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b

b

b Sentence Examples

  • Marked on it in bold letters were the words "Baby A" and "Baby B".

  • I never meant to drag you into this, B.

  • I'm bad, aren't I, or I wouldn't have done what I did to B.

  • If you kill her, you save us the trouble of Plan B.

  • Boring, with a capital B.

  • You write a whole series of 'A's" and 'B's" and so forth.

  • B.

  • A full list is given in B.

  • , 'i ' b.

  • B.)

  • HERNICI, an ancient people of Italy, whose territory was in Latium between the Fucine Lake and the Trerus, bounded b'y the Volscian on the S., and by the Aequian and the Marsian on the N.

  • It was the birthplace of Rutherford B.

  • (B.

  • Hosing, Fiirstbischof C. B.

  • Now, of these quantities, b is the only one depending on time; and therefore, as i is of no dimensions in time, b cannot occur in its expression.

  • The earliest form of the name is Bodleton or Botheltun, and the most important of the later forms are Bodeltown, Botheltunle-Moors, Bowelton, Boltune, Bolton-super-Moras, B olton-in-yeMoors, Bolton-le-Moors.

  • At Kremsmunster for 1902 P. B.

  • P. B.

  • (b) Again, there is a tendency to offer something like worship to the founders of religions.

  • m.) was incorporated with the rest of Transylvania; and in 1871 effect was given to the imperial decree of 1869 by which the districts of the Warasdin regiments (St George and the Cross) and the towns of Zengg, B elovar, Ivanic, &c., were "provincialized" or incorporated with the Croatian-Slavonian crown-land.

  • - Jeremy Bentham, An Introduction to the Principles of Morality and Legislation; Henry Maine, Ancient Law; C. B.

  • The eyepiece ab consists of two plano-convex lenses a, b, of nearly the same focal length, and with the two convex sides facing each other.

  • They are placed at a distance apart less than the focal length of a, so that the wires of the micrometer, which must be distinctly seen, are beyond b.

  • To measure distances with the Fraunhofer micrometer, the position-circle is clamped at the true position-angle of the star, and the telescope is moved by its slow motions so that the component A of the star is bisected by the fixed wire; the other component B is then bisected by the web, which is moved by the graduated head S.

  • Next the star B is bisected by the fixed web and A by the movable one.

  • The difference between the two readings of S is then twice the distance between A and B.

  • The electric lamp a gives illumination of the webs in a dark field, nearly in the manner described for the Cape transit circle micrometer; the intensity of illumination is regulated by a carbon-resistance controlled by the screw b.

  • 14) the slide, and b, b the spiral springs.

  • b.

  • By means of the quick rack motions A and B move the plate so as to bring the reseau-square into the centre of the field of the micrometer; then, by means of the screw heads o, p, perfect the coincidence of the " fixed square " of webs, with the image of the reseau-square.

  • In the apparatus of type B as made by Zeiss there are two microscopes attached to a base-plate, one of which views the spectrum-plate (or other object) to be measured, while the other views a scale that moves with the slide on which the spectrumplate is mounted.

  • The plate A i is mounted on the dove-tailed slide B 1, upon the metallic stage T, and can be moved to right or left relative to T by the micrometer-screw S; whilst the plate A2 is mounted on the dove-tailed slide B2 and can From Zeitschr.

  • (b) If the Divine constitution of the Church has not changed in its essential points since our Lord, the mode of exercise of the various powers of its head has varied; and that of the supreme teaching power as of the others.

  • A, Fertile shoot, springing B, C, Sporophylls bearing sporangia, from the rhizome, which which in C have opened.

  • B, C, D, E, enlarged.) branched rootstock from which spring slender aerial shoots which are green, ribbed, and bear at each node a whorl of leaves reduced to a toothed sheath.

  • trans., 1887); B.

  • B R.)

  • For the philosophy of Aquinas, see Albert Stockl, Geschichte der Philosophic des Mittelalters, ii.; B.

  • A bowl passing between the jack and either of the stationary bowls, and passing over the back line; or touching the jack, yet not trailing it past the first line, but itself crossing the back line; B I) 'B B ' S Feet---?

  • Erdmann (b.

  • For the Prytaneis of the Boule and of the Naucraries, see B Oule and Naucrary.

  • But the day showed the ' B attle of Macedonian army equal to the task.

  • trans., 1898); B.

  • B.) The Romance of Alexander.

  • Leipzig, 1900); B.

  • Any note may be a pitch note; for orchestras custom has settled upon a' in the treble clef, for organs and pianos in Great Britain c 2, and for modern brass instruments b flat'.

  • B.) Laristan, a sub-province of the province of Fars in Persia, bounded E.

  • Munk, Mélanges, 352-366; B.

  • Maria B uenos x4 Tres m Samborombon Bay Cabo.

  • s°- 75 B S0 r (?

  • von Rosen, Archaeological' Researches on the Frontier of Argentina and Bolivia 1901-1902 (Stockholm, 1904); Arturo B.

  • B go.

  • A4 B C Meridian ci of Greenwich D

  • - B __/_

  • (a) Normandy, Perche, Cotentin and maritime Flanders, where horses are bred in great numbers; (b) the strip of coast between the Gironde and the mouth of the Loire; (c) the Morvan including the Nivernais and the Charolais, from which the famous Charolais breed of oxen takes its name; (d) the central region of the central plateau including the districts of Cantal and Aubrac, the home of the famous beef-breeds of Salers and Aubrac.1 The famous pre-sal sheep are also reared in the Vende and Cotentin.

  • - Le B

  • pp. 85-205; B.

  • The origin and evolution of the Australian marsupials have been discussed by Mr B.

  • The latter has indeed been regarded as the direct descendant of these Mesozoic forms; but as already stated, in the opinion of Mr B.

  • Ogilby, Catalogue of Australian Mammals (Sydney, 1895); B.

  • Biologiques (Paris, 1899); B.

  • Among the dissident members were B.

  • BORON (symbol B, atomic weight ii), one of the non-metallic elements, occurring in nature in the form of boracic (boric) acid, and in various borates such as borax, tincal,.

  • Boron hydride has probably never been isolated in the pure condition; on heating boron trioxide with magnesium filings, a magnesium boride Mg 3 B 2 is obtained, and if this be decomposed with dilute hydrochloric acid a very evil-smelling gas, consisting of a mixture of hydrogen and boron hydride, is obtained.

  • Borimide B 2 (NH) 3 is obtained on long heating of the compound B 2 S 3.6NH 3 in a stream of hydrogen, or ammonia gas at 115-120° C. It is a white solid which decomposes on heating into boron nitride and ammonia.

  • Boron sulphide B 2 S 3 can be obtained by the direct union of the two elements at a white heat or from the tri-iodide and sulphur at 44 0 ° C., but is most conveniently prepared by heating a mixture of the trioxide and carbon in a stream of carbon bisulphide vapour.

  • Many organic compounds of boron are known; thus, from the action of the trichloride on ethyl alcohol or on methyl alcohol, ethyl borate B(OC2H5)3 and methyl borate B(OCH 3) 3 are obtained.

  • The next stage (b) is connected with the suppression of the local high-places or minor shrines in favour of a central sanctuary.

  • [b] and [c] above), which have incorporated older sources.'

  • The exact meaning of these features is not clear, but if it be remembered (a) that the Levites of post-exilic literature represent only the result of a long and intricate development, (b) that the name "Levite," in the later stages at least, was extended to include all priestly servants, and (c) that the priesthoods, in tending to become hereditary, included priests who were Levites by adoption and not by descent, it will be recognized that the examination of the evidence for the earlier stages cannot confine itself to those narratives where the specific term alone occurs.

  • van Gelder, Geschichte der alten Rhodier (Hague, 1900); B.

  • Bettany, The Red, Brown and Black Men of Australia (1890); B.

  • Although this crisis followed on the great strike the B g ?

  • 1311 b, he had previously killed Xerxes' son Darius, and was afraid that the father would avenge him; according to Ctesias, Pers.

  • by C. B.

  • (DE B.)

  • Ingram and B.

  • causas de la rebelion de los dichos estados (1625); B.

  • C. B.)

  • The stone implements are generally of one or two types: a long rectangular adze or wedge rudely pointed at one end, and used in conjunction with a mallet or flat stone, and a roughly triangular axe-head, which has evidently been fixed in the B too R.

  • On the 19th of October 1864 a small band of Confederate soldiers under Lieutenant B.

  • The standard authorities for the period before 1791 are: Ira Allen, Natural and Political History of the State of Vermont (London, 1898); B.

  • The present city was founded in 944 by Bulukkin b.

  • In 1516 the amir of Algiers, Selim b.

  • b, Diagram of female flower.

  • Krebs, Zur Kritik Alberts von Aachen (Munster, 1881); B.

  • - The editio princeps, based mainly on a transcript of D, was printed at Venice, 1472: the first scientific text, based on B, C and D, was that of Camerarius, completed 1552, in whose steps followed Lambinus (with a commentary which is still useful), 1576; Taubmann, 1605-1621; Pareus (a meritorious edition), 1619 and 1623; Guyet, edited by Marolles, 1658; Gronovius (the "Vulgate"), 1664-1684; then, after the lapse of more than a century, came the editions of Bothe, 1809-1811; Naudet, 1830; and Weise, 1837-1848.

  • Bielawski, Histoire de la comte d'Auvergne et de sa capitale Vic-le-Comte (1868); B.

  • B.) 1 Mahommedan itinerant chapmen, from the Volga.

  • With the Lives must be mentioned the Esprit du B.

  • The large tomb of the Volumni (3rd century B.

  • Clerk Maxwell supposed two compartments, A and B, to be filled with gas at the same temperature, and to be separated by an ideal, infinitely thin partition containing a number of exceedingly small trap-doors, each of which could be opened or closed without any expenditure of energy.

  • An intelligent creature, or "demon," possessed of unlimited powers of vision, is placed in charge of each door, with instructions to open the door whenever a particle in A comes towards it with more than a certain velocity V, and to keep it closed against all particles in A moving with less than this velocity, but, on the other hand, to open the door whenever a particle in B approaches it with less than a certain velocity v, which is not greater than V, and to keep it closed against all particles in B moving with a greater velocity than this.

  • By continuing this process every unit of mass which enters B will carry with it more energy than each unit which leaves B, and hence the temperature of the gas in B will be raised and that of the gas in A lowered, while no heat is lost and no energy expended; so that by the application of intelligence alone a portion of gas of uniform pressure and temperature may be sifted into two parts, in which both the temperature and the pressure are different, and from which, therefore, work can be obtained at the expense of heat.

  • The free use of discords and of wider intervals, together with the influence of the florid elements of solo-singing, enlarged the bounds of choral expression almost beyond recognition, while they crowded into very narrow quarters the subtleties of 16th-, century music. These, however, by no means disappeared; :and such devices as the crossing of parts in the second Kyrie of Bach's B Minor Mass (bars 7, 8, 14, 15, 22, 23, 50) abundantly show that in the hands of the great masters artistic truths are not things which a change of date can make false.

  • b, Mouth.

  • A, View of the heart of a dog infested with Filaria immitis Leidy; the right ventricle and base of the pulmonary artery have been opened: a, aorta; b, pulmonary artery; c, vena cava; d, right ventricle; e, appendix of left auricle; f, appendix of right auricle.

  • B, Female F.

  • After the second larval moult, he passes through a passive stage comparable to the pupa-stadium of an b insect, and during this stage, which occurs inside the root, the reproductive organs are perfected.

  • b, Mouth cavity.

  • Although married she always remained a member of her father's house - she is rarely named wife of A, usually daughter of B, or mother of C. Divorce was optional with the man, but he had to restore the dowry and, if the wife had borne him children, she had the custody of them.

  • 4); a current is sent from a battery, E, through one coil of a galvanometer, g, through a high resistance, r, through one of the wires, r, and thence back from office B (at which the wires are looped), through wire 2, through another high resistance, r', through a second coil on the galvanometer, g, and thence to earth.

  • to the piston P. The newly coated wire is passed through a long trough T, containing cold water, until it is sufficiently cold to allow it to be safely wound on a bobbin B' This operation completed, the wire is wound from the bobbin B' on to another, and at the same time carefully examined for air-holes or other flaws, all of which are eliminated.

  • On the same shaft with P is fixed a brake-wheel furnished with a powerful brake B, by the proper manipulation of which the speed of paying out is regulated, the pull on the cable being at the same time observed by means of D.

  • At small country towns or villages, where the message traffic is light, the Wheatstone " A B C " instrument is used.

  • In this apparatus electric A B C currents are generated by turning a handle (placed in front of the instrument), which is geared, in the instru ment.

  • A noticeable feature in the modern A B C indicator, as well as in all modern forms of telegraph instruments, is the adoption of " induced " magnets in the moving portion of the apparatus.

  • At offices where the work is heavier than can be dealt with by the A B C apparatus, the " Single Needle " instrument has been very largely employed; it has the advantage of slight Single liability to derangement, and of requiring very little adjustment.

  • ' 'B - ...

  • When signals are to be sent from either station the operator turns the switch c out of contact with the stop b, and then operates precisely as in open circuit send '" i ing.

  • When a current passes through R the armature A is attracted and the local circuit is closed through the armature at b.

  • The local 1_ E I battery B 1 then sends a current through the in FIG.

  • B, indicating whether a station is calling, in case the relay sticks or is out of adjustment.

  • 23, representing the " differential " method, B is the sending battery, B 1 a resistance equal to that of the battery, R a rheostat and C an adjustable condenser.

  • 24), instead of sending the currents through the two coils of a differentially wound relay or receiving a and b are inserted, and the receiving instrument is.

  • By a modification of the bridge method, applied with excellent results by Dr Muirhead to submarine work, condensers are substituted for a and b, one being also placed in the circuit between P and Q.

  • The general graphy, principle Arms a and arrangement b, one at eachstation and d B, are connected to the line wire, and are made to rotate simultaneously over metallic segments, 3, 4, and I', 3', 4', at the two stations, so that when the arm a is on segment i at A, then b is on segment I' at B, and so on.

  • To each group is connected a set of apparatus; hence during a complete revolution of the arms a pair of instruments (at station A and station B) will be in communication four times, and the intervals during which any particular set of instruments at the two stations are not in connexion with each other become much smaller than in the case of fig.

  • That now employed is, however, practically a development of his B 2 1 4 3 3 / ? ?

  • 28, and the levers are adjusted so that the left-hand one moves a, b, c and punches a row of holes across the paper (group i in the figure), the middle one moves b only and punches a centre hole (2 in the figure), while the right-hand one moves a, b, d, e and punches O p p Oa Oa' Ob Od 0?

  • An ebonite beam B is rocked up and down rapidly by a train of mechanism, and moves the cranks FIG.

  • A, slip as received on recorder, using ordinary relays for translating on to second cable; B, slip as received on recorder, when interpolator is used at intermediate station, for sending on to second cable; C (four cells through a line, KR=3.6), signals with recorder under ordinary conditions; D, all conditions the same as in C, but magnifying relay inserted between the end of the line and the recorder.

  • 35) were sunk in the water; the pair on one side were connected by a battery B, and the pair on the other by a galvanometer or telegraphic receiver R.

  • At the receiving station Marconi connected a single voltaic cell B 1 and a sensitive telegraphic relay R in series with his tube of metallic filings C, and interposed certain little coils called choking coils.

  • Ann., 1890, 40, p. 56) employed an arrangement as follows: Four fine platinum or iron wires were joined in lozenge shape, and two sets of these R and S were connected up with two resistances P and Q to form a bridge with a galvanometer G and battery B.

  • - A, antenna; P S, jigger or oscillation transformer; C, condenser; 0, Fleming oscillation valve; B, working battery; T, telephone; R, rheostat; E, earth-plate.

  • a b, constantan wire; c d, thermojunction; G G, galvanometer terminals; 0 0, antenna and earth terminals.

  • Rhigi and B.

  • - At least four periods in the history of the dialect can be distinguished in the records we have left to us, by the help of the successive changes (a) in alphabet and (b) in language, which the Tables exhibit.

  • (a and b) and VII.

  • (a and b).

  • a is written) consists of the following signs, the writing being always from right to Ieft: A a, 8 b, 9 d (:.e.

  • (a) and (b); earliest would seem that of II.

  • (b).

  • b 1, but this appears also in IV.

  • a and b would be in themselves too slight to prove an earlier date, but they have perhaps some weight as confirming the evidence of the language.

  • b, 53-60, and we may infer that the'town of Iguvium was independent but in fear of the Etruscans at the time when the curse was first composed.

  • 4), in an early form, consisted of a cell of insulating material having at its bottom a flat-headed platinum screw G; on the top of G was a layer of carbon powder C, on the top of that a platinum disk D, and above that again, forming the cover of the cell, a disk of ivory B, held in position by a ring E.

  • The case is firmly fixed to a " bridge " B with its back or bottom in a vertical position.

  • The junction circuits connecting two exchanges are invariably divided into two groups, one for traffic from exchange A to exchange B, the other for traffic from B to A.

  • When a subscriber at exchange A asks for a connexion to a subscriber at B, the operator at A, to whom the request is made, passes the particulars over an order wire to an operator at B.

  • During the progress of these operations the A operator connects the originating subscriber to the junction circuit named by the B operator.

  • There is only one signal on the cord circuit at B, and that signal is controlled by exchange A.

  • Control of the call is thus vested in the operator at the originating exchange, at which point the connexion must be severed before a clearing signal can appear at B.

  • (b) The obstructive use made by the local authorities of their power to veto underground wayleaves.

  • B, Digestive gland from interior A, B, and C magnified about of pitcher, in pocket-like deI oo diameters.

  • A, Attractive surface of lid; B, conducting; C, glandular; and D, detentive surface; magnified.

  • B, Monstrous leaf with spoon-shaped depression.

  • Ancient Languages and Peoples 27.2 B.

  • A law passed on the 22nd of March 1900 gave a B a, special impulse to this form of enterprise by fixing the ratio r naze.

  • Taxes proper are divided into (a) taxes on business transactions and (b) taxes on articles of consumption.

  • Nesbitt, London, 1904); B.

  • Prefixed to this are two sections dealing respectively with (A) the ethnographical and philological divisions of ancient Italy, and (B) the unification of the country under Augustus, the growth of the road system and so forth.

  • The contrast presented b)

  • These three bodies were to be chosen by three electoral colleges consisting of (a) landed proprietors, (b) learned men.

  • to allow him to dissolve parliament, entrusted Signor Giolitti, a Piedmontese deputy, sometime treasury minister in the Crispi cabinet, with the formation of a ministry of the Left, which contrived to obtain six months supply on account, and dissolved the Chamber, The ensuing general election (November 1892), marked by unprecedented violence and abuse of official pressure upon B k the electorate, fitly ushered in what proved to be scandals, the most unfortunate period of Italian history since the completion of national unity.

  • (b.

  • Machiavellis Stonia florentine, B.

  • B.) S, ifOMAS Osborne, 1st Duke Of (1631-1712), Inglis Statesman, commonly known also by his earlier title of Earl Of Danby, son of Sir Edward Osborne, Bart., of Kiveton, Yorkshire, was born in 1631.

  • b Macky's Memoirs, 46; Pepys's Diary, viii.

  • (1886); for the Armenian campaigns see B.

  • See Sir Richard Temple, The Andaman and Nicobar Islands (Indian Census, 1901); C. B.

  • 11, B,C, and 59, a, b, c).

  • The column (b) is generally long, slender and stalklike (hydrocaulus).

  • A, A hydriform person giving rise to medusiform person by budding from th margin of the disk; B, free swimming medusa (Steenstrupia of Forbes) detached from the same, with manubrial genitali.

  • B, C. multicornis, natural size; p, polyp; gon, gonophores; rh, hydrorhiza.

  • 6, B).

  • 6 B.

  • dz, by the hydranths, each with dactylozoid; gz, gastrozoid; b, mouth and tentacles; and, blastostyle; gon, gonophores; secondly, the " coenosarc," or rh, hydrorhiza.

  • cn, N, o.c, x, b, the 1.0¦6 From Gegenbaur's Elements of Comparative Anatomy.

  • 5, B; ii, A).

  • A and B modified cats i is seen when the from Hincks; C modified from Forbes's Brit.

  • A, colony of but grow in all planes Lar;B and C, young and adult medusae.

  • F, the founder-polyp; I, 2, 3, 4, the succession of polyps budded from the founder-polyp; a', b', c', the succession of polyps budded from 1; a 2, 2 polyps budded from 2; a 3, polyp budded from 3.

  • 10, b).

  • F, founder-polyp; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, succession of polyps budded from the founder; a, b, c, second series of polyps budded from the founder; a 3, b 3, series budded from 3.

  • H, With spadix branched (Cordy- B, Type of Tubularia.

  • B and C, Two views of a female gonophore after t, Tentacles.

  • side of the first out A, B, C, E, F, In vert, Tentacle.

  • 43, A); in this the mouth is formed distally as a perforation (B); next the sides of the tube so formed bulge out laterally near the attachment to form the umbrella, while the distal undilated portion of the tube represents the manubrium (C); the umbrella now grows out into a number of lobes or lappets, and the tentacles and tentaculocysts grow out, the former in a notch between two lappets, the latter on the apex of each lappet (D, E); finally, the velum arises as a growth of the ectoderm alone, the whole bud shapes itself, so to speak, and the little medusa is separated off by rupture of the thin stalk connecting it with the parent (F).

  • 44, A B D FIG.

  • A, B, C, D, F, Successub -umbra l sive stages in vercavity.

  • the future D, E); the cavity A between the two B C walls of the cup FIG.

  • 46, Ia, b, c).

  • 46, IIa, b, c).

  • 46, IVa, b, c).

  • 47, B).

  • II, Method of Cunina; (a) the mouth arises, next the umbrella (b), and lastly the tentacles (c).

  • III, Hypothetical transition from II to the indirect method with an entocodon; the formation of the manubrium is retarded, that of the umbrella hastened (IIIa, b).

  • B, The lower layer forms a solid G,H, Formation of the medusae.

  • (b) Tentacles capitate, simple; type of Coryne and Syncoryne; Myriothela is an aberrant form with some of the tentacles modified as " claspers " to hold the ova.

  • (b) Tentacles with a bilateral arrangement, branched tentacles in addition to simple filiform ones; type of Branchiocerianthus.

  • (b) With capitate tentacles; type of Clavatella.

  • b, The long manubrium, bearing medusiform buds; a, mouth.

  • 57, A, B).

  • In B the spadix of the upper bud has protruded itself through the top of the gonoat the base of the theca and the acrocyst (ac) is secreted round it.

  • manubrium and In C the marsupium (m) is formed as finger-like another below the process from the summit of the blastostyle, en closing the acrocyst; b, medusa-buds on the radial canal in blastostyle.

  • a, The youngest stage, is magnified 22 diameters; b, older, is magnified 8 diameters; c, .the adult medusa, is magnified 6 diameters.

  • b, In fig.

  • Physalia, general view, diagrammatic; B, cormidium of Physalia; D, palpon; T, palpacle; G, siphon; GP, gonopalpon; M d', male gonophore; M y, female gonophore, ultimately set free.

  • The canon provides that any clerk having a complaint against another clerk must not pass by his own bishop and turn to secular tribunals, but first lay b a re his cause before him, so that by the sentence of the bishop himself the dispute may be settled by arbitrators acceptable to both parties.

  • (b) At first the bishop was the only judge in the diocesan court and he always remains a judge.

  • (b) Reclusion in a monastery continued from former period, and might be either temporary or perpetual (loc. cit.

  • BIBLIOGRAPHY.-P. B.

  • Holtzmann (1892), B.

  • In Russia a prescription containing any of the poisons indicated in the schedules A and B in the Russian pharmacopoeia may not be repeated, except by order of the doctor.

  • P. Liechti and B.

  • B, Plant of the primitive Siphoneous Green Alga Protosiphon botryoides.

  • I B and D).

  • I B) is an example parallel with Oedocladiurn; Bryopsis, with Draparnaldia.

  • B

  • 2, B), since there is no difference in the illumination and other external conditions, --------

  • B, A small portion highly magnified.

  • a, Starch sheath; at the extremities of the figure its cells are represented as empty; b, cambiuin layer.

  • Opposite the primary xylems, the cambium either (a) forms parenchyma on both sides, making a broad, secondary (principal) ray, which interrupts the vascular ring and is divided at its inner extremity by the islet of primary xylem; or (b) forms secondary xylem and phloem in the ordinary way, completing the vascular ring.

  • Jahrb., B.

  • Such plants, which comprise the b ~eat majority of the species of the central European flora, ~himper termed tropophytes.

  • b D.

  • thard-scrub, (b) thorn-bushland and thorn-forest; (ii.) true vannah: tropical and sub-tropical savannah; (iii.) savannah-forest, 0

  • ~i B -

  • 2, B).

  • (2) Metaphase.The chromosomes pass to the equator of the spindle and b,ecome attached to the spindle-fibres in such a way that they form a radiating starthaped figureAster-when seen from the pole of the spindle.

  • contents of the two cells fuse together, cytoplasm ~ B

  • 4, B, C, D), it appears to take no part in the fertilization phenomena, nor in the subsequent division of the nucleus.

  • 3,A, B).

  • 3, A, B).

  • B, of Tradescantia fiuminensis.

  • 5, B, shows a photograph taken from life through the epidermal cells of Tradescantiafluminenus.

  • B, Anterior end of Euglena showing the flagellum with its swelling just in the hollow of the eye-spot.

  • B, single nucleus due to th~ fusion of the two pre-existing nuclei.

  • A and B, Tolypothrix lancita: (I) Young, (2) Old cells.

  • Both (B).

  • Soc., B.

  • Among Kenosha's manufactures are brass and iron beds (the Simmons Manufacturing Co.), mattresses, typewriters, leather and brass goods, wagons, and automobiles - the "Rambler" automobile being made at Kenosha by Thomas B.

  • Grant, Rutherford B.

  • [the city] Bast" (B;s-t), a city better known by its later name, P-ubasti, "place of Ubasti"; thus the goddess derived her name Ubasti from her city (Bast), and in turn the city derived its name P-ubasti from that of the goddess; the Greeks, confusing the name of the city with that of the goddess, called the latter Bubastis, and the former also Bubastis (later Bubastos).

  • In this article (A) the general anatomy of birds is discussed, (B) fossil birds, (c) the geographical distribution.

  • 'b?

  • Soc. Imp. Nat., Moscow, xiv., 1841; B.

  • This, when fully developed, consists of two parts, but inserted by a single ribbon-like tendon upon the hinder surface of the femur, near the end of its first third; the caudal part, femoro-caudalis, expressed by Garrod by the symbol A, arises from transverse processes of the tail; the iliac part (accessorofemoro-caudal of Garrod, with the symbol B), arises mostly from the outer surface of the postacetabular ilium.

  • B, Iliac portion of caud-ilio-femoralis.

  • The most primitive combination, ambiens and A B X Y, is the most common; next follows that of A X Y, meaning the reduction of B, i.e.

  • the iliac portion of the caud-ilio-femoralis; A B X and B X Y are less common; A X and X Y are rare and occur only in smaller groups, as in subfamilies or genera; B X occurs only in Podiceps.

  • Further, the combinations B X Y and A X Y cannot be derived from each other, but both directly from A B X Y in two different directions.

  • Keeping this in mind, we may fairly conclude that the flamingo with B X Y points to an ancestral condition A B X Y, which is still represented by Platalea and Ibis, whilst the other storks proper have taken a different line, leading to A X Y.

  • 179 B (1888), pp. I11 -141; L.

  • Australian Region Australian Papuan Antillean (B) Neogaea or II.

  • (B) Neogaea, or the Neotropical region.

  • (c) Complex Constructive: If A, then B; if C, then D; but either A or C; therefore either B or D.

  • (d) Complex Destructive: If A is true, B is true; if C is true, D is true; but B and D are not both true; hence A and C are not both true.

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