Attorney general sentence example

attorney general
  • As attorney-general he argued the famous cases, the United States v.

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  • In 1754 he became attorney-general, and for the next two years acted as leader of the House of Commons under the administration of the duke of Newcastle.

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  • In1830-1832he was attorney-general of South Carolina, and, although a State's Rights man, he strongly opposed nullification.

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  • He came of a good family; his father was in the commission of the peace and his mother was a sister of Sir John Popham, successively attorney-general and lord chief justice.

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  • He was secretary of the navy in President Tyler's cabinet (1844-1845), and was attorney-general (1845-1846) and secretary of the navy (1846-1849), succeeding George Bancroft, under President Polk.

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  • The board of control is composed of the governor, attorney-general and the three railroad commissioners.

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  • The schools are subject to the supervision of a state superintendent of public education and of a board of education, composed of the superintendent, the secretary of state, and the attorney-general, and within each county to a county superintendent.

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  • The present school system is supervised by a state board of education consisting of the governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, treasurer, auditor, attorney-general, and superintendent of public instruction.

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  • He was the son of Richard Bright, the physician who first diagnosed " Bright's disease " in 1827, and his mother was Eliza Follett, sister of Sir William Follett, who was solicitor-general and attorney-general in Peel's administration (1834-44).

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  • The executive department consists of a governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, auditor, treasurer and attorney-general.

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  • The commissioners of 'the fund are the auditor, the secretary of state and the attorney-general.

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  • His father, John Johnson (1770-1824), was a distinguished lawyer, who served in both houses of the Maryland General Assembly, as attorney-general of the state (1806-1811), as a judge of the court of appeals (1811-1821), and as a chancellor of his state (1821-1824).

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  • From 1821 to 1825 he was a state senator; from 1825 to 1845 he devoted himself to his practice; from 1845 to 1849, as a Whig, he was a member of the United States Senate; and from March 1849 to July 1850 he was attorney-general of the United States.

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  • The governor is a member of the Board of Pardons, the other members being the attorney-general, the secretary of state, the comptroller and the commissioner of agriculture; he and the secretary of state, attorney-general, comptroller, treasurer, superintendent of public instruction, and commissioner of agriculture comprise a Board of Commissioners of State Institutions; he is also a member of the Board of Education.

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  • The king's advocate led the bar of his courts, and before the privy council took precedence of the attorney-general.

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  • The governor is appointed by the president of the United States with the advice and consent of the Senate for a term of four years, and associated with the governor is an executive council consisting of the secretary, treasurer, auditor, attorney-general, commissioner of the interior, commissioner of education, and five other members, all appointed in the same manner and for the same term as the governor.

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  • The question of the legal existence of slavery in Great Britain and Ireland was raised in consequence of an opinion given in 1729 by Yorke and Talbot, attorney-general and solicitor-general at the time, to the effect that a slave by coming into those countries from the West Indies did not become free, and might be compelled by his master to return to the plantations.

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  • The executive department consists of a governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, treasurer and attorney-general, elected biennially in November of the even-numbered years, and an auditor elected at the same time every four years.

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  • From 1833 to 1835 Dallas was attorney-general of Pennsylvania, and from 1835 to 1839 was minister to Russia.

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  • In 1815 he became attorney-general, an office which he held, still as a member of the Senate, until 1819, when he was displaced to make room for a Federalist.

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  • Another son, John (1810-1866), graduated at Yale in 1828, was admitted to the bar at Albany in 1830 and was attorney-general of New York in 1845-1846.

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  • In that year he became attorney-general and was returned by Edinburgh, for which he sat till 1841.2 His political creed declared upon the hustings there was that of a moderate Whig.

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  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.

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  • In the furthering of this policy Tudhope was supported by Charles Leonard and his brother James Leonard, at one time attorney-general of Cape Colony.

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  • The other administrative officers are a secretary of state, an attorney-general, an auditor, a treasurer, a commissioner of public schools, a railroad commissioner, and a factory inspector, and various boards and commissions, such as the board of education, the board of agriculture, the board of health, and the commissioners of inland fisheries, commissioners of harbours and commissioners of pilots.

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  • His grandfather, Frederick Frelinghuysen (1753-1804), was an eminent lawyer, one of the framers of the first New Jersey constitution, a soldier in the War of Independence, and a member (1778-1779 and 1782-1783) of the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and in 1793-1796 of the United States senate; and his uncle, Theodore (1787-1862), was attorney-general of New Jersey from 1817 to 1829, was a United States senator from New Jersey in 1829-1835, was the Whig candidate for vice-president on the Clay ticket in 1844, and was chancellor of the university of New York in 1839-1850 and president of Rutgers College in 1850-1862.

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  • He became attorney for the Central Railroad of New Jersey, the Morris Canal and Banking Company, and other corporations, and from 1861 to 1867 was attorney-general of New Jersey.

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  • In 1848, largely on account of his personal attachment to Martin Van Buren, he participated in the revolt of the "Barnburner" or free-soil faction of the New York Democrats, and in 1855 was the candidate of the "softshell," or anti-slavery, faction for attorney-general of the state.

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  • The executive department consists of a governor, lieutenantgovernor, secretary of state, comptroller of public accounts, treasurer, commissioner of the general land office, and attorney-general.

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  • Under the present system, therefore, there is a biennial election (in even-numbered years) of a governor, a lieutenant-governor, a secretary of state, a state comptroller, a state treasurer, an attorney-general and a state engineer and surveyor; and the governor appoints, subject to the approval of the Senate, a superintendent of public works, a superintendent of state prisons, a superintendent of insurance, a superintendent of banks, a commissioner of excise, a commissioner of agriculture, a forest, fish and game commissioner, a commissioner of health, a commissioner of labour, a state architect, a state historian, a state librarian, two public service commissions, a civil service commission, a board of charities, a commission of prisons, a commission in lunacy, three tax commissioners and several other boards and commissions.

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  • From 1854 to 1857 he was attorney-general of Upper Canada, and then, on the retirement of Colonel Tache, he became prime minister.

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  • The officers of the executive department are the governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, attorney-general, treasurer, auditor and superintendent of public instruction, each of whom is elected for a term of four years.

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  • No person is eligible to any of these offices who shall not have lived within the state for two years next preceding the election; no person is eligible to the office of governor, lieutenant-governor, attorneygeneral or superintendent of public instruction who is not thirty years of age; no person is eligible to the office of secretary of state, treasurer or auditor who is not twenty-five years of age; no person is eligible to the office of attorney-general who has not been admitted to practice in the supreme court of the state; and the treasurer is ineligible to his office for the immediately succeeding term.

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  • With the approval of the majority of a board of pardons (composed of the secretary of state, attorney-general and auditor), he may pardon offences or commute punishment, and remit fines and forfeitures.

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  • They are all under the supervision and control of the state board of education, which consists of the governor, the state superintendent, the attorney-general and eight other members appointed by the governor for a term of four years, two retiring annually.

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  • The governor may remit fines and forfeitures, and grant reprieves, commutations and pardons, but in the more serious cases only on the recommendation of a board of pardons, composed of the presiding judge, the secretary of state, and the attorney-general.

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  • From 1782 to 1785 he was attorney-general of New Hampshire.

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  • In September 1863 he became attorney-general, and so continued till the government of which he was a member resigned in 1866.

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  • The queen, on the prayer of the attorney-general, ordered that the proceedings of the day should be recorded, an order which caused a momentary embarrassment to the lord chancellor, as the court had no existing registrar, and no existing book in which the record should be made.

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  • He was secretary of the navy in President Roosevelt's cabinet from July 1905 to December 1906, when he was made attorney-general of the United States.

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  • The other administrative officers are a secretary of state, auditor, treasurer, superintendent of public instruction, commissioner of insurance, three commissioners of railways, attorney general and commissioner of agriculture and labour; each of these officers is chosen biennially and must be at least twenty-five years of age.

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  • Burr was a member of the state assembly (1784-1785), attorney-general of the state (1789-1791), United States senator (1791-1797), and again a member of the assembly (1798-1799 and 1800-1801).

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  • Other executive officers are a treasurer, elected by joint ballot of the General Assembly for a term of two years, a comptroller elected by popular vote for a similar term, and an attorney-general elected by popular vote for four years.

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  • The sinking fund commission is composed of the governor, attorney-general, secretary of state, auditor and treasurer.

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  • In 1768 he was a delegate to the provincial convention which was called to meet in Boston, and conducted the prosecution of Captain Thomas Preston and his men for their share in the famous " Boston Massacre of the 5th of March 1770., He served in the Massachusetts General Court in 1773-1774, in the Provincial Congress in 177 4-1775, and in the Continental Congress in 1 7741778, and was speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1777, a member of the executive council in 1779, a member of the committee which drafted the constitution of 1780, attorney-general of the state from 1777 to 1790, and a judge of the state supreme court from 1790 to 1804.

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  • In 1846 he again declined public honours, when President Polk invited him to enter the cabinet as attorney-general.

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  • The attorney-general is the legal adviser of the president, public prosecutor and standing counsel for the United States, and also has general oversight of the Federal judicial administration, especially of the prosecuting officers called district attorneys and of the executive court officers called marshals.

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  • In 1794 William Bradford, attorney-general of the United States, decided that all rights in the 4,000,000 acres, on which the Ohio Company had secured an option for the Scioto Company, were legally vested in the Ohio Company.

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  • Latterly, and possibly from its inception, this repository consisted of a closet with three locks, of which the keys were entrusted, one to the chief justice of England, another to the attorney-general and the third to the master of the crown office, or coroner.

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  • The governor, auditor and attorney-general are required to prepare and present to each legislature a general revenue bill, and the secretary of state, with the last two officers, constitute a board of pardons who make recommendations to the governor, who, however, is not bound to follow their advice in the exercise of his pardoning power.

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  • The governor appoints, by and with the consent of the Senate of the Territory, an attorney-general, treasurer, commissioner of public lands, commissioner of agriculture and forestry, superintendent of public works, superintendent of public instruction, commissioners of public instruction, auditor and deputy-auditor, surveyor, high sheriff, members of the board of health, board of prison inspectors, board of registration, inspectors of election, &c. All such officers are appointed for four years except the commissioners of public instruction and the members of the said 1 Large numbers of Japanese immigrants have used the Hawaiian Islands merely as a means of gaining admission at the mainland ports of the United States.

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  • In June 1778 Wedderburn was promoted to the post of attorney-general, and in the same year he refused the dignity of chief baron of the exchequer because the offer was not accompanied by the promise of a peerage.

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  • He resigned with Pitt in 1761, but in 1762 became attorney-general under Lord Bute.

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  • Yorke, henceforward a member of the Rockingham party, was elected recorder of Dover in 1764, and in 1765 he again became attorney-general in the Rockingham administration, whose policy he did much to shape.

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  • In 1830 he was elected a member of the House of Representatives of Louisiana, in 1831 was appointed deputy attorney-general of his state, in 1833 became presiding judge of the city court of New Orleans, and in 1834 was elected as a Jackson Democrat to the United States Senate.

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  • In 1594 he was promoted to the office of attorney-general, despite the claims of Bacon, who was warmly supported by the earl of Essex.

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  • James, through Bacon, who was then attorney-general, commanded the chief justice to delay judgment till he himself should discuss the question with the judges.

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  • At Coke's request Bacon sent a letter containing the same command to each of the judges, and Coke then obtained their signatures to a paper declaring that the attorney-general's instructions were illegal, and that they were bound to proceed with the case.

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  • Soon after he was dismissed from all his offices on the following charges, - the concealment, as attorney-general, of a bond belonging to the king, a charge which could not be proved, illegal interference with the court of chancery and disrespect to the king in the case of commendams. He was also ordered by the council to revise his book of reports, which was said to contain many extravagant opinions (June 1616).

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  • In 1656 he became tutor to the son of Edmond Prideaux, attorney-general to Cromwell.

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  • He was a member of the lower house of the state legislature from 1814 to 1818, serving as speaker in the latter year; was attorney-general of the state from 1818 to 1822, and in 1823 was elected, as a Democrat, to the United States Senate.

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  • The Attorney-General of the United States decided before the 25th that the "Virginius" was the property of General Quesada and other Cubans, and had had no right to carry the American flag.

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  • In March 1919 he was appointed to the President's Cabinet as Attorney-General.

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  • His career as Attorney-General was widely, and it was generally felt justly, criticized by the public at large and by competent legal authorities as being both arbitrary and inefficient.

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  • They submitted their lists of criminal trials to the high commissioner, who, advised by the attorney-general, acted as a court of appeal, and no sentence exceeding six months could take effect without his confirmation.

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  • Prosecutions had to be instituted by the Director of Public Prosecutions in England, the Lord Advocate in Scotland, or the Attorney-General in Ireland.

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  • Under the old Internment Statute of 1789, the Attorney-General was authorized by the President to intern dangerous enemy aliens and by an Act of Congress the Alien Property Custodian assumed charge of enemy aliens' property.

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  • The Federal Attorney-General, his assistant and the 88 U.S. district attorneys were flooded with silly complaints and beset by unofficial disloyalty hunters and amateur detectives, but kept their heads in most cases remarkably well, as did most of the judges.

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  • In the end no prosecutions were permitted until the Attorney-General reviewed the facts and gave authorization.

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  • Mitchell Palmer, the new Attorney-General, were subjects of most bitter complaint as the war ended.

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  • Returning to America in 1769, C. C. Pinckney began the practice of law at Charleston, and soon became deputy attorney-general of the province.

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  • Charles Pinckney, the father, was long prominent in colonial affairs; he was attorney-general of the province in 1733, speaker of the assembly in 1736-1738 and in 1740, chief justice of the province in 1752-1753, and agent for South Carolina in England in 1 7531758.

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  • In 1858 he was sent to California by the United States attorney-general as special Federal agent for the settlement of land claims, and he succeeded in breaking up a conspiracy by which the government would have been defrauded of vast tracts of land of almost inestimable value.

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  • In the reorganization of President Buchanan's cabinet in 1860 Stanton became attorney-general, and he did what he could to strengthen the weak policy of the president in the last months of his administration.

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  • In the same year he became the first attorney-general of the state (serving until 1786).

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  • In September 1789 he was appointed by President Washington first attorney-general of the United States.

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  • The Union ministry likewise appoints an attorney-general as legal adviser.

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  • He served in the state Senate in 1816-21, was attorney-general of Maryland in 1827-31; and in July 1831 entered President Jackson's cabinet as attorney-general of the United States.

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  • He served in the state house of representatives in 1874, and in March 1893 became attorney-general of the United States in the cabinet of President Cleveland.

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  • When Mr. Lloyd George reconstructed his Ministry after the general election of Dec. 1918, the Attorney-General was appointed Lord Chancellor and created a peer.

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  • From 1778 to 1805 he was attorney-general of Maryland; in1814-1816he was chief judge of the court of Oyer and Terminer for the city of Baltimore; and in1818-1822he was attorney-general of Maryland.

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  • The following year he was Attorney-General in Mr. Deakin's administration (1908-9) and held the same office under Mr. Fisher (1910-3), and again in his first War Cabinet (1914-6).

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  • He was a member of the Maine House of Representatives in 1868-69 and of the state Senate in 1870, was attorney-general of the state in 1870-72, and was city solicitor of Portland in 18 74-77.

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  • In 1883 he was invited to assist in chambers the then Attorney-General, Sir Henry James, and from this time his success was assured.

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  • He served for three months, in 1810, as attorney-general of Illinois Territory, but soon returned to Kentucky, and during the War of 1812 he was for a time on the staff of General Isaac Shelby.

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  • Harrison as attorney-general, continuing after President Tyler's accession and serving from March until September.

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  • He was an ardent and outspoken supporter of Clay's compromise measures, and in 1850 he entered President Fillmore's cabinet as attorney-general, serving throughout the administration.

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  • The governor, with the concurrence of the Senate, appoints the attorney-general, the state engineer and the members of several boards and commissions.

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  • In 1757, through the influence of William Pitt (afterwards earl of Chatham), with whom he had formed an intimate friendship while at Eton, he received the appointment of attorney-general.

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  • The governor, lieutenant-governor, attorney-general, secretary of the commonwealth, treasurer, superintendent of public instruction and commissioner of agriculture are elected for a term of four y ears, every fourth year from 1905, and each new administration begins on the 1st of February.

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  • He joined Jefferson Davis's provisional government as attorney-general, becoming afterwards his secretary for war (1861-1862), and chief secretary of state (1862-1865).

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  • Joining the New York bar he obtained a lucrative practice and in 1812-13 was attorney-general of New York; his abilities and success being such that Judge Story declared him to be "by universal consent in the first rank of American advocates."

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  • To bolster up the case a fresh packet of five forged letters was concocted (31st August); but the forgery was transparent, and even Sir William Jones, the attorney-general, though a violent upholder of the plot, dared not produce them as evidence.

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  • In March 1594 it was at last understood that Coke was to be attorney-general.

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  • The vacancy caused by Coke's promotion was then filled up by Hobart, and Bacon, finally, stepped into the place of attorney-general.

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  • The House was enraged at the supposed project (then much misunderstood) of the " Undertakers "; objection was taken to Bacon being elected or serving as a member while holding office as attorney-general; and, though an exception was made in his favour, it was resolved that no attorneygeneral should in future be eligible for a seat in parliament.

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  • Bacon, as attorney-general, delivered a speech, which has not been reported; but the king was informed that the arguments on the other side had not been limited to the special case, but had directly impugned the general prerogative right of granting livings.

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  • Among these were included George William Curtis and his brother James Burrill Curtis, Father Isaac Thomas Hecker (1819-1888), General Francis C. Barlow (1834-1896), who as attorney-general of New York in 1872-1873 took a leading part in the prosecution of the "Tweed Ring."

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  • The administration of justice throughout the Union is vested in a minister of state who has all the powers of the attorneygenerals of the several colonies at the time of the Union, save that power as to the prosecution of crimes is vested in each province in an official appointed by the governor-general in council and styled the attorney-general of the province.

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  • In 1793 Sir John Scott was promoted to the office of attorney-general, in which it fell to him to conduct the memorable prosecutions for high treason against British sympathizers with French republicanism, - amongst others, against the celebrated Horne Tooke.

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  • From 1879 to 1882 he was assistant attorney-general of Mass., and in 1890 was elected to the Mass.

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  • His grandfather, John Breckinridge (1760-1806), who revised Jefferson's draft of the "Kentucky Resolutions" of 1798, was a United States senator from Kentucky in1801-1805and attorney-general in President Jefferson's cabinet in 1805-1806.

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  • Besides being citizens of the United States and residents of the state for two years preceding their election the governor, lieutenant-governor and attorney-general must each be at least thirty years of age, and the secretary of state, state auditor, treasurer and superintendent of education must be at least twenty-five years old.

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  • The governor's veto may be overridden by a two-thirds vote of the legislature; the governor, secretary of state, and the attorney-general constitute a Board of Pardons and a Board of State Prison Commissioners.

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  • Under the first constitution the secretary of state, treasurer, auditor-general, attorney-general, commissioner of the land office, superintendent of public instruction and the judges were all appointed by the governor, but under the present one they are elected and only minor officers are appointed.

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  • Austin (1784-1870),(1784-1870), attorney-general of the state, who said that Lovejoy had died "as the fool dieth," and compared his murderers to the men who threw the tea into Boston harbour just before the War of Independence.

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  • With the advice and consent of the state Senate he selects the secretary of state, attorney-general, superintendent of public instruction, chancellor, chief justice, judges of the supreme, circuit, inferior and district courts, and the so-called " lay " judges of the court of errors and appeals, in addition to the minor administrative officers who are usually appointive in all American states.

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  • In 1914 he became Minister of Justice and Attorney-General, from 1914 to 1917 was a member of the Legislative Council, and from 1917 to 1918 Colonial Secretary.

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  • Provision is made for preventing the pollution of water by gas refuse and enabling a district council, with the sanction of the attorney-general, to take any proceedings they may think fit for preventing the pollution of any stream in their district by sewage.

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  • The district council may, if in their opinion proceedings before justices afford an inadequateremedy, take proceedings in the high court, but in that case, if the nuisance is of a public nature, they must proceed by action in the name of the attorney-general.

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  • The seven members of the council, the secretary of state, the treasurer, the attorney general and the commissioner of agriculture are elected biennially by a joint ballot of the two houses of the legislature, which also elects, one every two years, the three state assessors, whose term is six years.

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  • From 1877 to 1881 he was attorney-general of the United States in the cabinet of President Hayes.

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  • During 1883-7 he was Speaker of the Assembly and in 1889 and again in 1891 he was for a time Attorney General.

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  • In parliament he was no less successful as a speaker than at the bar, and in 1852 was appointed solicitor-general for Ireland in the first administration of the earl of Derby, becoming attorney-general in 1858, and again in 1866.

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  • In 1826 he became a serjeant-at-law, and in 1830, and again, in 1841, was attorney-general for Ireland.

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  • The other important administrative officers are the secretary of state (who succeeds the governor if he dies or resigns - there is no lieutenant-governor), treasurer, attorney-general, superintendent of public instruction and labour commissioner.

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  • In 1917 he was appointed chairman of the Draft Appeals Board of New York City by Governor Whitman, and the following year was special assistant to the U.S. Attorney-General, in charge of the investigation of alleged waste and delay in the construction of aircraft.

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  • The governor and lieutenant-governor (minimum age, 30 years) and the clerk of the Supreme Court are chosen in presidential years for a term of four years,' the other state officers - secretary of state, attorney-general, auditor, treasurer and superintendent of public instruction - every two years.

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  • The state executive officers are a governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, auditor, treasurer, attorney-general and superintendent of public instruction, all elected for a term of two years.

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  • In1906-1907a fresh crusade to enforce the law was begun by the attorney-general, who brought ouster suits against the mayors of Wichita, Junction City, Pittsburg and Leavenworth for not enforcing the law and for replacing it with the " fine " system, which was merely an irregular licence.

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  • In 1907 the attorney-general's office turned its attention to outside brewing companies doing business in the state and secured injunctions against such breweries doing business in the state and the appointment of receivers of their property.

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  • The administrative officers, a secretary of state, a treasurer and an attorney-general, are elected for two years and act as commissioners of public lands.

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  • He was chief counsel for President Johnson during the impeachment trial, and from July 1868 until March 1869 he was attorney-general of the United States.

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  • He graduated as valedictorian of his class at Dartmouth College in 1819, was a tutor there in 1819-1820, spent a year in the law school of Harvard University, and studied for a like period at Washington, in the office of William Wirt, then attorney-general of the United States.

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  • The bank guarantee law was held to be valid by the United States Supreme Court in 7908 after the attorney-general of the United States had decided that it was illegal.

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  • In February 1792 an allusion in debate by Toler (afterwards earl of Norbury), the attorney-general, to Tandy's personal ugliness, provoked him into sending a challenge; this was treated by the House of Commons as a breach of privilege, and a Speaker's warrant was issued for his arrest, which however he managed to elude till its validity expired on the prorogation of parliament.

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  • At the suggestion of Sir William Jones, the attorney-general, he began his History of the Reformation in England, based on original documents.

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  • The governor is the chief executive officer of the state, but quite independent of him are a lieutenant-governor, a secretary of state, an auditor of public accounts, a treasurer, a superintendent of public instruction, an attorney-general and a commissioner of public lands and buildings, who, as well`as the governor, are elected for a term of two years.

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  • His constitutional power to pardon is regulated by an act of the legislature (1907) which requires that he shall in no instance grant a pardon until the attorney-general shall have investigated the case and conducted a public hearing.

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  • In January 1887 Mercier was sworn in as premier and attorney-general, and from this moment he exercised an extraordinary influence in the province.

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  • The executive and legislative officials are chosen by the electors for a term of two years; the attorney general for four years; the judges of the supreme court of errors and the superior court, appointed by the general assembly on nomination by the governor, serve for eight, and the judges of the courts of common pleas (in Hartford, New London, New Haven, Litchfield and Fairfield counties) and of the district courts, chosen in like manner, serve for four years.

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  • The secretary of state, the comptroller, and the treasurer are elected by a joint ballot of the Senate and the House of Representatives each for a term of two years; the attorney-general is appointed by the judges of the supreme court for a term of eight years.

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  • President Bush has named assistant attorney general and former appeals court judge Michael Chertoff as Ridge's successor, subject to Senate confirmation.

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  • Stepped up as about global companies suspend liability insurance attorney general last.

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  • The man who ran against Bill Clinton for the democratic nomination in 1992 now wants to be California's attorney general.

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  • Mulembue, a former attorney-general, is also chairman of the Mozambican parliament, the Assembly of the Republic.

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  • William Davidson and the Cato Street Conspiracy William Davidson was born in the 1780s, the illegitimate son and the Cato Street Conspiracy William Davidson was born in the 1780s, the illegitimate son of the Jamaican Attorney General.

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  • The executive department consists of the governor, secretary of state, superintendent of free schools, auditor, treasurer and attorney-general, all elected by the people at the time of the presidential election and serving for four years from the fourth of March following.

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  • Justice is administered by a supreme federal court of five judges and an attorney-general, which is also a court of appeal, four courts of appeal, with three judges each, located in Buenos Aires, La Plata, Parana and Cordoba, and by a number of inferior and local courts.

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  • The chief executive officials are the governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, treasurer, auditor, attorney-general, and superintendent of education.

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  • In addition to the executive officials mentioned above there are a lieutenant-governor, an attorney-general, a Bureau of Labor Statistics, established in 1887, and a Corporation Commission, which in 1899 superseded the Railroad Commission, established in 1891.

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  • Thelace of the attorney-general was Practi- P Y-g taken by the king's or queen's advocate-general, and that of the treasury solicitor by the king's or queen's procurator or proctor.

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  • The last holder of the office of standing counsel to the admiralty was Alexander Staveley Hill, K.C.,M.P. Since his death the office, like those of the king's or queen's advocate and the admiralty advocate, has not been filled up; and the ordinary law officers of the crown with the assistance of a junior counsel to the admiralty (a barrister appointed by the attorney-general) perform the duties of all these offices.

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  • To the cause he freely gave his services as a lawyer, and was particularly conspicuous as counsel for fugitive slaves seized in Ohio for rendition to slavery under the Fugitive Slave Law of 1793 - indeed, he came to be known as the "attorney-general of fugitive slaves."

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  • The greed and tyranny of several of the commissioners, and the bigotry and mismanagement of well-meaning fanatics such as Cradock and Powell, soon wrought dire confusion throughout the whole Principality, so that a monster petition, signed alike by moderate Puritans and by High Churchmen, was prepared for presentation to parliament in 1652 by Colonel Edward Freeman, attorney-general for South Wales.

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  • Even when the convention was being negotiated doubts arose as to its meaning, and legal authorities were divided as to its effect (see speech of Lord Cairns, Hansard, 269, p. 261; Lord Selborne, 260, p. 309; answer of attorney-general 260, 1534).

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  • William Davidson and the Cato Street Conspiracy William Davidson was born in the 1780s, the illegitimate son of the Jamaican Attorney General.

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  • The attorney general 's office has leaked every prosecution document to the press, contrary to Colombian sub judice laws.

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  • The Campaign for Human Dignity is a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization which has been warned by the state attorney general for improper tax filings.

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  • However, the state attorney general has said those claims are " baseless " and founded on " conjecture and unfounded speculation ".

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  • Also, North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper's office has information on a variety of consumer protection issues.

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  • If you have any doubts about the company, you can contact the Better Business Bureau or your state's Attorney General Office.

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  • A quick check with your local BBB office and your state's Attorney General office can shed a lot of light on things, and a Google search for the organization name and "scam", "complaint" and other similar terms doesn't hurt either.

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  • You can learn more about the statute of limitations set by your state by contacting your state's Attorney General.

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  • You may also want to contact the office of the state attorney general to learn the debt collection laws in your state.

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  • These exorbitant prices have led the Attorney General of Arkansas to open an investigation as to whether any ticket scalping laws are being violated.

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  • California Attorney General Jerry Brown is investigating how and why dozens of doctors gave Corey Haim dozens of different prescriptions.

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  • Despite this, more than one lawsuit has been filed against AHMSI by state Attorney General offices on the behalf of struggling homeowners.

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  • In Connecticut, the attorney general brought a lawsuit against the company in August 2008 for deceptive lending practices that caused financial strain for homeowners within that state.

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  • The governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, treasurer, auditor, attorney-general, superintendent of public instruction and commissioner of public lands are elected for a term of four years; and each new administration begins on the second Monday in January.

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  • The executive is composed of a governor, a lieutenant-governor, a treasurer, an auditor of public accounts, a register of the land office, a commissioner of agriculture, labour, and statistics, a secretary of state, an attorney-general and a superintendent of public instruction.

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  • The governor controls a large amount of patronage, appointing, subject to the advice and consent of two-thirds of the senate, a secretary of the commonwealth and an attorney-general during pleasure, and a superintendent of public instruction for four years, and may fill vacancies in various offices which occur during the recess of the senate.

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  • The other executive officials are the lieutenant-governor and the secretary of internal affairs, elected for four years, the auditor-general, elected for three years, the treasurer, elected for two years, and (all appointed by the governor) the secretary of the commonwealth, the attorney-general and a superintendent of public instruction.

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  • He was a member of the Quebec Legislature from 1897; and, after holding minor offices, in 1905-20 was Prime Minister and Attorney-General in the province of Quebec. Attempts were made by Sir Robert Borden to get him to join his Coalition Ministry, but these failed, and subsequently Sir Lomer declared his allegiance to the Liberal Opposition.

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  • As the present constitution was adopted in the year after a grasshopper plague, which had caused great financial loss, it limited the salary of the governor, auditor of public accounts and treasurer, as well as that of the judges of the supreme and district courts, to $2500 each and that of other important officers (including the secretary of state, the attorney-general and the superintendent of public instruction) to $2000.

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