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b

b

b Sentence Examples

  • Part B outlines the new policy, which promotes sustainable agriculture, and Part C focuses on policy implementation.

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  • If taken with other metabolites that aid in the creation of serotonin - vitamin B, niacin and magnesium, which a multivitamin should provide - 5HTP can help deal with many of the same health issues that people take tryptophan for.

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  • How much kudos is there really in beating a "B" team?

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  • Nutritional supplements that may be beneficial include large amounts of antioxidants (vitamins C, A, E, zinc, selenium, and flavenoids), as well as B vitamins and a full complement of minerals (including boron, copper, and manganese).

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  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that, prior to the launch of the infant HBV immunization program, about 33,000 American children of non-infected mothers acquired hepatitis B by the age of ten.

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  • A diet that promotes healthy hair includes lean protein, low-fat dairy, and also includes the vitamin A needed for healthy skin, the vitamin D and calcium needed for healthy bones as well as foods rich in vitamins B, C, and E.

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  • The Hib vaccine is an injection that helps protect children from contracting infections due to Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), a bacterium that is capable of causing serious illness and potential death in children under age five.

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  • These individuals have had the unfortunate occurrence of a spontaneous mutation, meaning that in their early development, some random genetic accident affected their X chromosome, resulting in the defect that causes hemophilia A or B.

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  • Hepatitis B, on the other hand, remains prevalent among drug addicts.

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  • Marked on it in bold letters were the words "Baby A" and "Baby B".

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  • I never meant to drag you into this, B.

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  • I'm bad, aren't I, or I wouldn't have done what I did to B.

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  • If you kill her, you save us the trouble of Plan B.

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  • Boring, with a capital B.

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  • You write a whole series of 'A's" and 'B's" and so forth.

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  • B.

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  • A full list is given in B.

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  • , 'i ' b.

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  • B.)

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  • HERNICI, an ancient people of Italy, whose territory was in Latium between the Fucine Lake and the Trerus, bounded b'y the Volscian on the S., and by the Aequian and the Marsian on the N.

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  • It was the birthplace of Rutherford B.

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  • (B.

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  • Hosing, Fiirstbischof C. B.

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  • Now, of these quantities, b is the only one depending on time; and therefore, as i is of no dimensions in time, b cannot occur in its expression.

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  • The earliest form of the name is Bodleton or Botheltun, and the most important of the later forms are Bodeltown, Botheltunle-Moors, Bowelton, Boltune, Bolton-super-Moras, B olton-in-yeMoors, Bolton-le-Moors.

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  • At Kremsmunster for 1902 P. B.

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  • P. B.

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  • (b) Again, there is a tendency to offer something like worship to the founders of religions.

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  • m.) was incorporated with the rest of Transylvania; and in 1871 effect was given to the imperial decree of 1869 by which the districts of the Warasdin regiments (St George and the Cross) and the towns of Zengg, B elovar, Ivanic, &c., were "provincialized" or incorporated with the Croatian-Slavonian crown-land.

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  • - Jeremy Bentham, An Introduction to the Principles of Morality and Legislation; Henry Maine, Ancient Law; C. B.

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  • The eyepiece ab consists of two plano-convex lenses a, b, of nearly the same focal length, and with the two convex sides facing each other.

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  • They are placed at a distance apart less than the focal length of a, so that the wires of the micrometer, which must be distinctly seen, are beyond b.

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  • To measure distances with the Fraunhofer micrometer, the position-circle is clamped at the true position-angle of the star, and the telescope is moved by its slow motions so that the component A of the star is bisected by the fixed wire; the other component B is then bisected by the web, which is moved by the graduated head S.

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  • Next the star B is bisected by the fixed web and A by the movable one.

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  • The difference between the two readings of S is then twice the distance between A and B.

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  • The electric lamp a gives illumination of the webs in a dark field, nearly in the manner described for the Cape transit circle micrometer; the intensity of illumination is regulated by a carbon-resistance controlled by the screw b.

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  • 14) the slide, and b, b the spiral springs.

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  • b.

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  • By means of the quick rack motions A and B move the plate so as to bring the reseau-square into the centre of the field of the micrometer; then, by means of the screw heads o, p, perfect the coincidence of the " fixed square " of webs, with the image of the reseau-square.

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  • In the apparatus of type B as made by Zeiss there are two microscopes attached to a base-plate, one of which views the spectrum-plate (or other object) to be measured, while the other views a scale that moves with the slide on which the spectrumplate is mounted.

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  • The plate A i is mounted on the dove-tailed slide B 1, upon the metallic stage T, and can be moved to right or left relative to T by the micrometer-screw S; whilst the plate A2 is mounted on the dove-tailed slide B2 and can From Zeitschr.

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  • (b) If the Divine constitution of the Church has not changed in its essential points since our Lord, the mode of exercise of the various powers of its head has varied; and that of the supreme teaching power as of the others.

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  • A, Fertile shoot, springing B, C, Sporophylls bearing sporangia, from the rhizome, which which in C have opened.

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  • B, C, D, E, enlarged.) branched rootstock from which spring slender aerial shoots which are green, ribbed, and bear at each node a whorl of leaves reduced to a toothed sheath.

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  • trans., 1887); B.

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  • B R.)

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  • For the philosophy of Aquinas, see Albert Stockl, Geschichte der Philosophic des Mittelalters, ii.; B.

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  • A bowl passing between the jack and either of the stationary bowls, and passing over the back line; or touching the jack, yet not trailing it past the first line, but itself crossing the back line; B I) 'B B ' S Feet---?

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  • Erdmann (b.

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  • For the Prytaneis of the Boule and of the Naucraries, see B Oule and Naucrary.

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  • But the day showed the ' B attle of Macedonian army equal to the task.

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  • trans., 1898); B.

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  • B.) The Romance of Alexander.

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  • Leipzig, 1900); B.

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  • Any note may be a pitch note; for orchestras custom has settled upon a' in the treble clef, for organs and pianos in Great Britain c 2, and for modern brass instruments b flat'.

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  • B.) Laristan, a sub-province of the province of Fars in Persia, bounded E.

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  • Munk, Mélanges, 352-366; B.

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  • Maria B uenos x4 Tres m Samborombon Bay Cabo.

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  • s°- 75 B S0 r (?

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  • von Rosen, Archaeological' Researches on the Frontier of Argentina and Bolivia 1901-1902 (Stockholm, 1904); Arturo B.

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  • B go.

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  • A4 B C Meridian ci of Greenwich D

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  • - B __/_

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  • (a) Normandy, Perche, Cotentin and maritime Flanders, where horses are bred in great numbers; (b) the strip of coast between the Gironde and the mouth of the Loire; (c) the Morvan including the Nivernais and the Charolais, from which the famous Charolais breed of oxen takes its name; (d) the central region of the central plateau including the districts of Cantal and Aubrac, the home of the famous beef-breeds of Salers and Aubrac.1 The famous pre-sal sheep are also reared in the Vende and Cotentin.

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  • - Le B

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  • pp. 85-205; B.

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  • The origin and evolution of the Australian marsupials have been discussed by Mr B.

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  • The latter has indeed been regarded as the direct descendant of these Mesozoic forms; but as already stated, in the opinion of Mr B.

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  • Ogilby, Catalogue of Australian Mammals (Sydney, 1895); B.

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  • Biologiques (Paris, 1899); B.

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  • Among the dissident members were B.

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  • BORON (symbol B, atomic weight ii), one of the non-metallic elements, occurring in nature in the form of boracic (boric) acid, and in various borates such as borax, tincal,.

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  • Boron hydride has probably never been isolated in the pure condition; on heating boron trioxide with magnesium filings, a magnesium boride Mg 3 B 2 is obtained, and if this be decomposed with dilute hydrochloric acid a very evil-smelling gas, consisting of a mixture of hydrogen and boron hydride, is obtained.

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  • Borimide B 2 (NH) 3 is obtained on long heating of the compound B 2 S 3.6NH 3 in a stream of hydrogen, or ammonia gas at 115-120° C. It is a white solid which decomposes on heating into boron nitride and ammonia.

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  • Boron sulphide B 2 S 3 can be obtained by the direct union of the two elements at a white heat or from the tri-iodide and sulphur at 44 0 ° C., but is most conveniently prepared by heating a mixture of the trioxide and carbon in a stream of carbon bisulphide vapour.

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  • Many organic compounds of boron are known; thus, from the action of the trichloride on ethyl alcohol or on methyl alcohol, ethyl borate B(OC2H5)3 and methyl borate B(OCH 3) 3 are obtained.

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  • The next stage (b) is connected with the suppression of the local high-places or minor shrines in favour of a central sanctuary.

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  • [b] and [c] above), which have incorporated older sources.'

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  • The exact meaning of these features is not clear, but if it be remembered (a) that the Levites of post-exilic literature represent only the result of a long and intricate development, (b) that the name "Levite," in the later stages at least, was extended to include all priestly servants, and (c) that the priesthoods, in tending to become hereditary, included priests who were Levites by adoption and not by descent, it will be recognized that the examination of the evidence for the earlier stages cannot confine itself to those narratives where the specific term alone occurs.

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  • van Gelder, Geschichte der alten Rhodier (Hague, 1900); B.

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  • Bettany, The Red, Brown and Black Men of Australia (1890); B.

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  • Although this crisis followed on the great strike the B g ?

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  • 1311 b, he had previously killed Xerxes' son Darius, and was afraid that the father would avenge him; according to Ctesias, Pers.

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  • by C. B.

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  • (DE B.)

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  • Ingram and B.

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  • causas de la rebelion de los dichos estados (1625); B.

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  • C. B.)

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  • The stone implements are generally of one or two types: a long rectangular adze or wedge rudely pointed at one end, and used in conjunction with a mallet or flat stone, and a roughly triangular axe-head, which has evidently been fixed in the B too R.

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  • On the 19th of October 1864 a small band of Confederate soldiers under Lieutenant B.

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  • The standard authorities for the period before 1791 are: Ira Allen, Natural and Political History of the State of Vermont (London, 1898); B.

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  • The present city was founded in 944 by Bulukkin b.

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  • In 1516 the amir of Algiers, Selim b.

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  • b, Diagram of female flower.

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  • Krebs, Zur Kritik Alberts von Aachen (Munster, 1881); B.

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  • - The editio princeps, based mainly on a transcript of D, was printed at Venice, 1472: the first scientific text, based on B, C and D, was that of Camerarius, completed 1552, in whose steps followed Lambinus (with a commentary which is still useful), 1576; Taubmann, 1605-1621; Pareus (a meritorious edition), 1619 and 1623; Guyet, edited by Marolles, 1658; Gronovius (the "Vulgate"), 1664-1684; then, after the lapse of more than a century, came the editions of Bothe, 1809-1811; Naudet, 1830; and Weise, 1837-1848.

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  • Bielawski, Histoire de la comte d'Auvergne et de sa capitale Vic-le-Comte (1868); B.

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  • B.) 1 Mahommedan itinerant chapmen, from the Volga.

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  • With the Lives must be mentioned the Esprit du B.

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  • The large tomb of the Volumni (3rd century B.

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  • Clerk Maxwell supposed two compartments, A and B, to be filled with gas at the same temperature, and to be separated by an ideal, infinitely thin partition containing a number of exceedingly small trap-doors, each of which could be opened or closed without any expenditure of energy.

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  • An intelligent creature, or "demon," possessed of unlimited powers of vision, is placed in charge of each door, with instructions to open the door whenever a particle in A comes towards it with more than a certain velocity V, and to keep it closed against all particles in A moving with less than this velocity, but, on the other hand, to open the door whenever a particle in B approaches it with less than a certain velocity v, which is not greater than V, and to keep it closed against all particles in B moving with a greater velocity than this.

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  • By continuing this process every unit of mass which enters B will carry with it more energy than each unit which leaves B, and hence the temperature of the gas in B will be raised and that of the gas in A lowered, while no heat is lost and no energy expended; so that by the application of intelligence alone a portion of gas of uniform pressure and temperature may be sifted into two parts, in which both the temperature and the pressure are different, and from which, therefore, work can be obtained at the expense of heat.

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  • The free use of discords and of wider intervals, together with the influence of the florid elements of solo-singing, enlarged the bounds of choral expression almost beyond recognition, while they crowded into very narrow quarters the subtleties of 16th-, century music. These, however, by no means disappeared; :and such devices as the crossing of parts in the second Kyrie of Bach's B Minor Mass (bars 7, 8, 14, 15, 22, 23, 50) abundantly show that in the hands of the great masters artistic truths are not things which a change of date can make false.

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  • b, Mouth.

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  • A, View of the heart of a dog infested with Filaria immitis Leidy; the right ventricle and base of the pulmonary artery have been opened: a, aorta; b, pulmonary artery; c, vena cava; d, right ventricle; e, appendix of left auricle; f, appendix of right auricle.

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  • B, Female F.

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  • After the second larval moult, he passes through a passive stage comparable to the pupa-stadium of an b insect, and during this stage, which occurs inside the root, the reproductive organs are perfected.

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  • b, Mouth cavity.

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  • Although married she always remained a member of her father's house - she is rarely named wife of A, usually daughter of B, or mother of C. Divorce was optional with the man, but he had to restore the dowry and, if the wife had borne him children, she had the custody of them.

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  • 4); a current is sent from a battery, E, through one coil of a galvanometer, g, through a high resistance, r, through one of the wires, r, and thence back from office B (at which the wires are looped), through wire 2, through another high resistance, r', through a second coil on the galvanometer, g, and thence to earth.

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  • to the piston P. The newly coated wire is passed through a long trough T, containing cold water, until it is sufficiently cold to allow it to be safely wound on a bobbin B' This operation completed, the wire is wound from the bobbin B' on to another, and at the same time carefully examined for air-holes or other flaws, all of which are eliminated.

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  • On the same shaft with P is fixed a brake-wheel furnished with a powerful brake B, by the proper manipulation of which the speed of paying out is regulated, the pull on the cable being at the same time observed by means of D.

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  • At small country towns or villages, where the message traffic is light, the Wheatstone " A B C " instrument is used.

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  • In this apparatus electric A B C currents are generated by turning a handle (placed in front of the instrument), which is geared, in the instru ment.

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  • A noticeable feature in the modern A B C indicator, as well as in all modern forms of telegraph instruments, is the adoption of " induced " magnets in the moving portion of the apparatus.

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  • At offices where the work is heavier than can be dealt with by the A B C apparatus, the " Single Needle " instrument has been very largely employed; it has the advantage of slight Single liability to derangement, and of requiring very little adjustment.

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  • ' 'B - ...

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  • When signals are to be sent from either station the operator turns the switch c out of contact with the stop b, and then operates precisely as in open circuit send '" i ing.

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  • When a current passes through R the armature A is attracted and the local circuit is closed through the armature at b.

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  • The local 1_ E I battery B 1 then sends a current through the in FIG.

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  • B, indicating whether a station is calling, in case the relay sticks or is out of adjustment.

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  • 23, representing the " differential " method, B is the sending battery, B 1 a resistance equal to that of the battery, R a rheostat and C an adjustable condenser.

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  • 24), instead of sending the currents through the two coils of a differentially wound relay or receiving a and b are inserted, and the receiving instrument is.

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  • By a modification of the bridge method, applied with excellent results by Dr Muirhead to submarine work, condensers are substituted for a and b, one being also placed in the circuit between P and Q.

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  • The general graphy, principle Arms a and arrangement b, one at eachstation and d B, are connected to the line wire, and are made to rotate simultaneously over metallic segments, 3, 4, and I', 3', 4', at the two stations, so that when the arm a is on segment i at A, then b is on segment I' at B, and so on.

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  • To each group is connected a set of apparatus; hence during a complete revolution of the arms a pair of instruments (at station A and station B) will be in communication four times, and the intervals during which any particular set of instruments at the two stations are not in connexion with each other become much smaller than in the case of fig.

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  • That now employed is, however, practically a development of his B 2 1 4 3 3 / ? ?

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  • 28, and the levers are adjusted so that the left-hand one moves a, b, c and punches a row of holes across the paper (group i in the figure), the middle one moves b only and punches a centre hole (2 in the figure), while the right-hand one moves a, b, d, e and punches O p p Oa Oa' Ob Od 0?

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  • An ebonite beam B is rocked up and down rapidly by a train of mechanism, and moves the cranks FIG.

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  • A, slip as received on recorder, using ordinary relays for translating on to second cable; B, slip as received on recorder, when interpolator is used at intermediate station, for sending on to second cable; C (four cells through a line, KR=3.6), signals with recorder under ordinary conditions; D, all conditions the same as in C, but magnifying relay inserted between the end of the line and the recorder.

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  • 35) were sunk in the water; the pair on one side were connected by a battery B, and the pair on the other by a galvanometer or telegraphic receiver R.

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  • At the receiving station Marconi connected a single voltaic cell B 1 and a sensitive telegraphic relay R in series with his tube of metallic filings C, and interposed certain little coils called choking coils.

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  • Ann., 1890, 40, p. 56) employed an arrangement as follows: Four fine platinum or iron wires were joined in lozenge shape, and two sets of these R and S were connected up with two resistances P and Q to form a bridge with a galvanometer G and battery B.

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  • - A, antenna; P S, jigger or oscillation transformer; C, condenser; 0, Fleming oscillation valve; B, working battery; T, telephone; R, rheostat; E, earth-plate.

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  • a b, constantan wire; c d, thermojunction; G G, galvanometer terminals; 0 0, antenna and earth terminals.

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  • Rhigi and B.

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  • - At least four periods in the history of the dialect can be distinguished in the records we have left to us, by the help of the successive changes (a) in alphabet and (b) in language, which the Tables exhibit.

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  • (a and b) and VII.

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  • (a and b).

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  • a is written) consists of the following signs, the writing being always from right to Ieft: A a, 8 b, 9 d (:.e.

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  • (a) and (b); earliest would seem that of II.

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  • (b).

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  • b 1, but this appears also in IV.

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  • a and b would be in themselves too slight to prove an earlier date, but they have perhaps some weight as confirming the evidence of the language.

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  • b, 53-60, and we may infer that the'town of Iguvium was independent but in fear of the Etruscans at the time when the curse was first composed.

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  • 4), in an early form, consisted of a cell of insulating material having at its bottom a flat-headed platinum screw G; on the top of G was a layer of carbon powder C, on the top of that a platinum disk D, and above that again, forming the cover of the cell, a disk of ivory B, held in position by a ring E.

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  • The case is firmly fixed to a " bridge " B with its back or bottom in a vertical position.

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  • The junction circuits connecting two exchanges are invariably divided into two groups, one for traffic from exchange A to exchange B, the other for traffic from B to A.

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  • When a subscriber at exchange A asks for a connexion to a subscriber at B, the operator at A, to whom the request is made, passes the particulars over an order wire to an operator at B.

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  • During the progress of these operations the A operator connects the originating subscriber to the junction circuit named by the B operator.

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  • There is only one signal on the cord circuit at B, and that signal is controlled by exchange A.

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  • Control of the call is thus vested in the operator at the originating exchange, at which point the connexion must be severed before a clearing signal can appear at B.

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  • (b) The obstructive use made by the local authorities of their power to veto underground wayleaves.

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  • B, Digestive gland from interior A, B, and C magnified about of pitcher, in pocket-like deI oo diameters.

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  • A, Attractive surface of lid; B, conducting; C, glandular; and D, detentive surface; magnified.

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  • B, Monstrous leaf with spoon-shaped depression.

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  • Ancient Languages and Peoples 27.2 B.

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  • A law passed on the 22nd of March 1900 gave a B a, special impulse to this form of enterprise by fixing the ratio r naze.

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  • Taxes proper are divided into (a) taxes on business transactions and (b) taxes on articles of consumption.

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  • Nesbitt, London, 1904); B.

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  • Prefixed to this are two sections dealing respectively with (A) the ethnographical and philological divisions of ancient Italy, and (B) the unification of the country under Augustus, the growth of the road system and so forth.

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  • The contrast presented b)

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  • These three bodies were to be chosen by three electoral colleges consisting of (a) landed proprietors, (b) learned men.

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  • to allow him to dissolve parliament, entrusted Signor Giolitti, a Piedmontese deputy, sometime treasury minister in the Crispi cabinet, with the formation of a ministry of the Left, which contrived to obtain six months supply on account, and dissolved the Chamber, The ensuing general election (November 1892), marked by unprecedented violence and abuse of official pressure upon B k the electorate, fitly ushered in what proved to be scandals, the most unfortunate period of Italian history since the completion of national unity.

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  • (b.

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  • Machiavellis Stonia florentine, B.

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  • B.) S, ifOMAS Osborne, 1st Duke Of (1631-1712), Inglis Statesman, commonly known also by his earlier title of Earl Of Danby, son of Sir Edward Osborne, Bart., of Kiveton, Yorkshire, was born in 1631.

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  • b Macky's Memoirs, 46; Pepys's Diary, viii.

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  • (1886); for the Armenian campaigns see B.

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  • See Sir Richard Temple, The Andaman and Nicobar Islands (Indian Census, 1901); C. B.

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  • 11, B,C, and 59, a, b, c).

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  • The column (b) is generally long, slender and stalklike (hydrocaulus).

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  • A, A hydriform person giving rise to medusiform person by budding from th margin of the disk; B, free swimming medusa (Steenstrupia of Forbes) detached from the same, with manubrial genitali.

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  • B, C. multicornis, natural size; p, polyp; gon, gonophores; rh, hydrorhiza.

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  • 6, B).

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  • 6 B.

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  • dz, by the hydranths, each with dactylozoid; gz, gastrozoid; b, mouth and tentacles; and, blastostyle; gon, gonophores; secondly, the " coenosarc," or rh, hydrorhiza.

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  • cn, N, o.c, x, b, the 1.0¦6 From Gegenbaur's Elements of Comparative Anatomy.

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  • 5, B; ii, A).

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  • A and B modified cats i is seen when the from Hincks; C modified from Forbes's Brit.

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  • A, colony of but grow in all planes Lar;B and C, young and adult medusae.

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  • F, the founder-polyp; I, 2, 3, 4, the succession of polyps budded from the founder-polyp; a', b', c', the succession of polyps budded from 1; a 2, 2 polyps budded from 2; a 3, polyp budded from 3.

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  • 10, b).

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  • F, founder-polyp; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, succession of polyps budded from the founder; a, b, c, second series of polyps budded from the founder; a 3, b 3, series budded from 3.

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  • H, With spadix branched (Cordy- B, Type of Tubularia.

    0
    0
  • B and C, Two views of a female gonophore after t, Tentacles.

    0
    0
  • side of the first out A, B, C, E, F, In vert, Tentacle.

    0
    0
  • 43, A); in this the mouth is formed distally as a perforation (B); next the sides of the tube so formed bulge out laterally near the attachment to form the umbrella, while the distal undilated portion of the tube represents the manubrium (C); the umbrella now grows out into a number of lobes or lappets, and the tentacles and tentaculocysts grow out, the former in a notch between two lappets, the latter on the apex of each lappet (D, E); finally, the velum arises as a growth of the ectoderm alone, the whole bud shapes itself, so to speak, and the little medusa is separated off by rupture of the thin stalk connecting it with the parent (F).

    0
    0
  • 44, A B D FIG.

    0
    0
  • A, B, C, D, F, Successub -umbra l sive stages in vercavity.

    0
    0
  • the future D, E); the cavity A between the two B C walls of the cup FIG.

    0
    0
  • 46, Ia, b, c).

    0
    0
  • 46, IIa, b, c).

    0
    0
  • 46, IVa, b, c).

    0
    0
  • 47, B).

    0
    0
  • II, Method of Cunina; (a) the mouth arises, next the umbrella (b), and lastly the tentacles (c).

    0
    0
  • III, Hypothetical transition from II to the indirect method with an entocodon; the formation of the manubrium is retarded, that of the umbrella hastened (IIIa, b).

    0
    0
  • B, The lower layer forms a solid G,H, Formation of the medusae.

    0
    0
  • (b) Tentacles capitate, simple; type of Coryne and Syncoryne; Myriothela is an aberrant form with some of the tentacles modified as " claspers " to hold the ova.

    0
    0
  • (b) Tentacles with a bilateral arrangement, branched tentacles in addition to simple filiform ones; type of Branchiocerianthus.

    0
    0
  • (b) With capitate tentacles; type of Clavatella.

    0
    0
  • b, The long manubrium, bearing medusiform buds; a, mouth.

    0
    0
  • 57, A, B).

    0
    0
  • In B the spadix of the upper bud has protruded itself through the top of the gonoat the base of the theca and the acrocyst (ac) is secreted round it.

    0
    0
  • manubrium and In C the marsupium (m) is formed as finger-like another below the process from the summit of the blastostyle, en closing the acrocyst; b, medusa-buds on the radial canal in blastostyle.

    0
    0
  • a, The youngest stage, is magnified 22 diameters; b, older, is magnified 8 diameters; c, .the adult medusa, is magnified 6 diameters.

    0
    0
  • b, In fig.

    0
    0
  • Physalia, general view, diagrammatic; B, cormidium of Physalia; D, palpon; T, palpacle; G, siphon; GP, gonopalpon; M d', male gonophore; M y, female gonophore, ultimately set free.

    0
    0
  • The canon provides that any clerk having a complaint against another clerk must not pass by his own bishop and turn to secular tribunals, but first lay b a re his cause before him, so that by the sentence of the bishop himself the dispute may be settled by arbitrators acceptable to both parties.

    0
    0
  • (b) At first the bishop was the only judge in the diocesan court and he always remains a judge.

    0
    0
  • (b) Reclusion in a monastery continued from former period, and might be either temporary or perpetual (loc. cit.

    0
    0
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY.-P. B.

    0
    0
  • Holtzmann (1892), B.

    0
    0
  • In Russia a prescription containing any of the poisons indicated in the schedules A and B in the Russian pharmacopoeia may not be repeated, except by order of the doctor.

    0
    0
  • P. Liechti and B.

    0
    0
  • B, Plant of the primitive Siphoneous Green Alga Protosiphon botryoides.

    0
    0
  • I B and D).

    0
    0
  • I B) is an example parallel with Oedocladiurn; Bryopsis, with Draparnaldia.

    0
    0
  • B

    0
    0
  • 2, B), since there is no difference in the illumination and other external conditions, --------

    0
    0
  • B, A small portion highly magnified.

    0
    0
  • a, Starch sheath; at the extremities of the figure its cells are represented as empty; b, cambiuin layer.

    0
    0
  • Opposite the primary xylems, the cambium either (a) forms parenchyma on both sides, making a broad, secondary (principal) ray, which interrupts the vascular ring and is divided at its inner extremity by the islet of primary xylem; or (b) forms secondary xylem and phloem in the ordinary way, completing the vascular ring.

    0
    0
  • Jahrb., B.

    0
    0
  • Such plants, which comprise the b ~eat majority of the species of the central European flora, ~himper termed tropophytes.

    0
    0
  • b D.

    0
    0
  • thard-scrub, (b) thorn-bushland and thorn-forest; (ii.) true vannah: tropical and sub-tropical savannah; (iii.) savannah-forest, 0

    0
    0
  • ~i B -

    0
    0
  • 2, B).

    0
    0
  • (2) Metaphase.The chromosomes pass to the equator of the spindle and b,ecome attached to the spindle-fibres in such a way that they form a radiating starthaped figureAster-when seen from the pole of the spindle.

    0
    0
  • contents of the two cells fuse together, cytoplasm ~ B

    0
    0
  • 4, B, C, D), it appears to take no part in the fertilization phenomena, nor in the subsequent division of the nucleus.

    0
    0
  • 3,A, B).

    0
    0
  • 3, A, B).

    0
    0
  • B, of Tradescantia fiuminensis.

    0
    0
  • 5, B, shows a photograph taken from life through the epidermal cells of Tradescantiafluminenus.

    0
    0
  • B, Anterior end of Euglena showing the flagellum with its swelling just in the hollow of the eye-spot.

    0
    0
  • B, single nucleus due to th~ fusion of the two pre-existing nuclei.

    0
    0
  • A and B, Tolypothrix lancita: (I) Young, (2) Old cells.

    0
    0
  • Both (B).

    0
    0
  • Soc., B.

    0
    0
  • Among Kenosha's manufactures are brass and iron beds (the Simmons Manufacturing Co.), mattresses, typewriters, leather and brass goods, wagons, and automobiles - the "Rambler" automobile being made at Kenosha by Thomas B.

    0
    0
  • Grant, Rutherford B.

    0
    0
  • [the city] Bast" (B;s-t), a city better known by its later name, P-ubasti, "place of Ubasti"; thus the goddess derived her name Ubasti from her city (Bast), and in turn the city derived its name P-ubasti from that of the goddess; the Greeks, confusing the name of the city with that of the goddess, called the latter Bubastis, and the former also Bubastis (later Bubastos).

    0
    0
  • In this article (A) the general anatomy of birds is discussed, (B) fossil birds, (c) the geographical distribution.

    0
    0
  • 'b?

    0
    0
  • Soc. Imp. Nat., Moscow, xiv., 1841; B.

    0
    0
  • This, when fully developed, consists of two parts, but inserted by a single ribbon-like tendon upon the hinder surface of the femur, near the end of its first third; the caudal part, femoro-caudalis, expressed by Garrod by the symbol A, arises from transverse processes of the tail; the iliac part (accessorofemoro-caudal of Garrod, with the symbol B), arises mostly from the outer surface of the postacetabular ilium.

    0
    0
  • B, Iliac portion of caud-ilio-femoralis.

    0
    0
  • The most primitive combination, ambiens and A B X Y, is the most common; next follows that of A X Y, meaning the reduction of B, i.e.

    0
    0
  • the iliac portion of the caud-ilio-femoralis; A B X and B X Y are less common; A X and X Y are rare and occur only in smaller groups, as in subfamilies or genera; B X occurs only in Podiceps.

    0
    0
  • Further, the combinations B X Y and A X Y cannot be derived from each other, but both directly from A B X Y in two different directions.

    0
    0
  • Keeping this in mind, we may fairly conclude that the flamingo with B X Y points to an ancestral condition A B X Y, which is still represented by Platalea and Ibis, whilst the other storks proper have taken a different line, leading to A X Y.

    0
    0
  • 179 B (1888), pp. I11 -141; L.

    0
    0
  • Australian Region Australian Papuan Antillean (B) Neogaea or II.

    0
    0
  • (B) Neogaea, or the Neotropical region.

    0
    0
  • (c) Complex Constructive: If A, then B; if C, then D; but either A or C; therefore either B or D.

    0
    0
  • (d) Complex Destructive: If A is true, B is true; if C is true, D is true; but B and D are not both true; hence A and C are not both true.

    0
    0
  • His son, Charles King (b.

    0
    0
  • Frohschammers (1894); B.

    0
    0
  • In Italy appeared the invaluable Talmud-lexicon (`Arukh) by Nathan b.

    0
    0
  • For further study: Graetz, Geschichte der Juden (Leipzig, 1853, &c.) (the volumes are in various editions), with sp€cial reference to the notes; English translation by B.

    0
    0
  • north Italy between Alps and Apennines and (b) the far more important Gallia Transalpina (or Ulterior, " Further"), usually called Gallia (Gaul) simply, the land bounded by the Alps, the Mediterranean, the Pyrenees, the Atlantic, the Rhine, i.e.

    0
    0
  • (b) Gaul proper first enters ancient history when the Greek colony of Massilia was founded (?

    0
    0
  • See The Writings of Hugh Swinton Legare (2 vols., Charleston, S.C., 1846), edited by his sister, Mrs Mary Bullen, who contributed a biographical sketch; and two articles by B.

    0
    0
  • A complete list of Airy's printed papers, numbering no less than 518, will be found in his Autobiography, edited in 1896 by his son, Wilfrid Airy, B.

    0
    0
  • In addition to this there is compulsory service in the National Guard (a) in the first class, consisting of men between seventeen and thirty years of age, liable for service with the standing army, and numbering some 15,000; (b) in the second class, for departmental service only, except in so far as it may be drawn upon to make up losses in the more active units in time of war, consisting of men from thirty to forty-five years of age, and (c) in the third class, for local garrison duty, consisting of men between forty-five and sixty years old.

    0
    0
  • A mean degree of the meridian being assumed to be 69-09 statute miles of 5280 ft., the nautical mile (A l b - degree) is taken as 6080 ft., which is a sufficiently close approximation for practical purposes, and the distances between the knots are made to bear the same relation to 6080 ft.

    0
    0
  • The half gimbal B pivoting in the _ = socket of the base C ?

    0
    0
  • 6) for cleaning or renewal; the adjustment of the bearings is made by screwing up the cage cap b, locked by a special washer and the two screws a, a (figs.

    0
    0
  • From it are made (a) confectio sulphuris; (b) unguentum sulphuris; (c) sulphur praecipitatum, milk of sulphur (U.S.P.) which has a sub-preparation trochiscus sulphuris each lozenge containing 5 grs.

    0
    0
  • Blyden (b.

    0
    0
  • Maurice or B.

    0
    0
  • (b) Personal immortality is affirmed as philosophically certain by the Church of Rome and many Protestant writers.

    0
    0
  • (b) Geology has also won its battles, and few now try to harmonize it with Genesis.

    0
    0
  • (b) New Testament criticism raises even more delicate issues.

    0
    0
  • The apologist must maintain (I) that Jesus of Nazareth is a real historical figure - a point well-nigh overlooked by Strauss, and denied by some modern advocates of a mythical theory; (2) that Jesus is knowable (not one " of whom we really know very little " - B.

    0
    0
  • At the last meeting of the Lambeth Conference (1907) some overtures, on certain conditions, were made for (a) joint consecration of bishops, (b) joint ordination of ministers, (c) interchange of pulpits.

    0
    0
  • In response the Moravians, at the General Synod (1909), welcomed the offer, but also declared their wish (a) to preserve their independence as a "Protestant Episcopal Church"; (b) to co-operate freely as heretofore with other Evangelical Churches.

    0
    0
  • The principal species, B.

    0
    0
  • The other species which yield buchu are B.

    0
    0
  • serratifolia, having linear-lanceolate sharply serrulate leaves, and B.

    0
    0
  • 2 b, 9b and 26 b, c); the number of segments is usually eleven, but may vary from two to more than twenty.

    0
    0
  • The female can protrude a long flexible tube in connexion with the eighth segment, carrying the sclerites of the ninth at its extremity, and these sclerites may carry short hairy processes A B D.yrnt,sc/'rle moathd ..

    0
    0
  • A, Dorsal view; B, mouth organs; C, under side.

    0
    0
  • a, Beetle; b, head of beetle with feelers and palps; c, larva; d, pupa.

    0
    0
  • 3 b).

    0
    0
  • a, Calandra granaria; b, larva; c, pupa; d, C. oryzae.

    0
    0
  • 18, 21 b); the body shortened, with the abdomen swollen, but protected with tubercles and spines, and with longish legs adapted for an active life, as in the predaceous larvae of ladybirds; the body soft-skinned, swollen and caterpillar-like, with legs well developed, but leading a sluggish underground life, as in the grub of a chafer; the body soft-skinned and whitish, and the legs greatly reduced in size, as in the wood-feeding grub of a longhorn beetle.

    0
    0
  • 4 b).

    0
    0
  • a, Labium; b, maxilla; c, labrum; d, mandible.

    0
    0
  • 2 b) possess slender, curved, hollow mandibles, which are perforated at the tip and at the base, being thus adapted for sucking the juices of victims. Large dyticid larvae often attack small fishes and tadpoles.

    0
    0
  • 9, b) short and reduced as in most Paussidae.

    0
    0
  • - A, Wireworm; B, pupa of Click Beetle; C, adult Click Beetle (A griotes lineatum), b c a FIG.

    0
    0
  • a, Male; b, female; c, larva (ventral view).

    0
    0
  • (b) (Churchyard Beetle).

    0
    0
  • 26, b, c).

    0
    0
  • 26, b, c) can be brought close together so as to form a club-like termination; usually the hinder abdominal segments are not covered by the elytra.

    0
    0
  • The heavy grubs of Geotrupes, their c b FIG.

    0
    0
  • b, Antenna of male; c, antenna swollen tail-ends black with the contained food-material, are often dug up in numbers in well-manured fields.

    0
    0
  • lxi., Ixii., 1895-1896); and B.

    0
    0
  • Gemminger and B.

    0
    0
  • des 13ten Jahrhunderts (Munster, 1891); P. Piacenza, Compendio della storia del b.

    0
    0
  • B): "Fools, you are treading in the footsteps of the fox; can you not read the hidden meaning of these charming words ?"

    0
    0
  • 7 b Eiri Kpovov f31os).

    0
    0
  • He advocated (a) alliances with Argos, Thessaly and Macedon, (b) ascendancy in the Aegean (Naxos and Delos), (c) control of the Hellespontine route (Sigeum and the Chersonese), (d) control of the Strymon valley (Mt Pangaeus and the Strymon).

    0
    0
  • ': opal e ° °o T A R ple ' ag a ',ap iJ,wl Karkinit A C K r B L Scale, English Miles D S E A 32 Stavropol P O L A PI A N L A s E Derbent ° I?

    0
    0
  • The coniferous forests of the north contain, besides conifers, the birch (Betula alba, B.

    0
    0
  • pubescens, B.

    0
    0
  • fruticosa and B.

    0
    0
  • of Livonia; the Livs, on the Gulf of Riga; and the Kurs, intermingled with the Letts; (b) the N.

    0
    0
  • in Ryazan, Tambov, Samara, Simbirsk and Penza; (b) the Tatars of Astrakhan at the mouth of the Volga; and (c) those of the Crimea, a great many of whom emigrated to Turkey after the Crimean War (1854-56).

    0
    0
  • B is a small temple of comparatively late date; while A and 0 lie on the S.

    0
    0
  • Hadley, Railroad Transportation (New York, 1885); B.

    0
    0
  • D.*) Accident Statistics Statistics of railway accidents may be divided into three classes: casualties (a) to passengers, (b) to servants or employ& and (c) to other persons; and again into (t) train accidents, (2) accidents to persons doing work on or about trains and (3) other accidents.

    0
    0
  • 21 53 (b) When alighting from trains.

    0
    0
  • (b) When alighting from train 3.

    0
    0
  • 84 245 (b) At other parts of the line.

    0
    0
  • (b) From other causes .

    0
    0
  • Miscellaneous (B) Accidents to or failure of rolling stock and permanent-way: 12.

    0
    0
  • Of these there are two main systems: (1) a continuous cable is carried over two main drums at each end of the line, and the motion is derived either (a) from the weight of the descending load or (b) from a motor acting on one of the main drums; (2) each end of the cable is attached to wagons, one set of which accordingly ascends as the other descends.

    0
    0
  • There are two main ways of attaching the rails to the sleepers, corresponding to two main types of rails - the bull-headed rail A B FIG.

    0
    0
  • B, Plan of Chair.

    0
    0
  • At the place where the four rails come together, the two inner ones (one of the main line and the other of the siding), known as " switch rails " (b, fig.

    0
    0
  • b =Switch rail.

    0
    0
  • seaport where branches from docks a, b, c and d converge, and where the main line also divides into three, going to B, C and D respectively.

    0
    0
  • A train from a will contain some wagons for B,, some for C and some for D, as will also the trains from a, b, c and d.

    0
    0
  • At A therefore it becomes necessary to disentangle and group together all the wagons that are intended for B, all that are intended for C, and all that are intended for D.

    0
    0
  • Between A and B, A and C, and A and D, there may be a string of stations, p, q, r, s, &c., all receiving goods from a, b, c and d, and it would manifestly be inconvenient and wasteful of time and trouble if the trains serving those intermediate stations were made up with, say, six wagons from a to p next the engine, five from b to p at the middle, and four from c to p near the end.

    0
    0
  • Hence at A the trucks from a, b, c and d must not only be sorted according as they have to travel along A B, A C, or A D, but also must be marshalled into trains in the order of the stations along those lines.

    0
    0
  • Conversely, trains arriving at A from B, C and D must be broken up. and remade in order to distribute their wagons to the different, dock branches.

    0
    0
  • The journal of the axle A, is carried in a bearing or axle-box B, which is free to move vertically in the wide vertical slot G, formed in the frame and called generally " the horns," under the control of the spring.

    0
    0
  • 18), the blast-pipe orifice B is placed at about the centre of the boiler barrel, and the exhaust steam is discharged straight into the trumpet-shaped end of the chimney, which is continued down inside the smoke-box.

    0
    0
  • 19 the blast orifice B is set much lower, and the steam is discharged through a frustum of a cone set in the upper part of the smoke-box into the short chimney.

    0
    0
  • This hook swings on the pivot B, and has an arm which extends backwards, practically at right angles with the working face of the hook, FIG.

    0
    0
  • The inner circle B has a radius of 12 in.

    0
    0
  • From its intersection with A'A' arcs are struck cutting B in two points.

    0
    0
  • As a general classification the commissioners have divided the schemes that have come before them into three classes: (A) those which like ordinary railways take their own line across country; (B) those in connexion with which it is proposed to use the public roads conjointly with the ordinary road traffic; and (Neutral) which includes inclined railways worked with a rope, and lines which possess the conditions of A and B in about equal porportions.

    0
    0
  • According to the light railway commissioners, experience satisfied them (a) that light railways were much needed in many parts of the country and that many of the lines proposed, but not constructed, were in fact necessary to admit of the progress, and even the maintenance, of existing trade interests; and (b) that improved means of access were requisite to assist in retaining the population on the land, to counteract the remoteness of rural districts, and also, in the neighbourhood of industrial centres, to cope with the difficulties as to housing and the supply of labour.

    0
    0
  • The successive explorations of B.

    0
    0
  • It is possible to classify sacrifices according to (a) the occasion of the rite, (b) the end to be achieved, (c) the material object to be affected or (d) the form of the rite.

    0
    0
  • (b) The end to be achieved is, as has been shown by Hubert and Mauss, sometimes sacralization, sometimes desacralization.

    0
    0
  • The necessary elements of a Hindu sacrifice are: (I) the sacrificer, who provides the victim, and is affected, directly or indirectly, by the sacrifice; he may or may not be identical with (2) the officiant, who performs the rite; we have further (3) the place, (4) the instruments of sacrifice and (5) the victim; where the sacrificer enjoys only the secondary results, the direct influence of the sacrifice is directed towards (6) the object; finally, we may distinguish (7) three moments of the rite - (a) the entry, (b) the slaughter, (c) the exit.

    0
    0
  • the only permitted method of kindling it, (b) the tracing on the ground of the vedi, or magical circle, to destroy impurities, (c) the digging of the hole which constituted the real altar, (d) the preparation of the post which represented the sacrificer and to which the victim was tied, and other minor details.

    0
    0
  • In the former case (a) individual animals might be distinguished by certain marks, or (b) the whole species.

    0
    0
  • (b) In parts of North America the nagual or manitu animal, of which the Indian dreams during the initiation fast and which is to be his tutelary spirit, is killed with certain rites.

    0
    0
  • Their object may be (a) to provide a guide to the other world; (b) to provide the dead with servants or a retinue suitable to his rank; (c) to send messengers to keep the dead informed of the things of this world; (d) to strengthen the dead by the blood or life of a living being, in the same way that food is offered to them or blood rituals enjoined on mourners.

    0
    0
  • In course of time there were two important changes in this respect: (a) the offerings of bread and wine were commuted for money, with which bread and wine were purchased by the church-officers; (b) the offerings were sometimes handed to the deacons and by them taken to the bishop at the altar, and sometimes, as at Rome, the bishop and deacons went round the church to collect them.'

    0
    0
  • The Falkland Islands form essentially a part of Patagonia, with which they are connected by an elevated submarine plateau, 1 See B Stechele, in'Milnchener geographische Studien, xx.(1906), and Geographical Journal (December 1907).

    0
    0
  • Falkner, Description of Patagonia and the Falkland Islands (1774); B.

    0
    0
  • Dummler (1877), and a partial translation into German, with an introduction b y W.

    0
    0
  • The process of transference was facilitated by two potent causes: (a) Both Canaanite and Hebrew spoke a common language; (b) the name Baal is not in reality an individual proper name like Kemosh (Chemosh), Ramman or Hadad, but is, like El (Ilu)" god," an appellative meaning " lord," " owner " or " husband."

    0
    0
  • 2 (b) In many passages Jewish particularism is painfully manifest.

    0
    0
  • (additional note B.) on holiness, uncleanness and taboo.

    0
    0
  • (b) The rite of the goat devoted to Azazel.

    0
    0
  • (b) Eschatology in the Judaism of the Greek period began to assume a new form.

    0
    0
  • In Plato (Charmides, 158 B) he is mentioned with Abaris as skilled in the arts of incantation.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at King Edward's school, Birmingham, under James Prince Lee, afterwards bishop of Manchester, and had as contemporaries B.

    0
    0
  • (New York, 1889); and, especially, the monograph by Franklin B.

    0
    0
  • Goodwin; the article by Herbert B.

    0
    0
  • He left his theological impress on the Bibliotheca sacra, which he and Bela B.

    0
    0
  • Pursuing the theory of B.

    0
    0
  • (C. B.*)

    0
    0
  • See B.

    0
    0
  • Hennessy and B.

    0
    0
  • 4, 54 0 b, Bekk.), serves to point more than one moral.

    0
    0
  • 6, 1885), by B.

    0
    0
  • It contains in fact the history itself in two forms: (a) from the creation of man to the fall of Judah (Genesis-2 Kings), which is supplemented and continued further - (b) to the foundation of Judaism in the 5th century B.C. (Chronicles - Ezra-Nehemiah).

    0
    0
  • Kuenen, C. Piepenbring, and especially B.

    0
    0
  • McCurdy, History, Prophecy and the Monuments; B.

    0
    0
  • Then (b) the former lost its independence towards the close of the 8th century B.C., when a number of its inhabitants were carried away; and the latter shared the fate of exile at the beginning of the 6th, but succeeded in making a fresh reconstruction some fifty or sixty years later.

    0
    0
  • ihre Nachbarstiimme (1906), PP. 228, 433; B.

    0
    0
  • Many attempts have been made to present a satisfactory sketch of the early history and to do justice to (a) the patriarchal narratives, (b) the exodus from Egypt and the Israelite invasion, and (c) the rise of the monarchy.

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    0
  • As regards (b), external evidence has already suggested to scholars that there were Israelites in Palestine before the invasion; internal historical criticism is against the view that all the tribes entered under Joshua; and in (a) there are traces of an actual settlement in the land, entirely distinct from the cycle of narratives which prepare the way for (b).

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  • (p. 464 seq.); B.

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  • Meyer and B.

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  • (b) Some fluctuation is obvious in the number, dates and extent of the deportations.

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  • which gives a list of families who returned from exile each to its own city, and (b) in the return of the holy vessels in the time of Cyrus (contrast 1 Esdras iv.

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  • (b) It was in the 7th year (i.e.

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  • The disaster which aroused Nehemiah's grief was scarcely the fall of Jerusalem in 586 B.C., but a more recent one, and it has been conjectured that it followed the work of Ezra (in b above).

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  • 4 There are three inquiries: (a) the critical value of i Esdras, (b) the character of the different representations of post-exilic internal and external history, and (c) the recovery of the historical facts.

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  • To start with the last before considering (a) and (b) would be futile.

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  • Thus, in any estimate of the influence of Babylonia upon the Old Testament, it is obviously necessary to ask whether certain features (a) are of true Babylonian origin, or (b) merely find parallels or analogies in its stores of literature; whether the indebtedness goes back to very early times or to the age of the Assyrian domination or to the exiles who now returned.

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  • (3) Roman prelates, (a) active and (b) honorary.

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  • Monfort, Les Tonga, on Archipel des Amis (Lyons, 1893); B.

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  • B.) ' Archaeology.

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  • The later class (B) of the linear script is that used on the great bulk of the clay tablets of the Cnossian palace, amounting in number to nearly 2000.

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  • It is certain that by crisis: the beginning of the 14th century B.C., when the signs c. 1400 of already decadent Minoan art are perceptible in the B.

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  • The remains supply detailed information as to the everyday life of a Cretan country town about the middle of the second millennium B.

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  • Wroth, B.

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  • B.) On the 22nd of February 1907 M.

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  • His extant works are (a) three poems, "The Praises of Wemen" (224 lines), "On Luve" (10 lines), and "The Miseries of a Pure Scholar" (189 lines), and (b) a Latin account of the Arbuthnot family, Originis et Incrementi Arbuthnoticae Familiae Descriptio Historica (still in MS.), of which an English continuation, by the father of Dr John Arbuthnot, is preserved in the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh.

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  • The native white element completely regained possession of the government in the following year, when the Democrats came into office under Governor Zebulon B.

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  • And as in Hebrew, the six letters b g d k p t are aspirated when immediately preceded by any vowel sound.

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  • Thus " the son of the king " is more commonly expressed by b`ra dh`malka or b`reh d`malka than by bar mailed, whereas the latter type would alone be permissible in Hebrew.

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  • Braun and reproduced from his Liturgische Gewandung by permission of B.

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  • of B.

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  • Benjamin of Tudela (Itinerary, p. 61) names an exilarch Daniel b.

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  • See Syracuse and Timoleon; and, on both the Dionysii, articles by B.

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  • 3, b, c,).

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  • 3,b) after the nuptial flight; in a few species the females, and in still fewer the males, never develop wings.

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  • a, Female; b, female after loss of wings; c, male; d, worker; e, larva; g, pupa (magnified four times); f, head of larva more highly magnified.

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  • The conformation of those flowers a consists essentially in the pres- ' 'A B ence of a six-parted perianth, the three outer segments of which correspond to a calyx, the three inner ones to a corolla.

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  • E Arabian Sea Ba Of G A L e Geological information incomplete Desert Deposits Quaternary Tertiary Mesozoic Palaeozoic Archaean and Metamorphic Younger Volcanic Rocks English Miles b iuHi iiiiuiiiiii after llargl,aua Geology The geology of Asia is so complex and over wide areas so little known that it is difficult to give a connected account of either the structure or the development of the continent, and only the broader features can be dealt with here.

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  • The Bovidae, or hollow-horned ruminants, are represented by several genera of antelopes, and by species of true Bos - such as B.

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    0
  • sondaicus, B.

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    0
  • frontalis and B.

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  • Apart from European conquests, the internal history of Asia in the last 2000 years is the result of the interaction of four main influences: (a) Chinese, (b) Indian, (c) Mahommedan, (d) Central Asian.

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  • (b) Indian influence may be defined as Buddhism, if it is understood that Buddhism is not at all periods clearly distinguishable from Hinduism.

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  • P. Smith, B.

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  • Again (b) the primitive stories of conflicts with " Philistine " giants between Hebron and Jerusalem (2 Sam.

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  • B, C and D); Florence of Worcester; Fragments of Irish Annals (ed.

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  • The prostomium overhangs the mouth, and is often of considerable size and, as a rule, quite distinct from the segment following, being A„ f s / 6/ ' A B I.

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  • - A, side view of the head region of Nereis cultrifera; B, dorsal view of the same.

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  • B, Diagram of the nephridium of Alciope, into which opens the large genital funnel (coelo mostome).

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  • Here, however, the buds are lateral, though produced from a budding may be defective upon one or other of the noto a b FIG.

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  • - a, Bristle of Pionosyllis Malmgreni; b, Hook of Terebella.

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  • B, Portion of a colony of Syllis ramosa (from M`Intosh).

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  • B, Side view of the trochophore larva of Eupomatus uncinatus (from Hatschek).

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  • of body numerous and not A, B, C, anterior segments from the distinctive of species, being ventral surface; D, hinder end of body irregular and not fixed in of Urochaeta.

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  • B Acanthodrilus: cp, orifices of sperminal, rarely dorsal, at a math ecae;, oviducal pores; little distance from end male pores; on 17th and 19th of body.

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  • b, Extremity of penial seta of Acanthodrilus (after Horst).

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  • B 18 FIG.Io.

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  • survived amongst the modern Greeks, without any traces of the influence of Christianity (B.

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  • Other published correspondence is Lettres de Mirabeau a Chamfort (1796); Lettres du comte de Mirabeau b Jacques Mauvillon (Brunswick, 1792); Lettres originates de Mirabeau, ecrites du donjon de Vincennes, 1777-178Q, published by L.

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  • 1.276-302; B.

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  • Diastase B .

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  • Let AB be the major axis of the orbit, B the pericentre, F the focus or centre of motion, P the position of the body.

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  • For examples of hair dedicated to gods, see B.

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  • The earliest important treatises are the of Cato (2 341 49 B.

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  • In the case of plants the method of procedure was to grow some of the most important crops of rotation, each separately year after year, for many years in succession on the same land, (a) without manure, (b) with farmyard manure and (c) with a great variety of chemical manures; the same description of manure being, as a rule, applied year after year on the same plot.

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  • Amongst the field experiments there is, perhaps, not one of more universal interest than that in which wheat was grown for fifty-seven years in succession, (a) without manure, (b) with farmyard manure and (c) with various artificial manures.

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  • In 1890, at Plymouth, competitions took place of light portable engines (a) using solid fuel, (b) using liquid or gaseous fuel, grist mills for use on a farm, disintegrators, and cider-making plant for use on a farm.

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  • In 1892, at Warwick, the competitions related to ploughs - single furrow (a) for light land, (b) for strong land, (c) for press drill and broad-cast sowing; two-furrow; three-furrow; digging (a) for light land, (b) for heavy land; and one-way ploughs.

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  • In 1899, at Maidstone, special prizes were offered for machines for washing hops with liquid insecticides, cream separators (power and hand), machines for the evaporation of fruit and vegetables, and packages for the carriage of (a) soft fruit, (b) hard fruit.

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  • Adalgisa Corvatta, Divisione amministrativa dell' impero dei Seleucidi (1901); Haussoullier, Histoire de Mild et du Didymeion (1902); B.

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  • - A, Wireworm; B, pupa of Click Beetle; C, adult Click Beetle (Agriotes lineatum).

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  • A B In Great Britain the flea beetles (Halticidae) are one of the most serious enemies; one of these, the turnip flea (Phyllotreta nemorum), has in some years, notably 1881, caused more than 500,00o loss in England and Scotland alone by eating the young seedling turnips, cabbage and other Cruciferae.

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  • These parasites damage the hide, B FIG.

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  • - A, Ox Bot Maggot; B, puparium; C, Ox Warble Fly (Hypoderma bovis).

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  • A, Male scale insect; B, female; C, larva; D, female scale; E, male scale.

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  • Another aphis of importance is the woolly aphis (Schizoneura lanigera) of the apple and pear: it secretes tufts of white flocculent wool often to be seen hanging B D E humuli).

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  • A, Winged female; B, winged D, viviparous wingless female from in patches from old apple trees, where the insects live in the rough bark and form cankered growths both above and below ground.

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  • We may mention particularly Charles Booth's Life and Labour of the People in London, B.

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  • A, branch bearing male cones, reduced; B, single male cone, enlarged; C, single stamen, enlarged.

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  • Spruce Fir (Picea excelsa B, Cone and foliage.

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  • B, Fruit and foliage.

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  • A variety of the spruce, abounding in some parts of Nor way, produces a red heartwood, not easy to distinguish from that of the Norway B pine (Scotch fir), and imported with it into England as "red deal" or "pine."

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  • A, Branch bearing (a) young female cones, (b) ripe cones, reduced.

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  • B, Ripe cone scale with seeds, enlarged.

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    0
  • Her two sons, James (b.

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  • May 1540) and Robert or Arthur (b.

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    0
  • B, A stage '1 hours later than A.

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    0
  • C, A stage 3 2 hours later than B.

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    0
  • 1, B, C).

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    0
  • In the subsequent growth of ergc- pl.y- i ln b a.

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    0
  • B, Quarter-rotation.

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  • Neither the rotation of the shell as a whole nor its helicoid spiral coiling is the immediate cause of the torsion of the body in the individual, for the direction of the torsion is indicated in the segmentation of the ovum, in which there is a complete A B From Lankester's Treatise on Zoology.

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  • B, Embryo with ventral flexure of the intestine.

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  • b, Plantar surface of the foot.

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  • - A, Section in a plane vertical to the surface of the neck of Patella through a, the rudimentary ctenidium (Lankester's organ), and b, the olfactory epithelium (osphradium); c, the olfactory (osphradial) ganglion.

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  • (After Spengel.) B, Surface view of a rudimentary ctenidium of Patella excised and viewed as a transparent object.

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  • B, Buccal ganglia.

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  • b FIG.

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    0
  • b, Foot.

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    0
  • In various members of the Pectini b, Head-tentacles.

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  • B, The same, partially everted by eversion of the sides, as in the Nemertine proboscis and Gastropod eye-tentacle = pleurecbolic.

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  • The introvert is not a simple one with complete range both in eversion and introversion, but is arrested in introversion by the fibrous bands at c, and similarly in eversion by the fibrous bands at b.

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  • G, The acrecbolic snout of a proboscidiferous Gastropod, arrested short of complete eversion by the fibrous band b.

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  • On the other hand, many which have a siphonate mantle-skirt are not provided with an introversible mouth-bearing al- B c..

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    0
  • (From Gegenbaur, after Jhering.) B, Buccal (suboesophageal) ganglion.

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    0
  • sb, S u b - intestinal ganglion on the course of the left visceral cord.

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    0
  • b, Edge of the mantle-skirt rest- h, Penis.

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    0
  • B, Sole of the foot of Pyrula tuba, to show a, the pore usually said to be " aquiferous " but probably the orifice of a gland; b, median line of foot.

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  • d, Proand meso-podium; to the right b, Cephalic tentacles.

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    0
  • b, Cephalic tentacle.

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    0
  • B, The diblastula has become a trochosphere by the development of the ciliated ring y r (optical section).

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    0
  • B, The shell removed.

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    0
  • b, Cephalic tentacles.

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    0
  • 31.-Shell of Crucibulum, seen coiled,but slightly in from below so as to show the inner whorl curved posteriorly; b, concealed by the cap-like outer whorl a.

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  • 34.-Female Janthina, with egg-float (a) attached to the foot; b, egg-capsules; c, ctenidium (gill-plume); d, cephalic tentacles.

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    0
  • b, Radular sac.

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    0
  • a, mouth; b, cephalic tentacle; h, gill (ctenidium).

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  • and here also is a small diverticulum of b, Vaginal portion of the the duct f.

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    0
  • Posterior cephalic tentacle; and b, the eyes.

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    0
  • 46, A, B), or retain purely negative characters (fig.

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    0
  • 46, B), possibly a continuation of the epipodia; b, b', cephalic tentacles.

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    0
  • h, shell; b, oral hood; d, foot; the exception of the Aplustridae, Lophocercidae and Thecosomata, the head is devoid of tentacles, and its dorsal surface forms a digging FIG.

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    0
  • a, b, Posterior and anterior cephalic tentacles.

    0
    0
  • B, Tethys leporina, dorsal view.

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    0
  • b, Margin of the head.

    0
    0
  • B, Pedal ganglion.

    0
    0
  • b, Nerves to inferior cephalic tentacles.

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    0
  • b, Pair of cephalic tentacles.

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    0
  • (From Keferstein.) B, Helicophanta brevipes.

    0
    0
  • (From Keferstein.) a, Shell in A, B, C, shell-sac (closed) in D; b, orifice leading into the subpallial chamber (lung).

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    0
  • (After Keferstein.) b, The mouth.

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    0
  • (Paris, 1852);B.

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