Australian sentence example

australian
  • There are no mountains behind the Great Australian Bight.
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  • Cambrian rocks occur in each of these districts, and they are best developed in the South Australian high= lands, where they include a long belt of contemporary glacial deposits.
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  • Another point agreed upon is that the Australian flora is one of vast antiquity.
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  • Of those peculiar to Australian waters may be mentioned the arripis, represented by what is called among the colonists a salmon trout.
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  • A narrow Cambrian sea must have extended across central Australia from the Kimberley Goldfield in the north-west, through Tempe Downs and the Macdonnell chain in central Australia, to the South Australian highlands, central Victoria at Mansfield, and northern Tasmania.
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  • 1 - The Australian people are mainly of British origin, only 34% of the population of European descent being of non-British race.
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  • The Kainozoic period opened with fresh earth movements, the most striking evidence of which are the volcanic outbreaks all round the Australian coasts.
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  • The Australian eucalyptus is now grown in many places, and there are groves of the paradise or paraiso tree (Melia azedarach) on the formerly treeless pampa.
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  • A further gentle rise in the high steppes leads to the mountains of the West Australian coast, and another strip of low-lying coastal land to the sea.
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  • The coastal belt of Australia is everywhere well watered, with the exception of the country around the Great Australian Bight and Spencer Gulf.
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  • Similar granitic intrusions occurred in New South Wales and Queensland, and built up a mountain chain, which ran north and south across the continent; its worn-down stumps now form the east Australian highlands.
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  • The sea does not appear to have extended completely across Australia, breaking it into halves, for a projection from the Archean plateau of Western Australia extended as far east as the South Australian highlands, and thence probably continued eastward, till it joined the Victorian highlands.
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  • The great monoclinal fold which formed the eastern face of the east Australian highlands, west of Sydney, is of later age.
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  • The numerous facts, geological, geographical and biological, which when linked together lend great support to this theory, have been well worked out in Australia by Mr Charles Hedley of the Australian Museum, Sydney.
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  • Except the opossums, no single living marsupial is known outside the Australian zoological region.
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  • The Australian seas are inhabited by many fishes of the same genera as exist in the southern parts of Asia and Africa.
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  • But the Transvaal War of 1899-1902, to which Australia sent 6310 volunteers (principally mounted rifles), and the gradual increase of military sentiment, brought the question more to the front, and more and more attention was given to making Australian defence a matter of local concern.
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  • The higher Australian peaks in the south-east look just what they are, the worn and denuded stumps of mountains, standing for untold ages above the sea.
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  • Westward of South Australia, on the shores of the Australian Bight, there is a stretch of country 300 m.
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  • From a geological standpoint, the Great Australian Plain and the fertile valley of the Nile have had a similar origin.
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  • Taking the Lachlan as one type of Australian river, we find it takes its rise amongst the precipitous and almost unexplored valleys of the Great Dividing Range.
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  • All Australian rivers, except the Murray and the Murrumbidgee, depend entirely and directly on the rainfall.
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  • This period was marked by intense earth movements, which affected the whole of the east Australian highlands.
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  • The sea encroached far on the land from the Great Australian Bight and there formed the limestones of the Nullarbor Plains.
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  • Tasmania and Victoria were separated by the foundering of Bass Strait, and at the same time the formation of the rift valley of Spencer Gulf, and Lake Torrens, isolated the South Australian highlands from the Eyre Peninsula and the Westralian plateau.
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  • These immigrants then developed, with some exceptions, into the present Australian flora and fauna.
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  • On the Australian side the fact that Tasmania is richest in marsupial types indicates the gate by which they entered.
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  • The marsupials constitute two-thirds of all the Australian species of mammals.
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  • Kangaroo Island, at the entrance of St Vincent Gulf, is one of the largest islands on the Australian coast, measuring 80 m.
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  • Putting aside the exotic vegetation of the north and east coast-line, the Australian bush gains its peculiar character from the prevalence of the so-called gum-trees (Eucalyptus) and the acacias, of which last there are 300 species, but the eucalypts above all are everywhere.
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  • As early as 1866, tannic acid, gallic acid, wood spirit, acetic acid, essential oil and eucalyptol were produced from various species of eucalyptus, and researches made by Australian chemists, notably by Messrs.
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  • They serve admirably to break the sombre and monotonous aspect of the Australian vegetation.
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  • Grasses and herbage in great variety constitute the most valuable element of Australian flora from the commercial point of view.
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  • Proteaceous plants, although not exclusively Australian, are exceedingly characteristic of Australian scenery, and are counted amongst the oldest flowering plants of the world.
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  • They are found in New Zealand and also in New Caledonia, their greatest developments being on the south-west of the Australian continent.
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  • The " grass-tree " (Xanthorrhoea), of the uplands and coast regions, is peculiarly Australian in its aspect.
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  • This terminates in a long spike thickly studded with white blossoms. The grass-tree gives as distinct a character to an Australian picture as the agave and cactus do to the Mexican landscape.
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  • No speculation of hypothesis has been propounded to account satisfactorily for the origin of the Australian flora.
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  • As a step towards such hypothesis it has been noted that the Antarctic, the South African, and the Australian floras have many types in common.
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  • Excellent fish of many varieties abound in the Australian seas and in many of the rivers.
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  • So what happens to the hundreds of Australian greyhounds in this park when they are no longer useful to them!
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  • The region extending round the south-western extremity of the continent has a peculiarly characteristic assemblage of typical Australian forms, notably a great abundance of the Proteaceae.
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  • The census of Western Australia included only those aborigines in the employment of the colonists; and as a large part of this, the greatest of the Australian states, is as yet unexplored, it may be presumed that the aborigines enumerated were very far short of the whole number of persons of that race in the state.
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  • Numerically the flocks of Australia represent one-sixth of the world's sheep, and in just over half a century (1851-1905) the exports of Australian wool alone reached the value of £650,000,000.
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  • Next to the pastoral industry, agriculture is the principal source of Australian wealth.
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  • The value of Australian wheat and flour exported in 1905 was £5,500,000.
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  • Trout may now be taken in many of the mountain streams. At one time whaling was an important industry on the coasts of New South Wales and Tasmania, and afterwards on the Western Australian coasts.
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  • In Queensland waters there are about 300 vessels, and on the Western Australian coast about 450 licensed craft engaged in the industry, the annual value of pearl-shell and pearls raised being nearly half a million sterling.
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  • This was the first of the many rich discoveries in the same district which have made Western Australia the chief gold-producer of the Australian group. In 1907 there were eighteen goldfields in the state, and it was estimated that over 30,000 miners were actively engaged in the search for gold.
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  • Bismuth is known to exist in all the Australian states, but up to the present time it has been mined for only in three states, viz.
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  • Lead is found in all the Australian states, but is worked only when associated with silver.
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  • Zinc ores, in the several varieties of carbonates, silicates, oxide, sulphide and sulphate of zinc, have been found in several of the Australian states, but have attracted little attention except in New South Wales, where special efforts are being made successfully to produce a high-grade zinc concentrate from the sulphide ores.
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  • Nickel, so abundant in the island of New Caledonia, has up to the present been found in none of the Australian states except Queensland and Tasmania.
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  • The Australian states have been bountifully supplied with mineral fuel.
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  • Many descriptions of gems and gem stones have been discovered in various parts of the Australian states, but systematic search has been made principally for the diamond and the noble opal.
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  • The nationality of the tonnage was, British 2,771,000, including Australian 288,000, and foreign 948,000.
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  • The United Kingdom in 1905 sent 60% of the imports taken by Australia, compared with 26% from foreign countries, and 14% from British possessions; of Australian imports the United Kingdom takes 47%, foreign countries 31% and British possessions 22%.
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  • - Australian public finance requires to be treated under the separate headings of Commonwealth and states finance.
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  • Although the financial operations of the Commonwealth and the states are quite distinct, a statement of the total revenue of the Australian Commonwealth and states is not without interest as showing the weight of taxation and the different sources from which revenue is obtained.
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  • Information regarding Australian state finance will be found under the heading of each state.
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  • While their neighbours, the Malays, Papuans and Polynesians, all cultivate the soil, and build substantial huts and houses, the Australian natives do neither.
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  • Wherever they came from, there is abundant evidence that their first occupation of the Australian continent must have been at a time so remote as to permit of no traditions.
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  • This linguistic poverty proves that the Australian tongue has no affinity to the Polynesian group of languages, where denary enumeration prevails: the nearest Polynesians, the Maoris, counting in thousands.
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  • Further evidence of the antiquity of Australian man is to be found in the strict observance of tribal boundaries, which would seem to show that the tribes must have been settled a long time in one place.
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  • Why should a Papuan type be found in what was certainly once a portion of the Australian continent?
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  • This Indo - Aryan origin for the Australian blackfellows is borne out by their physique.
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  • Strange as it may appear, I would refer to an Australian as the finest model of the human proportions I have ever met; in muscular development combining perfect symmetry, activity and strength, while his head might have compared with the antique bust of a philosopher."
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  • Huxley concluded, from descriptions, that" the Deccan tribes are indistinguishable from the Australian races."
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  • Hunter states that the Dravidian tribes were driven southwards in Hindustan, and that the grammatical relations of their dialects are " expressed by suffixes," which is true as to the Australian languages.
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  • He states that Bishop Caldwell,' whom he calls " the great missionary scholar of the Dravidian tongue," showed that the south and western Australian tribes use almost the same words for " I, thou, he, we, you, as the Dravidian fishermen on the Madras coast."
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  • Physically the typical Australian is the equal of the average European in height, but is inferior in muscular development,.
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  • When born, the Australian baby is of 'a much` lighter colour than its parents and remains so for about a week.
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  • The grammatical structure of some north Australian languages has a considerable degree of refinement.
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  • Yet the Australian is capable of strong affections, and the blind (of whom there have always been a great number) are cared for, and are often the best fed in a tribe.
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  • The characteristic weapon of the Australian is the boomerang.
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  • Their nets, made by women, either of the tendons of animals or the fibres of plants, will catch and hold the kangaroo or the emu, or the very large fish of Australian rivers.
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  • The most sacred duty an Australian had to perform was the avenging of the death of a kinsman, and he was the object of constant taunts and insults till he had done so.
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  • The first English navigator to sight the Australian continent was William Dampier, who made a visit to these shores in 1688, as supercargo of the " Cygnet," a trader whose crew had turned buccaneers.
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  • The great navigator and his crew, unacquainted with the character of the Australian aborigines, were not a little astonished that these natives took no notice of them or their proceedings.
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  • During the sojourn in Botany Bay the crew had to perform the painful duty of burying a comrade - a seaman named Forby Sutherland, who was in all probability the first British subject whose body was committed to Australian soil.
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  • The next recorded expedition is a memorable one in the annals of Australian history - the despatch of a British colony to the shores of Botany Bay.
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  • The fleet sailed in May 1787, and arrived off the Australian coast early in the following January.
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  • Messrs Hamilton Hume and Hovell set out from Lake George, crossed the Murrumbidgee, and, after following the river for a short distance, struck south, skirting the foothills of what are now known as the Australian Alps until they reached a fine river, which was called the Hume after the leader's father.
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  • By this time much had thus been done to obtain an acquaintance with the eastern parts of the Australian continent, although the problem of what could become of the large rivers flowing north-west and south-west into the interior was still unsolved.
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  • In 1840 he performed a feat of extraordinary personal daring, travelling all the way along the barren sea-coast of the Great Australian Bight, from Spencer Gulf to King George Sound.
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  • The first of his tours independently performed, in 1858 and 1859, were around the South Australian lakes, namely, Lake Torrens, Lake Eyre and Lake Gairdner.
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  • On the 23rd of February 1861 they commenced the return journey, having in effect accomplished the feat of crossing the Australian continent.
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  • Four other parties, besides Howitt's, were sent out that year from different Australian provinces.
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  • These valuable additions to Australian geography were gained through humane efforts to relieve the lost explorers.
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  • The line crossing Australia which was thus explored has since been occupied by the electric telegraph connecting Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, and other Australian cities with London.
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  • Mr Gosse, with men and horses provided by the South Australian government, started on the 21st of April from the telegraph station So m.
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  • Overland routes had now been found possible, though scarcely convenient for traffic, between all the widely separated Australian provinces.
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  • Ernest Giles made several attempts to cross the Central Australian Desert, but it was not until his third attempt that he was successful.
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  • Lindsay's expedition, which was fitted out by Sir Thomas Elder, the generous patron of Australian exploration, entered Western Australia about the 26th parallel south latitude, on the line of route taken by Forrest in 1874.
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  • Alive to the importance of the trade, the South Australian government despatched Hiibbe from Oodnadatta to Coolgardie.
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  • David Carnegie, which started in July 1896, and travelled north-easterly until it reached Alexander Spring; then turning northward, it traversed the country between Wells's track of 1896 and the South Australian border.
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  • After a few months' rest it started on the return journey, following Sturt Creek until its termination in Gregory's Salt Sea, and then keeping parallel with the South Australian border as far as Lake Macdonald.
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  • Of the six Australian states, New South Wales is the oldest.
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  • The choice of governor-general of the new Commonwealth fell upon Lord Hopetoun (afterwards Lord Linlithgow), who had won golden opinions as governor of Victoria a few years before; Mr (afterwards Sir Edmund) Barton, who had taken the lead among the Australian delegates, became first prime minister; and the Commonwealth was inaugurated at the opening of 1901.
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  • It is possible that the London dockers' strike was not without its influence on the minds of the Australian Labour leaders.
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  • That strike had been liberally helped by the Australian unions, and it was confidently predicted that, as the Australian workers were more effectively organized than the English unions, a corresponding success would result from their course of action.
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  • The other ideal, typified by the South Australian party, differs from this in one important respect.
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  • In spite of the official rebuff received from the mother-country, the Australian ministry, in drawing up the new Federal tariff, gave a substantial preference to British imports, and thus showed their willingness to go farther.
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  • Douglas Ogilby (Catalogue of Australian Mammals, p. 1, Sydney, 1902), but expressed the hope "that further inquiries might be made by naturalists in Australia as to the actual finding of such eggs in the burrows, so that this most interesting point might be finally settled."
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  • Belief in a primitive historical revelation, once universal among Christians, has almost disappeared; but belief in a very early and highly moral theism is stoutly defended, chiefly on Australian evidence, by Andrew Lang (The Making of Religion and later works).
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  • - This family contains the single Australian species Clathrozoon wilsoni Spencer, in which a massive hydrorhiza Stage 4, seen in Plumularidae.
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  • The Australian sub-region consists of Australia, Tasmania, New Caledonia and New Zealand, and, though partly lying within the tropic is most naturally treated as a whole.
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  • The Australian land-surface must be of great antiquity, possibly Jurassic, and its isolation scarcely less ancient.
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  • Little confidence can, however, be placed in the identification of Proteaceous or, indeed, of any distinctively Australian plants in Tertiary deposits in the northern hemisphere.
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  • The Australian flora has extensions at high levels in the tropics; such exists on Kinabalu in Borneo under the equator.
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  • While so many conspicuous Australian elements are wanting in New Zealand, one-eighth of its flora belongs to South American genera.
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  • There were several early indications of the existence of the great Australian continent, and the Dutch endeavoured to obtain further knowledge concerning the country and its extent; but only its northern and western coasts had been visited before the time of Governor van Diemen.
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  • Each of these divisions is the home of a special fauna, many species of which are confined to it alone; in the Australian region, indeed, practically the whole fauna is peculiar and distinctive, suggesting a prolonged period of complete biological isolation.
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  • Meditating, it is probable, emigration upon his release, he turned his attention while in prison to colonial subjects, and acutely detected the main causes of the slow progress of the Australian colonies in the enormous size of the landed estates, the reckless manner in which land was given away, the absence of all systematic effort at colonization, and the consequent discouragement of immigration and dearth of labour.
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  • He soon, however, became entirely engrossed with colonial affairs, and, having impressed John Stuart Mill, Colonel Torrens and other leading economists with the value of his ideas, became a leading though not a conspicuous manager of the South Australian Company, by which the colony of South Australia was ultimately founded.
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  • Sclater' was the first to divide the world into a few great " regions," the Palaearctic, Ethiopian, Indian and Australian forming one group, the " Old World " (Palaeogaea); and the Nearctic and Neotropical forming a second, the New World (Neogaea).
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  • (A) Austrogaea, the Australian region in the wider sense,with the Papuan, Australian and New Zealand subregions, including also Polynesia.
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  • But the Australian region is also remarkable for its ornithic singularity.
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  • Besides these, three or perhaps four groups, though widely distributed throughout the world, arrive in the Australian region at their culmination, presenting an abundance of most varied forms. These are the weaver-birds (Ploceidae), and the moreporks (Podargidae), but especially the kingfishers (Alcedinidae) and the pigeons (Columbidae), the species belonging to the two last obtaining in this region a degree of prominence and beauty which is elsewhere unequalled.
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  • The main affinities of the avifauna are, of course, Australian.
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  • A large flightless goose, Cnemiornis, allied to the Australian Cereopsis, and the gigantic rapacious Harpagornis, have died out recently, with the moas.
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  • In all, there is a wonderful amount of specialization, though perhaps in a very straight line from generalized forms; but the affinity to Australian or Polynesian types is in many cases clearly traceable, and it cannot be supposed but that these last are of cognate origin with those of New Zealand.
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  • The Australian Subregion comprises Australia and Tasmania.
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  • E Here, as over so large a portion of the Australian region, we find birds constituting the supreme class - the scarcity of mammals being accounted for in some measure as a normal effect of insularity.
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  • To compare the Palaearctic genera with those of the Australian and Neotropical regions would be simply a waste of time, for the points of resemblance are extremely few, and such as they are they lead to nothing.
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  • Of other families which, however, extend their range more or less far into the Australian realm, may be mentioned Otididae, the bustards; Meropidae or bee-eaters; Muscicapidae or flycatchers; Sturnidae or starlings.
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  • The Oriental Subregion comprises all the countries and numerous islands between the Palaearctic and Australian areas; it possesses upwards of seventy families, of which, however, only one is peculiar, but this family, the Eurylaemidae or broadbills, is of great importance since it represents all the Subclamatores.
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  • Some of the similarities to the Ethiopian and the great differences from the Australian avifauna have already been pointed out.
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  • The influence of the Australian realm is indicated by a Megapode in Celebes, another in Borneo and Labuan, and a third in the Nicobar islands (which, however, like the Andamans, belong to the Indian province), but there are no cockatoos, these keeping strictly to the other side of Wallace's line, whence we started on this survey of the world's avifauna.
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  • Picidae, woodpeckers, cosmopolitan, excepting Madagascar and Australian region.
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  • Thus the Zulu says to the ancestral ghost, "Help me or you will feed on nettles"; whilst the still more primitive Australian exclaims to the "dead hand" that he carries about with him as a kind of divining-rod, "Guide me aright, or I throw you to the dogs."
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  • Wallace as representing the so-called Wallace's Line, whereby he demarcated the Asiatic from the Australian fauna.
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  • In railway mileage per io,000 inhabitants, however, Queensland, in the Australian group, reports a figure much greater than any other country; while at the other end of the list Persia holds the record for isolation.
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  • Just as the German reaper leaves the last ears of corn as an offering to Wodan, so the Australian black offers a portion of a find of honey; in New South Wales a pebble is said to have been offered or a number of spears, in Queensland the skin removed in forming the body-scars.
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  • As a rule flies are of small or moderate size, and many, such as certain blood-sucking midges of the genus Ceratopogon, are even minute; as extremes of size may be mentioned a common British midge, Ceratopogon varius, the female of which measures only 14 millimetre, and the gigantic Mydaidae of Central and South America as well as certain Australian robber-flies, which have a body 1-11n.
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  • C. McCook in the American genus Myrmecocystus, and by later observers in Australian and African species of Plagiolepis and allied genera.
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  • The south-eastern parts of the Malay Archipelago have much in common with the Australian continent, to which they adjoin, though their affinities are chiefly Indian.
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  • On the other islands similar characteristics are to be observed, Australian genera extending to the Philippines, and even to southern China.
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  • The occurrence of mammals of the Marsupial order in the Molucca Islands and Celebes, while none have been found in the adjacent islands of Java and Borneo, lying on the west of Wallace's line, or in the Indian region, shows that the margin of the Australian region has here been reached.
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  • Those of the Indian region abruptly disappear at, and many Australian forms reach but do not pass, the line above spoken of.
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  • Other scale insects of note are the cosmopolitan mussel scale (Mytilaspis pomorum) and the Australian Icerya purchasi.
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  • The Australian fauna is rich in characteristic and peculiar genera, and New Zealand, while possessing some remarkable insects of its own, lacks entirely several families with an almost world-wide range - for example, the Notodontidae, Lasiocampidae, and other families of Lepidoptera.
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  • The several accounts by John White, Collins, Phillips, Hunter and others of the colonization of New South Wales at the end of the last century ought not to be overlooked by any Australian ornithologist.
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  • Some notices of Australian birds by Mr Ramsay and others are to be found in the Proceedings of the Linnaean Society of New South Wales and of the Royal Society of Tasmania.
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  • The constitution requires that all elections be by ballot, and the Australian ballot system was adopted in 1891; registration is required in cities having a population of 11,800 or more.
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  • Especially among the lower races the dead are regarded as hostile; the Australian avoids the grave even of a kinsman and elaborate ceremonies of mourning are found amongst most primitive peoples, whose object seems to be to rid the living of the danger they run by association with the ghost of the dead.
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  • Further, it is the opinion of competent ornithologists that there is affinity of the Australian emeus and cassowaries with the New Zealand moas and with the Malagasy Aepyornis.
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  • It is also rich in the types of Australian plants in the collections of Sir Joseph Banks and Robert Brown, and contains in addition many valuable modern collections.
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  • The suggestion that the eating of cakes of unleavened bread, similar to the Australian "damper," was due to the exigencies of the harvest does not meet the case, since it does not explain the seven days and is incongruous with the fact that the first sheaf of the harvest was put to the sickle not earlier than the third day of the feast.
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  • The most important were: the Australian Antarctic expedition of 1911-4 under Sir Douglas Mawson; the Danish Oceanographical expeditions in the Mediterranean and adjacent seas of 1908-10; a short cruise made by Sir John Murray and Dr. Johan Hjort in the Norwegian Fishery exploring vessel " Michael Sars " in 1910, the general results of which were published as The Depths of the Ocean (1912) by the leaders of the expedition; and a short special cruise made by the " Scotia " in 1913 (after the loss of the " Titanic ") under the leadership of Dr. Matthews, which made observations upon the distribution of ice in the North Atlantic.
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  • "ALFRED DEAKIN (1856-1919), Australian statesman, was born at Melbourne Aug.
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  • He was a member of all the bodies formed to promote the Federation of Australia as well as of the delegation which proceeded to London with the Australian Commonwealth bill in 1 9 o° and, as Attorney-General, he was included in Sir Edmund Barton's first Federal " Cabinet of the Captains " (1901-3), succeeding him as Premier of Australia.
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  • This fiscal policy he pursued during his three Federal premierships (1903-4, 1905-8, 1909-10), and he was also a strong supporter of Australia's cooperation in Imperial defence, being responsible for the acceptance of the measure authorizing Australian naval construction in 1909 and for the invitation to Lord Kitchener to come to Australia to report on the question of defence.
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  • He represented " Centre " thought in Australian politics and for a long time was a reconciling influence between the Conservatives and the Labour party.
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  • The Australian production of 18,000 tons in 1888 was increased to 58,000 tons in 1891, a value maintained until 1893, when a depression set in, only 21,000 tons being produced in 1897; prosperity then returned, and in 1898 the yield was 68,000 tons, and in 1905, 120,000 tons.
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  • The ocean currents, the trade-winds blowing from the Australian mainland, and north-westerly storms from the Malayan islands, are no doubt responsible for the introduction of many, but not all, of these Malayan and Australasian species.
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  • A small group of Australian genera closely approach the order Juncaceae in having small crowded flowers with a scarious or membranous perianth; they include Xanthorrhoea (grass-tree or blackboy) and Kingia, arborescent plants with an erect woody stem crowned with a tuft of long stiff narrow leaves, from the centre of which rises a tall dense flower spike or a number of stalked flower-heads; this group has been included in Juncaceae, from which it is doubtfully distinguished only by the absence of the long twisted stigmas which characterize the true rushes.
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  • It resembles Juncaceae in the general plan of the flower, which, however, has become much more elaborate and varied in the form and colour of its perianth in association with transmission of pollen by insect agency; a link between the two orders is found in the group of Australian genera referred to above under Asphodeloideae.
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  • The numerous bowling-greens are regularly frequented and are among the best in Scotland - the first Australian team of bowlers that visited the mother country (in 1901) pronouncing the green in Lutton Place the finest on which they had played.
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  • The town-hall, a large florid building of Classic order, stands on an eminence, and its clock tower forms a landmark; it contains the spacious Centennial Hall (commemorating the first Australian colonization here in 1787), and has one of the finest organs in the world.
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  • The Domain embraces 138 acres, extending along one side of Woolloomooloo Bay and surrounding Farm Cove, in which the warships belonging to the Australian station are usually anchored; in this charming expanse of park land are the governor's residence and the National Art Gallery, which houses a splendid collection of pictures by modern artists, statuary, pottery and other objects of art.
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  • The Australian Eucalyptus and Casuarina in great variety, and many other imported trees, including syringas, wattles, acacias, willows, pines, cypress, cork and oak all thrive when properly planted and protected from grass fires.
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  • He was ordained priest in 1831, and in 1833 went to New South Wales, as vicar-general to Bishop William Morris (1794-1872), whose jurisdiction extended over the Australian missions.
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  • Among the most successful of the imported trees are citrus trees, the Australian wattle and the eucalyptus.
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  • Australian deposits were worked in 1872, and in the following year the production was 3000 tons; the maximum outputs were in 1881-1883, averaging 10,000 tons annually; but the supply declined to 2420 tons in 1898 and has since increased to about 5028 tons in 1905.
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  • Between the last days of March and the day of the landing the defence system was overhauled and greatly developed.2 The Franco-British expeditionary force was to be composed of seven divisions - three, the 29th, the 42nd and the Royal Naval, furnished by the United Kingdom, two formed of Australian and New Zealand troops, and two composed of French colonial troops.
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  • One British and one French division were moved from the peninsula to Salonika early in Oct., but an additional Australian division had arrived a few weeks earlier.
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  • There are in addition some pearling grounds in the Mergui Archipelago, which have a very recent history; they were practically unknown before 1890; in the early 'nineties they were worked by Australian adventurers, most of whom have since departed; and now they are leased in blocks to a syndicate of Chinamen, who grant sub-leases to individual adventurers at the rate of £25 a pump for the pearling year.
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  • Boletus edulis, in the Oriental Trehala and in ergot of rye; melibiose, C12H22011, formed, with fructose, on hydrolysing the trisaccharose melitose (or raffinose), C18H32016.5H20, which occurs in Australian manna and in the molasses of sugar manufacture; touranose, C12H22011, formed with d-glucose and galactose on hydrolysing another trisaccharose, melizitose, C,8H32016 2H20, which occurs in Pinus larix and in Persian manna; and agavose, C12H22011, found in the stalks of Agave americana.
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  • There is much less moisture, and the flora is of a less tropical character than farther north; it has some Polynesian and New Zealand affinities, and on the west coast a partially Australian character; on the higher hills it is stunted; on the lower, however, there are fine .grass lands, and a scattered growth of niaulis (Melaleuca viridiflora), useful for its timber, bark and cajeput oil.
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  • "ANDREW FISHER (1862-), Australian statesman, was born at Crosshouse, Kilmarnock, Aug.
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  • The order Cedrelaceae (which is entirely distinct from the Conifers) includes, along with the mahoganies and other valuable timber-trees, the Jamaica and the Australian red cedars, Cedrela odorata, and C. Toona respectively.
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  • Milne Edwards has identified ten species which occur in Australian seas also, and Rein mentions, as belonging to the same category, the helmet-crab or horse-shoe crab (kabuto-gani, Limulus longispina I-Ioeven).
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  • Australia And New Zealand New South Wales.-The Australian Magazine was published monthly at Sydney in 1821-1822.
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  • Wilton, the New South Wales Magazine (1833), the New South Wales Literary, Political and Commercial Advertiser (1835), edited by the eccentric Dr Lhotsky, Tegg's Monthly Magazine (1836), the Australian Magazine (1838), the New South Wales Magazine (1843), the Australian Penny Journal (1848) and many others.
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  • Of later magazines the Australian (1878-1881), Aurora australis (1868), and the Sydney Magazine (1878), were the most noteworthy.
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  • Of contemporary magazines Dalgety's Review is mainly agricultural, the Australian Magazine (1909) and the Lone Hand (1907) are popular, and the Science of Man is an anthropological review.
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  • This was followed by the Australia Felix Magazine (1849), and the Australasian Quarterly Reprint (1850-1851) both published at Geelong, the Illustrated Australian Magazine (1850-1852), the Australian Gold-Digger's Monthly Magazine (1852-1853), edited by James Bonwick, and the Melbourne Monthly Magazine (1855-1856).
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  • The Journal of Australasia (1856-1858), the Australian Monthly Magazine (1865-1867), which contained contributions from Marcus Clarke and was continued as the Colonial Monthly (1867-1869), the Melbourne Review (1876-1885) and the Victorian Review (1879-1886) may also be mentioned.
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  • An Australian edition of the Review of Reviews is published at Melbourne.
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  • South Australia.-The South Australian Magazine was issued monthly in 1841-1843, the Adelaide Magazine (1845), the Adelaide Miscellany (1848-1849), and the Wanderer in 1853.
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  • The South Australian Twopenny Magazine was published at Plymouth, England, in 1839, and the South Australian Miscellany and New Zealand Review at London in the same year.
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  • The Australian venom and that of all viperine snakes, perhaps also that of the cobra, if introduced rapidly into the circulation, occasions extensive intravascular clotting.
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  • If the venom is slowly absorbed, the blood loses its coagulability, owing to the breaking down of the red blood-corpuscles, most so with vipers, less with Australian snakes, least so with the cobra.
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  • The pythons (q.v.) are restricted to the palaeotropical and Australian regions, with the sole exception of Loxocemus bicolor in southern Mexico.
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  • They are the tropical American Elaps, the Indian Callophis, the African Poecilophis and the Australian Vermicella.
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  • The family is cosmopolitan, excepting Madagascar and the whole of the Australian region.
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  • It is especially suitable to gold containing little silver and base metals - a character of Australian gold - but it yields to the sulphuric acid and electrolytic methods in point of economy.
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  • The line at the beginning of this advance was held as follows: on the right was the Australian Corps (Monash) with the 32nd, 5th Australian and 3rd Australian Div.
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  • Generally speaking the operations of the Australian Corps in the centre were completely successful, those of the IX.
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  • U.S. Corps; the former was maintained in reserve, but the latter was combined with the Australian Corps and took over the left of its front and the right of the III.
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  • Corps front, relieving the 1st Australian, 74th and 18th Div.
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  • The supporting Australian divisions therefore found themselves in a difficult situation, which was only redeemed by hard and skilful infantry fighting.
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  • The Australian Corps also successfully attained its first objectives, though not till later in the evening, so that the exploitation of their success on this day proved out of the question.
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  • The Australian Shelf rises steeply as a rule from depths, of 2500 to 3000 fathoms. A broad depression with depths of from 3300 to 3500 fathoms lies to the east of the Cocos Islands and extends into the angle between the Malay Archipelago and Australia.
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  • The Amphibia, to which the sea is a barrier, are almost exclusively of Australian affinities.
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  • In the low and sub-mountainous lands the flora is a mixture of Malayan, Australian and Polynesian forms. There are, according to Muller, twice as many palms known from New Guinea as from Australia.
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  • The trade of British New Guinea is exclusively with the Australian colonies.
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  • They inhabit the Ethiopian, Indian, and Australian regions, 2 and, with some notable exceptions, the species mostly have but a limited range.
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  • Speaking generally, the administration of the operations is conducted upon the Australian plan, with special attention to allaying the distrust of the native and more ignorant classes, for which purpose the influence of the clergy was enlisted.
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  • Coins from the London and Australian mints are examined.
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  • There are about one thousand species of flowering plants, of which about three-fourths are endemic. Most of those not peculiar to the country are Australian; others are South American, European, Antarctic; and some have Polynesian affinities.
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  • Compelled by the windy climate the colonists are doing something to repair these ravages by planting European, Californian and Australian sheltertrees; but it is only in the naturally open and grassy regions of the east and south-east that settlement as yet improves the landscape.
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  • - The increase of wealth went on after 1879 in spite of dull times, and was only checked by the especially severe financial depression of 1893 and 1894, caused by low prices and the Australian bank panic. The estimated private wealth of colonists fell from £236 per head in 1890 to £219 in 1895.
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  • Of the five banks of issue doing business in the dominion three are Australian and New Zealand institutions.
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  • The flora is most closely associated with that of New Zealand, and the avifauna indicates the same connexion rather than one with Australia, as those birds which belong to Australian genera are apparently immigrants, while those which occur on the island in common with New Zealand would be incapable of such distant migration.
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  • European fruit trees and vines flourish in certain localities, while in the drier regions the Australian wattle, gum trees and pepper trees have been introduced with success.
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  • Thus there is no sovereignty among wandering groups of Australian savages: each family is isolated, each horde is a loose and unstable collection.
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  • It is more accurate to say that as to certain matters the legislature of the Canadian Dominion is sovereign, and as to certain others that it is not (Lefroy, 244; Quick and Garran, Australian Commonwealth, 328; Dicey, 106); and as to some matters they are in fact, if not in form, universitates superiorem non recognoscentes (Quick and Garran, 319); or that they are states in process of making.
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  • The archipelago, in effect, is divided between two great regions, the Asiatic and the Australian, and the fact is evident in various branches of its geography - zoological, botanical, and even human.
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  • It is believed that there was a landconnexion between Asia and Australia in the later part of the Secondary epoch, and that the Australian continent, when separated, became divided into islands before the south-eastern part of the Asiatic did so.
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  • The physical division between the Asiatic and Australian regions is clearly reflected in the botany and zoology.
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  • Similarly, in the Asiatic islands are found the great mammals of the continent - the elephant, tiger, rhinoceros, anthropoid ape, &c., which are wanting in the Australian region, with which the eastern part of the archipelago is associated.
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  • Australian and Japanese trade in the archipelago was stimulated by the establishment of the Australian Commonwealth (1901) and the Russo-Japanese War (1904-5).
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  • The feathers have a large after-shaft which is of the size of the other half, likewise in agreement with the Australian Ratitae, while in the others, including the kiwis, the after-shaft is absent.
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  • The affinities of the moas are undoubtedly with the Australian Ratitae, and, in spite of the differences mentioned above, with the kiwis.
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  • The headquarters of parrots are in the Australian Region and the Malay countries; they are abundant in South America; in Africa and India the number of forms is relatively small; in Europe and North Asia there are none now alive, in North America only one.
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  • Sars (1887) having had the opportunity of raising it from dried Australian mud, found that, unlike other phyllopods, but like the Cladocera, the parent keeps its brood within the shell until their full development.
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  • On reaching the western Pacific part of this current passes southwards, east of New Zealand, and again east of Australia, as the East Australian Current, part northwards to join the Equatorial CounterCurrent, and during the north-east monsoon part makes its way through the China Sea towards the Indian Ocean.
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  • The kidnapping of natives for the South American and Australian labour markets was common.
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  • Lastly there are the few Pygopodidae of the Australian region, with still quite obscure relationship.
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  • On the other hand, two other Australian agamoids have attained some celebrity by their grotesque appearance, due to the extraordinary development of their integuments.
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  • This large family contains about 400 species, with numerous genera; the greatest diversity in numbers and forms occurs in the tropical parts of the Old World, especially in the Australian region, inclusive of many of the Pacific islands.
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  • Many of the commercial buildings are of architectural merit, notably the banks, of which the bank of Australasia, a massive edifice of the Doric order, and the Gothic Australian bank are the finest examples.
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  • In 1901 Melbourne became the temporary capital of the Australian commonwealth pending the selection of the permanent capital in New South Wales.
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  • The most marked case of such inversion in comparative anatomy is that of Carl Gegenbaur (5826-5903), who in arranging the fins of fishes in support of his theory that the fin of the Australian.
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  • Thus, animism is in some directions little developed, so far as we can see, among the Australian aborigines; but from those who know them best we learn that they believe in innumerable spirits and bush bogies, which wander, especially at night, and can be held at bay by means of fire; with this belief may be compared the ascription in European folk belief of prophylactic properties to iron.
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  • N.B.-A trifling quantity of Californian and Australian wheat was imported in the period in question, but the Board of Trade records do not distinguish the quantities, therefore they cannot be given.
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  • There are six living species, all in Australian seas.
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  • Sapphire is widely distributed through the gold-bearing drifts of Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, but the blue colour of the Australian stones is usually dark, and it is notable that green tints are not infrequent.
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  • Buying, selling or offering to buy or sell a vote has for penalty disfranchisement, and since 1891 the Australian ballot system has been used.
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  • 2 (total 12) in the Australian water-rats; but in the great majority of species it presents striking uniformity, and may be set down typically as i.
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  • There are several species, spread over the northern part of the Australian region from the Aru Islands to Queensland.
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  • In the typical Australian and Papuan Hydromys, locally known as water-rats, the molars originally have transverse ridges, the enamel folds between which form cutting edges whose sharpness depends upon the degree to which the teeth have been worn, while the large hind feet are webbed.
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  • A sort of Monroe doctrine is growing into popular favour also throughout the Australian Commonwealth, where it is felt that a continent so far removed from European rivalries ought not to be exposed to complications on account of them.
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  • Among the Australian natives we catch the consecrating agency at work.
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  • The Australian or " Massachusetts " ballot, adopted in 1891 under a law which fails to require personal registration, by a provision like that in Nebraska makes it easy to vote a straight ticket; party names are arranged on the ballot according to the number of votes secured by each party at the last preceding election.
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  • Owing to the deep water between Timor and the Arafura Sea, the fauna of Timor presents scarcely any Australian types beyond a marsupial cuscus.
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  • The elytra are equally reduced, and apparently for the same purpose, in an Australian Longicorn beetle (Esthesis ferrugineus), which, like so many wasp-like Hymenoptera, has the body banded red and black.
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  • This beetle probably mimics the Australian hornet (Abispa australis).
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  • The Australian Presbyterians have important agencies in the South Seas and in Korea, the Australian Baptists in Bengal, the Canadians of various denominations in the Far North-West of the Dominion, and in India and China.
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  • The Anglican Church in Canada has its Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, working in the North-West and in Japan; and in Australia it has a Board of Missions, working amongst the Australian aborigines and in New Guinea.
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  • In British New Guinea, the south-east portion of the island, the London Mission (1871), the Australian Wesleyans (1892) and the Anglican Church of Australia (1892), have arranged a friendly division of the field and met with gratifying success.
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  • Peat soil is largely employed for the culture of such plants as rhododendrons, azaleas, heaths, &c. In districts where heather and gritty soil predominate, the peat soil is poor and unprofitable, but selections from both the heathy and the richer peat soils, collected with judgment, and stored in a dry part of the compost yard, are essential ingredients in the cultivation of many choice pot plants, such as the Cape heaths and many of the Australian plants.
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  • Heaths and Australian plants must be very sparingly watered, and kept with only fire heat enough to repel frost.
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  • In the north the pine tree (Pinus Merkusii) has advanced almost to the equator, and in the south are a variety of species characteristic of the Australian region.
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  • To this species are more or less closely allied numerous birds inhabiting the Palaearctic and Indian regions, as well as the greater part of America, but not occurring in the Antilles, in the southern portion of the Neotropical Region, or in the Ethiopian or Australian.
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  • It is the hardest known substance (though tantalum, or an alloy of tantalum now competes with it) and is chosen as io in the mineralogist's scale of hardness; but the difference in hardness between diamond (io) and corundum (9) is really greater than that between corundum (9) and talc (1); there is a difference in the hardness of the different faces; the Borneo stones are also said to be harder than those of Australia, and the Australian harder than the African, but this is by no means certain.
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  • Other Australian localities are Echunga in South Australia; Beechworth, Arena and Melbourne in Victoria; Freemantle and Nullagine in Western Australia; the Palmer and Gilbert rivers in Queensland.
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  • Polish millet is P. sanguinale; P. frumentaceum, shamalo, a Deccan grass, is probably a native of tropical Africa; P. decompositum is the Australian millet, its grains being made into cakes by the aborigines.
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  • In some cases leaves, as in Iris, or leaf-like petioles, as in Australian acacias and eucalypti, have their plane of expansion parallel to the axis of the shoot, there is then no distinction into an upper and a lower face, but the two sides are developed alike; or the leaf may have a cylindrical or polyhedral form, as in mesembryanthemum.
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  • In some Australian acacias, and in some species of Oxalis and Bupleurum, the petiole is flattened in a vertical direction, the vascular bundles separating immediately after quitting the stem and running nearly parallel from base to apex.
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  • The Australian demand is fed by steamers from Calcutta and Colombo, with some additions direct from China and Java.
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  • When in 1905 the rich silver area was found in northern Ontario, a rush was made to it, comparable to those to the Australian and Californian goldfields.
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  • The Australian, Canadian and New Zealand censorships adopted a different system, so that the exploits of these troops were and are well known throughout the world.
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  • (8) The Australian Church, consisting of (a) the province of New South Wales, with 10 dioceses; (b) the province of Queensland, with 5 dioceses; (c) the province of Victoria, with 5 dioceses.
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  • The Bovidae form a most extensive family, with members widely distributed throughout the Old World, with the exception of the Australian region; but in America they are less numerous, and confined to the Arctic and northern temperate regions, no species being indigenous either to South or Central America.
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  • To the naturalist Lombok is of particular interest as the frontier island of the Australian region, with its cockatoos and megapods or moundbuilders, its peculiar bee-eaters and ground thrushes.
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  • On the other hand, such a decrease as has occurred in Tahiti and Tonga, can be accounted for only by an accumulation of outward causes, such as wars, massacres, and raidings for the Australian and South American labour markets before this traffic was suppressed or regulated.
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  • Under this act, in 1902, there was a favourable vote (451,319 to 76,975) for the adoption of measures requisite to securing the election of United States senators by popular and direct vote, and in 1903 the legislature of the state (which in 1891 had asked Congress to submit such an amendment) adopted a joint resolution asking Congress to call a convention to propose such an amendment to the Federal Constitution; in 1904 there was a majority of all the votes cast in the election for an amendment to the primary laws providing that voters may vote at state primaries under the Australian ballot.
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  • In 1845 he paid a visit to Canada and the United States, and in1857-1859to the Australian colonies.
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  • "WILLIAM MORRIS HUGHES (1864-), Australian statesman, was born in Wales Sept.
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  • On his journey to Great Britain he made a speech in New York, May 31 1918, advocating the application of the Monroe doctrine to the South Pacific islands in the interests of Australia, and at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, where he was the Australian representative, he objected to any authority over ex-German territory in these islands being granted to the League of Nations.
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  • An Australian expedition was fitted out under the command of Dr. (later Sir) Douglas Mawson, with Capt.
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  • The results of the Australian and German expeditions, which were for a great part of the time synchronous with those of Scott and Amundsen, required to be taken into consideration before a general theory of the atmospheric circulation within the Antarctic circle could be established.
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  • The rich and varied flora of the Philippines is essentially Malayan, intermixed with Chinese and Australian elements, but with sufficient individuality to constitute a sub-region, there being at least 769 species peculiar to the archipelago.
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  • The neat cattle, which are of Australian and Indian origin, are raised chiefly for beef, their hides and their horns; about nine-tenths of them were destroyed by the rinderpest and the war at the close of the 19th century.
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  • Elections are by Australian ballot; the constitution prescribes that no law shall " be enacted whereby the right to vote at any election shall be made to depend upon any previous registration of the elector's name " (extremely unusual).
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  • The Australian ballot was introduced in 1891.
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  • Adelaide is governed by a mayor and six aldermen elected by the whole body of the ratepayers, and is the only Australian city in which the mayor is so elected.
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  • Adelaide is also the central share market of Australia, for West Australian goldmines, for the silver-mines at Broken Hill, and for the coppermines at Wallaroo, Burra Burra and Moonta; while Port Adelaide, on the neighbouring shore of St Vincent Gulf, ranks as the third in the Commonwealth.
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  • Vertebraria and Phyllotheca, plants characteristic of the Indian Gondwana series, have been recorded in Sarawak; and marine forms, similar to those of the lower part of the Australian Carboniferous system, are stated to occur in the limestone of north Borneo.
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  • In some instances, however, more especially in the Australian species, the leaflets are suppressed and the leaf-stalks become vertically flattened, and serve the purpose of leaves.
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  • The bark of various Australian species, known as wattles, is also very rich in tannin and forms an important article of export.
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  • Some species afford valuable timber; such are Acacia melanoxylon, black wood of Australia, which attains a great size; its wood is used for furniture, and takes a high polish; and Acacia homalophylla (also Australian), myall wood, which yields a fragrant timber, used for ornamental purposes.
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  • The genuine Isopoda are divided among the Flabellifera, in which the terminal segment and uropods form a flabellum or swimming fan; the Epicaridea, parasitic on Crustaceans; the Valvifera, in which the uropods fold valve-like over the branchial pleopods; the Asellota, in which the first pair of pleopods of the female are usually transformed into a single opercular plate; the Phreatoicidea, a fresh-water tribe, known as yet only from subterranean waters in New Zealand and an Australian swamp nearly 6000 ft.
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  • The United Kingdom produces no wine, but the Cape and the Australian Commonwealth each produce some 5 million gallons.
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  • Wines Of The British Empire The production of the British empire is very small, amounting to roughly to million gallons, and this is produced almost entirely in the Cape of Good Hope and in the Australian Commonwealth.
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  • It has been recognized, however, that it is impossible to actually reproduce the character of the European wines, and it is now generally held to be desirable to recognize the fact that Australian and Cape wines represent distinct types, and to sell them as such without any reference to the European parent types from which they have been derived.
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  • The main point of interest connected with the dingo relates to its origin; that is to say, whether it is a member of the indigenous Australian fauna (among which it is the only large placental mammal), or whether it has been introduced into the country by man.
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  • There seems to be no doubt that fossilized remains of the dingo occur intermingled with those of the extinct Australian mammals, such as giant kangaroos, giant wombats and the still more gigantic Diprotodon.
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  • Ogilvy in a Catalogue of Australian Mammals, published at Sydney in 1892; the writer going however one step further and expressing the belief that the dingo is the ancestor of all domesticated dogs.
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  • Consequently the Australian natives must be presumed to have reached the island-continent by way of Malaya; and if this be admitted, nothing is more likely than that they should have been accompanied by pariah dogs of the Indian type.
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  • If so, all pariahs should be classed with the Australian warrigal under the name of Canis dingo.
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  • The literal sense of the term churinga, applied by the Central Australians to their sacred objects, and likewise used more abstractly to denote mystic power, as when a man is said to be " full of churinga," is " secret," and is symptomatic of the esotericism that is a striking mark of Australian, and indeed of all primitive, religion, with its insistence on initiation, its exclusion of women, and its strictly enforced reticence concerning traditional lore and proceedings.
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  • The prominence of the notion of the Alcheringa " dreamtime," or sacred past, in Central Australian religion illustrates the essential connexion perceived by the savage to lie between the sacred and the traditional.
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  • The common Australian "opossum" or phalanger (Trichosurus vulpecula) has been naturalized in New Zealand, although very destructive to fruit trees; the value of its fur being probably the motive.
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  • Attempts to naturalize that well-known Australian grass-parrakeet the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) in England have so far proved abortive, and none of the species experimented with in Norfolk and Bedfordshire effected a settlement.
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  • Rooks (Corvus frugilegus) and the Australian "magpie" or piping crow (Gymnorhina) are to be found in New Zealand, but only locally, especially the former.
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  • An Australian tree-frog (Hyla peronii) is naturalized in many parts of the north island of New Zealand.
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  • His mother was the daughter of Captain Matthew Flinders, the Australian explorer.
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    0
  • The Australian natives believed that the virtues of one killed could be transferred to survivors if the latter rubbed themselves with his caul-fat.
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  • Of non-indigenous flora are the oak, poplar, bluegum, the Australian wattle, the vine, and almost every variety of fruit tree and European vegetables.
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    0
  • The summer climate is the coolest in the Australian states.
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  • They were important sources of food-supply to the natives, and are hunted by the colonists, both for sport and on account of the damage they do in consuming grass required for cattle and sheep. A few species are found in New Guinea, and the adjacent islands, which belong, in the zoological sense, to the Australian province, beyond the bounds of which none occurs.
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  • The South Australian Caloprymnus campestris represents a genus near akin to the last, but with the edge of the hairy border of the bare muzzle less emarginate in the middle line, still more swollen auditory bullae, very large and posterially expanded nasals and longer vacuities on the palate.
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  • The soil is fertile, and the indigenous flora has been greatly enriched by the importation of such plants as the agave, the Mexican opuntia, the American maple, the Australian eucalyptus, the Scotch fir and the so-called Portuguese cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) from the Azores.
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  • An Australian ballot law was passed in 1891.
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  • He discovered that the Malay Archipelago was divided into a western group of islands, which in their zoological affinities are Oriental, and an eastern, which are Australian.
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  • Since 1860 New South Wales had added more largely to its population than any of the other Australian states.
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  • The bulk of the trade is carried on with the other Australian states; in 1905 the value of such trade was, imports, £14,938,885, and exports, £12,263,472 the British trade is also considerable, the imports direct from Great Britain being valued at £8,602,288 and the exports £10,222,422.
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  • He sighted the Australian coast at Gippsland, Victoria, near Cape Everard, which he named Point Hicks, and sailed along the east coast of Australia as far north as Botany Bay, where he landed, and claimed possession of the continent on behalf of King George III.
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  • This measure, passed with great difficulty and by bringing considerable pressure to bear upon the nominated council, was the outcome of a lengthened agitation throughout the Australian colonies, and was followed by similar legislation in all of them.
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  • Lord Jersey assumed office on the 15th of January 1891, and a few weeks afterwards the conference to consider the question of federating the Australian colonies was held at Sydney, and the great strike, which at one time had threatened to paralyse the trade of the colony, came to an end.
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  • In 1896 a conference of Australian premiers was held at Sydney to consider the question of federation.
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  • The visit of the Australian premiers to England on the occasion of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee gave an additional impetus to federation, and in September 1897 the convention reassembled in Sydney and discussed the modifications in the constitution which had been suggested in the local parliaments.
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  • Divination is practised in all grades of culture; its votaries range from the Australian black to the American medium.
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  • Among the Australian blacks, divination is largely employed to discover the cause of death, where it is assumed to be due to magic; in some cases the spirit of the dead man is held to give the information, in others the living magician is the source of the knowledge.
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  • These men of the factory - devoting their lives to the cataloguing of archives and libraries, to the publication of material, and then to the gigantic task of indexing what they have produced - have made it possible for the student in an American or Australian college to master in a few hours in his library sources of history which baffled the long years of research of a Martene or Rymer.
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  • The sparrow weighs 339 times less than the Australian crane, and possesses 7 times more surface, &c. If now we compare the insects and the birds, the gradation will become even much more striking.
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  • There is the interesting case of Papua (formerly British New Guinea), over which a protectorate was established in 1884, but which became in 1906 a territory of the Australian Commonwealth.
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  • Among modern tribes of mankind the forehead of the Australian aborigines makes the nearest approach to this type, as was pointed out by Huxley.
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  • It has been argued, on the other hand, that not all such mixed breeds are permanent, and especially that the cross between Europeans and Australian indigenes is almost sterile; but this assertion, when examined with the care demanded by its bearing on the general question of hybridity, has distinctly broken down.
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  • Still, the lower animals make no approach to the human system of natural utterance by gesturesigns and emotional-imitative sounds, while the practical identity of this human system among races physically so unlike as the Englishman and the native of the Australian bush indicates extreme closeness of mental similarity throughout the human species.
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  • When, however, the Englishman and the Australian speak each in his native tongue, only such words as belong to the interjectional and imitative classes will be naturally intelligible, and as it were instinctive to both.
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  • The Australian and English languages each consist mainly of a series of words having no apparent connexion with the ideas they signify, and differing utterly; of course, accidental coincidences and borrowed words must be excluded from such comparisons.
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  • It would be easy to enumerate other languages of the world, such as Basque, Turkish, Hebrew, Malay, Mexican, all devoid of traceable resemblance to Australian and English, and to one another.
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  • The Australian black-fellow or the forest Indian of Brazil, who may be taken as examples of the lowest modern savage, had, before contact with whites, attained to rudimentary stages in many of the characteristic functions of civilized life.
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  • The revision of the Australian species by Bentham well exhibits the wide range of the genera of the order in a flora generally so peculiar and restricted as that of Australia.
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  • A form of the Australian ballot with party columns is provided at public expense.
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  • - Stems tuberous or columnar, not infrequently branched, rarely epiphytic (Peruvian species of Zamia); fronds pinnate, bi-pinnate in the Australian genus Bowenia.
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  • Athrotaxis and Microcachrys are characteristic Australian types.
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  • "SIR EDMUND BARTON (1849-1920), Australian statesman and judge, was born at Sydney, N.S.W., Jan.
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  • He was a keen supporter of Federation and in 1900 led the delegation sent to London with the Australian Commonwealth bill.
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  • The same remark would apply to the charges for passenger conveyance and goods freight made by governments which carry on railway business, as in Prussia, India and the Australian states.
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  • Among trees introduced by the Dutch or British colonists the oak, poplar, various pines, the Australian blue-gum (eucalyptus) and wattle flourish.
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  • Several lines of steamers ply between Cape Town and Australian ports, and others between Cape Colony and India.
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  • He promoted the Economic Conference in Paris in June 1916, and represented his country on the occasion, with Mr. Hughes, the Australian Premier, and Lord Crewe as his colleagues.
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  • The saltest surface water is found in (a) the Arabian Sea and (b) along a belt extending from West Australia to South Africa, the highest salinity in this belt occurring at the Australian end.
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  • The Australian ballot was adopted in 1889.
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  • The Australian ballot was introduced in 1893.
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  • The great Australian colonies were almost created in her reign; two of themVictoria and Queenslandowe their name to her; they all received those autonomous institutions, under which their prosperity has been built up, during its continuance.
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  • The flora has also some Australian and New Zealand affinities (resembling in this respect the New Caledonia and New Hebrides groups), shown especially in these western districts by the Pandanus, by certain acacias and others.
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  • We find, among Australian natives, among Abipones in South America, and among Ojibways in the North, actual people named Dawn,Gold Flower of Day, Dark Cloud, Sun, and so forth.
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  • The son of an Australian male, whose kin or totem name is Crane, takes, in many tribes, his mother's kin-name, Swan or Cockatoo, or whatever it may be, and the same is a common rule in Africa and America among races who rarely remember their great-grandfathers.
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  • The same explanation may be applied to Greek and Aztec myths of the deluge, to Australian and Greek myths of the original theft of fire.
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  • Man's craving to know " the reason why " is already " among rude savages an intellectual appetite," and " even to the Australian scientific speculation has its germ in actual experience."' How does he try to satisfy this craving ?
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  • As a rule, however, the Australian AllFather is anthropomorphic, and fairly well described in the native term when they speak English as " the Big Man," powerful, deathless, friendly, " able to go everywhere and do everything," " to see whatever you do."
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  • Spencer and Gillen do not tell us that they have a colloquial knowledge of any Australian language.
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  • In the New Hebrides, Tagar takes the role of Qat, and Suqe of the bad principle, Loki, Ahriman, Tangaro Loloqong, the Australian Crow and so forth.
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  • In this aspect they are natural phenomena still, but phenomena as originally conceived of by the personifying imagination of the savage, and credited, like the gods of the Maori or the Australian, with all manner of freaks, adventures and disguises.
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  • The chief foes of Indra are Vrittra and Ahi, serpents which swallow up the waters, precisely as frogs do in Australian and Californian and Andaman myths.
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  • Another Australian theory is that the men of a previous race, the Nooralie (very old ones), made the earth.
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  • As a rule, destruction by a deluge is the most favourite myth, but destructions by fire and wind and by the wrath of a god are common in Australian, Peruvian and Egyptian tradition.
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  • The Australian version, singularly like one Greek legend, is given by Brough Smyth.
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  • Apart from South Africa, his most important work at this time was the successful passing of the Australian Commonwealth Act (1900), in which both tact and firmness were needed to settle certain differences between the imperial government and the colonial delegates.
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  • Comus was the sire of Humphrey Clinker (1822), whose son was Melbourne (1834), sire of West Australian (1850) and of many valuable mares, including Canezou (1845) and Blink Bonny (1854), dam of Blair Athol.
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  • This animal, which inhabits the south-eastern parts of the Australian continent, is about 2 ft.
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  • It has lately been stated that some of the Australian species are normally oviparous, but this has not been fully proved.
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  • Fletcher, indeed, is of opinion that the Australian forms are all varieties of, one species, P. leuckarti.
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  • Fletcher, "On the Specific Identity of the Australian Peripatus, usually supposed to be P. leuckarti, Saenger," Proc. Linn.
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  • It is composed of the island of Tasmania and its adjoining islands, and is separated from the Australian continent on the south-east by Bass Strait.
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  • The main axis of the Great Cordillera - so termed originally by Sir Roderick Murchison - bordering the eastern coast-line of Australia, may be traced across Bass Strait in the chain of islands forming the Furneaux and Kent group, which almost continually link Tasmania with Wilson's Promontory, the nearest and most southerly part of the Australian mainland.
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  • - Tasmania is, geologically, an outlier of the Australian continent.
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  • Insects, though similar to Australian ones, are far less troublesome; many are to be admired for their great beauty.
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  • Like all the Australian states, Tasmania shows a decline in the birthrate; in 5905 the births were 5256-36 less than in 1904 - which gives a rate of 29.32 per loco of mean population.
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  • The climate is probably more healthy than that of any of the Australian states, although, owing to the large number of old people in the colony, the death-rate would appear to put Tasmania on a par with New South Wales and South Australia.
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  • The local constitution resembles that of the other Australian states inasmuch as the executive government of four ministers is responsible to the legislature, which consists of a legislative council and a house of assembly.
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  • The Mount Zeehan and Dundas districts produce almost the whole of the silver at the present time, and most of the ore is sold to agents of the Australian and German smelting works.
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  • Wheat is the principal crop, and the yield is larger per acre and less variable than that of the Australian states: for the fifteen years ending with 1905 the average yield was 18.9 bushels per acre, ranging between 15 bushels in 1894 and 27 bushels in 1899.
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  • The oat crop is also much above the Australian average, and may be set down at 30 bushels an acre, but an average of 5 bushels higher is not infrequent.
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  • In the meat trade between the River Plate, the United States, Canada and Great Britain, ammonia or carbonic acid machines are now exclusively used, but for the Australian and New Zealand frozenmeat trade compressed-air machines are still employed to a small extent.
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  • This Jurassic species bore bipinnate fronds not unlike those of the South African, Australian, and New Zealand Fern Todea barbara, which were characterized by a stout rachis and short broad pinnules bearing numerous large sporangia covering the under surface of the lamina.
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  • Dorsetshire and in the Inferior Oolite beds of Yorkshire, as well as in Rhaetic strata in Persia and elsewhere; it is characterized by its bipinnate fronds, and may be compared with the recent Australian genus Bowenia - peculiar among living Cycads in having bipinnate fronds.
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  • The Proteaceae, according to Heer, are still common, the Australian genera Hakea, Dryandra, Grevillea and Banksia, being represented.
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  • Thus New Caledonia, which has a rich and quite special lizard-fauna, has no batrachians of its own, although the Australian Hyla aurea has been introduced with success.
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  • We should have four great realms:-(1) Europe and Northern and Temperate Asia, Africa north of the Sahara (palaearctic region) and North and Central America (nearctic region); (2) Africa and South-Eastern Asia (Ethiopian and Indian region); (3) South America (neotropical region); and (4) Australia (Australian region).
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  • Of land birds, for example, about 160 species are known, and of these not less than about 90 are peculiar, the majority of the remainder being Asiatic in distinction from Australian.
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  • As in natural vegetation and fauna, so in cultivated products, Celebes, apart from its peculiarities, presents the transitional link between the Asiatic and the Australian regions of the Malayan province.
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  • It stands upon the great Canterbury plain, which here is a dead level, though the monotony of the site has been much relieved by extensive plantations of English and Australian trees.
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  • In another Australian legend fire was stolen by the hawk from the bandicoot, and given to men.
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  • Like the Australian Pundjel, and the Maori Tiki, he made men of clay.
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  • I'm a mixture of Yorkshire man and Australian and I don't think we have much guile.
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  • An Australian aborigine who worked on a ranch could be seen talking to a tree.
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  • The cover carries stamps to the value of 1/4, which is sufficient for the All Australian airmail.
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  • The first Overseas player application is from Oulton Park who wish to register Australian all-rounder Jason Swift from Canberra.
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  • I'm fourth generation Australian, a volatile mixture of Italian, Irish and Scots ancestry.
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  • Experimental studies of ornaments in crested auklets (Alaska) and Australian finches, with reference to mate choice and species isolation.
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  • Tell us about your most memorable filming disaster. âIt has to be when we were filming Pebble Mill for the Australian bicentenary.
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  • Have the cricket reporters in Australia forgotten Gregory and Macdonald bowling ferocious bouncers in Armstrong's Australian team of 1921?
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  • Bursaria spinosa Australian boxthorn A man developed squamous carcinoma of the skin of the forehead at the site of a boxthorn prickle puncture injury.
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  • The picture Nurse Rozetta is hanging is a picture of Ned Kelly, a famous Australian bushranger.
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  • The sound of a beaten Australian captain comes close to the sound of angels playing harps.
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  • Australian researchers have already repaired torn cartilage on the knees of 10 sheep with this natural glue, which frogs use to trap insects.
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  • Three walkers completed in excess of 100 miles and we welcomed one new Australian centurion into our elite club.
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  • The Australian clearwings have shown excellent clear wings, but their size has left a lot to be desired.
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  • Smyrna was competed in Oct 1876 and launched as a wool clipper for the Australian trading market.
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  • That the length and broadness of their tail feathers is similar to the Australian black cockatoos Calyptorhynchus.
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  • Unfortunately, evidential collectivism is not the uniform style of Italian science and/or Australian science, nor even any single laboratory within those countries.
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  • Cult Australian spoof comedy Let the Blood Run Free charted life in St Christopher's Hospital.
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  • The context of my work within the Australian higher education sector is a site of knowledge contestation.
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  • What exactly does that mean.: :: I was surprised to find that crackerjack is not Australian in origin.
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  • The morning was, as expected, very productive and we saw some interesting things including an Australian crake and about 1000 Banded Stilts.
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  • October 15th 2003: Up before dawn to look for Baillon's crake around Berri effluent ponds, but only Australian Crakes were seen.
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  • They decide to visit a meteor crater, where their car fails to start leaving them stranded in the middle of the Australian outback.
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  • A group of German tourists swimming in the Australian outback was attacked by a giant saltwater crocodile, killing one.
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  • In this study, Australian researchers found that UVA rays caused DNA damage to the cells deep within the skin.
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  • What's been done with under a million Australian dollars is impressive.
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  • The Aussies start expressing their support for their fella and the Australian Alps are still full, if slightly downcast.
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  • Meanwhile the Australian Tunneling Party - led by Captain Alex Sanderson - located and destroyed two dugouts and three mine shafts.
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  • Dump opposed The South Australian state government has re-affirmed its opposition to plans to build a low-level nuclear waste dump opposed The South Australian state government has re-affirmed its opposition to plans to build a low-level nuclear waste dump near Woomera.
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  • Featured Richard Barrett - transmission Hard-edged showpieces written for crack Australian ensemble elision read more.
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  • An Australian friend and I had an inebriated plan to sneak onto Hampstead Heath at night and plant eucalyptus seedlings all over it.
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  • I'm always encouraged by the words of John Chapman, the Australian evangelist who led two missions here.
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  • However, in responding cautiously to French and german expansionism in the Pacific, he alienated and infuriated the Australian colonists.
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  • However, he is getting a first hand view of the depth to which animal rights extremism has pervaded Australian society.
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  • We love Australian fandom, and would love to meet more fans from the US!
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  • Australian finches are very engaging little birds which can provide many hours of enjoyment.
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  • The former Australian Olympic champion at the 200m freestyle, Duncan Campbell, considered what his response to Thorpe would have been.
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  • A Norwegian freighter ' The Tampa ' received the distress calls from the Australian Coast Guard and picked up the refugees.
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  • From here I drove to the east to Waihi Beach for some sea watching, but only few Australian gannets passed by.
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  • Why cannot Mr Jeremy Jones [of the Executive Council of Australian Jewry] show us or draw us a homicidal gas chamber?
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  • The new name is probably the worst-kept secret around and justifies us saying that the deaf community grapevine moves faster than Australian bushfire.
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  • Explain the identification and culture of a range of Australian native ground covers and small shrubs.
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  • Drug Aware this Australian site aims to provide information to minimize drug-related harm.
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  • Australian Cattle Dogs Australian Cattle Dogs are also known as Australian heelers, and are sturdy, working dogs.
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  • After coming through his lesson unscathed, Arthur gave a big high-five to longboarding and to Dave's Australian adventure.
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  • The action ranges from rural Essex to London's prisons and convict hulks; from the wilds of British Columbia to the Australian goldfields.
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  • I would like to conclude this paper by paying tribute to an Australian humorist.
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  • At one point observed an Australian infantryman " The whole division turned at an angle almost 45 degrees to us.
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  • It was also interesting to read the extent to which Britain covered up the rather inglorious performance of the Australian troops.
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