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audacious

audacious

audacious Sentence Examples

  • I was stunned to think Howie would be so audacious.

  • It would have been well if Kossuth had had something more of Gdrgei's calculated ruthlessness, for, as has been truly said, the revolutionary power he had seized could only be held by revolutionary means; but he was by nature soft-hearted and always merciful; though often audacious, he lacked decision in dealing with men.

  • This was a second and a more audacious compromise.

  • The horsemen were splendidly audacious in riding for long distances into the heart of a hostile country, without support, striking some terrific blows, and then returning rapidly beyond reach of pursuit.

  • Like Jean Hardouin he got to believe that a great deal of what is called classical literature was compiled by anonymous authors at a much later date, and he used frequently to startle his colleagues, the Gustavian academicians, by his audacious paradoxes.

  • Towards the end of the 14th century, this façade, with its lower colonnade, upper loggia with handsome Gothic tracery, and the vast impending upper storey, which give to the whole building its striking appearance and audacious design, had been carried as far as the tenth column on the piazzetta side.

  • In 1874, while captain of the "Audacious," he served for three years as flag-captain to viceadmiral Ryder in China; and finally he was appointed, in 1880, to command the "Thunderer" in the Mediterranean.

  • Such is this famous work, full of obscurities, redundancies and contradictions, in which the thread of the argument is sometimes lost in a labyrinth of reasonings and citations, both sacred and profane, but which nevertheless expresses, both in religion and politics, such audacious and novel ideas that it has been possible to trace in it, as it were, a rough sketch of the doctrines developed during the periods of the Reformation and of the French Revolution.

  • It was necessary for Gustavus to have an agent thoroughly in the confidence of the French royal family, and, at the same time, sufficiently able and audacious to help them in their desperate straits, especially as he had lost all confidence in his accredited minister, the baron de Stael.

  • Born at Lima in 1806, of pure Basque descent, he joined the patriot army before he was fifteen and displayed his audacious valour in many a hard-fought battle.

  • We feel its presence in his earliest notable work, The Rationale of Religious Enquiry, 1836; and may there see the rigour with which it applied audacious logic to narrow premisses, the tenacity with which it clung to a limited literal supernaturalism which it had no philosophy to justify, and so could not believe without historical and verbal authority.

  • The ridge was captured with little resistance, but the sound of the firing at once set all the neighbouring troops in motion, and fortunately so, for the French had immediately retaliated on von der Goltz's audacious attack.

  • Yet these audacious spirits start from a basis of authority, and insist upon 6pOoroµia Soyµarwv (Stromata, vii.

  • Events seemed at first to favour this audacious speculation.

  • It was only by an audacious surprise that Kollontaj and his associates contrived to carry through the new constitution.

  • Other opponents were weakened by the audacious stroke of 1223, when the justiciar suddenly announced the resumption of all the castles, sheriffdoms and other grants which had been made since the king's accession.

  • The plan was audacious, for the English in America outnumbered the French by twenty to one.

  • In reality his audacious plan of reforms, which Necker took up later, might have saved the monarchy had it been firmly seconded by the king.

  • Brand-new institutions on Western models were gradually growing up among the cumbrous, antiquated, wornout machinery of old Muscovy; and new men, like Menshikov, Goloykin, Apraksin, Osterman, Kurakin, Tolstoy, Shafirov, Prokopovich, Yaguszhinsky, Yavorsky, all capable, audacious, and brimful of new ideas, were being trained under the eye of the great regenerator to help him to carry on his herculean task.

  • Early in 1793 the "Juno" went to the Mediterranean under Lord Hood, and her captain distinguished himself by an audacious feat of coolness and seamanship in extricating his vessel from the harbour of Toulon, which he had entered in ignorance of Lord Hood's withdrawal.

  • When a question arose at Toulouse in 1160 as to the best means of settling the papal schism, this audacious statement was made before the kings of France and England: " That the best course was to side with neither of the two popes; that the apostolic see had been ever a burden to the princes; that advantage must be taken of the schism to throw off the yoke; and that, while awaiting the death of one of the competitors, the authority of the bishops was sufficient in France and England alike for the government of the churches."

  • Rizzio, hitherto his friend and advocate, induced the queen to reply by a reasonable refusal to this hazardous and audacious request.

  • In 1311 Bruce carried the war into England, seconded by the most audacious if the least skilled of his captains, his daring brother Edward.

  • If the chiefs had possessed information now accessible to us, they might not have made " the great refusal," but with only the intelligence which they possessed they could not have followed their audacious prince to the south.

  • Pichegru's campaigns of 1794 are marked by traits of an audacious genius which would not have disgraced Napoleon.

  • The Afghans, inured to bloodshed from childhood, are familiar with death, and audacious in attack, but easily discouraged by failure; excessively turbulent and unsubmissive to law or discipline; apparently frank and affable in manner, especially when they hope to gain some object, but capable of the grossest brutality when that hope ceases.

  • In 1199 one of his lieutenants, named Bakhtiyar, advanced into Bengal, and expelled by an audacious stratagem the last Hindu raja of Nadia.

  • But that audacious exploratory energy which formed the motive force of the Renaissance as distinguished from the Revival of Learning took, as we shall see, very different directions in the several nations who now were sending the flower of their youth to study at the feet of Italian rhetoricians.

  • By an audacious fraud that represented him as an enemy, and Polk as a friend of protection, Clay lost the vote of Pennsylvania; and he lost the vote of New York by his own letter abating the force of his previous opposition to the annexation of Texas.

  • Zwingli, who details these articles, as he says, that the world may see that they are "fanatical, stolid, audacious, impious," can scarcely be acquitted of unfairness in joining together two of them, - the fourth and fifth, - thus making the article treat "of the avoiding of abominable pastors in the church" (Super devitatione abominabilium pastorum in Ecclesia), though there is nothing about pastors in the fourth article, and nothing about abominations in the fifth, and though in a marginal note he himself explains that the first two copies that were sent him read as he does, but the other copies make two articles, as in fact they evidently are.

  • If it is daringly realistic, it is no less audacious in its idealism.

  • He asserted that the fortifications of Paris were directed against liberty, not against foreign invasion, and he stigmatized the law of regency (1842) as an audacious usurpation.

  • At dawn this regiment found itself isolated but in possession of the fort, and the open gorges of the row of forts tempted the audacious commander to strike out right and left along the ridge.

  • At the same time he wrote a life of St Remigius, in which he endeavoured by audacious falsifications to prove the supremacy of the church of Reims over the other churches.

  • The lack of any central principle or common interest was shown in the divided counsels and sporadic action of the mutineers and their allies, which made them an easy prey to the solid and audacious British forces.

  • The view, however, to which he gave audacious expression, that moral regulation is something alien to the natural man, and imposed on him from without, seems to have been very current in the polite society of his time, as we learn both from Berkeley's Alciphron and from Butler's more famous sermons.

  • Burnet wisely refused to accept a benefice in the disturbed state of church affairs, but he wrote an audacious letter to Archbishop Sharp asking him to take measures to restore peace.

  • I was stunned to think Howie would be so audacious.

  • audacious bids were made for your wallet last week.

  • audacious debut that preceded it.

  • audacious attempt to portray an ordinary man dealing with extraordinary emotions.

  • audacious chip on the run with his left peg.

  • audacious move.

  • audacious sneak attack at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

  • Kate will be having words with the Poll Gremlins before we try something so audacious again.

  • In a typically audacious action, Rampage struck at a Gold convoy passing Planet New London.

  • Perhaps the very idea was too audacious to succeed?

  • The feature-length ' Tale of the Fox ', Starewicz ' best-known work, is a technically audacious, gleefully wicked medieval animal fable.

  • Rather, our prayers can be confident, daring, even audacious.

  • I have never been stung myself but some of the sh*t they try and pull on you is truly audacious.

  • I particularly loved the fact that she appropriated the voices of men when she felt like it - that seemed wonderfully audacious somehow.

  • The feature-length ' Tale of the Fox ', Starewicz ' best-known work, is a technically audacious, gleefully wicked medieval animal fable.

  • Glyndwr's Way In the early 15th Century, Owain Glyndwr led an audacious, but ultimately ill-fated rebellion against English rule.

  • insouciant way, it has audacious things to say about the difference between meritocracy and mediocrity.

  • Laced with audacious wit and pithy humor, Bunny Girl is romantic, funny and full of Joan Conway's brilliant one-liners.

  • Instead it proved a springboard for an audacious attempt to heist the match from England, mooted no doubt during tea.

  • It would have been well if Kossuth had had something more of Gdrgei's calculated ruthlessness, for, as has been truly said, the revolutionary power he had seized could only be held by revolutionary means; but he was by nature soft-hearted and always merciful; though often audacious, he lacked decision in dealing with men.

  • This was a second and a more audacious compromise.

  • The horsemen were splendidly audacious in riding for long distances into the heart of a hostile country, without support, striking some terrific blows, and then returning rapidly beyond reach of pursuit.

  • Like Jean Hardouin he got to believe that a great deal of what is called classical literature was compiled by anonymous authors at a much later date, and he used frequently to startle his colleagues, the Gustavian academicians, by his audacious paradoxes.

  • Towards the end of the 14th century, this façade, with its lower colonnade, upper loggia with handsome Gothic tracery, and the vast impending upper storey, which give to the whole building its striking appearance and audacious design, had been carried as far as the tenth column on the piazzetta side.

  • In 1874, while captain of the "Audacious," he served for three years as flag-captain to viceadmiral Ryder in China; and finally he was appointed, in 1880, to command the "Thunderer" in the Mediterranean.

  • In spite of the confusion due to the destruction of the Janissaries and army reforms as yet hardly begun, it cost the tzar two hardly fought campaigns before the audacious strategy of General Diebitsch enabled him to dictate the terms of the treaty of Adrianople (Sep. 14, 1829).

  • Such is this famous work, full of obscurities, redundancies and contradictions, in which the thread of the argument is sometimes lost in a labyrinth of reasonings and citations, both sacred and profane, but which nevertheless expresses, both in religion and politics, such audacious and novel ideas that it has been possible to trace in it, as it were, a rough sketch of the doctrines developed during the periods of the Reformation and of the French Revolution.

  • Retz, however, despite the little inclination which he felt towards clerical life, entered into the disputes of the Sorbonne with vigour, and when he was scarcely eighteen wrote the remarkable Conjuration de Fiesque, a little historical essay, of which he drew the material from the Italian of Augustino Mascardi, but which is all his own in the negligent vigour of the style and the audacious insinuation, if nothing more, of revolutionary principles.

  • It was necessary for Gustavus to have an agent thoroughly in the confidence of the French royal family, and, at the same time, sufficiently able and audacious to help them in their desperate straits, especially as he had lost all confidence in his accredited minister, the baron de Stael.

  • Born at Lima in 1806, of pure Basque descent, he joined the patriot army before he was fifteen and displayed his audacious valour in many a hard-fought battle.

  • We feel its presence in his earliest notable work, The Rationale of Religious Enquiry, 1836; and may there see the rigour with which it applied audacious logic to narrow premisses, the tenacity with which it clung to a limited literal supernaturalism which it had no philosophy to justify, and so could not believe without historical and verbal authority.

  • The ridge was captured with little resistance, but the sound of the firing at once set all the neighbouring troops in motion, and fortunately so, for the French had immediately retaliated on von der Goltz's audacious attack.

  • Yet these audacious spirits start from a basis of authority, and insist upon 6pOoroµia Soyµarwv (Stromata, vii.

  • Events seemed at first to favour this audacious speculation.

  • It was only by an audacious surprise that Kollontaj and his associates contrived to carry through the new constitution.

  • Other opponents were weakened by the audacious stroke of 1223, when the justiciar suddenly announced the resumption of all the castles, sheriffdoms and other grants which had been made since the king's accession.

  • The plan was audacious, for the English in America outnumbered the French by twenty to one.

  • In reality his audacious plan of reforms, which Necker took up later, might have saved the monarchy had it been firmly seconded by the king.

  • Brand-new institutions on Western models were gradually growing up among the cumbrous, antiquated, wornout machinery of old Muscovy; and new men, like Menshikov, Goloykin, Apraksin, Osterman, Kurakin, Tolstoy, Shafirov, Prokopovich, Yaguszhinsky, Yavorsky, all capable, audacious, and brimful of new ideas, were being trained under the eye of the great regenerator to help him to carry on his herculean task.

  • Early in 1793 the "Juno" went to the Mediterranean under Lord Hood, and her captain distinguished himself by an audacious feat of coolness and seamanship in extricating his vessel from the harbour of Toulon, which he had entered in ignorance of Lord Hood's withdrawal.

  • When a question arose at Toulouse in 1160 as to the best means of settling the papal schism, this audacious statement was made before the kings of France and England: " That the best course was to side with neither of the two popes; that the apostolic see had been ever a burden to the princes; that advantage must be taken of the schism to throw off the yoke; and that, while awaiting the death of one of the competitors, the authority of the bishops was sufficient in France and England alike for the government of the churches."

  • Rizzio, hitherto his friend and advocate, induced the queen to reply by a reasonable refusal to this hazardous and audacious request.

  • In 1311 Bruce carried the war into England, seconded by the most audacious if the least skilled of his captains, his daring brother Edward.

  • If the chiefs had possessed information now accessible to us, they might not have made " the great refusal," but with only the intelligence which they possessed they could not have followed their audacious prince to the south.

  • Pichegru's campaigns of 1794 are marked by traits of an audacious genius which would not have disgraced Napoleon.

  • The Afghans, inured to bloodshed from childhood, are familiar with death, and audacious in attack, but easily discouraged by failure; excessively turbulent and unsubmissive to law or discipline; apparently frank and affable in manner, especially when they hope to gain some object, but capable of the grossest brutality when that hope ceases.

  • In 1199 one of his lieutenants, named Bakhtiyar, advanced into Bengal, and expelled by an audacious stratagem the last Hindu raja of Nadia.

  • But that audacious exploratory energy which formed the motive force of the Renaissance as distinguished from the Revival of Learning took, as we shall see, very different directions in the several nations who now were sending the flower of their youth to study at the feet of Italian rhetoricians.

  • By an audacious fraud that represented him as an enemy, and Polk as a friend of protection, Clay lost the vote of Pennsylvania; and he lost the vote of New York by his own letter abating the force of his previous opposition to the annexation of Texas.

  • Zwingli, who details these articles, as he says, that the world may see that they are "fanatical, stolid, audacious, impious," can scarcely be acquitted of unfairness in joining together two of them, - the fourth and fifth, - thus making the article treat "of the avoiding of abominable pastors in the church" (Super devitatione abominabilium pastorum in Ecclesia), though there is nothing about pastors in the fourth article, and nothing about abominations in the fifth, and though in a marginal note he himself explains that the first two copies that were sent him read as he does, but the other copies make two articles, as in fact they evidently are.

  • If it is daringly realistic, it is no less audacious in its idealism.

  • He asserted that the fortifications of Paris were directed against liberty, not against foreign invasion, and he stigmatized the law of regency (1842) as an audacious usurpation.

  • At dawn this regiment found itself isolated but in possession of the fort, and the open gorges of the row of forts tempted the audacious commander to strike out right and left along the ridge.

  • At the same time he wrote a life of St Remigius, in which he endeavoured by audacious falsifications to prove the supremacy of the church of Reims over the other churches.

  • The lack of any central principle or common interest was shown in the divided counsels and sporadic action of the mutineers and their allies, which made them an easy prey to the solid and audacious British forces.

  • The view, however, to which he gave audacious expression, that moral regulation is something alien to the natural man, and imposed on him from without, seems to have been very current in the polite society of his time, as we learn both from Berkeley's Alciphron and from Butler's more famous sermons.

  • Burnet wisely refused to accept a benefice in the disturbed state of church affairs, but he wrote an audacious letter to Archbishop Sharp asking him to take measures to restore peace.

  • Instead it proved a springboard for an audacious attempt to heist the match from England, mooted no doubt during tea.

  • I can't believe she had the guts to make such an audacious statement!

  • His idea is equal parts ambitious and audacious.

  • I try not to date men with a history of making audacious actions.

  • Political leaders are known for making many audacious promises.

  • He made the audacious choice to tell me a downright lie.

  • It was audacious of him to take such action in this situation.

  • His idea is equal parts ambitious and audacious.

  • He made the audacious choice to tell me a downright lie.

  • It could also be that you're interested in adding something audacious and vivid to your living space, but aren't sure where to start.

  • Just a hint of the color will prevent it from looking too audacious.

  • While Nike and Oakley sunglasses outfit traditional athletes, Black Flys are typically worn by audacious snowboarders and bikers.

  • Singers Pink and Gwen Stefani are known for their audacious, colorful, ever-changing looks, and even men like David Beckham and Pete Wentz have been known to frequently alter their hair styles.

  • These suits embrace sex appeal with their flattering cuts and audacious prints.

  • Their striking and almost audacious styles immediately launched Dolce & Gabbana into popularity.

  • But whether you have health risks or not--use common sense when shopping for diet supplements and disregard audacious claims.

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