This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

audiences

audiences Sentence Examples

  • His lectures drew large audiences, including many Protestants.

    19
    5
  • As their reputation grew he travelled all over the country, delighting large audiences with his quaint humour and natural pathos.

    6
    6
  • In 1807 he was appointed Lady Margaret professor of divinity at Cambridge, and lectured to large audiences on biblical criticism, substituting English for the traditional Latin.

    5
    3
  • three fruitless audiences with James II.

    5
    5
  • three fruitless audiences with James II.

    5
    5
  • He succeeded in maintaining his disguise, and on arriving at Khiva went safely through two audiences of the khan.

    4
    2
  • It is a mistake to say that he grew more conservative in later years; but his judgment grew more generous and catholic. He was a greater orator than man of letters, and his sermons in New York were delivered to large audiences, averaging one thousand at the Masonic Temple, and were printed each week; in eloquence and in the charm of his spoken word he was probably surpassed in his day by none save George William Curtis.

    4
    2
  • Few of those in the audiences of Moliere, returning home under the grey walls of St Germaindes-Pres, knew that within that monastery the men whose midnight they disturbed were laying the basis for all scientific history; and few of the later historians of that age have been any wiser.

    4
    2
  • Few of those in the audiences of Moliere, returning home under the grey walls of St Germaindes-Pres, knew that within that monastery the men whose midnight they disturbed were laying the basis for all scientific history; and few of the later historians of that age have been any wiser.

    4
    2
  • In his own day he took high rank as a pulpit orator, and even royalty had to beg for a seat amongst his audiences; but his sermons are now forgotten.

    4
    4
  • A quaint figure in the pantheon of the heroic age is Hanuman, the deified chief of monkeys - probably meant to represent the aboriginal tribes of southern India - whose wonderful exploits as Rama's ally on the expedition to Lanka Indian audiences will never weary of hearing recounted.

    4
    4
  • In 1830 a rising in Dresden led to his being named joint regent of the kingdom along with King Anthony on the 13th of September; and in this position his popularity and his wise and liberal reforms (for instance, in arranging public audiences) speedily quelled all discontent.

    3
    3
  • Even oratory was intended quite as much for readers as for the audiences to which it was immediately addressed; and some of the greatest speeches which have come down from that great age of orators were never delivered at all, but were published as manifestoes after the event with the view of influencing educated opinion, and as works of art with the view of giving pleasure to educated taste.

    2
    2
  • He banished the musicians and singers, and forbade all kinds of games; he devoted himself to the administration of justice, and gave public audiences to the people for the redress of their grievances.

    2
    2
  • Everywhere the imperial competitor was victorious, and crowded audiences importuned him to display his talents.

    2
    2
  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.

    2
    2
  • In 1847 Emerson visited Great Britain for the second time, was welcomed by Carlyle, lectured to appreciative audiences in Manchester, Liverpool, Edinburgh and London, made many new friends among the best English people, paid a brief visit to Paris, and returned home in July 1848.

    2
    3
  • In 1757 Voltaire came to reside at Lausanne; and although he took but little notice of the young Englishman of twenty, who eagerly sought and easily obtained an introduction, the establishment of the theatre at Monrepos, where the brilliant versifier himself declaimed before select audiences his own productions on the stage, had no small influence in fortifying Gibbon's taste for the French theatre, and in at the same time abating that "idolatry for the gigantic genius of Shakespeare which is inculcated from our infancy as the first duty of an Englishman."

    1
    1
  • He would frequently have audiences of the king, by whom he was graciously received.

    1
    1
  • He had public and private audiences with the pope on the 9th of April and the 11th of May 1848, but recorded next to nothing in his diary concerning them, though numerous other entries show an eager interest in everything connected with the Roman Church, and private papers also indicate that he recognized at this time grave defects in the Church of England and a mysterious attractiveness in Roman Catholicism, going so far as to question whether he might not one day be a Roman Catholic himself.

    1
    1
  • For the stately declamation, the sonorous, and beyond a doubt impressive, chant of Quin and his fellows, Garrick substituted rapid changes of passion and humour in both voice and gesture, which held his audiences spellbound.

    1
    1
  • The functions of the first dragoman are mainly political; he accompanies the ambassador or minister at his audiences of the sultan and usually of the ministers, and it is he who is charged with the bulk of diplomatic negotiations at the palace or the Porte.

    1
    1
  • He was in constant demand as a lecturer from 1843, when he made his first appearance on the platform, always drew large audiences, and, in spite of his bad management in money matters, received considerable sums, sometimes $600o or $7000 for a single winter's lecturing.

    1
    1
  • He gradually became a logician out of his previous studies: out of metaphysics, for with him being is always the basis of thinking, and common principles, such as that of contradiction, are axioms of things before axioms of thought, while categories are primarily things signified by names; out of the mathematics of the Pythagoreans and the Platonists, which taught him the nature of demonstration; out of the physics, of which he imbibed the first draughts from his father, which taught him induction from sense and the modification of strict demonstration to suit facts; out of the dialectic between man and man which provided him with beautiful examples of inference in the Socratic dialogues of Xenophon and Plato; out of the rhetoric addressed to large audiences, which with dialectic called his attention to probable inferences; out of the grammar taught with rhetoric and poetics which led him to the logic of the proposition.

    1
    1
  • We find him delivering a lecture to audiences of " all the chief learned of the city of London."

    1
    1
  • Each tana - or rabbi of the earlier period - had a spokesman, who repeated to large audiences the discourses of the tana.

    1
    1
  • In 1875 he was appointed one of the Old Testament revisers; in1880-1882he delivered by invitation, to very large audiences in Edinburgh and Glasgow, two courses of lectures on the criticism of the Old Testament, which he afterwards published (The Old Testament in the Jewish Church, first edition 1881, second edition 1892, and The Prophets of Israel, 1882, which also passed through two editions); and soon after his dismissal from his chair he joined Professor Baynes in the editorship of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and after Professor Baynes's death remained in supreme editorial control till the work was completed.

    1
    1
  • During the week he lectured to large audiences of young and old on the principal Greek and Latin authors, and on Sundays he explained Dante to the people in the Duomo.

    1
    1
  • His lectures were attended by persons of the highest distinction from all parts of Europe, and such was the charm of his demonstrations that a hall capable of containing 2000 people had eventually to be assigned for the accommodation of the overflowing audiences which they attracted.

    1
    1
  • On the two following days Dr Lukacs and Mr de Justh had audiences of the king, but without result; and on the 31st Hungary once more entered on a period of extra-constitutional government.

    1
    2
  • appointed him professor of philosophy and eloquence at the College de France, where for a considerable time he lectured before audiences numbering as many as 2000.

    1
    2
  • Next come the four palatine prelates, the majordomo, the superintendent of the household and its staff, and successor of the ancient vicedominus; the master of the chamber, who presides over the arrangement of audiences; the auditor, or private secretary; and finally the master of the sacred palace (magister sacri palatii), a kind of theological adviser, always a Dominican, whose special duty is nowadays the revision of books published at Rome.

    1
    2
  • The logical form of the argument makes it especially valuable in public speaking, before uncritical audiences.

    0
    0
  • He was also distinguished as a reciter, and on a visit to the United States in 1871 read extracts from his works before large audiences.

    0
    0
  • In 1561 he went to teach theology in Rome, reckoning among his pupils Robert Bellarmine, afterwards cardinal; then passed into Sicily; and in 1569 he was sent to Paris, where his expositions of the writings of Thomas Aquinas attracted large audiences.

    0
    0
  • In 1901 he was received by the sultan; the pope and many European statesmen gave him audiences.

    0
    0
  • His "more stately genius," as Mr John Morley calls it, was already making him the undisputed master of the feelings of his audiences.

    0
    0
  • In the principal coffee-shops of Cairo are to be found reciters of romances, surrounded by iiiterested audiences.

    0
    0
  • He still preached occasionally, and always drew large audiences.

    0
    0
  • The pope admitted him to six long audiences in the course of two months, wrote an enthusiastic letter to the grand-duke praising the great astronomer, not only for his distinguished learning, but also for his exemplary piety, and granted a pension to his son Vincenzio, which was afterwards transferred to himself, and paid, with some irregularities, to the end of his life.

    0
    0
  • Mr Chamberlain had relied on his personal influence, which from 1895 to 1902 had been supreme; but his own resignation, and the course of events, had since 1903 made his personality less authoritative, and new interests - such as the opposition to the Education Act, to the heavy taxation, and to Chinese labour in the Transvaal, and indignation over the revelations concerned with the war - were monopolizing attention, to the weakening of his hold on the public. The revival in trade, and the production of new statistics which appeared to stultify Mr Chamberlain's prophecies of progressive decline, enabled the free-trade champions to reassure their audiences as to the very foundation of his case, and to represent the whole tariff reform movement as no less unnecessary than risky.

    0
    0
  • The play received accolades from critics and audiences alike.

    0
    0
  • absurdist plays were actually staged in Eastern Europe, the East European audiences found the plays highly relevant.

    0
    0
  • acclaim from the audiences.

    0
    0
  • actualityor Butt relates such performance to arguments about ' heritage ', new audiences and actualities of performance.

    0
    0
  • adapted for general non-scientist audiences.

    0
    0
  • The new songs ' mix of styles is proving sufficiently adaptive to win him burgeoning audiences around the world.

    0
    0
  • adore they just keep on coming - adoring audiences and critics ' plaudits.

    0
    0
  • Page always looks on the bright side of life and audiences quickly relate to his genuinely affable nature with some serious cheekiness thrown in.

    0
    0
  • aimed at older audiences.

    0
    0
  • alderman's wife in the audiences, (fn.

    0
    0
  • But there is enough in the book to keep audiences amused from Sutherland to Cornwall, Dyfed to Norfolk, for years to come.

    0
    0
  • The regimented North Korean military audiences listening stiffly to their great leader seem positively animated by comparison.

    0
    0
  • Anticipating the impact Will the report cause undue anxiety or optimism among audiences or readers?

    0
    0
  • The flawless technique and supreme artistry of Chinese pianist Lang Lang has left audiences awestruck and critics lost for words.

    0
    0
  • astonished audiences for years and will continue to do so for many more.

    0
    0
  • audiences laugh, and highlighted many moments that were special to him.

    0
    0
  • bamboozleckest of these, like glib lawyers paid to advocate a poor case, are accustomed to bamboozling innocent audiences.

    0
    0
  • bass amp that will slap your audiences in the face?

    0
    0
  • Elizabethan plays were often bawdy and the audiences were rowdy!

    0
    0
  • Unlike many of this summer's blockbusters who have relied on mega stars to lure the audiences, Open Water stars relatively unknown actors.

    0
    0
  • He now performs to a mixture of audiences, including churchgoers and non-churchgoers.

    0
    0
  • closed down to stop the disease spreading among the tightly packed audiences.

    0
    0
  • In addition we create formats for sport and game shows, shoot commercials and produce high quality webcasts for global audiences.

    0
    0
  • connecting with audiences by entertaining them with magic and illusions.

    0
    0
  • convulse heard of readers convulsing audiences with my " Aurelia's Unfortunate Young Man.

    0
    0
  • coping with stress ' have enthralled business audiences over five continents.

    0
    0
  • As the venue also encompasses club nights, live music events and a vibrant café bar, their audiences benefit from cultural cross-pollination.

    0
    0
  • curator of the exhibition, Claire Doherty, aims to draw new audiences to experience contemporary art in unexpected sites, inspiring new stories.

    0
    0
  • We don't know what audiences want, we would n't deign to guess.

    0
    0
  • Combines live action with classic Disney animation to illustrate proper dental hygiene for young audiences.

    0
    0
  • The effect of her actions on audiences ranges from a sense of pity to a horrified disbelief that such a woman could actually exist.

    0
    0
  • eclectic blend of rock & pop has touched the hearts of audiences across Britain.

    0
    0
  • enchant younger audiences in The Greatest Drummer In The World.

    0
    0
  • end result is some superb trial scenes, where the audiences hopes are raised or dashed, depending on how evidence is accepted.

    0
    0
  • engage with audiences and acknowledge that we need to improve on this.

    0
    0
  • enthused audiences throughout the English-speaking world.

    0
    0
  • Unlike audiences in World War 1 who needed escapism, the audiences of the 1940s were looking for something more.

    0
    0
  • Remember that a typical 18th century fiddler would have played for a greater variety of audiences and situations than today.

    0
    0
  • finger picking banjo, harmonica and great lyrics, it is already receiving acclaim from festival audiences nationwide.

    0
    0
  • Working 4 restaurants per week for over 20 years has taught him to create flashy, attention-getting magic that makes audiences scream.

    0
    0
  • foremost exponents of her craft and never fails to entrance her audiences.

    0
    0
  • hypnotized audiences from New York to DC to Europe.

    0
    0
  • inaugurated a series of monthly evening meetings, the audiences of which came from all walks of life.

    0
    0
  • international in scope, the Institute targets audiences ranging from students to scholars to the general public.

    0
    0
  • Designed as a chamber production for unusual spaces, this production has thrilled audiences around the country with its intense intimacy.

    0
    0
  • Thatâs where working with MSN can make the difference: by bringing your clients closer to their audiences and developing unparalleled customer intimacy.

    0
    0
  • With a wonderfully intimate style, Stacey has charmed audiences with a remarkable repertoire of standards.

    0
    0
  • mesmerized audiences throughout the world during her career.

    0
    0
  • mezzo soprano voice had the audiences transfixed.

    0
    0
  • For American audiences the film was re-titled " Young Scarface ", but that's a complete misnomer.

    0
    0
  • increasingly national and international in scope, the Institute targets audiences ranging from students to scholars to the general public.

    0
    0
  • ovation from audiences at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival, where it moved many to tears.

    0
    0
  • His high energy, groove-based funky dance music -with jazz overtones - appeals to audiences of all ages.

    0
    0
  • palatable for Western audiences tho, then fair enough.

    0
    0
  • By varying the compilation parameters, different webs may be produced over similar material for different audiences.

    0
    0
  • Or perhaps present-day audiences have a new-found relish for gore more like that of their Elizabethan counterparts.

    0
    0
  • proscenium setting also helps shatter any a priori definitions of'music ' audiences may hold.

    0
    0
  • Where else, for example, would you encounter the witty put-down of unruly audiences that opens Frogs?

    0
    0
  • The project aimed to build on the key recommendations in the report Research into Audiences for Contemporary Dance in the North West.

    0
    0
  • Regionally produced drama and entertainment can be a potent and effective means of expressing such regionalism and meeting the needs of audiences.

    0
    0
  • US remake for Davis's dark comedy Nighty Night could be the next British comedy hit to be remade for American audiences.

    0
    0
  • resonate with audiences of all ages.

    0
    0
  • Despite the apparent respectability of the West End halls, music hall was still associated with wild audiences and high living.

    0
    0
  • The end result is some superb trial scenes, where the audiences hopes are raised or dashed, depending on how evidence is accepted.

    0
    0
  • retained in the audiences' memories for longer than spoken words.

    0
    0
  • In the mid-1980s, Wessex Films was producing two revues a term that were regularly screened to audiences of over 150.

    0
    0
  • sassy songs that sweeps audiences along in its breathless wake.

    0
    0
  • His greatest drama was, ironically, first staged at a private club in London because it was considered too scandalous for Paris audiences.

    0
    0
  • Well, in his mind, he was challenging preconceptions, possibly the audiences, possibly his own self-doubt.

    0
    0
  • The show was originally labeled a children's program, but its silliness and clever skits also appealed to adult audiences.

    0
    0
  • classical songstress Lesley Garrett will be treating audiences to an intimate evening of entertainment at The Bridgewater Hall on Thursday 15 June.

    0
    0
  • For fifty years, Peter Brook's opera, stage, and film productions have held audiences spellbound.

    0
    0
  • stager manager and actor but also a madcap schemer in generating audiences for his show.

    0
    0
  • standing ovation from audiences at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival, where it moved many to tears.

    0
    0
  • stun audiences around the world.

    0
    0
  • tautology implicatures which actually arise in English are not ones that audiences could work out.

    0
    0
  • through-composed opera in English was not a crowdpuller - it was only acceptable to specialized audiences such as a school or a court.

    0
    0
  • treachery of a surprising white devil, Shakespeare challenges his audiences to spot the true color of villainy.

    0
    0
  • unleashed on audiences.

    0
    0
  • venture capital investors, or more surprisingly â only in the short-term -- audiences.

    0
    0
  • Even tho Home Improvement drew larger audiences than Frasier, the Cheers spin-off had a younger viewership.

    0
    0
  • I think the audiences stopped watching scary movies when Hollywood made a seemingly endless stream of graphically violent brainless movies.

    0
    0
  • woo back audiences?

    0
    0
  • He wandered from village to village and town to town, preaching to enormous audiences, always in the open air; the earnestness and straightforward eloquence with which he insisted that true repentance came from the heart, that pious pilgrimages and the absolution of the Church were mere outward symbols, appealed to all classes.

    0
    0
  • The logical form of the argument makes it especially valuable in public speaking, before uncritical audiences.

    0
    0
  • In 1757 Voltaire came to reside at Lausanne; and although he took but little notice of the young Englishman of twenty, who eagerly sought and easily obtained an introduction, the establishment of the theatre at Monrepos, where the brilliant versifier himself declaimed before select audiences his own productions on the stage, had no small influence in fortifying Gibbon's taste for the French theatre, and in at the same time abating that "idolatry for the gigantic genius of Shakespeare which is inculcated from our infancy as the first duty of an Englishman."

    0
    0
  • He would frequently have audiences of the king, by whom he was graciously received.

    0
    0
  • His peculiar strength lay in his power of adapting himself to audiences of every kind, and throughout his public career he was highly appreciated by all classes of society.

    0
    0
  • The later years of his life were spent in ardent anti-slavery propaganda, and his eloquence moved large audiences in London, as well as in Paris, Brussels and other parts of the continent.

    0
    0
  • On the two following days Dr Lukacs and Mr de Justh had audiences of the king, but without result; and on the 31st Hungary once more entered on a period of extra-constitutional government.

    0
    0
  • In his own day he took high rank as a pulpit orator, and even royalty had to beg for a seat amongst his audiences; but his sermons are now forgotten.

    0
    0
  • He succeeded in maintaining his disguise, and on arriving at Khiva went safely through two audiences of the khan.

    0
    0
  • appointed him professor of philosophy and eloquence at the College de France, where for a considerable time he lectured before audiences numbering as many as 2000.

    0
    0
  • He was also distinguished as a reciter, and on a visit to the United States in 1871 read extracts from his works before large audiences.

    0
    0
  • Even oratory was intended quite as much for readers as for the audiences to which it was immediately addressed; and some of the greatest speeches which have come down from that great age of orators were never delivered at all, but were published as manifestoes after the event with the view of influencing educated opinion, and as works of art with the view of giving pleasure to educated taste.

    0
    0
  • Forced and distorted expression, exaggerated emphasis, point and antithesis, an affected prettiness, are studied with the view of gaining the applause of audiences who thronged the lecture and recitation rooms in search of temporary excitement.

    0
    0
  • In 1561 he went to teach theology in Rome, reckoning among his pupils Robert Bellarmine, afterwards cardinal; then passed into Sicily; and in 1569 he was sent to Paris, where his expositions of the writings of Thomas Aquinas attracted large audiences.

    0
    0
  • Towards the end of the period we note the beginnings of the triple division of medieval preaching into cloistral, parochial and missionary or popular preaching, a division based at first on audiences rather than on subject-matter, the general character of which - legends and popular stories rather than exposition of Scripture - was much the same everywhere.

    0
    0
  • He had public and private audiences with the pope on the 9th of April and the 11th of May 1848, but recorded next to nothing in his diary concerning them, though numerous other entries show an eager interest in everything connected with the Roman Church, and private papers also indicate that he recognized at this time grave defects in the Church of England and a mysterious attractiveness in Roman Catholicism, going so far as to question whether he might not one day be a Roman Catholic himself.

    0
    0
  • For the stately declamation, the sonorous, and beyond a doubt impressive, chant of Quin and his fellows, Garrick substituted rapid changes of passion and humour in both voice and gesture, which held his audiences spellbound.

    0
    0
  • The functions of the first dragoman are mainly political; he accompanies the ambassador or minister at his audiences of the sultan and usually of the ministers, and it is he who is charged with the bulk of diplomatic negotiations at the palace or the Porte.

    0
    0
  • In 1901 he was received by the sultan; the pope and many European statesmen gave him audiences.

    0
    0
  • He was in constant demand as a lecturer from 1843, when he made his first appearance on the platform, always drew large audiences, and, in spite of his bad management in money matters, received considerable sums, sometimes $600o or $7000 for a single winter's lecturing.

    0
    0
  • His lectures drew large audiences, including many Protestants.

    0
    0
  • He gradually became a logician out of his previous studies: out of metaphysics, for with him being is always the basis of thinking, and common principles, such as that of contradiction, are axioms of things before axioms of thought, while categories are primarily things signified by names; out of the mathematics of the Pythagoreans and the Platonists, which taught him the nature of demonstration; out of the physics, of which he imbibed the first draughts from his father, which taught him induction from sense and the modification of strict demonstration to suit facts; out of the dialectic between man and man which provided him with beautiful examples of inference in the Socratic dialogues of Xenophon and Plato; out of the rhetoric addressed to large audiences, which with dialectic called his attention to probable inferences; out of the grammar taught with rhetoric and poetics which led him to the logic of the proposition.

    0
    0
  • In 1807 he was appointed Lady Margaret professor of divinity at Cambridge, and lectured to large audiences on biblical criticism, substituting English for the traditional Latin.

    0
    0
  • We find him delivering a lecture to audiences of " all the chief learned of the city of London."

    0
    0
  • Next come the four palatine prelates, the majordomo, the superintendent of the household and its staff, and successor of the ancient vicedominus; the master of the chamber, who presides over the arrangement of audiences; the auditor, or private secretary; and finally the master of the sacred palace (magister sacri palatii), a kind of theological adviser, always a Dominican, whose special duty is nowadays the revision of books published at Rome.

    0
    0
  • His "more stately genius," as Mr John Morley calls it, was already making him the undisputed master of the feelings of his audiences.

    0
    0
  • In the principal coffee-shops of Cairo are to be found reciters of romances, surrounded by iiiterested audiences.

    0
    0
  • Each tana - or rabbi of the earlier period - had a spokesman, who repeated to large audiences the discourses of the tana.

    0
    0
  • He banished the musicians and singers, and forbade all kinds of games; he devoted himself to the administration of justice, and gave public audiences to the people for the redress of their grievances.

    0
    0
  • A quaint figure in the pantheon of the heroic age is Hanuman, the deified chief of monkeys - probably meant to represent the aboriginal tribes of southern India - whose wonderful exploits as Rama's ally on the expedition to Lanka Indian audiences will never weary of hearing recounted.

    0
    0
  • Everywhere the imperial competitor was victorious, and crowded audiences importuned him to display his talents.

    0
    0
  • In 1875 he was appointed one of the Old Testament revisers; in1880-1882he delivered by invitation, to very large audiences in Edinburgh and Glasgow, two courses of lectures on the criticism of the Old Testament, which he afterwards published (The Old Testament in the Jewish Church, first edition 1881, second edition 1892, and The Prophets of Israel, 1882, which also passed through two editions); and soon after his dismissal from his chair he joined Professor Baynes in the editorship of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and after Professor Baynes's death remained in supreme editorial control till the work was completed.

    0
    0
  • It is a mistake to say that he grew more conservative in later years; but his judgment grew more generous and catholic. He was a greater orator than man of letters, and his sermons in New York were delivered to large audiences, averaging one thousand at the Masonic Temple, and were printed each week; in eloquence and in the charm of his spoken word he was probably surpassed in his day by none save George William Curtis.

    0
    0
  • In 1847 Emerson visited Great Britain for the second time, was welcomed by Carlyle, lectured to appreciative audiences in Manchester, Liverpool, Edinburgh and London, made many new friends among the best English people, paid a brief visit to Paris, and returned home in July 1848.

    0
    0
  • In 1830 a rising in Dresden led to his being named joint regent of the kingdom along with King Anthony on the 13th of September; and in this position his popularity and his wise and liberal reforms (for instance, in arranging public audiences) speedily quelled all discontent.

    0
    0
  • During the week he lectured to large audiences of young and old on the principal Greek and Latin authors, and on Sundays he explained Dante to the people in the Duomo.

    0
    0
  • As their reputation grew he travelled all over the country, delighting large audiences with his quaint humour and natural pathos.

    0
    0
  • He still preached occasionally, and always drew large audiences.

    0
    0
  • His lectures were attended by persons of the highest distinction from all parts of Europe, and such was the charm of his demonstrations that a hall capable of containing 2000 people had eventually to be assigned for the accommodation of the overflowing audiences which they attracted.

    0
    0
  • The pope admitted him to six long audiences in the course of two months, wrote an enthusiastic letter to the grand-duke praising the great astronomer, not only for his distinguished learning, but also for his exemplary piety, and granted a pension to his son Vincenzio, which was afterwards transferred to himself, and paid, with some irregularities, to the end of his life.

    0
    0
  • Mr Chamberlain had relied on his personal influence, which from 1895 to 1902 had been supreme; but his own resignation, and the course of events, had since 1903 made his personality less authoritative, and new interests - such as the opposition to the Education Act, to the heavy taxation, and to Chinese labour in the Transvaal, and indignation over the revelations concerned with the war - were monopolizing attention, to the weakening of his hold on the public. The revival in trade, and the production of new statistics which appeared to stultify Mr Chamberlain's prophecies of progressive decline, enabled the free-trade champions to reassure their audiences as to the very foundation of his case, and to represent the whole tariff reform movement as no less unnecessary than risky.

    0
    0
  • Where else, for example, would you encounter the witty put-down of unruly audiences that opens Frogs?

    0
    0
  • The project aimed to build on the key recommendations in the report Research into Audiences for Contemporary Dance in the North West.

    0
    0
  • Regionally produced drama and entertainment can be a potent and effective means of expressing such regionalism and meeting the needs of audiences.

    0
    0
  • US remake for Davis 's dark comedy Nighty Night could be the next British comedy hit to be remade for American audiences.

    0
    0
  • Forever is a compelling modern tale of friendship that will resonate with audiences of all ages.

    0
    0
  • Despite the apparent respectability of the West End halls, music hall was still associated with wild audiences and high living.

    0
    0
  • Often catchy phrases are used in the musical lyrics as they are retained in the audiences' memories for longer than spoken words.

    0
    0
  • In the mid-1980s, Wessex Films was producing two revues a term that were regularly screened to audiences of over 150.

    0
    0
  • And he has American rightists accusing him of " Jew-hatred " for the benefit of audiences whom he may never address.

    0
    0
  • Soumik will be treating Leeds audiences to an hour long sarod recital accompanied by tabla virtuoso Shahbaz Hussain Khan.

    0
    0
  • The show is a riot of sassy songs that sweeps audiences along in its breathless wake.

    0
    0
  • His greatest drama was, ironically, first staged at a private club in London because it was considered too scandalous for Paris audiences.

    0
    0
  • Well, in his mind, he was challenging preconceptions, possibly the audiences, possibly his own self-doubt.

    0
    0
  • The show was originally labeled a children 's program, but its silliness and clever skits also appealed to adult audiences.

    0
    0
  • Classical songstress Lesley Garrett will be treating audiences to an intimate evening of entertainment at The Bridgewater Hall on Thursday 15 June.

    0
    0
  • For fifty years, Peter Brook 's opera, stage, and film productions have held audiences spellbound.

    0
    0
  • Giles Ponsford was not only stager manager and actor but also a madcap schemer in generating audiences for his show.

    0
    0
  • He has decided to release more of his awesome material, the routines which he uses to stun audiences around the world.

    0
    0
  • Davis argues that the specific tautology implicatures which actually arise in English are not ones that audiences could work out.

    0
    0
  • But through-composed opera in English was not a crowdpuller - it was only acceptable to specialized audiences such as a school or a court.

    0
    0
  • Through the treachery of a surprising white devil, Shakespeare challenges his audiences to spot the true color of villainy.

    0
    0
  • Television audiences of over 20 million, although almost unheard of today, were not that unusual back then.

    0
    0
  • The Wild Bunch broke new ground when it was unleashed on audiences.

    0
    0
  • Private funders could include distributors, exhibitors, venture capital investors, or more surprisingly â only in the short-term -- audiences.

    0
    0
  • Even tho Home Improvement drew larger audiences than Frasier, the Cheers spin-off had a younger viewership.

    0
    0
  • Charlotte Higgins: is it enough to woo back audiences?

    0
    0
  • The goal of motivational speakers is to cause their audiences to aspire to be something better.

    0
    0
  • The goal of motivational speakers is to cause their audiences to aspire to be something better.

    0
    0
  • Although aimed at slightly different audiences (the iPod at an older, more image-conscious crowd, the U2 at budget shoppers), these two flash music players have a lot in common.

    0
    0
  • Bible stories geared toward children are based on the books of Bible from which adults pray and study but are written specifically for younger audiences.

    0
    0
  • The imaginative depiction of the North Pole and Father Christmas are magnificent, stirring wonder in young audiences.

    0
    0
  • The Pokemon cartoon was dubbed into English for American audiences.

    0
    0
  • There are many different scrapbooking styles and not all pages will appeal to all audiences.

    0
    0
  • Comedy shows like Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Futurama, The Boondocks, and Family Guy draw in young audiences with their twisted sense of humor.

    0
    0
  • Fox is another network with strong appeal for young audiences, lead by the powerhouse American Idol.

    0
    0
  • There are programs intended for small children and very adult programs that should only be watched by mature audiences.

    0
    0
  • While this may be partially true, many of the most popular musical productions from today and yesterday are being rearranged to meet the skill level and attention span of middle school performers and audiences.

    0
    0
  • Lady Gaga extends her unusual wardrobe choices to her live shows, and audiences are continuously surprised by her frequent costume changes.

    0
    0
  • The performance earned rave reviews from critics and audiences alike.

    0
    0
  • While some have called the album a calculated attempt to gain favor with country audiences, others applaud the openness of Fireflies.

    0
    0
  • Jennifer Aniston captivated with audiences as one of the stars of Friends with both her likeable character Rachel Green and her famous hairstyle.

    0
    0
  • Singer Nicki Minaj appeared on morning show Good Morning America to perform for live and television audiences.

    0
    0
  • At a time when most of his contemporaries are retired, this legend shows no signs of stopping and is even reaching new audiences with his recent song, Stoned in Love, released in 2006.

    0
    0
  • During the mid 1960s, Tom strengthened his hold on American audiences by modeling himself after popular crooners like Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin with his release Green Green Grass of Home.

    0
    0
  • As Lindsay quickly outgrew Disney's family films, she began looking for older roles that would help her reach new audiences.

    0
    0
  • In addition to rapper Ali G, Baron Cohen also introduced audiences to Borat (a Kazakhstan reporter) and Bruno (a flamboyantly gay Austrian fashion presenter).

    0
    0
  • David Letterman is now in his 25th year of entertaining audiences with his late night talk show.

    0
    0
  • In these roles, Mendes demonstrates that she is a flexible actress, able to switch from drama to action to comedy in the blink of an eye to capture and delight audiences.

    0
    0
  • While Seth Rogen's first starring role was in the wildly successful comedy Knocked Up, this funny guy has been entertaining audiences in smaller parts for some time now.

    0
    0
  • There could be no better way to make her mark than in a movie that resounded with young audiences across the country, but this was simply a stepping stone for Fisher.

    0
    0
  • She has captivated fans and audiences with her wide-eyed portrayals of a vast range of characters and her skilled performances in many demanding roles.

    0
    0
  • The movie was released in 3-D, and audiences raved over every aspect of the film.

    0
    0
  • It wasn't long before he was making international audiences laugh through his stand-up comedy and acting.

    0
    0
  • Although young, Kristen Stewart has consistently impressed audiences and the film industry with her performances.

    0
    0
  • In Red Dawn, she worked with Patrick Swayze for the first time, several years before their fancy footwork charmed audiences in Dirty Dancing.

    0
    0
  • While the show was funny, it failed to draw in audiences and only lasted a single season.

    0
    0
  • Television audiences fell in love with the actress and enjoyed seeing her grow up over the years.

    0
    0
  • Audiences, show producers and her parents were worried this could ruin Candace's self-esteem and possibly lead to an eating disorder, similar to the one plaguing Growing Pains co-star Tracey Gold.

    0
    0
  • She did take on guest roles on sitcoms such as Cybill and Boy Meets World, but it was her role in two television movies that gave audiences a more grown-up view of the young actress.

    0
    0
  • Later that year they kicked off their first world tour to record-breaking audiences worldwide.

    0
    0
  • These movie stars are the ones who bring in huge audiences to any film they appear in, just because their names are so well known and respected.

    0
    0
  • Entertainment is used as an escape, and audiences don't necessarily want to mix their escape with heated exchanges or outlandish views.

    0
    0
  • Whether they are acting, playing sports, modeling, or performing in another format, Brazilian stars offer their talent to audiences worldwide.

    0
    0
  • Due to film techniques, many short actresses are able to disguise their diminutive frames from audiences.

    0
    0
  • In April 2009, Hannah Montana: The Movie premiered to record audiences and paved the way for the marketing of additional Hannah Montana merchandise.

    0
    0
  • The costume shocked audiences, but was allowed by censors since it had originated on ostensibly respectable stages in Europe, such as the Gaiety in London and the Folies Bergère in Paris.

    0
    0
  • That was infinitely more appealing to male audiences and it was achieved not through nudity, but through an undressing that mimicked the disrobing which preceded a sexual encounter.

    0
    0
  • These acts were so popular that in 1951 Frenchman Alain Bernadin opened the Crazy Horse Saloon in Paris to bring American-style striptease to European cabaret audiences.

    0
    0
  • They've sold millions and millions of records, played live in front of some of the largest audiences ever assembled and have one of the most devoted, passionate fan bases in the history of contemporary music.

    0
    0
  • Eight albums into a very successful career, the band shows no signs of slowing down since they are currently working on a new record and can often be found on tour playing before devout audiences.

    0
    0
  • For audiences, this was all perfectly acceptable.

    0
    0
  • There's nothing to reference a cowboy hunk in the entire video - which actually may be an effort to appeal to crossover pop audiences in terms of style.

    0
    0
  • They often show movies that are made for general audiences and are suitable for families to watch together.

    0
    0
  • Since this time, RLTV has continually grown as more television and cable companies continue to realize the value of senior audiences.

    0
    0
  • You can use the maps to plan your vacation or compare the parks for what Disney treasures translate to foreign audiences and what alterations were made.

    0
    0
  • In this way, the online video game show is not appropriate for younger audiences.

    0
    0
  • These are all kart-racing games, so the simplified arcade style racing is suitable for younger audiences.

    0
    0
  • The House of the Dead: Overkill is not at all appropriate for younger audiences, due to its extremely gory violence and extensive use of foul language.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps one of the single greatest strengths of video games is their inherent appeal to younger audiences.

    0
    0
  • GA - General Audiences - Suitable for all audiences.

    0
    0
  • MA-13 - Mature Audiences over 13 Years - Games rated MA-13 could contain only brief instances of blood or violence.

    0
    0
  • MA-17 - Mature Audiences over 17 Years - These games could contain more blood, violence, sexual themes or illegal substance use.

    0
    0
  • The more Miis you transfer and the more Miis that get transferred means the more opportunity for Miis that you know to show up in ''Wii Play'' with Remote Mii in any game that has audiences.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the dancers that everyone loves, audiences love Lythgoe's interactions with the dancers and the other judges.

    0
    0
  • The show features the same "audition episodes" as American Idol, giving home audiences a sneak peek at those who actually have what it takes.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →