This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

australian

australian

australian Sentence Examples

  • There are no mountains behind the Great Australian Bight.

    23
    8
  • Another point agreed upon is that the Australian flora is one of vast antiquity.

    16
    5
  • Cambrian rocks occur in each of these districts, and they are best developed in the South Australian high= lands, where they include a long belt of contemporary glacial deposits.

    13
    3
  • A narrow Cambrian sea must have extended across central Australia from the Kimberley Goldfield in the north-west, through Tempe Downs and the Macdonnell chain in central Australia, to the South Australian highlands, central Victoria at Mansfield, and northern Tasmania.

    11
    5
  • A narrow Cambrian sea must have extended across central Australia from the Kimberley Goldfield in the north-west, through Tempe Downs and the Macdonnell chain in central Australia, to the South Australian highlands, central Victoria at Mansfield, and northern Tasmania.

    11
    5
  • Of those peculiar to Australian waters may be mentioned the arripis, represented by what is called among the colonists a salmon trout.

    10
    3
  • 1 - The Australian people are mainly of British origin, only 34% of the population of European descent being of non-British race.

    5
    3
  • Under the agreement a royal naval reserve was maintained, three of the Imperial vessels provided being utilized as drill ships for crews recruited from the Australian states.

    5
    6
  • 12), a west Australian creature of the size of a mouse, which may be regarded as representing by itself a sub-family (Tarsipediinae), characterized by the rudimentary teeth, the long and extensile tongue, and absence of a caecum.

    4
    3
  • The Kainozoic period opened with fresh earth movements, the most striking evidence of which are the volcanic outbreaks all round the Australian coasts.

    3
    1
  • A further gentle rise in the high steppes leads to the mountains of the West Australian coast, and another strip of low-lying coastal land to the sea.

    3
    2
  • Kangaroo Island, at the entrance of St Vincent Gulf, is one of the largest islands on the Australian coast, measuring 80 m.

    3
    3
  • The sea does not appear to have extended completely across Australia, breaking it into halves, for a projection from the Archean plateau of Western Australia extended as far east as the South Australian highlands, and thence probably continued eastward, till it joined the Victorian highlands.

    2
    0
  • The great monoclinal fold which formed the eastern face of the east Australian highlands, west of Sydney, is of later age.

    2
    0
  • The numerous facts, geological, geographical and biological, which when linked together lend great support to this theory, have been well worked out in Australia by Mr Charles Hedley of the Australian Museum, Sydney.

    2
    0
  • Except the opossums, no single living marsupial is known outside the Australian zoological region.

    2
    0
  • But the Transvaal War of 1899-1902, to which Australia sent 6310 volunteers (principally mounted rifles), and the gradual increase of military sentiment, brought the question more to the front, and more and more attention was given to making Australian defence a matter of local concern.

    2
    0
  • The Australian eucalyptus is now grown in many places, and there are groves of the paradise or paraiso tree (Melia azedarach) on the formerly treeless pampa.

    2
    1
  • The higher Australian peaks in the south-east look just what they are, the worn and denuded stumps of mountains, standing for untold ages above the sea.

    2
    1
  • Westward of South Australia, on the shores of the Australian Bight, there is a stretch of country 300 m.

    2
    1
  • From a geological standpoint, the Great Australian Plain and the fertile valley of the Nile have had a similar origin.

    2
    1
  • Taking the Lachlan as one type of Australian river, we find it takes its rise amongst the precipitous and almost unexplored valleys of the Great Dividing Range.

    2
    1
  • All Australian rivers, except the Murray and the Murrumbidgee, depend entirely and directly on the rainfall.

    2
    1
  • This period was marked by intense earth movements, which affected the whole of the east Australian highlands.

    2
    1
  • Similar granitic intrusions occurred in New South Wales and Queensland, and built up a mountain chain, which ran north and south across the continent; its worn-down stumps now form the east Australian highlands.

    2
    1
  • The Australian eucalyptus is now grown in many places, and there are groves of the paradise or paraiso tree (Melia azedarach) on the formerly treeless pampa.

    2
    1
  • From a geological standpoint, the Great Australian Plain and the fertile valley of the Nile have had a similar origin.

    2
    1
  • The Australian seas are inhabited by many fishes of the same genera as exist in the southern parts of Asia and Africa.

    2
    2
  • The origin and evolution of the Australian marsupials have been discussed by Mr B.

    2
    3
  • Round the Australian Bight it continues parallel to the coast, until south of Spencer Gulf (the basal ledge still averaging 8000 ft.

    1
    0
  • The coastal belt of Australia is everywhere well watered, with the exception of the country around the Great Australian Bight and Spencer Gulf.

    1
    0
  • The sea encroached far on the land from the Great Australian Bight and there formed the limestones of the Nullarbor Plains.

    1
    0
  • Tasmania and Victoria were separated by the foundering of Bass Strait, and at the same time the formation of the rift valley of Spencer Gulf, and Lake Torrens, isolated the South Australian highlands from the Eyre Peninsula and the Westralian plateau.

    1
    0
  • These immigrants then developed, with some exceptions, into the present Australian flora and fauna.

    1
    0
  • On the Australian side the fact that Tasmania is richest in marsupial types indicates the gate by which they entered.

    1
    0
  • The marsupials constitute two-thirds of all the Australian species of mammals.

    1
    0
  • Putting aside the exotic vegetation of the north and east coast-line, the Australian bush gains its peculiar character from the prevalence of the so-called gum-trees (Eucalyptus) and the acacias, of which last there are 300 species, but the eucalypts above all are everywhere.

    1
    0
  • As early as 1866, tannic acid, gallic acid, wood spirit, acetic acid, essential oil and eucalyptol were produced from various species of eucalyptus, and researches made by Australian chemists, notably by Messrs.

    1
    0
  • They serve admirably to break the sombre and monotonous aspect of the Australian vegetation.

    1
    0
  • Grasses and herbage in great variety constitute the most valuable element of Australian flora from the commercial point of view.

    1
    0
  • Proteaceous plants, although not exclusively Australian, are exceedingly characteristic of Australian scenery, and are counted amongst the oldest flowering plants of the world.

    1
    0
  • They are found in New Zealand and also in New Caledonia, their greatest developments being on the south-west of the Australian continent.

    1
    0
  • The " grass-tree " (Xanthorrhoea), of the uplands and coast regions, is peculiarly Australian in its aspect.

    1
    0
  • This terminates in a long spike thickly studded with white blossoms. The grass-tree gives as distinct a character to an Australian picture as the agave and cactus do to the Mexican landscape.

    1
    0
  • No speculation of hypothesis has been propounded to account satisfactorily for the origin of the Australian flora.

    1
    0
  • As a step towards such hypothesis it has been noted that the Antarctic, the South African, and the Australian floras have many types in common.

    1
    0
  • the excess of the 1 The statistical portion of this article includes Tasmania, which is a member of the Australian Commonwealth.

    1
    0
  • - The salient features of the Australian continent are its compact outline, the absence of navigable rivers communicating with the interior, the absence of active volcanoes or snow-capped mountains, its isolation from other lands, and its antiquity.

    1
    1
  • The terrace closest to the land, known as the continental shelf, has an average depth of 600 ft., and connects Australia, New Guinea, and Tasmania in one unbroken sweep. Compared with other continents, the Australian continental shelf is extremely narrow, and there are points on the eastern coast where the land plunges down to oceanic depths with an abruptness rarely paralleled.

    1
    1
  • The interior of the continent west of 135° and north of the Musgrave ranges is usually termed by geographers the Australian Steppes.

    1
    1
  • Behind the luxuriant jungles of the sub-tropical coast, once over the main range, we find the purely Australian flora with its apparent sameness and sombre dulness.

    1
    1
  • In the five years 1881-1888 the rate was 8 08 marriages (16.1 persons) per thousand of the population, declining to 6.51 in 1891-1895; in recent years there has been a considerable improvement, and the Australian marriage rate may be quoted as ranging between 6.75 and 7.25.

    1
    1
  • It is also interesting to note that fossil remains indicate the former occurrence of thylacines and Tasmanian devils on the Australian mainland.

    1
    2
  • Ogilby, Catalogue of Australian Mammals (Sydney, 1895); B.

    1
    2
  • Bensley, "A Theory of the Origin and Evolution of the Australian Marsupialia," American Naturalist (1901); "On the Evolution of the Australian Marsupialia, &c.," Trans.

    1
    3
  • The region extending round the south-western extremity of the continent has a peculiarly characteristic assemblage of typical Australian forms, notably a great abundance of the Proteaceae.

    0
    0
  • The census of Western Australia included only those aborigines in the employment of the colonists; and as a large part of this, the greatest of the Australian states, is as yet unexplored, it may be presumed that the aborigines enumerated were very far short of the whole number of persons of that race in the state.

    0
    0
  • Numerically the flocks of Australia represent one-sixth of the world's sheep, and in just over half a century (1851-1905) the exports of Australian wool alone reached the value of £650,000,000.

    0
    0
  • Next to the pastoral industry, agriculture is the principal source of Australian wealth.

    0
    0
  • The value of Australian wheat and flour exported in 1905 was £5,500,000.

    0
    0
  • Excellent fish of many varieties abound in the Australian seas and in many of the rivers.

    0
    0
  • Trout may now be taken in many of the mountain streams. At one time whaling was an important industry on the coasts of New South Wales and Tasmania, and afterwards on the Western Australian coasts.

    0
    0
  • In Queensland waters there are about 300 vessels, and on the Western Australian coast about 450 licensed craft engaged in the industry, the annual value of pearl-shell and pearls raised being nearly half a million sterling.

    0
    0
  • This was the first of the many rich discoveries in the same district which have made Western Australia the chief gold-producer of the Australian group. In 1907 there were eighteen goldfields in the state, and it was estimated that over 30,000 miners were actively engaged in the search for gold.

    0
    0
  • Bismuth is known to exist in all the Australian states, but up to the present time it has been mined for only in three states, viz.

    0
    0
  • Lead is found in all the Australian states, but is worked only when associated with silver.

    0
    0
  • Zinc ores, in the several varieties of carbonates, silicates, oxide, sulphide and sulphate of zinc, have been found in several of the Australian states, but have attracted little attention except in New South Wales, where special efforts are being made successfully to produce a high-grade zinc concentrate from the sulphide ores.

    0
    0
  • Nickel, so abundant in the island of New Caledonia, has up to the present been found in none of the Australian states except Queensland and Tasmania.

    0
    0
  • The Australian states have been bountifully supplied with mineral fuel.

    0
    0
  • Many descriptions of gems and gem stones have been discovered in various parts of the Australian states, but systematic search has been made principally for the diamond and the noble opal.

    0
    0
  • The nationality of the tonnage was, British 2,771,000, including Australian 288,000, and foreign 948,000.

    0
    0
  • The United Kingdom in 1905 sent 60% of the imports taken by Australia, compared with 26% from foreign countries, and 14% from British possessions; of Australian imports the United Kingdom takes 47%, foreign countries 31% and British possessions 22%.

    0
    0
  • - Australian public finance requires to be treated under the separate headings of Commonwealth and states finance.

    0
    0
  • Although the financial operations of the Commonwealth and the states are quite distinct, a statement of the total revenue of the Australian Commonwealth and states is not without interest as showing the weight of taxation and the different sources from which revenue is obtained.

    0
    0
  • Information regarding Australian state finance will be found under the heading of each state.

    0
    0
  • While their neighbours, the Malays, Papuans and Polynesians, all cultivate the soil, and build substantial huts and houses, the Australian natives do neither.

    0
    0
  • Wherever they came from, there is abundant evidence that their first occupation of the Australian continent must have been at a time so remote as to permit of no traditions.

    0
    0
  • This linguistic poverty proves that the Australian tongue has no affinity to the Polynesian group of languages, where denary enumeration prevails: the nearest Polynesians, the Maoris, counting in thousands.

    0
    0
  • Further evidence of the antiquity of Australian man is to be found in the strict observance of tribal boundaries, which would seem to show that the tribes must have been settled a long time in one place.

    0
    0
  • Why should a Papuan type be found in what was certainly once a portion of the Australian continent?

    0
    0
  • This Indo - Aryan origin for the Australian blackfellows is borne out by their physique.

    0
    0
  • Strange as it may appear, I would refer to an Australian as the finest model of the human proportions I have ever met; in muscular development combining perfect symmetry, activity and strength, while his head might have compared with the antique bust of a philosopher."

    0
    0
  • Huxley concluded, from descriptions, that" the Deccan tribes are indistinguishable from the Australian races."

    0
    0
  • Hunter states that the Dravidian tribes were driven southwards in Hindustan, and that the grammatical relations of their dialects are " expressed by suffixes," which is true as to the Australian languages.

    0
    0
  • He states that Bishop Caldwell,' whom he calls " the great missionary scholar of the Dravidian tongue," showed that the south and western Australian tribes use almost the same words for " I, thou, he, we, you, as the Dravidian fishermen on the Madras coast."

    0
    0
  • Physically the typical Australian is the equal of the average European in height, but is inferior in muscular development,.

    0
    0
  • When born, the Australian baby is of 'a much` lighter colour than its parents and remains so for about a week.

    0
    0
  • The grammatical structure of some north Australian languages has a considerable degree of refinement.

    0
    0
  • Yet the Australian is capable of strong affections, and the blind (of whom there have always been a great number) are cared for, and are often the best fed in a tribe.

    0
    0
  • The characteristic weapon of the Australian is the boomerang.

    0
    0
  • Their nets, made by women, either of the tendons of animals or the fibres of plants, will catch and hold the kangaroo or the emu, or the very large fish of Australian rivers.

    0
    0
  • The most sacred duty an Australian had to perform was the avenging of the death of a kinsman, and he was the object of constant taunts and insults till he had done so.

    0
    0
  • Howitt, The Native Tribes of South-east Australia (1904) and On the Organization of Australian Tribes (1889); G.

    0
    0
  • Curr, The Australian Race (3 vols.,1886-1887); G.

    0
    0
  • Frazer, " The Beginnings of Religion and Totemism among the Australian Aborigines," Fortnightly Review, July 1905; N.

    0
    0
  • The first English navigator to sight the Australian continent was William Dampier, who made a visit to these shores in 1688, as supercargo of the " Cygnet," a trader whose crew had turned buccaneers.

    0
    0
  • The great navigator and his crew, unacquainted with the character of the Australian aborigines, were not a little astonished that these natives took no notice of them or their proceedings.

    0
    0
  • During the sojourn in Botany Bay the crew had to perform the painful duty of burying a comrade - a seaman named Forby Sutherland, who was in all probability the first British subject whose body was committed to Australian soil.

    0
    0
  • The next recorded expedition is a memorable one in the annals of Australian history - the despatch of a British colony to the shores of Botany Bay.

    0
    0
  • The fleet sailed in May 1787, and arrived off the Australian coast early in the following January.

    0
    0
  • Messrs Hamilton Hume and Hovell set out from Lake George, crossed the Murrumbidgee, and, after following the river for a short distance, struck south, skirting the foothills of what are now known as the Australian Alps until they reached a fine river, which was called the Hume after the leader's father.

    0
    0
  • By this time much had thus been done to obtain an acquaintance with the eastern parts of the Australian continent, although the problem of what could become of the large rivers flowing north-west and south-west into the interior was still unsolved.

    0
    0
  • In 1840 he performed a feat of extraordinary personal daring, travelling all the way along the barren sea-coast of the Great Australian Bight, from Spencer Gulf to King George Sound.

    0
    0
  • The first of his tours independently performed, in 1858 and 1859, were around the South Australian lakes, namely, Lake Torrens, Lake Eyre and Lake Gairdner.

    0
    0
  • nearly 134°, which is the most central marked point of the Australian continent, and has been named Central Mount Stuart.

    0
    0
  • On the 23rd of February 1861 they commenced the return journey, having in effect accomplished the feat of crossing the Australian continent.

    0
    0
  • Four other parties, besides Howitt's, were sent out that year from different Australian provinces.

    0
    0
  • These valuable additions to Australian geography were gained through humane efforts to relieve the lost explorers.

    0
    0
  • The line crossing Australia which was thus explored has since been occupied by the electric telegraph connecting Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, and other Australian cities with London.

    0
    0
  • Mr Gosse, with men and horses provided by the South Australian government, started on the 21st of April from the telegraph station So m.

    0
    0
  • and 127° E., two degrees within the Western Australian boundary, was forced to return.

    0
    0
  • Overland routes had now been found possible, though scarcely convenient for traffic, between all the widely separated Australian provinces.

    0
    0
  • Ernest Giles made several attempts to cross the Central Australian Desert, but it was not until his third attempt that he was successful.

    0
    0
  • Lindsay's expedition, which was fitted out by Sir Thomas Elder, the generous patron of Australian exploration, entered Western Australia about the 26th parallel south latitude, on the line of route taken by Forrest in 1874.

    0
    0
  • Alive to the importance of the trade, the South Australian government despatched Hiibbe from Oodnadatta to Coolgardie.

    0
    0
  • David Carnegie, which started in July 1896, and travelled north-easterly until it reached Alexander Spring; then turning northward, it traversed the country between Wells's track of 1896 and the South Australian border.

    0
    0
  • After a few months' rest it started on the return journey, following Sturt Creek until its termination in Gregory's Salt Sea, and then keeping parallel with the South Australian border as far as Lake Macdonald.

    0
    0
  • Of the six Australian states, New South Wales is the oldest.

    0
    0
  • The choice of governor-general of the new Commonwealth fell upon Lord Hopetoun (afterwards Lord Linlithgow), who had won golden opinions as governor of Victoria a few years before; Mr (afterwards Sir Edmund) Barton, who had taken the lead among the Australian delegates, became first prime minister; and the Commonwealth was inaugurated at the opening of 1901.

    0
    0
  • It is possible that the London dockers' strike was not without its influence on the minds of the Australian Labour leaders.

    0
    0
  • That strike had been liberally helped by the Australian unions, and it was confidently predicted that, as the Australian workers were more effectively organized than the English unions, a corresponding success would result from their course of action.

    0
    0
  • The other ideal, typified by the South Australian party, differs from this in one important respect.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the official rebuff received from the mother-country, the Australian ministry, in drawing up the new Federal tariff, gave a substantial preference to British imports, and thus showed their willingness to go farther.

    0
    0
  • - For Physical Geography: Barton, Australian Physiography (Brisbane, 1895); Wall, Physical Geography of Australia (Melbourne, 1883); Taylor, Geography of New South Wales (Sydney, 1898); Saville Kent, The Great Barrier Reef of Australia (London, 1893); A.

    0
    0
  • For Flora: Maiden, Useful Native Plants of Australia (Sydney, 1889); Bentham and Mueller, Flora Australiensis (London, 1863-1878); Fitzgerald, Australian Orchids (Sydney, 1870-1890); Mueller, Census of Australian Plants (Melbourne, 1889).

    0
    0
  • Science (1893); Tenison-Woods, The Fish and Fisheries of New South Wales (Sydney, 1883); Ogilvy, Catalogue of Australian Mammals (Sydney, 1892); Aflalo, Natural History of Australia (London, 1896); Flower and Lydekker, Mammals, Living and Extinct (London, 1891); J.

    0
    0
  • Scott, The Romance of Australian Exploring (London, 1899); H.

    0
    0
  • Douglas Ogilby (Catalogue of Australian Mammals, p. 1, Sydney, 1902), but expressed the hope "that further inquiries might be made by naturalists in Australia as to the actual finding of such eggs in the burrows, so that this most interesting point might be finally settled."

    0
    0
  • Belief in a primitive historical revelation, once universal among Christians, has almost disappeared; but belief in a very early and highly moral theism is stoutly defended, chiefly on Australian evidence, by Andrew Lang (The Making of Religion and later works).

    0
    0
  • - This family contains the single Australian species Clathrozoon wilsoni Spencer, in which a massive hydrorhiza Stage 4, seen in Plumularidae.

    0
    0
  • The Australian sub-region consists of Australia, Tasmania, New Caledonia and New Zealand, and, though partly lying within the tropic is most naturally treated as a whole.

    0
    0
  • The Australian land-surface must be of great antiquity, possibly Jurassic, and its isolation scarcely less ancient.

    0
    0
  • Little confidence can, however, be placed in the identification of Proteaceous or, indeed, of any distinctively Australian plants in Tertiary deposits in the northern hemisphere.

    0
    0
  • The Australian flora has extensions at high levels in the tropics; such exists on Kinabalu in Borneo under the equator.

    0
    0
  • While so many conspicuous Australian elements are wanting in New Zealand, one-eighth of its flora belongs to South American genera.

    0
    0
  • There were several early indications of the existence of the great Australian continent, and the Dutch endeavoured to obtain further knowledge concerning the country and its extent; but only its northern and western coasts had been visited before the time of Governor van Diemen.

    0
    0
  • Each of these divisions is the home of a special fauna, many species of which are confined to it alone; in the Australian region, indeed, practically the whole fauna is peculiar and distinctive, suggesting a prolonged period of complete biological isolation.

    0
    0
  • Meditating, it is probable, emigration upon his release, he turned his attention while in prison to colonial subjects, and acutely detected the main causes of the slow progress of the Australian colonies in the enormous size of the landed estates, the reckless manner in which land was given away, the absence of all systematic effort at colonization, and the consequent discouragement of immigration and dearth of labour.

    0
    0
  • He soon, however, became entirely engrossed with colonial affairs, and, having impressed John Stuart Mill, Colonel Torrens and other leading economists with the value of his ideas, became a leading though not a conspicuous manager of the South Australian Company, by which the colony of South Australia was ultimately founded.

    0
    0
  • Sclater' was the first to divide the world into a few great " regions," the Palaearctic, Ethiopian, Indian and Australian forming one group, the " Old World " (Palaeogaea); and the Nearctic and Neotropical forming a second, the New World (Neogaea).

    0
    0
  • Australian Region Australian Papuan Antillean (B) Neogaea or II.

    0
    0
  • (A) Austrogaea, the Australian region in the wider sense,with the Papuan, Australian and New Zealand subregions, including also Polynesia.

    0
    0
  • But the Australian region is also remarkable for its ornithic singularity.

    0
    0
  • Besides these, three or perhaps four groups, though widely distributed throughout the world, arrive in the Australian region at their culmination, presenting an abundance of most varied forms. These are the weaver-birds (Ploceidae), and the moreporks (Podargidae), but especially the kingfishers (Alcedinidae) and the pigeons (Columbidae), the species belonging to the two last obtaining in this region a degree of prominence and beauty which is elsewhere unequalled.

    0
    0
  • The main affinities of the avifauna are, of course, Australian.

    0
    0
  • A large flightless goose, Cnemiornis, allied to the Australian Cereopsis, and the gigantic rapacious Harpagornis, have died out recently, with the moas.

    0
    0
  • In all, there is a wonderful amount of specialization, though perhaps in a very straight line from generalized forms; but the affinity to Australian or Polynesian types is in many cases clearly traceable, and it cannot be supposed but that these last are of cognate origin with those of New Zealand.

    0
    0
  • The Australian Subregion comprises Australia and Tasmania.

    0
    0
  • the Peristeropodes and the Alectoropodes, the former composed of the families Megapodiidae, almost wholly Australian, and the Cracidae, entirely Neotropical.

    0
    0
  • E Here, as over so large a portion of the Australian region, we find birds constituting the supreme class - the scarcity of mammals being accounted for in some measure as a normal effect of insularity.

    0
    0
  • To compare the Palaearctic genera with those of the Australian and Neotropical regions would be simply a waste of time, for the points of resemblance are extremely few, and such as they are they lead to nothing.

    0
    0
  • Of other families which, however, extend their range more or less far into the Australian realm, may be mentioned Otididae, the bustards; Meropidae or bee-eaters; Muscicapidae or flycatchers; Sturnidae or starlings.

    0
    0
  • The Oriental Subregion comprises all the countries and numerous islands between the Palaearctic and Australian areas; it possesses upwards of seventy families, of which, however, only one is peculiar, but this family, the Eurylaemidae or broadbills, is of great importance since it represents all the Subclamatores.

    0
    0
  • Some of the similarities to the Ethiopian and the great differences from the Australian avifauna have already been pointed out.

    0
    0
  • The influence of the Australian realm is indicated by a Megapode in Celebes, another in Borneo and Labuan, and a third in the Nicobar islands (which, however, like the Andamans, belong to the Indian province), but there are no cockatoos, these keeping strictly to the other side of Wallace's line, whence we started on this survey of the world's avifauna.

    0
    0
  • Casuarius and Dromaeus, Australian.

    0
    0
  • Megapodiidae, Australian region.

    0
    0
  • Picidae, woodpeckers, cosmopolitan, excepting Madagascar and Australian region.

    0
    0
  • Thus the Zulu says to the ancestral ghost, "Help me or you will feed on nettles"; whilst the still more primitive Australian exclaims to the "dead hand" that he carries about with him as a kind of divining-rod, "Guide me aright, or I throw you to the dogs."

    0
    0
  • Wallace as representing the so-called Wallace's Line, whereby he demarcated the Asiatic from the Australian fauna.

    0
    0
  • In railway mileage per io,000 inhabitants, however, Queensland, in the Australian group, reports a figure much greater than any other country; while at the other end of the list Persia holds the record for isolation.

    0
    0
  • Just as the German reaper leaves the last ears of corn as an offering to Wodan, so the Australian black offers a portion of a find of honey; in New South Wales a pebble is said to have been offered or a number of spears, in Queensland the skin removed in forming the body-scars.

    0
    0
  • As a rule flies are of small or moderate size, and many, such as certain blood-sucking midges of the genus Ceratopogon, are even minute; as extremes of size may be mentioned a common British midge, Ceratopogon varius, the female of which measures only 14 millimetre, and the gigantic Mydaidae of Central and South America as well as certain Australian robber-flies, which have a body 1-11n.

    0
    0
  • C. McCook in the American genus Myrmecocystus, and by later observers in Australian and African species of Plagiolepis and allied genera.

    0
    0
  • and fauna are essentially Asiatic in their type, while to the south and east the Australian element begins to be distinctly marked, soon to become predominant.

    0
    0
  • The south-eastern parts of the Malay Archipelago have much in common with the Australian continent, to which they adjoin, though their affinities are chiefly Indian.

    0
    0
  • On the other islands similar characteristics are to be observed, Australian genera extending to the Philippines, and even to southern China.

    0
    0
  • Celebes, Papua, and the other islands east of Java beyond Wallace's line, fall within the Australian region.

    0
    0
  • The occurrence of mammals of the Marsupial order in the Molucca Islands and Celebes, while none have been found in the adjacent islands of Java and Borneo, lying on the west of Wallace's line, or in the Indian region, shows that the margin of the Australian region has here been reached.

    0
    0
  • Those of the Indian region abruptly disappear at, and many Australian forms reach but do not pass, the line above spoken of.

    0
    0
  • Proteaceae), an Australian genus of trees with very thick, woody, inversely pear-shaped fruits which split into two parts when ripe.

    0
    0
  • Other scale insects of note are the cosmopolitan mussel scale (Mytilaspis pomorum) and the Australian Icerya purchasi.

    0
    0
  • The Australian fauna is rich in characteristic and peculiar genera, and New Zealand, while possessing some remarkable insects of its own, lacks entirely several families with an almost world-wide range - for example, the Notodontidae, Lasiocampidae, and other families of Lepidoptera.

    0
    0
  • The several accounts by John White, Collins, Phillips, Hunter and others of the colonization of New South Wales at the end of the last century ought not to be overlooked by any Australian ornithologist.

    0
    0
  • Some notices of Australian birds by Mr Ramsay and others are to be found in the Proceedings of the Linnaean Society of New South Wales and of the Royal Society of Tasmania.

    0
    0
  • The constitution requires that all elections be by ballot, and the Australian ballot system was adopted in 1891; registration is required in cities having a population of 11,800 or more.

    0
    0
  • Especially among the lower races the dead are regarded as hostile; the Australian avoids the grave even of a kinsman and elaborate ceremonies of mourning are found amongst most primitive peoples, whose object seems to be to rid the living of the danger they run by association with the ghost of the dead.

    0
    0
  • Further, it is the opinion of competent ornithologists that there is affinity of the Australian emeus and cassowaries with the New Zealand moas and with the Malagasy Aepyornis.

    0
    0
  • Australian Terrier.

    0
    0
  • It is also rich in the types of Australian plants in the collections of Sir Joseph Banks and Robert Brown, and contains in addition many valuable modern collections.

    0
    0
  • The suggestion that the eating of cakes of unleavened bread, similar to the Australian "damper," was due to the exigencies of the harvest does not meet the case, since it does not explain the seven days and is incongruous with the fact that the first sheaf of the harvest was put to the sickle not earlier than the third day of the feast.

    0
    0
  • The most important were: the Australian Antarctic expedition of 1911-4 under Sir Douglas Mawson; the Danish Oceanographical expeditions in the Mediterranean and adjacent seas of 1908-10; a short cruise made by Sir John Murray and Dr. Johan Hjort in the Norwegian Fishery exploring vessel " Michael Sars " in 1910, the general results of which were published as The Depths of the Ocean (1912) by the leaders of the expedition; and a short special cruise made by the " Scotia " in 1913 (after the loss of the " Titanic ") under the leadership of Dr. Matthews, which made observations upon the distribution of ice in the North Atlantic.

    0
    0
  • "ALFRED DEAKIN (1856-1919), Australian statesman, was born at Melbourne Aug.

    0
    0
  • He was a member of all the bodies formed to promote the Federation of Australia as well as of the delegation which proceeded to London with the Australian Commonwealth bill in 1 9 o° and, as Attorney-General, he was included in Sir Edmund Barton's first Federal " Cabinet of the Captains " (1901-3), succeeding him as Premier of Australia.

    0
    0
  • This fiscal policy he pursued during his three Federal premierships (1903-4, 1905-8, 1909-10), and he was also a strong supporter of Australia's cooperation in Imperial defence, being responsible for the acceptance of the measure authorizing Australian naval construction in 1909 and for the invitation to Lord Kitchener to come to Australia to report on the question of defence.

    0
    0
  • the Opposition in the Australian Parliament until ill-health compelled his retirement in 1913.

    0
    0
  • He represented " Centre " thought in Australian politics and for a long time was a reconciling influence between the Conservatives and the Labour party.

    0
    0
  • The Australian production of 18,000 tons in 1888 was increased to 58,000 tons in 1891, a value maintained until 1893, when a depression set in, only 21,000 tons being produced in 1897; prosperity then returned, and in 1898 the yield was 68,000 tons, and in 1905, 120,000 tons.

    0
    0
  • The ocean currents, the trade-winds blowing from the Australian mainland, and north-westerly storms from the Malayan islands, are no doubt responsible for the introduction of many, but not all, of these Malayan and Australasian species.

    0
    0
  • A small group of Australian genera closely approach the order Juncaceae in having small crowded flowers with a scarious or membranous perianth; they include Xanthorrhoea (grass-tree or blackboy) and Kingia, arborescent plants with an erect woody stem crowned with a tuft of long stiff narrow leaves, from the centre of which rises a tall dense flower spike or a number of stalked flower-heads; this group has been included in Juncaceae, from which it is doubtfully distinguished only by the absence of the long twisted stigmas which characterize the true rushes.

    0
    0
  • It resembles Juncaceae in the general plan of the flower, which, however, has become much more elaborate and varied in the form and colour of its perianth in association with transmission of pollen by insect agency; a link between the two orders is found in the group of Australian genera referred to above under Asphodeloideae.

    0
    0
  • The numerous bowling-greens are regularly frequented and are among the best in Scotland - the first Australian team of bowlers that visited the mother country (in 1901) pronouncing the green in Lutton Place the finest on which they had played.

    0
    0
  • The town-hall, a large florid building of Classic order, stands on an eminence, and its clock tower forms a landmark; it contains the spacious Centennial Hall (commemorating the first Australian colonization here in 1787), and has one of the finest organs in the world.

    0
    0
  • The Domain embraces 138 acres, extending along one side of Woolloomooloo Bay and surrounding Farm Cove, in which the warships belonging to the Australian station are usually anchored; in this charming expanse of park land are the governor's residence and the National Art Gallery, which houses a splendid collection of pictures by modern artists, statuary, pottery and other objects of art.

    0
    0
  • The Australian Eucalyptus and Casuarina in great variety, and many other imported trees, including syringas, wattles, acacias, willows, pines, cypress, cork and oak all thrive when properly planted and protected from grass fires.

    0
    0
  • He was ordained priest in 1831, and in 1833 went to New South Wales, as vicar-general to Bishop William Morris (1794-1872), whose jurisdiction extended over the Australian missions.

    0
    0
  • Among the most successful of the imported trees are citrus trees, the Australian wattle and the eucalyptus.

    0
    0
  • Australian deposits were worked in 1872, and in the following year the production was 3000 tons; the maximum outputs were in 1881-1883, averaging 10,000 tons annually; but the supply declined to 2420 tons in 1898 and has since increased to about 5028 tons in 1905.

    0
    0
  • Between the last days of March and the day of the landing the defence system was overhauled and greatly developed.2 The Franco-British expeditionary force was to be composed of seven divisions - three, the 29th, the 42nd and the Royal Naval, furnished by the United Kingdom, two formed of Australian and New Zealand troops, and two composed of French colonial troops.

    0
    0
  • s The abbreviated designation of the " Australian and New Zealand Army Corps."

    0
    0
  • One British and one French division were moved from the peninsula to Salonika early in Oct., but an additional Australian division had arrived a few weeks earlier.

    0
    0
  • There are in addition some pearling grounds in the Mergui Archipelago, which have a very recent history; they were practically unknown before 1890; in the early 'nineties they were worked by Australian adventurers, most of whom have since departed; and now they are leased in blocks to a syndicate of Chinamen, who grant sub-leases to individual adventurers at the rate of £25 a pump for the pearling year.

    0
    0
  • Boletus edulis, in the Oriental Trehala and in ergot of rye; melibiose, C12H22011, formed, with fructose, on hydrolysing the trisaccharose melitose (or raffinose), C18H32016.5H20, which occurs in Australian manna and in the molasses of sugar manufacture; touranose, C12H22011, formed with d-glucose and galactose on hydrolysing another trisaccharose, melizitose, C,8H32016 2H20, which occurs in Pinus larix and in Persian manna; and agavose, C12H22011, found in the stalks of Agave americana.

    0
    0
  • There is much less moisture, and the flora is of a less tropical character than farther north; it has some Polynesian and New Zealand affinities, and on the west coast a partially Australian character; on the higher hills it is stunted; on the lower, however, there are fine .grass lands, and a scattered growth of niaulis (Melaleuca viridiflora), useful for its timber, bark and cajeput oil.

    0
    0
  • "ANDREW FISHER (1862-), Australian statesman, was born at Crosshouse, Kilmarnock, Aug.

    0
    0
  • The order Cedrelaceae (which is entirely distinct from the Conifers) includes, along with the mahoganies and other valuable timber-trees, the Jamaica and the Australian red cedars, Cedrela odorata, and C. Toona respectively.

    0
    0
  • Milne Edwards has identified ten species which occur in Australian seas also, and Rein mentions, as belonging to the same category, the helmet-crab or horse-shoe crab (kabuto-gani, Limulus longispina I-Ioeven).

    0
    0
  • Australia And New Zealand New South Wales.-The Australian Magazine was published monthly at Sydney in 1821-1822.

    0
    0
  • This was followed by the South Asian Register (1827), the Australian Quarterly Journal (1828), edited by the Rev. P. N.

    0
    0
  • Wilton, the New South Wales Magazine (1833), the New South Wales Literary, Political and Commercial Advertiser (1835), edited by the eccentric Dr Lhotsky, Tegg's Monthly Magazine (1836), the Australian Magazine (1838), the New South Wales Magazine (1843), the Australian Penny Journal (1848) and many others.

    0
    0
  • Of later magazines the Australian (1878-1881), Aurora australis (1868), and the Sydney Magazine (1878), were the most noteworthy.

    0
    0
  • Of contemporary magazines Dalgety's Review is mainly agricultural, the Australian Magazine (1909) and the Lone Hand (1907) are popular, and the Science of Man is an anthropological review.

    0
    0
  • This was followed by the Australia Felix Magazine (1849), and the Australasian Quarterly Reprint (1850-1851) both published at Geelong, the Illustrated Australian Magazine (1850-1852), the Australian Gold-Digger's Monthly Magazine (1852-1853), edited by James Bonwick, and the Melbourne Monthly Magazine (1855-1856).

    0
    0
  • The Journal of Australasia (1856-1858), the Australian Monthly Magazine (1865-1867), which contained contributions from Marcus Clarke and was continued as the Colonial Monthly (1867-1869), the Melbourne Review (1876-1885) and the Victorian Review (1879-1886) may also be mentioned.

    0
    0
  • An Australian edition of the Review of Reviews is published at Melbourne.

    0
    0
  • South Australia.-The South Australian Magazine was issued monthly in 1841-1843, the Adelaide Magazine (1845), the Adelaide Miscellany (1848-1849), and the Wanderer in 1853.

    0
    0
  • The South Australian Twopenny Magazine was published at Plymouth, England, in 1839, and the South Australian Miscellany and New Zealand Review at London in the same year.

    0
    0
  • The Australian venom and that of all viperine snakes, perhaps also that of the cobra, if introduced rapidly into the circulation, occasions extensive intravascular clotting.

    0
    0
  • If the venom is slowly absorbed, the blood loses its coagulability, owing to the breaking down of the red blood-corpuscles, most so with vipers, less with Australian snakes, least so with the cobra.

    0
    0
  • The pythons (q.v.) are restricted to the palaeotropical and Australian regions, with the sole exception of Loxocemus bicolor in southern Mexico.

    0
    0
  • They are the tropical American Elaps, the Indian Callophis, the African Poecilophis and the Australian Vermicella.

    0
    0
  • The family is cosmopolitan, excepting Madagascar and the whole of the Australian region.

    0
    0
  • CORREA, a genus of Australian plants belonging to the natural order Rutaceae, named after the Portuguese botanist Jose Francisco Correa da Serra.

    0
    0
  • production of the five years 1881-1885 was the smallest since the Australian and Californian mines began to be worked in 1848-1849; the minimum 4,614,588 oz., occurred in 1882.

    0
    0
  • It is especially suitable to gold containing little silver and base metals - a character of Australian gold - but it yields to the sulphuric acid and electrolytic methods in point of economy.

    0
    0
  • Clark, Australian Mining and Metallurgy; Karl Schmeisser, Goldfields of Australasia; A.

    0
    0
  • The line at the beginning of this advance was held as follows: on the right was the Australian Corps (Monash) with the 32nd, 5th Australian and 3rd Australian Div.

    0
    0
  • in line, and the ist and 4th Australian Div.

    0
    0
  • Generally speaking the operations of the Australian Corps in the centre were completely successful, those of the IX.

    0
    0
  • The Australian Corps (4th Div.

    0
    0
  • U.S. Corps; the former was maintained in reserve, but the latter was combined with the Australian Corps and took over the left of its front and the right of the III.

    0
    0
  • Corps front, relieving the 1st Australian, 74th and 18th Div.

    0
    0
  • in line, 5th and 3rd Australian in support, 2nd Australian in reserve); and the III.

    0
    0
  • The supporting Australian divisions therefore found themselves in a difficult situation, which was only redeemed by hard and skilful infantry fighting.

    0
    0
  • On the right of the corps sector the 5th Australian Div.

    0
    0
  • finally got as far forward as the Hindenburg reserve line about Nauroy; but the 3rd Australian Div.

    0
    0
  • 1, when the 3rd Australian Div., after fighting all night, succeeded by a combined attack from W.

    0
    0
  • Corps also had a successful day; the 32nd Div., advancing in conjunction with the 5th Australian Div., cleared Joncourt and Estrees and breached the Masnieres - Beaurevoir line on a mile front E.

    0
    0
  • Corps on the right, with all three divisions, 1st, 32nd and 46th, in front line; the Australian Corps with the 2nd Australian Div.

    0
    0
  • The Australian Corps also successfully attained its first objectives, though not till later in the evening, so that the exploitation of their success on this day proved out of the question.

    0
    0
  • The Australian and IX.

    0
    0
  • The Australian Shelf rises steeply as a rule from depths, of 2500 to 3000 fathoms. A broad depression with depths of from 3300 to 3500 fathoms lies to the east of the Cocos Islands and extends into the angle between the Malay Archipelago and Australia.

    0
    0
  • In a similar manner the Brazil current, the Agulhas current and the East Australian current originate from the drift of the south-east trades, and in the North Pacific the Japan current arises from the north-east trade drift.

    0
    0
  • New Guinea shares in the poverty in mammals of the Australian sub-region.

    0
    0
  • The Amphibia, to which the sea is a barrier, are almost exclusively of Australian affinities.

    0
    0
  • In the low and sub-mountainous lands the flora is a mixture of Malayan, Australian and Polynesian forms. There are, according to Muller, twice as many palms known from New Guinea as from Australia.

    0
    0
  • The Protectorate, as declared in 1884, with its seat of government at Port Moresby, was subsidized by the three Australian colonies of Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, and lasted, under the administration of two successive special commissioners (Major-General Sir Peter Scratchley and the Hon.

    0
    0
  • The trade of British New Guinea is exclusively with the Australian colonies.

    0
    0
  • Parkinson, Im Bismarck Archipel (Leipzig, 1887); C. Kinloch Cooke, Australian Defences and New Guinea (London, 1887); J.

    0
    0
  • They inhabit the Ethiopian, Indian, and Australian regions, 2 and, with some notable exceptions, the species mostly have but a limited range.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →