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attic

attic

attic Sentence Examples

  • She is prominent as the promoter of agriculture in Attic legend.

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  • There are some curtains and rugs in the attic - I'm sure you've already found them.

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  • It was used by Cicero (Ep. ad Attic. xiii.

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  • was for a long while largely struck with Alexander's 3 own image and superscription; the gold and silver coined in the names of Antigonid and Seleucid kings and by the minor principalities of Asia, kept to the Attic standard which Alexander had established.

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  • I take things from my attic and my garage and sell them to people who value them more than I do.

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  • Solon also ordered that the tombs of the heroes should be treated with the greatest respect, and Cleisthenes sought to create a pan-Athenian enthusiasm by calling his new tribes after Attic heroes and setting up their statues in the Agora.

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  • On the whole it seems most likely that, while the kernel of the Roman plebs was rural or belonged to the small towns admitted to the Roman franchise, the Attic demos, largely at least, though doubtless not wholly, arose out of the mixed settlers who had come together in the city, answering to the p rotKot of later times.

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  • Haigh, The Attic Theatre (Oxford, 1889); W.

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  • I felt such a strong urge to dress up in this, like a little girl trying to be someone she isn't—fishing in an attic trunk.

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  • The Ionic order, as used in this temple, is of the most ornate Attic type.

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  • For the Attic Demes, A.

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  • The rulers fostered agriculture, stimulated commerce and industry (notably the famous Attic ceramics), adorned the city with public works and temples, and rendered it a centre of culture.

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  • Such hints as we have, while they set before us, just as at Rome, a state of things in which small landed proprietors are burthened with debt, also set before us the Attic demos as, largely at least, a body of various origins which had grown up in the city.

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  • Topography And Antiquities The Attic plain, -ro ircSlov, slopes gently towards the coast of the Saronic Gulf on the south-west; on the east it is overlooked by Mount Hymettus (3369 ft.); on the north-east by Pentelicus or Brilessus (3635 ft.) from which, in ancient and modern times, an immense quantity of the finest marble has been quarried; on the north-west by Parnes (4636 ft.), a continuation of the Boeotian Cithaeron, and on the west by Aegaleus (1532 ft.), which descends abruptly to the bay of Salamis.

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  • As an orator he was the leader of the opponents of the florid Asiatic school, who took the simplest Attic orators as their model and attacked even Cicero as wordy and artificial.

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  • ATHENA (the Attic form of the Homeric Athene, also called Athenaia, Pallas Athene, Pallas), one of the most important goddesses in Greek mythology.

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  • The Attic plain, notwithstanding the lightness of the soil, furnished an adequate supply of cereals; olive and fig groves and vineyards were cultivated from the earliest times in the valley of the Cephisus, and pasturage for sheep and goats was abundant.

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  • In the Minoan epoch Athens is proved by the archaeological remains to have been a petty kingdom scarcely more important than many other Attic communities, yet enjoying a more unbroken course of development than the leading states of that period.

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  • It must not be confused with the fanciful barbarian costumes that are so common upon the Attic pots.

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  • Numbers of statues - among them a series of draped and richlycoloured female figures - masterpieces of painted pottery, only equalled by the Attic vases found in Magna Grecia and Etruria, and numerous bronzes, were among the treasures of art now brought to light.

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  • Attic. i.

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  • In this neighbourhood were found a great number of tombs containing vases of all periods, which furnish a marvellous record of the development of Attic ceramic art.

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  • But from such glimpses of early Attic history as we can get the union of the Attic towns would seem to have been completed before the constitutional struggle began.

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  • in circumference, were hung with trees and o rushwood, and at their base stretched a wide grassy plain, where attic grazed and the wild boar lurked in the thickets.

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  • Gold had fallen still further from the diffusion of the Persian treasure, and Alexander struck in both metals on the Attic standard, leaving their relation to adjust itself by the state of the market.

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  • Gold had fallen still further from the diffusion of the Persian treasure, and Alexander struck in both metals on the Attic standard, leaving their relation to adjust itself by the state of the market.

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  • So far she had never mentioned her excursions to the attic, but when things got too dull around the house, she went up to explore.

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  • The fact that spring water is not now found in this locality is by no means fatal to the theory; recent engineering investigations have shown that much of the surface water of the Attic plain has sunk to a lower level.

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  • Dorpfeld, we assume an Attic stadium of 200 steps (500 ft.) to be equal to 164 metres, a degree of 700 stad.

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  • The Attic bouleutae took the oath by Athena Boulaia; at Sparta she was ayopaia, presiding over the popular assemblies in the market-place; in Arcadia µnXavZTts, the discoverer of devices.

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  • Sainte-Beuve calls Terence the bond of union between Roman urbanity and the Atticism of the Greeks, and adds that it was in the r 7th century, when French literature was most truly Attic, that he was most appreciated.

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  • In Philo, Alexandrian Judaism had already seized upon Plato as " the Attic Moses," and done its best to combine his speculations with the teaching of his Jewish prototype.

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  • The Athenians honoured him with a statue and a shrine, and one of the Attic demes was named after him.

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  • The arch is surmounted by a triple attic with Corinthian columns; the frieze above the keystone bears, on the north-western side, the inscription aZS' 'Aqvat, OouEw 7rpiv rats, and on the south-eastern, aZS' do' `ASptavoii Kai ou X i Ono-Los 'TO Xis.

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  • The Macedonian garrison which was henceforth stationed in Attic territory prevented the city from taking a prominent part in the wars of the Diadochi.

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  • For the symbol which was used at Ephesus and other places in Asia Minor and elsewhere for the sound represented by -aa- in Ionic Greek, by -TT- in Attic, see ALPHABET.

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  • Plautus, though, like Terence, he takes the first sketch of his plots, scenes and characters, from the Attic stage, is yet a true representative of his time, a genuine Italian, writing before the genius of Italy had learned the restraints of Greek art.

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  • It was a border city between Boeotia and Attica, and its possession was a continual cause of dispute between the two countries; but at last it came into the final possession of Athens, and is always alluded to under the Roman empire as an Attic town.

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  • As in glyptic so in poetic art, the Hellenism of the time was decadent and Alexandrine rather than Attic of the best period.

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  • The Macedonian garrison which was henceforth stationed in Attic territory prevented the city from taking a prominent part in the wars of the Diadochi.

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  • As in glyptic so in poetic art, the Hellenism of the time was decadent and Alexandrine rather than Attic of the best period.

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  • The " Attic " or " Corinthian " 7rErrAos was sewn together on the right side from below the arm, and thus became an nlvµa.

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  • The important Attic sacrifice of the Dipolia, known as Ta f30vOovia, demands some notice.

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  • 34), Cicero states that he was contemptuous of other philosophers and even called Socrates "the Attic Buffoon."

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  • The division attributed to Theseus is always spoken of by ancient authorities as a division of the entire population; but Busolt has recently maintained the view that the three classes represent three elements in the Attic nobility, namely, the city nobility, the landed nobility and the commercial nobility, and exclude altogether the mass of the population.

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  • The influence of Aspasia on Athenian thought, though denounced unsparingly by most critics, may indeed have been beneficial, inasmuch as it tended towards the emancipation of the Attic woman from the over-strict tutelage in which she was kept.

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  • It is a noble portal, erected in 1460, apparently from designs by Fra Giocondo, with the lion of St Mark in the attic. The statuary, with Sta Giustina on the summit of the tympanum, was added in 1571 and 1578.

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  • The statement of Herodotus is illustrated both by Attic vase-paintings and also by the series of archaic female statues from the Acropolis of Athens, which (with the exception of one clothed in the Doric irk-Nos) wear the Ionic chiton, together with an outer garment, sometimes laid over both shoulders like a cloak (Greek Art,, fig.

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  • The statement of Herodotus is illustrated both by Attic vase-paintings and also by the series of archaic female statues from the Acropolis of Athens, which (with the exception of one clothed in the Doric irk-Nos) wear the Ionic chiton, together with an outer garment, sometimes laid over both shoulders like a cloak (Greek Art,, fig.

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  • Tradition ascribes to Theseus, whom it also regards as the author of the union (synoecism) of Attica round Athens as a political centre, the division of the Attic population into three classes, Eupatridae, Geomori and Demiurgi.

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  • DINARCHUS, last of the "ten" Attic orators, son of Sostratus (or, according to Suidas, Socrates), born at Corinth about 361 B.C. He settled at Athens early in life, and when not more than twenty-five was already active as a writer of speeches for the law courts.

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  • Above the shaft comes the arcaded bell-chamber, frequently built of Istrian stone; and above that again the attic, either round or square or octagonal, carrying either a cone or a pyramid or a cupola, sometimes surmounted by a cross or a gilded angel which serves as a weathercock.

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  • At Delphi he erected a great group in bronze including the figures of Apollo and Athena, several Attic heroes, and Miltiades the general.

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  • At Delphi he erected a great group in bronze including the figures of Apollo and Athena, several Attic heroes, and Miltiades the general.

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  • At the end of the hall, a steep set of stairs led to the attic.

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  • She stared into the flames, wondering why none of the windows had curtains, and why so many things were left to gather dust in the attic.

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  • It wasn't the first time she had done so, but this morning she had run across some curtains and rugs in the attic.

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  • Anyone as bright and curious as you would have to explore that attic.

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  • There is a chest of drawers and a three-quarter bed in the attic.

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  • Feel free to get anything you want out of the attic.

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  • Even the way you felt about that attic.

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  • Then put it in the attic.

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  • She carried the mug with her down the street to a store that smelled like an attic.

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  • He located the nearest Watcher and Traveled, appearing in a small attic.

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  • He spun as the creature materialized on the other end of the attic.

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  • Rev. ii., 188 7, p. 317 seq.; Niese, Historische Zeitschrift, lxxix., 18 97, p. 1, seq.); even the explicit statement in Arrian as to Alexander and the Arabians is given as a mere report; but we have wellauthenticated utterances of Attic orators when the question of the cult of Alexander came up for debate, which seem to prove that an intimation of the king's pleasure had been conveyed to Athens.

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  • The Attic months, of which we possess the most certain knowledge, were named as follows: Hecatombaeon.

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  • In the forms of his words he generally follows Attic usage.

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  • The amphora was a standard measure of capacity among both Greeks and Romans, the Attic containing nearly nine gallons, and the Roman about six.

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  • He wrote also forensic speeches; Phrynichus, in Photius, ranks him amongst the best orators, and mentions his orations as the standard of the pure Attic style.

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  • He compiled chronological lists of the archons and Olympiads, and made a collection of Attic inscriptions, the first of its kind in Greece.

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  • TYRTAEUS, Greek elegiac poet, lived at Sparta about the middle of the 7th century B.C. According to the older tradition he was a native of the Attic deme of Aphidnae, and was invited to Sparta at the suggestion of the Delphic oracle to assist the Spartans in the second Messenian war.

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  • 6 Kuos 6 iv 'H0aca-ria), and their allotments were politically part of Attic soil.

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  • In the Attic deme Melita he was invoked as 6W /caws (" Helper in ills "), at Olympia as KaXAlvcrcos (" Nobly-victorious "), in the rustic worship of the Oetaeans as eopvoiricov (K6pv01rEs, " locusts "), by the Erythraeans of Ionia as tlrotcrdvos (" Canker-worm-slayer ").

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  • As the standard of the coins of Attic type is not Attic but Babylonian, we must not think of direct Athenian influence.

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  • One remarkable tetradrachm with the Sabaean legend Abyath'a is imitated from an Alexander of the 2nd century B.C., the execution being quite artistic and the weight Attic. There are also coins struck at Raydan and Harib, which must be assigned to the Himyarite period (1st and 2nd century A.D.).

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  • Rutherford devoted special attention to Attic idioms and the language of Aristophanes.

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  • The book also contains contributions to the history of Attic oratory and Greek literature generally.

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  • Apart from his special interest in the history of the Old Attic comedy, he was a man of vast and varied learning; the founder of astronomical geography and of scientific chronology; and the first to assume the name of 4aX6Xo a yos.

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  • It is also the age of the lexicographers of Attic Greek, the most important of whom are Phrynichus, Pollux (fl.

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  • In 1494-1515 Aldus Manutius published at Venice no less than twenty-seven editiones principes of Greek authors and of Greek works of reference, the authors including Aristotle, Theophrastus, Theocritus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Demosthenes (and the minor Attic orators), Pindar, Plato and Athenaeus.

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  • In Attic tradition and on the Athenian stage Minos is a cruel tyrant, the heartless exactor of the tribute of Athenian youths to feed the Minotaur.

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  • Covering a longer time, we find an average variation of 1/200 in the Attic foot (25), 1/150 in the English foot (25), 1/170 in the English itinerary foot (25).

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  • Of weights there are scarce any dated, excepting coins, which nearly all decrease; the Attic tetradrachm, however, increased in three centuries (28), owing probably to its being below the average trade weight to begin with.

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  • Dörpfeld considers this as the Attic foot, and states the foot of the Greek metrological relief at Oxford as 11.65 (or 11.61, Hultsch).

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  • A large number of their statements are rough (2, 18, 33), being based on the working equivalence of the bath or epha with the Attic metretes, from which are sometimes drawn fractional statements which seem more accurate than they are.

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  • There are two better data (2) of Epiphanius and Theodoret -- Attic medimnus = 3/2 baths, and saton (1/3 bath) = 1+3/8 modii; these give about 2240 and 2260 cub.

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  • 15, 3), where 10 baths = 41 Attic or 31 Sicilian medimni, for which it is agreed we must read modii (33); hence the bath = 2300 cub.

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  • valuing them by 31 Sicilian = 41 Attic modii (Josephus, above).

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  • The approximate value from capitha = 2 Attic choenices (Xenophon) warrants us in taking the achane as fixed in the following system, which places it closely in accord with the preceding.

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  • the absolute values being fixed by artaba = 51 Attic choenices (Herod.

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  • The absolute data are all dependent on the Attic and Roman systems, as there are no monumental data.

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  • The series of names is the same as in the Attic system (18).

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  • The values are 1.5 times the Attic (Athenaeus, Theophrastus, &c.) (2, 18), or more closely 11 to 12 times (1/8)th of Attic. Hence, the Attic cotyle being 17.5 cub.

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  • Attic or Usual Greek System.

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  • therefore 16.8; medimnus = 2 Attic talents, hecteus = 20 minae, choenix = 2.5 minae,.

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  • Writers have unified it with the Attic, but it is decidedly larger in its unit, giving 19.4 (var.

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  • It has been described (Rev. Arch., 1872) as an Attic choenix.

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  • This is the system of the "Babylonian" talent, by Herodotus = 70 minae Euboic, by Pollux = 70 minae Attic, by Aelian = 72 minae Attic, and, therefore, about 470,000 grains.

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  • At Corinth the unit was evidently the Assyrian and not the Attic, being 129.6 at the earliest (17) (though modified to double Attic, or 133, later) and being divided by 3, and not into 2 drachms. And this agrees with the mina being repeatedly found at Corcyra, and with the same standard passing to the Italian coinage (17) similar in weight, and in division into 1/3 -- the heaviest coinages (17) down to 400 B.C. (Terina, Velia, Sybaris, Posidonia, Metapontum, Tarentum, &c.) being none over 126, while later on many were adjusted to the Attic, and rose to 134.

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  • From Phoenicia this naturally became the main Punic unit; a bronze weight from Iol (18), marked 100, gives a drachma of 56 or 57 (224-228); and a Punic inscription (18) names 28 drachmae = 25 Attic, and therefore 57 to 59 grains (228-236); while a probably later series of 8 marble disks from Carthage (44) show 208, but vary from 197 to 234.

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  • Then Attic: Euboic or Aeginetan :: 18:25 in the metrologists (2), and the Euboic talent = 7000 "Alexandrian" drachmae; the drachma therefore is 80.0.

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  • The "Alexandrian" wood talent: Attic talent:: 6:5 (Hero, Didymus), and therefore 480,000, which is 60 minae of 8000.

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  • The Attic and Assyrian standards were used indifferently for either gold or silver.

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  • At Athens the old mina was fixed by Solon at 150 of his drachmae (18) or 9800 grains, according to the earliest drachmae, showing a stater of 196; and this continued to be the trade mina in Athens, at least until 160 B.C., but in a reduced form, in which it equalled only 138 Attic drachmae, or 9200.

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  • The system which is perhaps the best known, through its adoption by Solon in Athens, and is thence called Attic or Solonic, is nevertheless far older than its introduction into Greece, being found in full vigour in Egypt in the 6th century B.C. It has been usually reckoned as a rather heavier form of the 129 shekel, increased to 134 on its adoption by Solon.

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  • The 129 range is up to 131.8, while the Attic range is 130 to 138 (65-69).

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  • Hultsch reckons on a ratio of 24:25 between them, and this is very near the true values; the full Attic being 67.3, the Assyrian should be 129.2, and this is just the full gold coinage weight.

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  • The 80-grain system, as we have seen, was probably formed by binarily dividing the 10 shekels, or "stone"; and it had a talent (Abydus lion) of 5000 drachmae; this is practically identical with the talent of 6000 Attic drachmae.

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  • Next it is found at Troy (44) in three cases, all high examples of 68.2 to 68.7; and these are very important, since they cannot be dissociated from the Greek Attic unit, and yet they are of a variety as far removed as may be from the half of the Assyrian, which ranges there from 123.5 to 131; thus the difference of unit between Assyrian and Attic in these earliest of all Greek weights is very strongly marked.

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  • In literature it is constantly referred to; but we may notice the "general mina" (Cleopatra), in Egypt, 16 unciae=6600; the Ptolemaic talent, equal to the Attic in weight and divisions (Hero, Didymus); the Antiochian talent, equal to the Attic (Hero); the treaty of the Romans with Antiochus, naming talents of 80 librae, i.e.

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  • In the first place as regards style, though the Stagirite pupil Aristotle could never rival his Attic master in literary form, yet he did a signal service to philosophy in gradually passing from the vague generalities of the dialogue to the scientific precision of the didactic treatise.

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  • On a larger scale speeches written by orators to be delivered by litigants were published and encouraged publication; and, as the Attic orators were his contemporaries, publication had become pretty common in the time of Aristotle, who speaks of many bundles (Skaas) of judicial speeches by Isocrates being hawked about by the booksellers (Fragm.

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  • But we have little record of his cult in this aspect, except at Athens, where his worship was of real importance, belonging to the oldest stratum of Attic religion.

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  • A tribe was called after his name, and Erichthonius, the mythical father of the Attic people, was the son of Hephaestus.

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  • It was the constant ambition of the Thebans to absorb the other townships into a single state, just as Athens had annexed the Attic communities.

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  • In the earlier period of its history it seems to have been an independent rival of Athens, and it was afterwards reckoned one of the twelve Old Attic cities.

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  • A colony of Attic cleruchs was established by Pericles, and many inscriptions on the island relate to Athenians.

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  • They belong to the period of Attic occupation, and bear Athenian types.

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  • In the Heraeum at Olympia, it may be remarked, the unit adopted was not this Olympian foot, but an older one of 0.297 metre, and in the temple of Zeus an Attic foot of 1.08 English foot was used.

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  • His chief work, 'EKA(ryr) 'Ovoµarwv Kai `Prµarwv Attgkcjv, is a collection of selected Attic words and phrases, partly arranged in alphabetical order, compiled as a help to Greek composition from the works of Phrynichus, Ammonius, Herodian and Moeris.

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  • According to the best known Attic legend (Apollodorus, i.

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  • The Attic legend of Eleusis also represented him as one of the judges of the underworld.

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  • In the and and 1st centuries B.C. Apollodorus, nicknamed laprorupavvos (" Lord of the Garden "), and Zeno of Sidon (who describes Socrates as " the Attic buffoon ": Cic. De nat.

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  • His narrative contains frequent repetitions and contradictions, is without colouring, and monotonous; and his simple diction, which stands intermediate between pure Attic and the colloquial Greek of his time, enables us to detect in the narrative the undigested fragments of the materials which he employed.

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  • He read little Greek; for his proficiency in that language was not such that he could take much pleasure in the masters of Attic poetry and eloquence.

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  • LYSIAS, Attic orator, was born, according to Dionysius of IIalicarnassus and the author of the life ascribed to Plutarch, in 459 B.C. This date was evidently obtained by reckoning back from the foundation of Thurii (444 B.C.), since there was a tradi tion that Lysias had gone thither at the age of fifteen.

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  • Against Philo 1 See further Jebb, The Attic Orators from Antiphon to Isaeus, i.

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  • See also Jebb's Attic Orators (1893) and Selections from the Attic Orators (2nd [Some remains of the speech against Theozotides have been found in the Hibeh papyri; see W.

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  • In the second phase (700500 B.C.), sometimes called the fourth period, proto-Corinthian and Attic black figured vases are sometimes, though rarely, found, while local geometric pottery develops considerably.

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  • On the other hand, Tissaphernes undertook to pay the Peloponnesian sailors a daily wage of one Attic drachma (afterwards reduced to a drachma).

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  • In Athens the Hellenic genius was focussed, its tendencies drawn together and combined; nor was it a circumstance of small moment that the Attic dialect attained, for prose, a classical authority; for if Hellenism was to be propagated in the world at large, it was obviously convenient that it should have some one definite form of speech to be its medium.

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  • Libanius) anxious to affiliate themselves to the Attic Ionians - an anxiety which is illustrated by the Athenian types used on the city's coins.

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  • After Demetrius and Eucratides, the kings abandoned the Attic standard of coinage and introduced a native standard; at the same time the native language came into use by the side of the Greek.

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  • A circular building identified (bv Svoronos) as the Attic mint in the Peloponnesian War, was cleared, and a fine archaic relief of an ephebe crowning himself was discovered.

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  • THESEUS, the great hero of Attic legend,' son of Aegeus, king of Athens, and Aethra, daughter of Pittheus, king of Troezen.

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  • Theseus now carried out a political revolution in Attica by abolishing the semi-independent powers of the separate townships and concentrating those powers at Athens, and he instituted the festival of the Panathenaea,3 as a symbol of the unity of the Attic race.

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  • When the Persian war was over the Delphic oracle bade the Athenians fetch the bones of Theseus from Scyrus, and' lay them in Attic earth.

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  • But although he goes to the Scriptures, and tastes the mystical spirit of the medieval saints, the Christ of his conception has traits that seem borrowed from Socrates and from the heroes of Attic tragedy, who suffer much, and yet smile gently on a destiny to which they were reconciled.

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  • Midas with the ass's ears was a frequent subject of the Attic satyr-drama.

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  • On the connexion between Midas and the Attic story see J.

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  • So long as she lived, her small salon in the attic storey of the great house was a centre of attraction for many of the most illustrious personages in Europe.

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  • In 469 B.C. it was conquered by the Athenians under Cimon,- and it was probably about this time that the legends arose which connect it with the Attic hero Theseus, who was said to have been treacherously slain and buried there.

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  • ATTHIS (an adjective meaning "Attic"), the name given to a monograph or special treatise on the religious and political history, antiquities and topography of Attica and Athens.

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  • Attic >>

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  • 'DIPHILUS, of Sinope, poet of the new Attic comedy and contemporary of Menander (342-291 B.C.).

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  • The style of Diphilus was simple and natural, and his language on the whole good Attic; he paid great attention to versification, and was supposed to have invented a peculiar kind of metre.

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  • the Attic a, which does not represent an IndoEuropean a, but arises by contraction, as in OtXe77-m, or through the lengthening of the vowel sound as the result of the loss of a consonant, as in Eiprt j Avos for FEFpn Avos) the short sound is represented by B; c is found at Corinth in its oldest form, and also as I, while in Thera it is In Thera the w sound of digamma (F) was entirely lost, and therefore is not represented.

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  • On the other hand, no doubt Athens in 403 B.C. officially adopted the Ionic alphabet and gave up the old Attic alphabet.

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  • On the contrary, Plato and other Attic writers use the word to include interpreters and admirers - in short, the whole " spiritual kindred " - of Homer.

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  • Now in Homer there are upwards of 80 second aorists (not reckoning aorists of " Verbs in µc," such as i'ar,Y, i,3rpv), whereas in all Attic prose not more than 30 are found.

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  • In Attic poets, it is true, the number of such aorists is much larger than in prose.

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  • Of the poetical aorists in Attic the larger part are also Homeric. Others are not really Attic at all, but borrowed from earlier Aeolic and Doric poetry.

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  • These constitute a distinct formation, generally with a " causative " meaning; the solitary Attic specimen is riyayov.

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  • In fact, however, the Homeric subjunctive is almost quite " regular," though the rule which it obeys is a different one from the Attic. It may be summed up by saying that the subjunctive takes or when the indicative has o or and not otherwise.

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  • The article (6, ?, in Homer is chiefly used as an independent pronoun (he, she, it), a use which in Attic appears only in a few combinations (such as o dv ...

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  • Again, " with " is in Homer auv (with the dative), in Attic prose perec with the genitive.

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  • Here Attic poetry is intermediate; the use of auv is retained as a piece of poetical tradition.

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  • The points that have been mentioned, to which many others might be added, make it clear that the Homeric and Attic dialects are separated by differences which affect the whole structure of the language, and require a considerable time for their development.

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  • There are doubtless many Homeric forms which were unknown to the later Ionic and Attic, and which are found in Aeolic or other dialects.

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  • The nonDorian dialects, Ionic, Attic and the various forms of Aeolic, are regarded as relatively closely akin, and go by the common name " Achaean."

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  • The remains of a temple, devastated in ancient times (possibly by Dionysius of Syracuse in 384 B.C.), were also discovered, with fragments of Attic vases of the 5th century B.C., which had served as ex votos in it.

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  • From the mention in the letters of towns (Phintia, Alaesa and Tauromenium) which did not exist in the time of Phalaris, from the imitations of authors (Herodotus, Democritus, Euripides, Callimachus) who wrote long after he was dead, from the reference to tragedies, though tragedy was not yet invented in the lifetime of Phalaris, from the dialect, which is not Dorian but Attic, nay, New or Late Attic, as well as from absurdities in the matter, and the entire absence of any reference to them by any writer before Stobaeus (c. A.D.

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  • The Greek colonists traced their descent, at Curium, from Argos; at Lapathus, from Laconia; at Paphos, from Arcadia; at Salamis, from the Attic island of that name; and at Soli, also from Attica.

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  • Laos and F ra (Davus, Geta) were common as names of slaves in Attic comedy and in the adaptations of Plautus and Terence.

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  • There Persian and Attic money was widely distributed, and imitations of it struck, in the fifth and fourth pre-Christian centuries.

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  • their coinage with its Greek inscriptions and nomenclature; their Attic standard of currency; and, doubtless, a great part of their administration also.

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  • The name was traditionally derived from Cephalus, the Attic hero who was regarded as having colonized the island.

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  • The description of Pausanias was written at a time when the lower city was deserted, and only the temples and the gates left; and the references to Thebes in the Attic dramatists are, like those to Mycenae and Argos, of little or no topographical value.

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  • At last Athena receives him on the acropolis, of Athens and arranges a formal trial of the case before twelve Attic judges.

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  • But a new idea is introduced by the Attic Oresteia.

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  • Panaetius was competent to pass judgment upon the critical " divination " of an Aristarchus (who was perhaps himself also a Stoic), and took an interest in the restoration of Old% Attic forms to the text of Plato.

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  • His chief claim to recognition consists in the fact that he transplanted rhetoric to Greece, and contributed to the diffusion of the Attic dialect as the language of literary prose.

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  • chap. vii.; Jebb's Attic Orators, introd.

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  • set the staple a t Theodosia, where the Attic ships were allowed special privileges.

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  • We have many references to this in the Attic orators.

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  • In the Eumenides of Aeschylus" the Erinyes are reproached in that by aiding Clytemnestra, who slew her husband, " they are dishonouring and bringing to naught the pledges of Zeus and Hera, the marriage-goddess "; and these were the divinities to whom sacrifice was offered before the wedding," and it may be that some kind of mimetic representation of the " Holy Marriage," the IEpos ydpos, of Zeus and Hera formed a part of the Attic nuptial ceremonies.'

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  • Attic. iii.

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  • In the Fisher Building, Chicago, the entire steel skeleton above the first floor, nineteen storeys and attic, was erected in twenty-six days.

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  • D€K€Xeia), an Attic deme, on the pass which led over the east end of Mt.

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  • The connexion with Tyrrhenians which began with Hellanicus, Herodotus and Sophocles becomes confusion with them in the 3rd century, when the Lemnian pirates and their Attic kinsmen are plainly styled Tyrrhenians, and early fortress-walls in Italy (like those on the Palatine in Rome) are quoted as "Arcadian" colonies.

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  • A poet of the Old Attic comedy and a contemporary of Aristophanes.

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  • According to Suidas he was the author of (i) an Atticist, or On Attic Words, in two books; (2) TLOc,APWv vvvaywry17, a collection of subjects for discussion; (3) Eocino-n) rapao-KEvii, or Sophistical Equipment, in forty-seven (or seventy-four) books.

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  • As models of Attic style Phrynichus assigned the highest place to Plato, Demosthenes and Aeschines the Socratic. The work was learned, but prolix and garrulous.

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  • Another work of Phrynichus, not mentioned by Photius, but perhaps identical with the Atticist mentioned by Suidas, the Selection ('EKX(rryrt) of Attic Words and Phrases, is extant.

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  • It is dedicated to Cornelianus, a man of literary tastes, and one of the imperial secretaries, who had invited the author to undertake the work; It is a collection of current words and forms which deviated from the Old Attic standard, the true Attic equivalents being given side by side.

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  • The Attic comedians and Plato speak with enthusiasm of their native climate, and the fineness of the Athenian intellect was attributed to the clearness of the Attic atmosphere.

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  • Attic base >>

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  • The Attic tradition, reproduced in Euripides (Ion 1002), regarded the Gorgon as a monster, produced by Gaea to aid her sons the giants against the gods and slain by Athena (the passage is a locus classicus on the aegis of Athena).

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  • DEMOSTHENES, the great Attic orator and statesman, was born in 384 (or 383) B.C. His father, who bore the same name, was an Athenian citizen belonging to the deme of Paeania.

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  • Demosthenes, after studying with Isaeus - then the great master of forensic eloquence and of Attic law, especially in will cases 1 - brought an action against Aphobus, and gained a verdict for about £2400.

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  • Pericles had introduced the practice of giving a small bounty from the treasury to the poorer citizens, for the purpose of enabling them to attend the theatre at the great festivals, - in other words, for the purpose of bringing them under the concentrated influence of the best Attic culture.

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  • The works of the three great dramatists had been thus protected, about 340 B.C., by a standard Attic recension.

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  • Kennedy's complete translation is a model of scholarly finish, and the appendices on Attic law, &c., are of great value.

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  • The insulting dismissal of a large body of Athenian troops which had come, under Cimon, to aid the Spartans in the siege of the Messenian stronghold of Ithome, the consummation of the Attic democracy under Ephi altes and Pericles, the conclusion of an alliance between Athens Training A pothetae (ai 'A-r-o%-raa, from lurOBEros, hidden) .

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  • Ajax then became an Attic hero; he was worshipped at Athens, where he had a statue in the market-place, and the tribe Aiantis was called after his name.

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  • The Aeolic form of the name, /piipva, was retained even in the Attic dialect, and the epithet "Aeolian Smyrna" remained long after the conquest.

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  • In Attic Greek 0 and 12 were not really a pair, for o + o became not w but ov, o being a close and w an open sound.

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  • It was believed to have been founded after the Trojan War (c. 1180) by the Attic hero Acamas; but no remains have been found in this district earlier than the Early Iron Age (c. moo-Soo).

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  • She retrieved two boxes from the attic and enlisted help from Destiny in setting up and decorating the tree in the dining room.

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  • At the end of the hall, a steep set of stairs led to the attic.

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  • She stared into the flames, wondering why none of the windows had curtains, and why so many things were left to gather dust in the attic.

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  • It wasn't the first time she had done so, but this morning she had run across some curtains and rugs in the attic.

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  • So far she had never mentioned her excursions to the attic, but when things got too dull around the house, she went up to explore.

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  • The discovery of a second room in the attic had provided more hours of entertainment.

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  • There are some curtains and rugs in the attic - I'm sure you've already found them.

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  • Anyone as bright and curious as you would have to explore that attic.

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  • There is a chest of drawers and a three-quarter bed in the attic.

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  • Feel free to get anything you want out of the attic.

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  • Even the way you felt about that attic.

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  • Then put it in the attic.

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  • She carried the mug with her down the street to a store that smelled like an attic.

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  • I felt such a strong urge to dress up in this, like a little girl trying to be someone she isn't—fishing in an attic trunk.

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  • He located the nearest Watcher and Traveled, appearing in a small attic.

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  • He spun as the creature materialized on the other end of the attic.

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  • We have a converted attic with 2 further bedrooms.

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  • The family-style hotel is a 4-story building (elevator is in the house ), including an attic.

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  • But we don't have an attic she said Well, she wouldn't know, would she?

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  • It appears somebody used the attic for wood working.

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  • On the bare wooden floor in the dusty attic, Leo taps.

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  • Sara loses her beautiful room and her fine possessions and moves into the cold, dark attic.

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  • Additionally, a large storage attic is found above the garage.

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  • The Youngs and their family lived in the converted attic, where Canon Willis had kept a huge train set.

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  • Even the attic, which had been converted into my bedroom, was the most perfect little bijou attic that could possibly be imagined.

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  • attic bedroom of a house in Golders Green.

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  • attic conversion has three beds suitable for children.

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  • attic room above a friend's antique shop.

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  • attic window are the arms of Sir John Walter, MP, who gave the original glass.

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  • attic space or within the dwelling.

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  • attic floor.

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  • The second floor attic conversion has three beds suitable for children.

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  • The condition of the book itself is terrible, and the pages smell like something out of my grandmother's attic.

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  • attic of the house in which she works.

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  • attic of the building where Otto has had his business.

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  • attic for 25 years.

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  • She's given him an indoor job, fixing pesky cupboard shelves in an attic, the lucky bleeder.

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  • Close the cold supply from the storage cistern in the attic to the hot water cylinder.

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  • Recently rewired thoughout to modern standards and a stunning attic conversion with en-suite.

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  • This two-storey building with attic dormers is brick with a Welsh slate roof.

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  • dusty attic, Leo taps.

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  • The strengths of the collection lie in its broad coverage of early Greek inscriptions, attic epigraphy and the Hellenistic world.

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  • Over the years both staff and visitors have reported unusual goings-on, particularly in the chemist and attic areas.

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  • hides in the attic of the governor's house.

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  • now incarcerated in the attic room Jane confronts her alter-ego " What have you done you've made them hate me?

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  • Toys in the Attic captured the essence of the newly invigorated Aerosmith.

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  • It's an attic black-figure kylix, with commentary.

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  • lean-to roof over the side section was replaced with an attic store room approached via a ladder from the room below.

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  • From the hallway there is the access to the attic room, only partially liveable.

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  • From the passage there is access to the not liveable attic very useful as storage.

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  • mayonnaise jar in the attic?

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