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aurangzeb

aurangzeb

aurangzeb Sentence Examples

  • p by Aurangzeb in A.D.

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  • p by Aurangzeb in A.D.

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  • He accordingly, in 1687, entered into a bargain for its sale to Chikka Deva, raja of Mysore, for three lakhs of rupees; but before it could be completed, Kasim Khan, commander of the forces of Aurangzeb, marched upon the place and entered it almost without resistance.

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  • In 1685 the fort was taken by the emperor Aurangzeb, and Dharwar, on the break-up of the Mogul empire, fell under the sway of the peshwa of Poona.

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  • The minarets of the mosque of Aurangzeb rise above all.

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  • Aurangzeb's death and the invasion of Nadir Shah led to a triple alliance among the three leading chiefs, which internal jealousy so weakened that the Mahrattas, having been called in by the Rahtors to aid them, took possession of Ajmere about 1756; thenceforward Rajputana became involved in the general disorganization of India.

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  • In the time of Aurangzeb the Ahom kings held sway over the entire Brahmaputra valley from Sadiya to near Goalpara, and from the skirts of the southern hills to the Bhutia frontier on the north.

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  • The Lal-bagh palace was commenced by Azam Shah, the third son of the emperor Aurangzeb.

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  • Among the most conspicuous of these are the mosque of Aurangzeb, built as an intentional insult in the middle of the Hindu quarter; the Bisheshwar or Golden Temple, important less through architectural beauty than through its rank as the holiest spot in the holy city; and the Durga temple, which, like most of the other principal temples, is a Mahratta building of the 17th century.

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  • In 1658 he fell ill, and was confined by his son Aurangzeb in the citadel of Agra until his death in 1666.

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  • The eighth guru was the second son of Har Rai, but he died when a child and too young to leave any mark on in his favour and also in favour of the next guru for having altered a line of the Granth to please the emperor Aurangzeb.

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  • For some years after his father's execution Govind Singh, then known as Gobind Rai, lived in retirement, brooding over the wrongs of his people and the persecutions of the fanatical Aurangzeb.

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  • The death of the emperor Aurangzeb brought a temporary lull: the guru assisted Aurangzeb's successor, Bahadur Shah, and was himself not long after assassinated at Nander in the Deccan.

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  • The guru replied, "Emperor Aurangzeb, I was on the top storey of my prison, but I was not looking at thy private apartments or at thy queen's.

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  • after the death of Aurangzeb in 1707.

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  • In 1669-70 Aurangzeb visited the city and continued the work of destruction.

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  • The majority are modern, but the mosque of Aurangzeb, on a lofty site, dates from 1669.

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  • AURANGZEB (1618-1707), one of the greatest of the Mogul emperors of Hindustan, was the third son of Shah Jahan, and was born in November 1618.

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  • His original name, Mahommed, was changed by his father, with whom he was a favourite, into Aurangzeb, meaning ornament of the throne, and at a later time he assumed the additional titles of Mohi-eddin, reviver of religion, and Alam-gir, conqueror of the world.

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  • His father's express orders prevented Aurangzeb from following up this success, and, not long after, the sudden and alarming illness of Shah Jahan turned his thoughts in another direction.

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  • The keen eye of Aurangzeb saw in this conjuncture of events a favourable opportunity for realising his own ambitious schemes.

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  • Aurangzeb then, by a clever stroke of policy, seized the person of his father, and threw him into confinement, in which he was kept for the remaining eight years of his life.

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  • Murad was soon removed by assassination, and the way being thus cleared, Aurangzeb, with affected reluctance, ascended the throne in August 1658.

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  • Shuja, who had been a second time defeated near Allahabad, was attacked by the imperial forces under Mir Jumla and Mahommed, Aurangzeb's eldest son, who, however, deserted and joined his uncle.

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  • No similar contest disturbed Aurangzeb's long reign of forty-six years, which has been celebrated, though with doubtful justice, as the most brilliant period of the history of Hindustan.

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  • Under their able leader, Sivaji, these daring freebooters plundered in every direction, nor could all Aurangzeb's efforts avail to subdue them.

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  • For the last twenty-six years of his life Aurangzeb was engaged in wars in the Deccan, and never set foot in his own capital.

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  • The Bundelas, under Champat Rai and his son Chhatar Sal, offered a successful resistance to the proselytizing efforts of Aurangzeb.

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  • 1707-1712, the son and successor of Aurangzeb.

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  • In the 17th century, after a long struggle, the settlers in the plains wrested from Aurangzeb terms which left them almost as independent as their brothers in the hills.

    0
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  • The following are some of the most famous diamonds of the world: - A large stone found in the Golconda mines and said to have weighed 787 carats in the rough, before being cut by a Venetian lapidary, was seen in the treasury of Aurangzeb in 1665 by Tavernier, who estimated its weight after cutting as 280 (?) carats, and described it as a rounded rose-cut-stone, tall on one side.

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  • Aurangzeb tried to take it in 1649 with 5000 men, but failed.

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  • The victories of the Delhi emperors, Akbar, Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb, crushed the rest.

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  • Nizam-ul-Mulk (_ "administrator of the kingdom") was the title of Asaf Jah, the founder of the dynasty, a very able soldier and minister of the court of Aurangzeb, who was appointed governor of the Deccan in 1713, and established his independence before his death in 1748.

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  • Another very popular poet is Khushal Khan, the warlike chief of the Khattaks in the time of Aurangzeb.

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  • Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb extracted a larger land revenue than the British do.

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  • Despite frequent internal strife, the sultans of the Deccan retained their independence until conquered by the Mogul emperor Aurangzeb in the latter half of the 17th century.

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  • At last he turned his arms against the Mahommedan kings of the Deccan, and wrested from them Berar; but the permanent conquest of the south was reserved for Aurangzeb.

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  • Suffice it to say that Aurangzeb, by mingled treachery and violence, supplanted or overthrew his brothers and proclaimed himself emperor in 1658, while Shah Jahan was yet alive.

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  • Aurangzeb's long reign, from 1658 to 1707, may be regarded as representing both the culminating point of Mogul power and the beginning of its decay.

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  • Aurangzeb had indeed enlarged the empire, but he had not strengthened its foundations.

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  • In name Sivaji was a feudatory of the house of Bijapur, on whose behalf he held the rock-forts of his native Ghats; but in fact he found his opportunity in playing off the Mahommedan powers against one another, and in rivalling Aurangzeb himself in the art of treachery.

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  • In 1680 Sivaji died, and his son and successor, Sambhaji, was betrayed to Aurangzeb and put to death.

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  • In 1686 the city of Bijapur was taken by Aurangzeb in person, and in the following year Golconda also fell.

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  • During the early years of his reign Aurangzeb had fixed his capital at Delhi, while he kept his dethroned father, Shah Jahan, in close confinement at Agra.

    0
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  • In this camp life Aurangzeb may be taken as representative of one aspect of the Mogul rule, which has been picturesquely described by European travellers of that day.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Aurangzeb in 1707, the decline of the Mogul empire set in with extraordinary rapidity.

    0
    0
  • Ten emperors after Aurangzeb are enumerated in the chronicles, but none of them has left any mark on history.

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  • From the time of Aurangzeb no Mussulman, however powerful, dared to assume the title of sultan or emperor, with the single exception of Tippoo's brief paroxysm of madness.

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  • During the troubled period of intrigue and assassination that followed on the death of Aurangzeb, two Mahommedan foreigners rose to high position as courtiers and generals, and succeeded in transmitting their power to their sons.

    0
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  • They paid their annual rent of 1200 pagodas (say £50o) to the deputies of the Mogul empire when Aurangzeb annexed the south, and on two several occasions bought off a besieging army with a heavy bribe.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Aurangzeb in 1707, the whole of southern India became practically independent of Delhi.

    0
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  • At the time of Aurangzeb's death in 1707 the nawab or governor of Bengal was Murshid Kuli Khan, known also as Jafar Khan.

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  • Sivaji the Great, as already mentioned, died in 1680, while Aurangzeb was still on the throne.

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  • The second Mysore War of 1790-92 is noteworthy on two accounts: Lord Cornwallis, the governor-general, led the British army in person, with a pomp and lavishness of supplies that recalled the campaigns of Aurangzeb; y and the two great native powers, the nizam of the Wa Deccan and the Mahratta confederacy, co-operated as allies of the British.

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  • With the firm establishment of the Mogul empire peace was restored, the most permanent effect of this period being the large proportion of Mussulmans among the population, due to the zeal of Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • In 1687 the Circars were added, along with the empire of Hyderabad, to the extensive empire of Aurangzeb.

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  • In 1666 he visited the Mogul emperor, Aurangzeb, at Delhi,.

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  • Aurangzeb, who erected here a mausoleum to his wife which has been compared to the Taj at Agra, made the city the seat of his government during his viceroyalty of the Deccan, and gave it the name of Aurangabad.

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  • Aurangzeb >>

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  • During the civil wars between the sons of Shah Jahan, the king of Assam renewed his predatory incursions into Bengal; upon the termination of the contest, Aurangzeb determined to avenge these repeated insults, and despatched a considerable force for the regular invasion of the Assamese territory (1660-1662).

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  • The marriage of his son to the granddaughter of Aurangzeb and the formal restoration of the crown to the dethroned emperor were doubtless politic, but the descendant of Babar could not easily forget how humiliating a chapter in history would remain to be written against him.

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  • Two other mosques in Delhi itself deserve passing notice, the Kala Masjid or Black Mosque, which was built about 1380 in the reign of Feroz Shah, and the Moti Masjid or Pearl Mosque, a tiny building added to the palace by Aurangzeb, as the emperor's private place of prayer.

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  • Through this arch Sikandar Adil Shah, the last king of Bijapur, was brought bound with silver chains, while on a raised platform sat Aurangzeb, the Mogul emperor, who had left Delhi three years previously to conquer the Deccan.

    0
    0
  • The kingdom had been for some time rapidly falling to ruin, and in 1686 the Mogul emperor Aurangzeb, who as Shah Jahan's general had unsuccessfully besieged the city under Mahommed Adil Shah, took Bijapur and annexed the kingdom to the Delhi empire.

    0
    0
  • An inscription on the gun recording that fact was erased by Aurangzeb, who substituted the present inscription stating that he conquered Bijapur in 1686.

    0
    0
  • In 696 the English built the original Fort William by permission of the nawab, and in 1698 they formally purchased the three villages of Sutanati, Kalikata and Govindpur from Prince Azim, son of the emperor Aurangzeb.

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  • Balkh formed the government of Aurangzeb in his youth.

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  • In 1685, the Bengal factors, driven to extremity by the oppression of the Mogul governors, threw down the gauntlet; and after various successes and hairbreadth escapes, purchased from the grandson of Aurangzeb, in 1696, the villages which have since grown up into Calcutta, the metropolis of India.

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  • In 1685 the fort was taken by the emperor Aurangzeb, and Dharwar, on the break-up of the Mogul empire, fell under the sway of the peshwa of Poona.

    0
    0
  • From Akbar's accession to Aurangzeb's death, a period of 151 years, the Mogul was India's master.

    0
    0
  • Aurangzeb's death and the invasion of Nadir Shah led to a triple alliance among the three leading chiefs, which internal jealousy so weakened that the Mahrattas, having been called in by the Rahtors to aid them, took possession of Ajmere about 1756; thenceforward Rajputana became involved in the general disorganization of India.

    0
    0
  • In the time of Aurangzeb the Ahom kings held sway over the entire Brahmaputra valley from Sadiya to near Goalpara, and from the skirts of the southern hills to the Bhutia frontier on the north.

    0
    0
  • The Lal-bagh palace was commenced by Azam Shah, the third son of the emperor Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • The minarets of the mosque of Aurangzeb rise above all.

    0
    0
  • Among the most conspicuous of these are the mosque of Aurangzeb, built as an intentional insult in the middle of the Hindu quarter; the Bisheshwar or Golden Temple, important less through architectural beauty than through its rank as the holiest spot in the holy city; and the Durga temple, which, like most of the other principal temples, is a Mahratta building of the 17th century.

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  • Two other distinguished chiefs of the house were Karan Singh (1631-1669), who in the struggle of the sons of Shah Jahan for the throne threw in his lot with Aurangzeb, and his eldest son, Anup Singh (1669-1698), who fought with distinction in the Deccan, was conspicuous in the capture of Golconda, and earned the title of maharaja.

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  • In 1658 he fell ill, and was confined by his son Aurangzeb in the citadel of Agra until his death in 1666.

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  • The eighth guru was the second son of Har Rai, but he died when a child and too young to leave any mark on in his favour and also in favour of the next guru for having altered a line of the Granth to please the emperor Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • For some years after his father's execution Govind Singh, then known as Gobind Rai, lived in retirement, brooding over the wrongs of his people and the persecutions of the fanatical Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • The death of the emperor Aurangzeb brought a temporary lull: the guru assisted Aurangzeb's successor, Bahadur Shah, and was himself not long after assassinated at Nander in the Deccan.

    0
    0
  • The guru replied, "Emperor Aurangzeb, I was on the top storey of my prison, but I was not looking at thy private apartments or at thy queen's.

    0
    0
  • after the death of Aurangzeb in 1707.

    0
    0
  • In 1669-70 Aurangzeb visited the city and continued the work of destruction.

    0
    0
  • The majority are modern, but the mosque of Aurangzeb, on a lofty site, dates from 1669.

    0
    0
  • AURANGZEB (1618-1707), one of the greatest of the Mogul emperors of Hindustan, was the third son of Shah Jahan, and was born in November 1618.

    0
    0
  • His original name, Mahommed, was changed by his father, with whom he was a favourite, into Aurangzeb, meaning ornament of the throne, and at a later time he assumed the additional titles of Mohi-eddin, reviver of religion, and Alam-gir, conqueror of the world.

    0
    0
  • His father's express orders prevented Aurangzeb from following up this success, and, not long after, the sudden and alarming illness of Shah Jahan turned his thoughts in another direction.

    0
    0
  • The keen eye of Aurangzeb saw in this conjuncture of events a favourable opportunity for realising his own ambitious schemes.

    0
    0
  • Shuja was defeated by Dara's son, but the imperial forces under Jaswant Singh were completely routed by the united armies of Aurangzeb and Murad.

    0
    0
  • Aurangzeb then, by a clever stroke of policy, seized the person of his father, and threw him into confinement, in which he was kept for the remaining eight years of his life.

    0
    0
  • Murad was soon removed by assassination, and the way being thus cleared, Aurangzeb, with affected reluctance, ascended the throne in August 1658.

    0
    0
  • Shuja, who had been a second time defeated near Allahabad, was attacked by the imperial forces under Mir Jumla and Mahommed, Aurangzeb's eldest son, who, however, deserted and joined his uncle.

    0
    0
  • No similar contest disturbed Aurangzeb's long reign of forty-six years, which has been celebrated, though with doubtful justice, as the most brilliant period of the history of Hindustan.

    0
    0
  • The one was the intense bigotry and intolerant policy of Aurangzeb, which had alienated the Hindus and roused the fierce animosity of the haughty Rajputs.

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    0
  • Under their able leader, Sivaji, these daring freebooters plundered in every direction, nor could all Aurangzeb's efforts avail to subdue them.

    0
    0
  • For the last twenty-six years of his life Aurangzeb was engaged in wars in the Deccan, and never set foot in his own capital.

    0
    0
  • The Bundelas, under Champat Rai and his son Chhatar Sal, offered a successful resistance to the proselytizing efforts of Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • 1707-1712, the son and successor of Aurangzeb.

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  • The reply to this indictment is that the British land revenue is L16,000,000 annually, whereas Aurangzeb's over a smaller area, allowing for the difference in the value of the rupee, was X110,000,000; though the Indian Civil Service is expensive, its cost is more than covered by the fact that India, under British guarantee, obtains her loans at 31% as against 10% or more paid by native rulers; though India has a heavy military burden, she pays no contribution to the British navy, which protects her seaboard from invasion; the drain of the home charges cannot be very great, as India annually absorbs 6 millions sterling of the precious metals; in 1899-1900, a year of famine, the net imports of gold and silver were 1 3 o millions.

    0
    0
  • In the 17th century, after a long struggle, the settlers in the plains wrested from Aurangzeb terms which left them almost as independent as their brothers in the hills.

    0
    0
  • The following are some of the most famous diamonds of the world: - A large stone found in the Golconda mines and said to have weighed 787 carats in the rough, before being cut by a Venetian lapidary, was seen in the treasury of Aurangzeb in 1665 by Tavernier, who estimated its weight after cutting as 280 (?) carats, and described it as a rounded rose-cut-stone, tall on one side.

    0
    0
  • Aurangzeb tried to take it in 1649 with 5000 men, but failed.

    0
    0
  • The victories of the Delhi emperors, Akbar, Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb, crushed the rest.

    0
    0
  • Nizam-ul-Mulk (_ "administrator of the kingdom") was the title of Asaf Jah, the founder of the dynasty, a very able soldier and minister of the court of Aurangzeb, who was appointed governor of the Deccan in 1713, and established his independence before his death in 1748.

    0
    0
  • During the dissensions which followed the death of Aurangzeb in 1707, Raja Kalyan Singh Bhadauria obtained possession of Dholpur, and his family retained it till 1761, after which it was taken successively by the Jat raja, Suraj Mal of Bharatpur, by Mirza Najaf Khan in 1 775, by Sindhia in 1782, and in 1803 by the British.

    0
    0
  • Another very popular poet is Khushal Khan, the warlike chief of the Khattaks in the time of Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • Shah Jahan and Aurangzeb extracted a larger land revenue than the British do.

    0
    0
  • Despite frequent internal strife, the sultans of the Deccan retained their independence until conquered by the Mogul emperor Aurangzeb in the latter half of the 17th century.

    0
    0
  • At last he turned his arms against the Mahommedan kings of the Deccan, and wrested from them Berar; but the permanent conquest of the south was reserved for Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • Suffice it to say that Aurangzeb, by mingled treachery and violence, supplanted or overthrew his brothers and proclaimed himself emperor in 1658, while Shah Jahan was yet alive.

    0
    0
  • Aurangzeb's long reign, from 1658 to 1707, may be regarded as representing both the culminating point of Mogul power and the beginning of its decay.

    0
    0
  • Aurangzeb had indeed enlarged the empire, but he had not strengthened its foundations.

    0
    0
  • In name Sivaji was a feudatory of the house of Bijapur, on whose behalf he held the rock-forts of his native Ghats; but in fact he found his opportunity in playing off the Mahommedan powers against one another, and in rivalling Aurangzeb himself in the art of treachery.

    0
    0
  • In 1680 Sivaji died, and his son and successor, Sambhaji, was betrayed to Aurangzeb and put to death.

    0
    0
  • In 1686 the city of Bijapur was taken by Aurangzeb in person, and in the following year Golconda also fell.

    0
    0
  • During the early years of his reign Aurangzeb had fixed his capital at Delhi, while he kept his dethroned father, Shah Jahan, in close confinement at Agra.

    0
    0
  • In this camp life Aurangzeb may be taken as representative of one aspect of the Mogul rule, which has been picturesquely described by European travellers of that day.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Aurangzeb in 1707, the decline of the Mogul empire set in with extraordinary rapidity.

    0
    0
  • Ten emperors after Aurangzeb are enumerated in the chronicles, but none of them has left any mark on history.

    0
    0
  • From the time of Aurangzeb no Mussulman, however powerful, dared to assume the title of sultan or emperor, with the single exception of Tippoo's brief paroxysm of madness.

    0
    0
  • During the troubled period of intrigue and assassination that followed on the death of Aurangzeb, two Mahommedan foreigners rose to high position as courtiers and generals, and succeeded in transmitting their power to their sons.

    0
    0
  • They paid their annual rent of 1200 pagodas (say £50o) to the deputies of the Mogul empire when Aurangzeb annexed the south, and on two several occasions bought off a besieging army with a heavy bribe.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Aurangzeb in 1707, the whole of southern India became practically independent of Delhi.

    0
    0
  • At the time of Aurangzeb's death in 1707 the nawab or governor of Bengal was Murshid Kuli Khan, known also as Jafar Khan.

    0
    0
  • Sivaji the Great, as already mentioned, died in 1680, while Aurangzeb was still on the throne.

    0
    0
  • The second Mysore War of 1790-92 is noteworthy on two accounts: Lord Cornwallis, the governor-general, led the British army in person, with a pomp and lavishness of supplies that recalled the campaigns of Aurangzeb; y and the two great native powers, the nizam of the Wa Deccan and the Mahratta confederacy, co-operated as allies of the British.

    0
    0
  • With the firm establishment of the Mogul empire peace was restored, the most permanent effect of this period being the large proportion of Mussulmans among the population, due to the zeal of Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • In 1687 the Circars were added, along with the empire of Hyderabad, to the extensive empire of Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • In 1666 he visited the Mogul emperor, Aurangzeb, at Delhi,.

    0
    0
  • Aurangzeb, who erected here a mausoleum to his wife which has been compared to the Taj at Agra, made the city the seat of his government during his viceroyalty of the Deccan, and gave it the name of Aurangabad.

    0
    0
  • During the civil wars between the sons of Shah Jahan, the king of Assam renewed his predatory incursions into Bengal; upon the termination of the contest, Aurangzeb determined to avenge these repeated insults, and despatched a considerable force for the regular invasion of the Assamese territory (1660-1662).

    0
    0
  • The marriage of his son to the granddaughter of Aurangzeb and the formal restoration of the crown to the dethroned emperor were doubtless politic, but the descendant of Babar could not easily forget how humiliating a chapter in history would remain to be written against him.

    0
    0
  • Two other mosques in Delhi itself deserve passing notice, the Kala Masjid or Black Mosque, which was built about 1380 in the reign of Feroz Shah, and the Moti Masjid or Pearl Mosque, a tiny building added to the palace by Aurangzeb, as the emperor's private place of prayer.

    0
    0
  • Through this arch Sikandar Adil Shah, the last king of Bijapur, was brought bound with silver chains, while on a raised platform sat Aurangzeb, the Mogul emperor, who had left Delhi three years previously to conquer the Deccan.

    0
    0
  • The kingdom had been for some time rapidly falling to ruin, and in 1686 the Mogul emperor Aurangzeb, who as Shah Jahan's general had unsuccessfully besieged the city under Mahommed Adil Shah, took Bijapur and annexed the kingdom to the Delhi empire.

    0
    0
  • An inscription on the gun recording that fact was erased by Aurangzeb, who substituted the present inscription stating that he conquered Bijapur in 1686.

    0
    0
  • In 696 the English built the original Fort William by permission of the nawab, and in 1698 they formally purchased the three villages of Sutanati, Kalikata and Govindpur from Prince Azim, son of the emperor Aurangzeb.

    0
    0
  • Balkh formed the government of Aurangzeb in his youth.

    0
    0
  • In 1685, the Bengal factors, driven to extremity by the oppression of the Mogul governors, threw down the gauntlet; and after various successes and hairbreadth escapes, purchased from the grandson of Aurangzeb, in 1696, the villages which have since grown up into Calcutta, the metropolis of India.

    0
    0
  • He accordingly, in 1687, entered into a bargain for its sale to Chikka Deva, raja of Mysore, for three lakhs of rupees; but before it could be completed, Kasim Khan, commander of the forces of Aurangzeb, marched upon the place and entered it almost without resistance.

    0
    0
  • From Akbar's accession to Aurangzeb's death, a period of 151 years, the Mogul was India's master.

    0
    1
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