At-the-mercy-of sentence example

at-the-mercy-of
  • The Genoese Admiral Luciano Doria sailed into the Adriatic, attacked and defeated Vettor Pisani at Pola in Istria, and again Venice and the lagoons lay at the mercy of the enemy.

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  • Butler occupied that city The navigation of the river being secured by this success and by later operations in the north ending in July 1863 with the capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, the state was wholly at the mercy of the Union armies.

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  • Seeing that Godoy, the all-powerful minister at Madrid, had given mortal offence to Napoleon early in the Prussian campaign of 1806 by calling on Spain to arm on behalf of her independence, it passes belief how he could have placed his country at the mercy of Napoleon at the end of the year 1807.

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  • Below the feudal nobility and their Moslem soldiers came the Christian serfs, tillers of the soil and taxpayers, whose lives and property were at the mercy of their lords.

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  • The atrophy of the Ottoman sea-power had left the archipelago at the mercy of the Greek war-brigs; piracy flourished; and it became essential in the interests of the commerce of all nations to make some power responsible for the policing of the narrow seas.

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  • Fynn thus became leader of the whites at the port, who were much at the mercy of Dingaan.

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  • He had, however, returned to his allegiance to the house of Capet before the fall of Laon placed both Arnulf and Charles at the mercy of the French king (March 991).

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  • Bestuzhev had previously rejected with scorn the proposals of the French government to mediate between Russia and Sweden on the basis of a territorial surrender on the part of the former; and he conducted the war so vigorously that by the end of 1742 Sweden lay at the mercy of the empress.

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  • Before the end of the year he was forced to admit that the cause of the French monarchy was hopeless so long as the king and queen of France were nothing but captives in their own capital, at the mercy of an irresponsible mob.

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  • Defeated in 486 by Clovis, king of the Salian Franks, at the battle of Soissons, Syagrius fled, leaving his land at the mercy of the Franks.

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  • When, after the battle of Kilsyth, Scotland was at the mercy of Montrose and his army, Leslie was recalled from England in 1645, and made lieutenant-general of horse.

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  • In response, Mr Fraser, one of the Free State delegates, remarked that a harbour requires forts, soldiers, ships and sailors to man them, or else it would be at the mercy of the first gunboat that happened to assail it.

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  • The Feuillants copy is in existence, being the only manuscript, or partly manuscript, authority for the text; but access to it and reproduction of it are subjected to rather unfortunate restrictions by the authorities, and until it is completely edited students are rather at the mercy of those who have actually consulted it.

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  • Meantime, Sulla having left Italy for the Mithradatic war, Cinna's sudden and violent revolution put the senate at the mercy of the popular leaders, and Marius greedily caught at the opportunity of a bloody vengeance, which became in fact a reign of terror in which senators and nobles were slaughtered wholesale.

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  • The loss of revenue consequent upon the secession of Lithuania placed John Albert at the mercy of the Polish Sejmiki or local diets, where the szlachta, or country gentry, made their subsidies dependent upon the king's subservience.

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  • This ended, unlike the former one, in the utter defeat of the Carlist forces, and left the Provinces at the mercy of the government, without terms or agreement.

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  • He was not, however, destined to compass the downfall of the Sullan regime; the crisis of the Slave War placed the Senate at the mercy of Pompey and Crassus, who in 70 B.C. swept away the safeguards of senatorial ascendancy, restored the initiative in legislation to the tribunes, and replaced the Equestrian order, i.e.

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  • On the landing of Pyrrhus in Italy (281 B.C.) they were among the first to declare in his favour, and found themselves exposed to the resentment of Rome when the departure of Pyrrhus left his allies at the mercy of the Romans.

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  • Ferdinand refused to despoil his brother's infant son, and even if he did not act on the moral ground he alleged, his sagacity must have shown him that he would be at the mercy of the men who had chosen him in such circumstances.

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  • After the battle of Jena she went with her husband to Konigsberg, and when the battles of Eylau and Friedland had placed Prussia absolutely at the mercy of France, she made a personal appeal to Napoleon at his headquarters in Tilsit, but without success.

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  • This exaggeration of the real fact of the will to think ignores throughout the position of little man in the great world and at the mercy of things which drive him perforce to sense and from sense to thought.

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  • This put the caliphs fatally at the mercy of their guards.

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  • The United Provinces, as in 1672, seemed to lie at the mercy of their enemies, and as in that eventful year, popular feeling broke down the opposition of the burgher oligarchies, and turned to William IV., prince of Orange, as the saviour of the state.

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  • When war broke out Dutch commerce was destroyed, and the Dutch colonies were at the mercy of the English fleet without the possibility of a blow being struck in their defence.

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  • Its contents, as was to be expected, are of a very chaotic character - of a character so chaotic indeed that the reader is almost at the mercy of the arrangement, perforce an arbitrary arrangement, of the editors.

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  • He knew little or nothing of any Teutonic language except English, which indeed, as he wrote it, was scarcely a Teutonic language; and thus he was absolutely at the mercy of Junius and Skinner.

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  • The estimates could not be sanctioned, and though Kossuth granted the Szell cabinet a vote on account for the first four months of 1903, the Government found itself at the mercy of the Opposition.

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  • There was no assertion of political rights by the white men, who were largely at the mercy of the natives, and who rarely ventured far from their ships or the " factories " established on the various rivers and estuaries.

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  • The peshwa's dominions were annexed, and those of Sindhia, Holkar, and the raja of Berar lay at the mercy of the governor-general, and were saved only by his moderation.

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  • Our sources fail us, and we are at the mercy of doubtful rumours and more or less unreliable anecdotes.

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  • The death of Mar (28th of October 1572) left power in the stronger hands of Morton, and the death of Knox (24th of November) put the kirk for a while at the mercy of the new regent.

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  • In the Spanish campaign of 1808 his advice was often of the highest value to the marshal, but Jomini quarrelled with his chief, and was left almost at the mercy of his numerous enemies, especially Berthier, the emperor's chief of staff.

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  • By two stringent regulations of 1799 and 1812 the tenant was practically put at the mercy of a rackrenting landlord.

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  • This resolution of Motasim was destined to prove fatal to his dynasty; for it placed the caliphs at the mercy of their praetorians.

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  • Aristotelians, the dialectical induction of the Topics, content with imperfect enumeration and with showing the burden of disproof upon the critic, is puerile, and at the mercy of a single instance to the contrary.

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  • The defeat of Antiochus the Great at Magnesia, 190 B.C., placed Asia Minor at the mercy of Rome; but it was not until 133 that the first Roman province, Asia, was formed to include only western Anatolia, without Bithynia.

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  • Lima was now at the mercy of the Chileans, and on the 17th of January a division of 4000 men of all arms, under the command of General Cornelio Saavedra, was sent forward to occupy the Peruvian capital and restore order within the town limits.

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  • Always feeble in character, he was at that time old, and, from the first, was wholly at the mercy of the mutinous soldiery in Delhi, who were controlled by a council called the Barah Topi, or Twelve Heads.

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  • England was the chief market for Portuguese wine and grain; and the long Portuguese littoral was at the mercy of the British navy.

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  • The balloon, because of its vast size and from its being lighter than the air, is completely at the mercy of the wind.

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  • Under his weak successor (Rolt, 1677-1682), the English waters, the value of which had now been proved, became the battle-ground between the rival navies, and for some years Bombay lay at the mercy of both.

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  • Bogdan's successor, John the Terrible (1572-74), was provoked by the Porte's demand for 120,000 ducats as tribute instead of 60,000 as heretofore to rise against the oppressor; but after gaining three victories he was finally defeated and slain (1574), and the country was left more than ever at the mercy of the Ottoman.

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  • Some of these ancient seaweeds may have remained permanently rooted in the littoral regions, while others may have become broken off and drifted, like the recent Sargassum, at the mercy of the winds and currents, carrying the attached Graptolites into all latitudes.

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  • The encumbered estates act, though it substituted a solvent for an insolvent proprietary, placed the Irish tenants at the mercy of landlords of whom they had no previous knowledge, who were frequently absentees, who bought the land as a matter of business, and who dealt with it on business principles by raising the rent.

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  • The land act of 1870 had given the tenant no security in the case of eviction for non-payment of rent; and the tenant whose rent was too high or had been raised was at the mercy of his landlord.

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  • When thousands after thousands are dragooned out of their country for the sake of their religion, or sent to row in the galleys for selling salt against law, - when the liberty of every individual is at the mercy of every prostitute, pimp or parasite that has access to power or any of its basest substitutes, - my mind, I own, is not at once prepared to be satisfied with gentle palliatives for such disorders" (Francis to Burke, November 3, 1790).

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  • Macedonia was now at the mercy of Rome, but Flamininus contented himself with his previous demands.

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  • In 1866 Wurttemberg took up arms on behalf of Austria, but three weeks after the battle of Koniggratz her troops were decisively beaten at Tauberbischofsheim, and the country was at the mercy of Prussia.

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  • Two new laws placed almost everybody at the mercy of the government.

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  • In such a situation the country is at the mercy of hostile tariffs.

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  • The bill attempted to safeguard British interests, while leaving Ireland at the mercy of the native politicians.

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  • Italy and Germany were two great tracts of land at the mercy of the highest bidder, rich and easy to, dominate, where these coarse and alien kings, still reared on medieval traditions, were for fifty years to gratify their love of conciucst.

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  • Thus, here as elsewhere, we see a vacillating hand-to-mouth policy, at the mercy of a passion for power or for sensual gratification.

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  • Amidst this extraordinary instability, when everything was at the mercy of a secret thought of the master, the mistress alone held lasting sway; in a reign of all-pervading satiety and tedium, she managed to remain indispensable and bewitching to the day of her death.

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  • A lively trade had grown up between Great Britain and the revolted colonies; but since this commerce, under the colonial laws of Spain, was technically illegitimate, it was at the mercy of the pirates, who preyed upon it under the aegis of the Spanish flag, without there being any possibility of claiming redress from the Spanish government.

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  • All this time he was in close communication with the royalists in France, but was much embarrassed by the conflicting policy pursued by the comte d'Artois from England, and was largely at the mercy of corrupt and dishonest agents. ?

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  • The imperialists did nothing, however, to drive the Swedes from Brandenburg, and the unfortunate land was entirely at the mercy of the enemy.

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  • Darkyn brought Past-Death back, fulfilling their mystery-deal, and you were at the mercy of Darkyn, Gabriel finished for her.

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  • It gave her a little bit of peace, knowing she wasn't solely at the mercy of the Immortal Laws and Fate.

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  • So you left Deidre in Hell at the mercy of the Dark One.

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  • Darkyn brought past-Death back, fulfilling their mystery-deal, and you were at the mercy of Darkyn, Gabriel finished.

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  • With all the insults and arrogance, she couldn.t take her mind off the statue of Rhyn and her sister being at the mercy of such a man.

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  • She was done being at the mercy of Immortals.  The first Immortal, Death, she'd tell that would probably be the last, but she was done with this game.

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  • She hadn't wanted to believe she might be caught at the mercy of not one, but two real-live vampires!

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  • For a moment, she thought he was going to let her hang at the mercy of the hungry women waiting to get a piece of him.

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  • There is no part of me that believes any Natural should be at the mercy of a Vamp.

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  • This will foster a global appreciation that we are no longer isolated islands at the mercy of climate changes.

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  • Never again should they be left at the mercy of the city financier or speculator.

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  • Sufferers are often at the mercy of telephone salespersons, magazine articles and junk mail.

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  • But that strategy has left Afghanistan at the mercy of brutal warlords and at perpetual risk of chaos.

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  • The power of Buenos Aires was thus completely broken and at the mercy of the Cordoba League.

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  • Now the country was at the mercy of the invaders, but, instead of advancing, they suddenly retreated and did not reappear for thirteen years, during which the princes went on quarrelling and fighting as before, till they were startled by a new invasion much more formidable than its predecessor.

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  • Unfortunately, Venice, for her own safety's sake, insisted on the publication of Wladislaus's antiTurkish alliance; the Porte, well informed of the course of Polish affairs, remained strictly neutral despite the most outrageous provocations; and Wladislaus, bound by his coronation oath not to undertake an offensive war, found himself at the mercy of the diet which, full of consternation and rage, assembled at Warsaw on the 2nd of May 1647.

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  • Nevertheless, at this the eleventh hour of ter opportunities, Sweden might still have saved something from the wreck of her empire if Charles had behaved like a reasonable being (see CHARLES Peter The Great; Gortz, Georg Heinricii Von; Osterman, Andrei); but he would only consent to play off Russia against England, and his sudden death before Fredrikshald (Dec. i 1, 1718) left Sweden practically at the end of her resources and at the mercy of her enemies.

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  • He returned in 146 to find Corinth in ruins, the fairest cities of Achaea at the mercy of the Roman soldiery, and the famous Achaean League shattered to pieces (see Achaean League).

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  • Should our storehouse of knowledge be at the mercy of corporate bean counters?

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  • Anyplace that stocks the Wii Fit is at the mercy of how fast Nintendo can produce them.

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  • Thus, many people find themselves lost and at the mercy of salesmen out to push the most expensive model.

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  • Once the custody fight arrives in court, the parents then find themselves at the mercy of the courts and lose the flexibility they would have had if they had worked an agreement out together.

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  • The uncertainty of home fuel oil prices and the constant fluctuation in pricing makes the general public vulnerable and at the mercy of high oil prices.

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  • In October of 2009, Carroll once again found himself at the mercy of United's baggage handlers.

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  • At default, your companion is computer-controlled, so you are at the mercy of its artificial intelligence.

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  • This is the guy or girl that will be at the mercy of your keystrokes and commands, so make him or her someone you are willing to grow with.

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  • In this way, you are heavily reliant on the local infrastructure and you are at the mercy of its reliability.

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  • Patriarch John Abbott died, leaving his children bereft and at the mercy of his despicable last wife Gloria.

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  • You can shop from the comfort and privacy of your home and quickly compare prices, styles, and search for exactly what you want rather than being at the mercy of whatever you can find on the racks.

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  • You can dip in as a passive listener at any time, but you are at the mercy of the playlists created by the site owners and members.

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  • It gave her a little bit of peace, knowing she wasn't solely at the mercy of the outlaw.

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  • Wynn didn't like being out of control, at the mercy of one he couldn't predict or manipulate.

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  • Nice and Savoy also seemed at the mercy of the invaders.

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  • More than ever at the mercy of the Radicals and of their revolutionary allies, Rudini continued so to administer public affairs that subversive propaganda and associations obtained unprecedented extension.

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  • The members of the Duma, moreover, were placed at the mercy of the government by a clause empowering the Directing Senate to suspend or deprive them.

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  • The result of this double-dealing was that his army was destroyed by Ptolemy, who advanced into Egypt leaving Palestine at the mercy of Cleopatra.

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  • In general, the small cotton farmer was at the mercy of the commission merchant, to whom he mortgaged his crops in advance; but this evil has lessened, and in some districts the system of advancing is either nonexistent or very slightly developed.

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