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avebury

avebury Sentence Examples

  • (1899) p. 225; Lord Avebury, ibid.

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  • Geikie, The Scenery and Geology of Scotland (London, 2nd ed., 1887); Lord Avebury (Sir J.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) states that the common British yellow ants (Lasius flavus) collect flocks of root-feeding aphids in their underground nests, protect them, build earthen shelters over them, and take the greatest care of their eggs.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) on these subjects are familiar to all naturalists.

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  • Lubbock's (Lord Avebury) Ants, Bees and Wasps (London, 1882), dealing with British and European species, has been followed by numerous important papers by A.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Origin and Metamorphosis of Insects (London, 1874); L.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) and L.

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  • Pegs, new, and ALOos, stone), a term employed first by Lord Avebury and since generally accepted, for the period of highly finished and polished stone implements, in contrast with the rude workmanship of those of the earlier Stone Age (Palaeolithic).

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  • See Archaeology; also Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1900); Sir John Evans, Ancient Stone Implements of Great Britain (1897); Sir J.

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  • Romanes, Mental Evolution in Animals (1883), and Natural History of Instinct (1886); Lord Avebury, On the Instincts of Animals (1889); Marshall, Instinct and Reason (1898); Mills, Nature of Animal Intelligence (1898); St George Mivart, Nature and Thought (1882), and Origin of Human Reason (1899); E.

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  • He spent much of his time in the country, and in 1649 he brought into notice the megalithic remains at Avebury.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) separated the springtails as a distinct order, the Collembola, and by many students this separation has been maintained.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Ants, Bees and Wasps (9th ed., London, 1889); C. Janet, Etudes sur les fourmis, les guepes et les abeilles (Paris, &c., 1893 and onwards); and G.

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  • by Lord Avebury in his Prehistoric Times) to have no religious belief; it is, however, the better opinion that there are no peoples who are entirely destitute of some rudimentary religious belief.

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  • Abulfeda the geographer, writing in the r3th century, notices the fact that part of the Apamaean Lake was inhabited by Christian fishermen who lived on the lake in wooden huts built on piles, and Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) mentions that the Rumelian fishermen on Lake Prasias "still inhabit wooden cottages built over the water, as in the time of Herodotus."

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  • Chambers (London, 1865); Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Prehistoric Times (4th ed., London, 1878); Robert Munro, The Lake-Dwellings of Europe (London, 1890), with a bibliography of the subject.

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  • See Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1865; 1900); Sir J.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), "Monograph of the Collembola and Thysanura," Ray Society, 1873.

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  • The next controversialist who appeared on the scene was the famous Dr Stukely (1740) who propounded the theory that Stonehenge, the stone circle at Avebury (Abury), &c., were temples for serpent worship, "Dracontia" as he called them, the serpent worshippers being the Druids.

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  • Lord Avebury regards it as a temple of the Bronze Age (150o - 1000 B.C.), though apparently it was not all erected at one time, the inner circle of small unwrought, blue stones being probably older than the rest (Prehistoric Times).

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  • He married, in 1853, Alice Margaret, daughter of the second Lord Stanley of Alderley, and had a numerous family; his second daughter became in 1884 the wife of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • See ARCHAEOLOGY, &c. Also Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1900); Sir J.

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  • Woodward (London, 1894); Lord Avebury, The Scenery of England and the Causes to which it is due (London, 1902); Sir A.

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  • John Lubbock, 1st baron Avebury >>

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  • trans., 1879); Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1865, 6th ed.

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  • See Sir John Evans, Ancient Stone Implements of Great Britain (London, 1897); Lord Avebury's Prehistoric Times (1900); W.

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  • AVEBURY, a village in the Devizes parliamentary division of Wiltshire, England, on the river Kennet, 8 m.

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  • Avebury House is Elizabethan, with a curious stone dovecot.

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  • At the time of the Domesday Survey, the church of Avebury (Avreberie, Abury), with two hides attached, was held in chief by Rainbold, a priest, and was bestowed by Henry III.

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  • The manor of Avebury was granted in the reign of Henry I.

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  • This first period of human culture has been subdivided by Lord Avebury into Palaeolithic and Neolithic, words which have been generally accepted as expressing the two stages of the rough, unpolished and the finely finished and polished stone implements.

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  • This body had for its first president the distinguished naturalist Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • The site museum, including a new exhibition in the 17th Century thatched threshing barn, presents the archeological story of Avebury.

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  • chequerthe Avebury stone circle, Avebury Manor has had a checkered past.

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  • In sites like Avebury the ditch is on the inside indicating the purpose was not primarily defensive.

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  • eclipse watcher, Avebury's mysterious history attracted a group of UFO enthusiasts.

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  • great circleo draw the landscape around him, in Avebury, close to the great stone circle.

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  • The ancient sites visited included Avebury stone circles in Wiltshire which includes the largest prehistoric stone circle in Europe.

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  • And the main course every day is called the megalith, after the huge stones which form the Avebury circle.

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  • Avebury stone circle is the largest henge monument in Britain, which is managed by the National Trust.

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  • pilgrimage route from the west to the great temple at Avebury.

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  • politics of identity: A Loyalist Community In Belfast (Avebury: 1994 ).

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  • But despite the division, parish chairman Betty Hunter says Avebury must not become an archeological showpiece.

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  • Stukeley saw the Avebury site as a giant snake, representing God's creative power, crossing a huge circle which symbolized God.

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  • summer solstice celebrations in Avebury on June 21 are calling themselves.

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  • (1899) p. 225; Lord Avebury, ibid.

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  • Geikie, The Scenery and Geology of Scotland (London, 2nd ed., 1887); Lord Avebury (Sir J.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) states that the common British yellow ants (Lasius flavus) collect flocks of root-feeding aphids in their underground nests, protect them, build earthen shelters over them, and take the greatest care of their eggs.

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    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) on these subjects are familiar to all naturalists.

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    0
  • Lubbock's (Lord Avebury) Ants, Bees and Wasps (London, 1882), dealing with British and European species, has been followed by numerous important papers by A.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Origin and Metamorphosis of Insects (London, 1874); L.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) and L.

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  • Pegs, new, and ALOos, stone), a term employed first by Lord Avebury and since generally accepted, for the period of highly finished and polished stone implements, in contrast with the rude workmanship of those of the earlier Stone Age (Palaeolithic).

    0
    0
  • See Archaeology; also Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1900); Sir John Evans, Ancient Stone Implements of Great Britain (1897); Sir J.

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    0
  • Romanes, Mental Evolution in Animals (1883), and Natural History of Instinct (1886); Lord Avebury, On the Instincts of Animals (1889); Marshall, Instinct and Reason (1898); Mills, Nature of Animal Intelligence (1898); St George Mivart, Nature and Thought (1882), and Origin of Human Reason (1899); E.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) proved it to extend over more than six months; but in larger and more robust genera (e.g.

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  • He spent much of his time in the country, and in 1649 he brought into notice the megalithic remains at Avebury.

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    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) separated the springtails as a distinct order, the Collembola, and by many students this separation has been maintained.

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    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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    0
  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Ants, Bees and Wasps (9th ed., London, 1889); C. Janet, Etudes sur les fourmis, les guepes et les abeilles (Paris, &c., 1893 and onwards); and G.

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  • by Lord Avebury in his Prehistoric Times) to have no religious belief; it is, however, the better opinion that there are no peoples who are entirely destitute of some rudimentary religious belief.

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    0
  • Abulfeda the geographer, writing in the r3th century, notices the fact that part of the Apamaean Lake was inhabited by Christian fishermen who lived on the lake in wooden huts built on piles, and Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) mentions that the Rumelian fishermen on Lake Prasias "still inhabit wooden cottages built over the water, as in the time of Herodotus."

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  • Chambers (London, 1865); Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Prehistoric Times (4th ed., London, 1878); Robert Munro, The Lake-Dwellings of Europe (London, 1890), with a bibliography of the subject.

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  • See Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1865; 1900); Sir J.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury), "Monograph of the Collembola and Thysanura," Ray Society, 1873.

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  • The next controversialist who appeared on the scene was the famous Dr Stukely (1740) who propounded the theory that Stonehenge, the stone circle at Avebury (Abury), &c., were temples for serpent worship, "Dracontia" as he called them, the serpent worshippers being the Druids.

    0
    0
  • Lord Avebury regards it as a temple of the Bronze Age (150o - 1000 B.C.), though apparently it was not all erected at one time, the inner circle of small unwrought, blue stones being probably older than the rest (Prehistoric Times).

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    0
  • He married, in 1853, Alice Margaret, daughter of the second Lord Stanley of Alderley, and had a numerous family; his second daughter became in 1884 the wife of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • See ARCHAEOLOGY, &c. Also Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1900); Sir J.

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  • Woodward (London, 1894); Lord Avebury, The Scenery of England and the Causes to which it is due (London, 1902); Sir A.

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  • John Lubbock, 1st baron Avebury >>

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  • trans., 1879); Lord Avebury, Prehistoric Times (1865, 6th ed.

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  • See Sir John Evans, Ancient Stone Implements of Great Britain (London, 1897); Lord Avebury's Prehistoric Times (1900); W.

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  • AVEBURY, a village in the Devizes parliamentary division of Wiltshire, England, on the river Kennet, 8 m.

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  • Avebury House is Elizabethan, with a curious stone dovecot.

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  • As in the case of Stonehenge, the purpose for which the Avebury monument was erected has been the source of much difference of opinion among antiquaries, Dr Stukely (Stonehenge a Temple restored to the British Druids, 1740) regarding it as a Druidical temple, while Fergusson (Rude Stone Monuments, 1872) believed that it, as well as Silbury Hill, marks the site of the graves of those who fell in the last Arthurian battle at Badon Hill (A.D.

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  • At the time of the Domesday Survey, the church of Avebury (Avreberie, Abury), with two hides attached, was held in chief by Rainbold, a priest, and was bestowed by Henry III.

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  • The manor of Avebury was granted in the reign of Henry I.

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    0
  • This first period of human culture has been subdivided by Lord Avebury into Palaeolithic and Neolithic, words which have been generally accepted as expressing the two stages of the rough, unpolished and the finely finished and polished stone implements.

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  • This body had for its first president the distinguished naturalist Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury).

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  • But despite the division, parish chairman Betty Hunter says Avebury must not become an archeological showpiece.

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  • Stukeley saw the Avebury site as a giant snake, representing God 's creative power, crossing a huge circle which symbolized God.

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  • That 's what officers who will be carrying out bicycle patrols during the summer solstice celebrations in Avebury on June 21 are calling themselves.

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