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atresia

atresia

atresia Sentence Examples

  • During a process called atresia, eggs are lost at some stage without maturing to ovulation.

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  • The remainder may undergo atresia and their growth arrests.

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  • In biliary atresia, the bile ducts are actually absent, also causing jaundice.

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  • A nasogastric tube was inserted and this plain abdominal x-ray shows the ' double-bubble ' appearance of duodenal atresia.

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  • Percutaneous fetal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum New NICE guideline.

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  • Rarer causes of poor response include the presence of congenital anomalies such as choanal atresia, diaphragmatic hernia or pulmonary hypoplasia.

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  • atresia with intact ventricular septum New NICE guideline.

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  • biliary atresia, the bile ducts are actually absent, also causing jaundice.

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  • duodenal atresia.

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  • fetal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum New NICE guideline.

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  • Rarer causes of poor response include the presence of congenital anomalies such as choanal atresia, diaphragmatic hernia or pulmonary hypoplasia.

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  • percutaneous fetal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum New NICE guideline.

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  • Biliary atresia is the congenital failure of a fetus to develop an adequate pathway for bile to drain from the liver to the intestine.

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  • Biliary atresia is the congenital absence or closure of the ducts that drain bile from the liver.

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  • Biliary atresia is the most common lethal liver disease in children, occurring once every 10,000 to 15,000 live births.

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  • In the United States, approximately 300 cases of biliary atresia are diagnosed each year.

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  • The incidence of biliary atresia is highest in Asian populations.

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  • The cause of biliary atresia is unknown.

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  • However, there are indications that viral infections or autoimmune mechanisms may be responsible for the development of biliary atresia.

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  • About 10 percent of children with biliary atresia also have other associated congenital defects in blood vessels, heart, spleen, or intestines.

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  • The doctor should be called if an infant older than two weeks of age exhibits jaundice or has other symptoms typical of biliary atresia.

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  • If, after surgery for biliary atresia, an infant becomes jaundiced, has a high temperature for more than 24 hours, or if there is a change in the color of the stools or urine.

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  • Other liver diseases that cause symptoms similar to biliary atresia must be ruled out through the testing process.

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  • Surgery is the only means to treat biliary atresia.

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  • A dietary expert should be consulted to guide in the development of feeding requirements for an infant who has been treated surgically for biliary atresia.

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  • Early diagnosis of biliary atresia is essential, for if left untreated, few children survive beyond the age of two years.

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  • Since the specific cause of this birth defect is unknown, there is no way known as of 2004 to prevent biliary atresia.

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  • Parents of children with biliary atresia require help in coping with the strain of this chronic illness as well as the stress associated with waiting for a liver transplant.

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  • Parents may also feel guilty because they feel that they may have in some way contributed to the development of biliary atresia, although as of 2004, there is no known way to prevent the disease.

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  • "Patient Information about Biliary Atresia."

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  • One cause of hyperbilirubinemia in seemingly healthy full-term or near-term infants is biliary atresia, an obstruction or inflammation of the bile ducts.

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  • The cause of biliary atresia was as of 2004 unknown, and jaundice may not appear until the infant is two to six weeks old.

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  • Biliary atresia must be detected before two months of age to prevent further liver damage.

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  • Surgery for biliary atresia must be performed within the first few weeks of an infant's life to prevent fatal liver damage.

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  • About 40-50 percent of infants with biliary atresia are candidates for replacement bile ducts leading from the liver into the intestine.

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  • Untreated biliary atresia leads to biliary cirrhosis, a progressive, irreversible scarring of the liver, by about two months of age.

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  • Cyanotic defects include truncus arteriosus, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, tricuspid atresia, and pulmonary atresia.

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  • In tricuspid atresia, the baby lacks a triscupid valve and blood cannot flow properly from the right atrium to the right ventricle.

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  • In pulmonary atresia, the baby lacks a pulmonary valve and blood cannot flow properly from the right ventricle into the pulmonary artery and on to the lungs.

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  • For tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia, the Fontan procedure connects the right atrium to the pulmonary artery directly or with a conduit, and the atrial defect is closed.

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  • Pulmonary artery banding, narrowing the pulmonary artery with a band to reduce blood flow and pressure in the lungs, is used for ventricular septal defect, atrioventricular canal defect, and tricuspid atresia.

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  • For tetralogy of Fallot, tricuspid atresia, or pulmonary atresia, the shunt procedure creates a passage between blood vessels, sending blood into parts of the body that need it.

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  • This condition is known as duodenal atresia, and it results in duodenal obstruction.

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  • About 30 to 50 percent of infants born with duodenal atresia also have Down syndrome, and some have cardiac abnormalities as well.

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  • Duodenal atresia can occur with other conditions such as a narrowing of the duodenal lumen (duodenal stenosis) or twisting of the duodenum around itself (duodenal volvulus).

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  • Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) may also accompany duodenal atresia.

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  • Duodenal atresia, one of the causes of duodenal obstruction, affects one in 10,000 live births in the United States and is found equally among boys and girls and more often among premature births.

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  • The duodenal channel may be underdeveloped (duodenal hypoplasia), narrowed (duodenal stenosis), or the duodenum channel may not be properly formed (duodenal atresia).

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  • Surgery to correct duodenal atresia is usually duodenoduodenostomy.

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  • In most cases, the esophagus is discontinuous (an esophageal atresia), causing immediate feeding difficulties.

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  • "Esophageal Atresia with or without Tracheoesophageal Fistula." eMedicine Medical Library.

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  • Esophageal atresia (EA) is a birth defect (congenital anomaly) in which the esophagus, which connects the mouth to the stomach, is shortened and closed off (dead ended) at some point along its length.

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  • Type A (7.7%): Esophageal atresia in which both segments of the esophagus end in blind pouches.

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  • Type B (0.8%): Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula in which the upper segment of the esophagus forms a fistula to the trachea.

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  • Type C (86.5%): Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, in which the upper segment of the esophagus ends in a blind pouch (EA) and the lower segment of the esophagus is attached to the trachea (TEF).

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  • Type D (0.7%): Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, in which both segments of the esophagus are attached to the trachea.

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  • Type H (4.2%): Tracheoesophageal fistula in which there is no esophageal atresia because the esophagus is continuous to the stomach.

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  • Esophageal atresia alone or with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) occurs in approximately one in 4,000 live births.

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  • The cause of esophageal atresia, like that of most birth defects, was as of 2004 unknown.

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  • When a physician suspects esophageal atresia after being presented with the typical symptoms, diagnosis usually begins with gently passing a catheter through the nose and into the esophagus.

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  • Esophageal atresia is indicated if the catheter stops at the blind pouch, indicating that it has hit an obstruction.

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  • Air in the stomach may confirm the presence of fistula; gas in the large intestine rules out intestinal (duodenal) atresia.

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  • Surgery to correct esophageal atresia is usually successful, with survival rates close to 100 percent in otherwise healthy infants after the condition is corrected.

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  • "Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula."

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  • This disorder, called duodenal atresia, interferes with the baby's milk or formula leaving the stomach and entering the intestine for digestion.

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  • For example, heart defects often times require surgical repair, as will duodenal atresia.

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  • Because of modern medical treatments, including antibiotics to treat infections and surgery to treat heart defects and duodenal atresia, life expectancy has greatly increased.

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