early date, it was the rival of Ecbatana, Nineveh and Babylon.
    0
    1
  • In 1851 he published anonymously Babylon and Jerusalem, a slashing criticism of the views of the Countess von Hahn-Hahn.
    0
    1
  • His knowledge of the Bible was such that he might have been called a living concordance; and on the margin of his copy of the Book of Martyrs are still legible the ill-spelt lines of doggerel in which he expressed his reverence for the brave sufferers, and his implacable enmity to the mystical Babylon.
    0
    1
  • There is evidence, however, that so early as loon B.C. an export trade existed to the Red Sea by way of East Africa, and before 750 B.C. a similar trade had sprung up with Babylon by way of the Persian Gulf.
    0
    1
  • BABYLONIAN CAPTIVITY, the name generally given to the deportation of the Jews to Babylon by Nebuchadrezzar.
    0
    1
  • 17, of the Medes against Babylon, and more generally Ezek.
    0
    1
  • Babylon, Isa.
    0
    1
  • also the use of Assyria for Babylon (Ezra vi.
    0
    1
  • He travelled through Asia and visited Nineveh, Babylon and India, imbibing the oriental mysticism of magi, Brahmans and gymnosophists.
    0
    1
  • When Cyrus conquered Babylon in 539 he was employed in leading religious ceremonies (Chronicle of Nabonidus), and in the cylinder.
    0
    1
  • 2.2) names Damascus; Ctesias, Babylon, which is absolutely impossible.
    0
    1
  • Merodach 2), the name of the patron deity of the city of Babylon, who, when Babylon permanently became the political centre of the united states of the Euphrates valley under Khammurabi (c. 2250 B.C.), rose to the position of the head of the Babylonian pantheon.
    0
    1
  • This association of Marduk and Ea, while indicating primarily the passing of the supremacy once enjoyed by Eridu to Babylon as a religious and political centre, may also reflect an early dependence of Babylon upon Eridu, not necessarily of a political character but, in view of the spread of culture in the Euphrates valley from the south to the north, the recognition of Eridu as the older centre on the part of the younger one.
    0
    1
  • At all events, traces of a cult of Marduk at Eridu are to be noted in the religious literature, and the most reasonable explanation for the existence of a god Marduk in Eridu is to assume that Babylon in this way paid its homage to the old settlement at the head of the Persian Gulf.
    0
    1
  • The old myths in which Bel of Nippur was celebrated as the hero were transformed by the priests of Babylon in the interest 'The name Mordecai denotes "belonging to Maduk."
    0
    1
  • The hymns once sung in the temple of Bel were re-edited and adapted to the cult of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • So far as one can speak of a monotheistic tendency in Babylonia it connects itself with this conception that was gradually crystallized in regard to the old solar deity of Babylon.
    0
    1
  • The history of the city of Babylon can now be traced back to the days of Sargon of Agade (before 3000 B.C.) who appears to have given the city its name.
    0
    1
  • The epic reciting his wonderful deed in despatching the monster Tiamat and in establishing law and Order in the world in the place of chaos was recited in his temple at Babylon known as E-Saggila, "the lofty house," and there are some reasons for believing that the recital was accompanied by a dramatical representation of the epic.
    0
    1
  • Divination by means of flies was known at Babylon."' There are other cases of names compounded of Baal and an element equivalent to a descriptive epithet, e.g.
    0
    1
  • NEBUCHADREZZAR, or Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, the Na130uicoSpovopos of the Greeks.
    0
    1
  • 1867-1867-18711871-1873-1873-18751875-1879-1879-18831883-1887-1887-18911891-1892-1892-18931893-1895-1895-18991899-1901 1901-1909-1911191 Republican Democrat Republican Fusion Republican Democrat Republican and continued the restoration of Babylon, which he made one of the wonders of the world.
    0
    1
  • BABYLON (mod.
    0
    1
  • "Babylon" is the Greek form of Babel or Bab-ili, "the gate of the god" (sometimes incorrectly written "of the gods"), which again is the Semitic translation of the original Sumerian name Ka-dimirra.
    0
    1
  • Uru-azagga, "the holy city," was also a title sometimes applied to Babylon as to other cities in Babylonia.
    0
    1
  • Like the other great sanctuaries of Babylonia the temple had been founded in pre-Semitic times, and the future Babylon grew up around it.
    0
    1
  • Since Merodach was the son of Ea, the culture god of Eridu near Ur on the Persian Gulf, it is possible that Babylon was a colony of Eridu.
    0
    1
  • Adjoining Babylon was a town called Borsippa.
    0
    1
  • Winckler may be right in restoring a mutilated passage in the annals of this king so as to make it mean that Babylon owed its name to Sargon, who made it the capital of his empire.
    0
    1
  • If so, it fell back afterwards into the position of a mere provincial town and remained so for centuries, until it became the capital of "the first dynasty of Babylon" and then of Khammurabi's empire (2250 B.C.).
    0
    1
  • The claim to supremacy in Asia, however real in fact, was not admitted de jure until the claimant had "taken the hands" of BelMerodach at Babylon, and thereby been accepted as his adopted son and the inheritor of the old Babylonian empire.
    0
    1
  • and other Assyrian kings so anxious to possess themselves of Babylon and so to legitimize their power.
    0
    1
  • In 689 B.C. its walls, temples and palaces were razed to the ground and the rubbish thrown into the Arakhtu, the canal which bordered the earlier Babylon on the south.
    0
    1
  • Once more Babylon was besieged by the Assyrians and starved into surrender.
    0
    1
  • With the recovery of Babylonian independence under Nabopolassar a new era of architectural activity set in, and his son Nebuchadrezzar made Babylon one of the wonders of the ancient world.
    0
    1
  • A tablet dated 275 B.C. states that on the 12th of Nisan the inhabitants of Babylon were transported to the new town, where a palace was built as well as a temple to which the ancient name of E-Saggila was given.
    0
    1
  • With this event the history of Babylon comes practically to an end, though more than a century later we find sacrifices being still performed in its old sanctuary.
    0
    1
  • The topography is necessarily that of the Babylon of Nebuchadrezzar; the older Babylon which was destroyed by Sennacherib having left few, if any, traces behind.
    0
    1
  • high, and that the spaces between the 250 towers of the wall of Babylon (Ctes.
    0
    1
  • Moreover, the two-walls - Imgur-Bel, the inner wall, and Nimitti-Bel, the outer - which enclosed the city proper on the site of the older Babylon have been confused with the outer ramparts (enclosing the whole of Nebuchadrezzar's city), the remains of which can still be traced to the east.
    0
    1
  • North of the mound was a canal, which seems to have been the Libilkhegal of the inscriptions, while on the south side was the Arakhtu, "the river of Babylon," the brick quays of which were built by Nabopolassar.
    0
    1
  • Fifty-five of these chapels existed altogether in Babylon, but some of them stood independently in other parts of the city.
    0
    1
  • Rich, Memoir on the Ruins of Babylon (1816), and Collected Memoirs (1839); A.
    0
    1
  • Weissbach, Das Stadtbild von Babylon (1904); F.
    0
    1
  • 280-264 B.C.), was described by Archimedes in his Arenarius, only to be set aside Astronomisches aus Babylon (Freiburg im Breisgau, 1889).
    0
    1
  • Strassmeier, Astronomisches aus Babylon (1889); F.
    0
    1
  • His chief publications are his translation of the History of Herodotus (in collaboration with Sir Henry Rawlinson and Sir Gardner Wilkinson), 1858-60; The Five Great Monarchies of the Ancient Eastern World, 1862-67; The Sixth Great Oriental Monarchy (Parthian), 1873; The Seventh Great Oriental Monarchy (Sassanian), 1875; Manual of Ancient History, 1869; Historical Illustrations of the Old Testament, 1871; The Origin of Nations, 1877; History of Ancient Egypt, 1881; Egypt and Babylon, 1885; History of Phoenicia, 1889; Parthia, 1893; Memoir of Major-General Sir H.
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  • Of the two temples, that at Sippara was the more famous, but temples to Shamash were erected in all large centres - as Babylon, Ur, Nippur and Nineveh.
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  • C. Thompson, Reports of the Magicians and Astrologers of Nineveh and Babylon (2 vols., London, 1900); F.
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  • Tigranes founded a new capital, Tigranocerta, in northern Mesopotamia, which he modelled on Nineveh and Babylon, and peopled with Greek and other captives.
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  • The chronicler, however, relates that the Assyrian army took him in chains to Babylon, and that after his repentance he returned, and distinguished himself by his piety, by building operations in Jerusalem and by military organization (2 Chron, xxxiii.
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  • 14 sent from Babylon (i.
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  • A confession of the captives in Babylon and a prayer for restoration.
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  • 19 it is said that Baruch wrote two epistles, one to the nine and a half tribes and the other to the two and a half at Babylon.
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  • Baruch remains in Jerusalem and Jeremiah accompanies the Exiles to Babylon.
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  • The Chaldaean usurper was compelled to fly, and Bel-ibni was appointed king of Babylon in his place.
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  • Both sides claimed the victory, but the advantage remained with Sennacherib, and in 689 B.C. he captured Babylon and razed it to the ground, a deed which excited the horror of all western Asia.
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  • The ferry over an unusually deep and narrow part of the Euphrates has been used from time immemorial in the passage from North Syria to Haran (Charrae), Edessa and North Mesopotamia, and was second in importance only to that at Thapsacus, by which crossed the route to Babylon and South Mesopotamia.
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  • Babylon will be left desolate without a single inhabitant.
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  • How is Babylon become an astonishment among y e nations!
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  • captivity in Babylon by the friendly Persian King, Cyrus.
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  • chariot with the black horses goes toward the north, i.e. to Babylon.
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  • cuneiform script of ancient Babylon dating back at least 5,000 years.
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  • foretells the destruction of Babylon 5. A mysterious stranger visits each of Babylon 5's alien ambassadors.
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  • guesswork in ancient Babylon.
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  • harlot Babylon (vv.
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  • Who are the rightful heirs of Babylon or the Ottoman Empire?
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  • Now while Nabonidus maintained the title of king in Arabia, Belshazzar exercised kingship in Babylon.
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  • literate elite in Babylon imagined a new community and gave it a history via ancient and invented traditions c 550 BC.
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  • overrun by the armies of Babylon.
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  • Much of the nation was then taken away captive to Babylon - one of the richest but most pagan and immoral of cities.
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  • These last chapters of Isaiah relate to the period following the arrival of the first returnees from exile in Babylon.
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  • rightful heirs of Babylon or the Ottoman Empire?
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  • ruins of ancient Babylon.
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  • Babylon's main temple was also a bank and it employed scribes to record the city's business.
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  • He had also again seceded in Babylon and supported the allies.
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  • Babylon had always proved a thorn in the side of the Assyrian Empire.
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  • He built temples, canals, defensive fortifications, the gateway of Ishtar, the great ziggurat and the sacred processional way in Babylon.
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  • He followed the Tigris into Babylonia, the central seat of the empire and its richest region, and from Babylon went on to seize the fabulous riches which the Persian kings had amassed in their spring residence, Susa.
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  • The exploration of the waterways round about the empire was Alexander's immediate concern, the discovery of the presumed connexion of the Caspian with the Northern Ocean, the opening of a maritime route from Babylon to Egypt round Arabia.
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  • But this book itself was a farrago of heterogeneous elements - pieces of genuine history, ancient stories once told in Babylon of Gilgamesh or Etanna, literary forgeries of the days soon after Alexander, like the oldest part of the "Testament of Alexander," variations due to Egyptian patriotic sentiment, like that which made Alexander the son of the last Pharaoh, Nectanebus.
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  • It is strange that neither Haggai nor his contemporary Zechariah mentions or implies any return of exiles from Babylon, and the suggestion has accordingly been made that the return under Cyrus described in Ezra i.-iv.
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  • In the reign of Zedekiah, the last of the line of kings, Jerusalem was captured by Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon, who pillaged the city, destroyed the Temple, and ruined the fortifications (see Jews, § 17).
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  • 2 The centralizing of worship at Babylon by its last king, Nabonidos, hardly seems to have amounted to monotheism.
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  • ABEDNEGO, the name given in Babylon to Azariah, one of the companions of Daniel (Dan.
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  • The poetic imagery in which the prophets clothed the doom of Babylon, like the romantic account of Herodotus (i.
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  • is against any previous large return from Babylon, and clearly illustrates the strength of the groups of " southern " origin whose presence is only to be expected (p. 285).
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  • of Babylon itself (see above, p. 286, n.
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  • After the exodus, which perhaps took place about 1300 B.C., they moved northwards again and founded a state of modest dimensions, which attained a short-lived unity under Solomon, but succumbed to internal dissensions and to the attacks of Assyria and Babylon.
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  • Why the war with Babylon, which had become inevitable, was delayed until 539, we do not know.
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  • From the beginning of 538 Cyrus dates his years as "king of Babylon and king of the countries" (i.e.
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  • He continued for about sixteen years to disseminate his views by writing and teaching, without being directly interfered with by either his civil or ecclesiastical superiors, greatly to the scandal of the multitude and of the zealots, in whose eyes Berengar was 4 ` ille apostolus Satanae," and the academy of Tours the " Babylon nostri temporis."
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  • The great German excavations at Babylon 35 and Assur (Qal°at Shergat), 36 under the direction of Koldewey and Andrae, will probably not be resumed for many years.
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  • Scientific geography profited largely from the labours of Eratosthenes of Cyrene, whom Ptolemy Euergetes appointed The gnomon was known to the Chinese in the 5th century B.C., and reached the Greeks (Anaximander) through Babylon.
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  • If the church, and not the state, was regarded as Babylon, and the pope declared to be the Antichrist, these were legitimate inferences from the ancient traditions and the actual position of the church.
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  • (606-586 B.C.), the great templebuilder of the neo-Babylonian monarchy, alludes to his operations at E-shid-lam in Kutha, he makes no mention of a sanctuary to Nergal in Babylon.
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  • Here stood Ur (Mugheir, more correctly Muqayyar) the earliest capital of the country; and Babylon, with its suburb, Borsippa (Birs Nimrud), as well as the two Sipparas (the Sepharvaim of Scripture, now Abu Habba), occupied both the Arabian and Chaldaean sides of the river (see Babylon).
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  • It was only when Darius Hystaspis, the representative of the Aryan race and the Zoroastrian religion, had re-conquered the empire of Cyrus, that the old tradition was broken and the claim of Babylon to confer legitimacy on the rulers of western Asia ceased to be acknowledged (see DARIUs).
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  • Under the Seleucids Greek was introduced into Babylon, and fragments of tablets have been found with Sumerian and Assyrian (i.e.
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  • from the throne of Babylon points to a date not much earlier than 2000 or 2050 B.C. for the rise of Dynasty I., a date which harmonizes with the chronological notices of Shalmaneser I.; Nabonidus's estimate of the period of Khammurabi, so far from being centuries too low, is now seen to have been exaggerated, as the context of the passage in his inscription suggests; and finally the beginning of the historical period of Berossus is not to be synchronized with Dynasty I.
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  • Friedrich Delitzsch brought into notice three tablets, of the age of the first dynasty of Babylon, in which he read the names of Yaa'-ve-ilu, Ya-ve-ilu, and Ya-u- um -ilu (" Yahweh is God "), and which he regarded as conclusive proof that Yahweh was known in Babylonia before 2000 B.C.; he was a god of the Semitic invaders in the second wave of migration, who were, according to Winckler and Delitzsch, of North Semitic stock (Canaanites, in the linguistic sense).'
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  • The monuments are as follows: (r) the pyramids of Egypt, (2) the gardens of Semiramis at Babylon, (3) the statue of Zeus at Olympia (see PHE1DIAS), (4) the temple of Artemis at Ephesus, (5) the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus (see Mausoleum), (6) the Colossus at Rhodes, (7) the Pharos (lighthouse) of Alexandria, or the Walls of Babylon.
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  • It is curious, for instance, to compare the scanty references to the material marvels of Constantinople which Villehardouin saw in their glory, which perished by sack and fire under his very eyes, and which live chiefly in the melancholy pages of his Greek contemporary Nicetas, with the elaborate descriptions of the scarcely greater wonders of fabulous courts at Constantinople itself, at Babylon, and elsewhere, to be found in his other contemporaries, the later chanson de geste writers and the earlier embroiderers of the Arthurian romances and romans d'aventures.
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  • 12), and ignores the fact that Judah was not depopulated, that the Jews were carried off to other places besides Babylon and that many remained behind in Babylon.
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  • 9 (J) an etymology was found for the name of Babylon in the Hebrew verb Mal," to confuse or confound," Babel being regarded as a contraction of Balbel.
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  • (see NOAH) correspond to the ten primitive kings of Babylon, Seth, as second, will correspond with the Adapa of the Babylonian inscriptions, the Alaparos or Adaparos of Berosus.
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  • The name "Babylonian foot" used by Böckh (2) is only a theory of his, from which to derive volumes and weights; and no evidence for this name, or connexion with Babylon, is to be found.
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  • Nineveh, according to Herodotus, was besieged by Cyaxares and the Medes but saved by Madyes and the Scythians some twenty or more years before the Medes in alliance with Nabopolassar, king of Babylon, finally took it, c. 606 B.C. Much conjecture has been lavished upon the varying accounts which have reached us of the capture, but it seems probable that a heavy flood or the besiegers burst the great dam and while thus emptying the moats launched a flood against the west wall on the inside and thus breached the defences.
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  • The year of his birth is uncertain, but Kessler accepts as reliable the statement made by Biruni, that Mani was born in the year 527 of the astronomers of Babylon (A.D.
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  • His sons were killed, and he was blinded and carried to Babylon in chains (cf.
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