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austerlitz

austerlitz

austerlitz Sentence Examples

  • "Tell Consalvi," wrote the conqueror, still flushed with Austerlitz, "that if he loves his country he must either resign or do what I demand."

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  • In the public gardens there is a statue of General Jean Marie Valhubert, killed at Austerlitz.

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  • Dunbar attested his constancy and gave proof that Cromwell was a master of the tactics of all arms. Preston was an example like Austerlitz of the two stages of a battle as defined by Napoleon, the first flottante, the second foudroyante.

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  • After Austerlitz (December 2, 1805) Austria made peace by the treaty of Pressburg, ceding to the kingdom of Italy her part of Venetia along with the provinces of Istria and Dalmatia.

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  • He did so with masterly skill and swiftness, and the triumphs of Ulm and Austerlitz hid from view the disaster of Trafalgar; and the only official reference to that crushing defeat was couched in these terms: "Storms caused us to lose some ships of the line after a fight imprudently engaged" (speech to the Legislature, 2nd of March 1806).

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  • After Austerlitz the conqueror fulminated against them, and sent southwards a strong column which compelled an Anglo-Russian force to sail away and brought about the flight of the Bourbons to Sicily (February 1806).

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  • For Austria we may read Prussia; for Ulm, Jena-Auerstadt; for the occupation of Vienna, that of Berlin; for Austerlitz, Friedland, which again disposed of the belated succour given by Russia.

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  • The parallel extends even to the secret negotiations; for, if Austria could have been induced in May 1807 to send an army against Napoleon's communications, his position would have been fully as dangerous as before Austerlitz if Prussia had taken a similar step. Once more he triumphed owing to the timidity of the central power which had the game in its hands; and the folly which marked the Russian tactics at Friedland (14th of June 1807), as at Austerlitz, enabled him to close the campaign in a blaze of glory and shiver the coalition in pieces.

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  • Now came an opportunity far greater than that which occurred after Austerlitz.

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  • The campaigns described below are theref ore (a) The Austrian War of 1805 (Ulm and Austerlitz).

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  • The battle of Austerlitz began early next morning and closed in the evening with the thorough and decisive defeat of the allies.

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  • Ever since Austerlitz the Austrian officers had been labouring to reconstitute and reform their army.

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  • Perhaps no battle better exemplifies the inherent strength of the emperor's strategy, and in none was his grasp of the battlefield more brilliantly displayed, for, as he fully recognized, " These Prussians have at last learnt something - they are no longer the wooden toys of Frederick the Great," and, on the other hand, the relative inferiority of his own men as compared with his veterans of Austerlitz called for far more individual effort than on any previous day.

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  • Furse, Ulm, Trafalgar and Austerlitz (London, 1905).

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  • The formation of the coalition and the outbreak of war for a while raised his hopes, in spite of his lively distrust of the competence of Austrian ministers; but the hopes were speedily dashed by Austerlitz and its results.

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  • In 1803 he received a commission in an infantry regiment, and took part in the campaign of 1805 under General Davoust, first in the Low Countries, and later at Ulm, Maria Zell and Austerlitz, where he fought with distinction, was wounded several times and promoted.

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  • AUSTERLITZ (Czech Slavkov), a town of Austria, in Moravia, 15 m.

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  • defeated the Austrians and Russians on the 2nd of December 1805, was fought in the country to the west of Austerlitz, the position of Napoleon's left wing being almost equi-distant from Briinn and from Austerlitz.

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  • (The 'course of events which led to the action is described under Napoleonic Campaigns.) Napoleon, falling back before the advance of the allied Austrians and Russians from Olmiitz, bivouacked west of the Goldbach, whilst the allies, holding, near Austerlitz, the junction of the roads from Olmiitz and from Hungary, formed up in the valleys east of the Pratzen heights.

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  • The French not only held their ground, but steadily advanced and eventually forced back the allies on Austerlitz, thereby barring their retreat on Olmiitz.

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  • After the "Chevalier Guards" had been routed by Marshal Bessieres and the Guard cavalry, the allies had no more hope of victory; orders had already been sent to Buxhbwden, who commanded the three columns engaged against Davout, to retreat on Austerlitz.

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  • Soult now barred the way to Austerlitz, and the allies turned southward towards Satschan.

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  • It was he who after Austerlitz aggrandized the margravate at the expense of Austria; transformed it into a sovereign principality and raised it to a grand-duchy.

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  • War was averted for a moment by the result of the battle of Austerlitz, but it broke out in earnest in October 1806.

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  • His conduct at Austerlitz (2nd December), where he was wounded, won him promotion to the rank of general of division.

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  • Herein Napoleon showed that he was no longer the Napoleon of Austerlitz; for he left locked up in far-distant secondary theatres no less than 56,500 men, of whom he could have collected some 30,000 to 36,000 for the decisive campaign in Belgium.

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  • Napoleon himself was no longer the Napoleon of Marengo or Austerlitz, and though he was not broken down, his physical strength was certainly impaired.

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  • In Paris the Austerlitz (1800-1806) and Carrousel (1834-1836) bridges had cast iron arches.

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  • After the victory of Austerlitz (December 2, 1805) Napoleon began to plan the formation of a ring of states surrounding, and in close alliance with, the French empire.

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  • At Austerlitz he had the satisfaction of witnessing the actual results of his artillery reforms. The commissariat scandals which came to light after the peace of Tilsit convinced the emperor that nothing short of the stern and incorruptible energy of Arakcheev could reach the sources of the evil, and in January 1808 he was appointed inspector-general and war minister.

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  • He was rewarded for his services at Austerlitz (December 2, 1805) by the principality of Ponte Corvo (June 5,18°6), but during the campaign against Prussia, the same year, was severely reproached by Napoleon for not participating with his army corps in the battles of Jena and Auerstalt, though close at hand.

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  • After the battle of Austerlitz, he took part in the drafting of the treaty of Presburg.

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  • Two years later, when the defeat Roman of Austerlitz had led to the treaty of Pressburg Empire.

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  • But the campaign of Austerlitz followed, then the peace of Pressburg which guaranteed to Napoleon the former dominions of Venice, and finally the treaty of Tilsit, which involved, among other things, the withdrawal of the Russians from the Ionian Islands and the Albanian coast.

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  • He had no sooner entered Vienna in triumph than he opened negotiations with him; he resumed them after Austerlitz.

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  • After Austerlitz Napoleon revenged himself by declaring that " the Bourbon dynasty had ceased to reign," and sent an army under his brother Joseph to occupy the kingdom.

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  • He distinguished himself at Austerlitz, and, after serving for a short time in Italy, he rejoined the grande armee as a general of brigade, in time to take part in the campaign of Friedland.

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  • of Prussia detained him in Pomerania; and when at last (December 1805) he led his 6000 men towards the Elbe district the third coalition had already been dissipated by the victories of Ulm and Austerlitz.

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  • He distinguished himself at the battles of Austerlitz and Jena,.

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  • He commanded a corps in the advance on Ulm, and at Austerlitz he led the decisive attack on the allied centre.

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  • The French victory at Austerlitz enabled Napoleon to despatch an army to southern Italy.

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  • calamity and of personal wrong, he looked to Prussia as affording the best example of an organized system of national education; and he was persuaded that "to carry back the education of Prussia into France afforded a nobler (if a bloodless) triumph than the trophies of Austerlitz and Jena."

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  • It served, however, to precipitate the crisis on the continent of Europe; the great army assembled at Boulogne was turned eastwards; by the capitulation of Ulm (October 19) Austria lost a large part of her forces; and the last news that reached Pitt on his A t lit death-bed was that of the ruin of all his hopes by the US er Z crushing victory of Napoleon over the Russians and Austrians at Austerlitz (December 2).

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  • Though the vague plan for an invasion of England fell to the ground Ulm and Austerlitz obliterated Trafalgar, and the camp at Boulogne put the best military resources he had ever commanded at Napoleons disposal.

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  • The soldiers themselves, discontented after Austerlitz, cried out for peace after Eylau.

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  • "Tell Consalvi," wrote the conqueror, still flushed with Austerlitz, "that if he loves his country he must either resign or do what I demand."

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  • In the public gardens there is a statue of General Jean Marie Valhubert, killed at Austerlitz.

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  • Dunbar attested his constancy and gave proof that Cromwell was a master of the tactics of all arms. Preston was an example like Austerlitz of the two stages of a battle as defined by Napoleon, the first flottante, the second foudroyante.

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  • After Austerlitz (December 2, 1805) Austria made peace by the treaty of Pressburg, ceding to the kingdom of Italy her part of Venetia along with the provinces of Istria and Dalmatia.

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  • It broke out in the following year, and after the battles of Austerlitz (December 1805) and Friedland (June 1807), in which the Russians were completely defeated, the two sovereigns had their famous interviews at Tilsit, at which they not only made peace but agreed to divide the world between them, with a sublime indifference to the interests of other states.

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  • He did so with masterly skill and swiftness, and the triumphs of Ulm and Austerlitz hid from view the disaster of Trafalgar; and the only official reference to that crushing defeat was couched in these terms: "Storms caused us to lose some ships of the line after a fight imprudently engaged" (speech to the Legislature, 2nd of March 1806).

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  • The glamour of Austerlitz had very naturally dazzled all Frenchmen.

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  • After Austerlitz the conqueror fulminated against them, and sent southwards a strong column which compelled an Anglo-Russian force to sail away and brought about the flight of the Bourbons to Sicily (February 1806).

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  • For Austria we may read Prussia; for Ulm, Jena-Auerstadt; for the occupation of Vienna, that of Berlin; for Austerlitz, Friedland, which again disposed of the belated succour given by Russia.

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  • The parallel extends even to the secret negotiations; for, if Austria could have been induced in May 1807 to send an army against Napoleon's communications, his position would have been fully as dangerous as before Austerlitz if Prussia had taken a similar step. Once more he triumphed owing to the timidity of the central power which had the game in its hands; and the folly which marked the Russian tactics at Friedland (14th of June 1807), as at Austerlitz, enabled him to close the campaign in a blaze of glory and shiver the coalition in pieces.

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  • Now came an opportunity far greater than that which occurred after Austerlitz.

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  • The campaigns described below are theref ore (a) The Austrian War of 1805 (Ulm and Austerlitz).

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  • The allies were aware of his position, and still adhering to the old " linear " system, marched to turn his right flank (see Austerlitz).

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  • The battle of Austerlitz began early next morning and closed in the evening with the thorough and decisive defeat of the allies.

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  • Ever since Austerlitz the Austrian officers had been labouring to reconstitute and reform their army.

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  • Perhaps no battle better exemplifies the inherent strength of the emperor's strategy, and in none was his grasp of the battlefield more brilliantly displayed, for, as he fully recognized, " These Prussians have at last learnt something - they are no longer the wooden toys of Frederick the Great," and, on the other hand, the relative inferiority of his own men as compared with his veterans of Austerlitz called for far more individual effort than on any previous day.

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  • Ceaseless industry, energy and conspicuous personal gallantry were the principal factors of his brilliant victories, and even in 1805 at Ulm and Austerlitz it was still the excellence of the tactical instrument, the army, which the Revolution had bequeathed to him that essentially produced the results.

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  • Furse, Ulm, Trafalgar and Austerlitz (London, 1905).

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  • The formation of the coalition and the outbreak of war for a while raised his hopes, in spite of his lively distrust of the competence of Austrian ministers; but the hopes were speedily dashed by Austerlitz and its results.

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  • In 1803 he received a commission in an infantry regiment, and took part in the campaign of 1805 under General Davoust, first in the Low Countries, and later at Ulm, Maria Zell and Austerlitz, where he fought with distinction, was wounded several times and promoted.

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  • AUSTERLITZ (Czech Slavkov), a town of Austria, in Moravia, 15 m.

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  • defeated the Austrians and Russians on the 2nd of December 1805, was fought in the country to the west of Austerlitz, the position of Napoleon's left wing being almost equi-distant from Briinn and from Austerlitz.

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  • (The 'course of events which led to the action is described under Napoleonic Campaigns.) Napoleon, falling back before the advance of the allied Austrians and Russians from Olmiitz, bivouacked west of the Goldbach, whilst the allies, holding, near Austerlitz, the junction of the roads from Olmiitz and from Hungary, formed up in the valleys east of the Pratzen heights.

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  • The French not only held their ground, but steadily advanced and eventually forced back the allies on Austerlitz, thereby barring their retreat on Olmiitz.

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  • After the "Chevalier Guards" had been routed by Marshal Bessieres and the Guard cavalry, the allies had no more hope of victory; orders had already been sent to Buxhbwden, who commanded the three columns engaged against Davout, to retreat on Austerlitz.

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  • Soult now barred the way to Austerlitz, and the allies turned southward towards Satschan.

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  • It was he who after Austerlitz aggrandized the margravate at the expense of Austria; transformed it into a sovereign principality and raised it to a grand-duchy.

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  • War was averted for a moment by the result of the battle of Austerlitz, but it broke out in earnest in October 1806.

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  • His conduct at Austerlitz (2nd December), where he was wounded, won him promotion to the rank of general of division.

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  • Herein Napoleon showed that he was no longer the Napoleon of Austerlitz; for he left locked up in far-distant secondary theatres no less than 56,500 men, of whom he could have collected some 30,000 to 36,000 for the decisive campaign in Belgium.

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  • Napoleon himself was no longer the Napoleon of Marengo or Austerlitz, and though he was not broken down, his physical strength was certainly impaired.

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  • In Paris the Austerlitz (1800-1806) and Carrousel (1834-1836) bridges had cast iron arches.

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  • After the victory of Austerlitz (December 2, 1805) Napoleon began to plan the formation of a ring of states surrounding, and in close alliance with, the French empire.

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    0
  • At Austerlitz he had the satisfaction of witnessing the actual results of his artillery reforms. The commissariat scandals which came to light after the peace of Tilsit convinced the emperor that nothing short of the stern and incorruptible energy of Arakcheev could reach the sources of the evil, and in January 1808 he was appointed inspector-general and war minister.

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  • He was rewarded for his services at Austerlitz (December 2, 1805) by the principality of Ponte Corvo (June 5,18°6), but during the campaign against Prussia, the same year, was severely reproached by Napoleon for not participating with his army corps in the battles of Jena and Auerstalt, though close at hand.

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  • After the battle of Austerlitz, he took part in the drafting of the treaty of Presburg.

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  • Two years later, when the defeat Roman of Austerlitz had led to the treaty of Pressburg Empire.

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  • But the campaign of Austerlitz followed, then the peace of Pressburg which guaranteed to Napoleon the former dominions of Venice, and finally the treaty of Tilsit, which involved, among other things, the withdrawal of the Russians from the Ionian Islands and the Albanian coast.

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  • He had no sooner entered Vienna in triumph than he opened negotiations with him; he resumed them after Austerlitz.

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  • Introduced to Marshal Ney, he served in the campaign of Austerlitz as a volunteer aide-de-camp on Ney's personal staff.

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  • After Austerlitz Napoleon revenged himself by declaring that " the Bourbon dynasty had ceased to reign," and sent an army under his brother Joseph to occupy the kingdom.

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  • He distinguished himself at Austerlitz, and, after serving for a short time in Italy, he rejoined the grande armee as a general of brigade, in time to take part in the campaign of Friedland.

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  • of Prussia detained him in Pomerania; and when at last (December 1805) he led his 6000 men towards the Elbe district the third coalition had already been dissipated by the victories of Ulm and Austerlitz.

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  • He distinguished himself at the battles of Austerlitz and Jena,.

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  • He commanded a corps in the advance on Ulm, and at Austerlitz he led the decisive attack on the allied centre.

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  • The French victory at Austerlitz enabled Napoleon to despatch an army to southern Italy.

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  • calamity and of personal wrong, he looked to Prussia as affording the best example of an organized system of national education; and he was persuaded that "to carry back the education of Prussia into France afforded a nobler (if a bloodless) triumph than the trophies of Austerlitz and Jena."

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  • It served, however, to precipitate the crisis on the continent of Europe; the great army assembled at Boulogne was turned eastwards; by the capitulation of Ulm (October 19) Austria lost a large part of her forces; and the last news that reached Pitt on his A t lit death-bed was that of the ruin of all his hopes by the US er Z crushing victory of Napoleon over the Russians and Austrians at Austerlitz (December 2).

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  • Though the vague plan for an invasion of England fell to the ground Ulm and Austerlitz obliterated Trafalgar, and the camp at Boulogne put the best military resources he had ever commanded at Napoleons disposal.

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  • The soldiers themselves, discontented after Austerlitz, cried out for peace after Eylau.

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  • (See Italy.) Not long of ter the battle of Austerlitz (2nd December 1805) Napoleon dignified the elector of Bavaria with the title of king and arranged a marriage between Eugene and the princess Augusta Amelia of Bavaria.

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  • For numbers and for carnage it was an Austerlitz or Dresden.

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  • Next day, the army began its campaign, and up to the very battle of Austerlitz, Boris was unable to see either Prince Andrew or Dolgorukov again and remained for a while with the Ismaylov regiment.

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  • And he was not the only man to experience that feeling during those memorable days preceding the battle of Austerlitz: nine tenths of the men in the Russian army were then in love, though less ecstatically, with their Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms.

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  • In the highest army circles from midday on the nineteenth, a great, excitedly bustling activity began which lasted till the morning of the twentieth, when the memorable battle of Austerlitz was fought.

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  • Just as in a clock, the result of the complicated motion of innumerable wheels and pulleys is merely a slow and regular movement of the hands which show the time, so the result of all the complicated human activities of 160,000 Russians and French--all their passions, desires, remorse, humiliations, sufferings, outbursts of pride, fear, and enthusiasm--was only the loss of the battle of Austerlitz, the so-called battle of the three Emperors--that is to say, a slow movement of the hand on the dial of human history.

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  • On all sides, new and fresh anecdotes were heard of individual examples of heroism shown by our officers and men at Austerlitz.

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  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.

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  • The gazettes from which the old prince first heard of the defeat at Austerlitz stated, as usual very briefly and vaguely, that after brilliant engagements the Russians had had to retreat and had made their withdrawal in perfect order.

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  • After the Austerlitz campaign Prince Andrew had firmly resolved not to continue his military service, and when the war recommenced and everybody had to serve, he took a post under his father in the recruitment so as to avoid active service.

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  • "Since the day of our brilliant success at Austerlitz," wrote Bilibin, "as you know, my dear prince, I never leave headquarters.

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  • "After Austerlitz!" said Prince Andrew gloomily.

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  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.

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  • Memories of Austerlitz and of Dolokhov flashed rapidly and clearly through his mind.

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  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.

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  • Of a fourth opinion the most conspicuous representative was the Tsarevich, who could not forget his disillusionment at Austerlitz, where he had ridden out at the head of the Guards, in his casque and cavalry uniform as to a review, expecting to crush the French gallantly; but unexpectedly finding himself in the front line had narrowly escaped amid the general confusion.

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  • From this short interview with Pfuel, Prince Andrew, thanks to his Austerlitz experiences, was able to form a clear conception of the man.

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  • Since the campaigns of Austerlitz and of 1807 Rostov knew by experience that men always lie when describing military exploits, as he himself had done when recounting them; besides that, he had experience enough to know that nothing happens in war at all as we can imagine or relate it.

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  • He was listening to the general's report-- which consisted chiefly of a criticism of the position at Tsarevo- Zaymishche--as he had listened to Denisov, and seven years previously had listened to the discussion at the Austerlitz council of war.

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  • I remember you at Austerlitz....

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  • Narrow and burdensome and useless to anyone as his life now seemed to him, Prince Andrew on the eve of battle felt agitated and irritable as he had done seven years before at Austerlitz.

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  • Why did we lose the battle at Austerlitz?

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  • Behave as you did at Austerlitz, Friedland, Vitebsk, and Smolensk.

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  • The dispositions drawn up by Weyrother for the battle of Austerlitz were a model of perfection for that kind of composition, but still they were criticized--criticized for their very perfection, for their excessive minuteness.

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  • As in the Austerlitz dispositions, it was written--though not in German this time:

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  • Toll, who in this battle played the part of Weyrother at Austerlitz, galloped assiduously from place to place, finding everything upside down everywhere.

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  • No battle--Tarutino, Borodino, or Austerlitz--takes place as those who planned it anticipated.

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  • At Austerlitz he remained last at the Augezd dam, rallying the regiments, saving what was possible when all were flying and perishing and not a single general was left in the rear guard.

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  • The same submissive, expressionless look with which he had listened to the Emperor's commands on the field of Austerlitz seven years before settled on his face now.

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  • That city is taken; the Russian army suffers heavier losses than the opposing armies had suffered in the former war from Austerlitz to Wagram.

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  • The impressive structure was commissioned by Napoleon to celebrate his victory at Austerlitz in 1806.

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