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  • A few minutes later they all marched in and took their places at the table.
  • Then he got into the buggy again and took the reins, and the horse at once backed away from the tree, turned slowly around, and began to trot down the sandy road which was just visible in the dim light.
  • At ten years old, Jonathan was almost as tall as she was.
  • She straightened and smiled at him.
  • At any rate, today was no different.
  • They would have some time to enjoy a late Christmas at home when they returned.
  • So, with a snort and a neigh and a whisk of his short tail he trotted off the roof into the air and at once began floating downward to the street.
  • With everything going on, Carmen didn't have time to worry about flying, but when they were all sitting at the airport, she finally had time to stew over it.
  • Next minute there was a roar and a sharp crash, and at her side Dorothy saw the ground open in a wide crack and then come together again.
  • Then she looked at Zeb, whose face was blue and whose hair was pink, and gave a little laugh that sounded a bit nervous.
  • He was not hurt at all.
  • Yes, and Jonathan is at school.
  • She objected at first, but finally submitted.
  • She glanced up at his face, but it gave no clue of his mood.
  • Glinka, the editor of the Russian Messenger, who was recognized (cries of "author! author!" were heard in the crowd), said that "hell must be repulsed by hell," and that he had seen a child smiling at lightning flashes and thunderclaps, but "we will not be that child."
  • "Yes, yes, at thunderclaps!" was repeated approvingly in the back rows of the crowd.
  • She glanced up at him as he stopped beside her.
  • At least at this point, the old house was paying for itself.
  • Alex glanced at Jonathan and then rubbed the top of his head.
  • They entered the house and she glanced at the dark fireplace.
  • Hippolyte is at least a quiet fool, but Anatole is an active one.
  • At some point, that stopped bugging her and became an attraction.
  • We've got a meeting at two and it's almost one-thirty now.
  • He stood at the back, and, though he had heard hardly anything, understood everything in his own way.
  • She placed the dish in the rack and glanced at Katie.
  • Pierre's one feeling at the moment was a desire to show that he was ready to go all lengths and was prepared to sacrifice everything.
  • Old Rostov could not tell his wife of what had passed without tears, and at once consented to Petya's request and went himself to enter his name.
  • She stopped and gazed up at his face.
  • He glanced at his watch and swallowed before answering.
  • Apparently his greatest concern was the fact that his mother was married to his adoptive father at the time he was conceived.
  • When Josh died, Mary had indicated that she felt Carmen was at least partially responsible.
  • Ed merely looked at them and then back at Carmen.
  • That might be true, but there was no point in working at becoming a spendthrift simply because he had money.
  • With his return to work, things at the house shifted to a faster pace.
  • When she glanced at him, he was eyeing her, a wry smile twisting his lips.
  • Carmen glanced at Alex.
  • Let's just leave it at that.
  • The golden brown skin and black hair reminded her of the conversation at Thanksgiving.
  • She caught her breath and glanced at him in the mirror.
  • When she glanced up at him, even his smile was reassuring.
  • Alex didn't look at Carmen, which was her first inkling that something was amiss.
  • When Señor Medena introduced the girl as his daughter, Carmen caught her breath and looked at Alex for an explanation.
  • It should have arrived at Hugson's Siding at midnight, but it was already five o'clock and the gray dawn was breaking in the east when the little train slowly rumbled up to the open shed that served for the station-house.
  • The shed at Hugson's Siding was bare save for an old wooden bench, and did not look very inviting.
  • "Yes," she answered, looking gravely at his tousled hair and blinking gray eyes.
  • He laughed at that, and his laugh was merry and frank.
  • The worst thing was their terror of reaching the bottom of this great crack in the earth, and the natural fear that sudden death was about to overtake them at any moment.
  • At this they both put their heads over the side of the buggy and looked down.
  • At least, it isn't as wrong as some other things.
  • "Maybe Jim will go," continued Dorothy, looking at the horse.
  • I can see plenty of nice gardens and fields down below us, at the edge of this city.
  • There were men and women, but no children at all, and the folks were all beautifully formed and attractively dressed and had wonderfully handsome faces.
  • If you had any sense at all you'd known it was the earthquake.
  • "By the way," said the man with the star, looking steadily at the Sorcerer, "you told us yesterday that there would not be a second Rain of Stones.
  • He waved a thorny hand and at once the tinkling of bells was heard, playing sweet music.
  • Yet, look where she would, Dorothy could discover no bells at all in the great glass hall.
  • "I'm sure the Princess is ready to be picked," asserted Dorothy, gazing hard at the beautiful girl on the bush.
  • She was not at all heavy, so the Wizard and Dorothy managed to lift her gently to the ground.
  • "Very true," declared the Wizard, nodding at her.
  • "Dear me!" murmured the Wizard, looking at his pets in astonishment.
  • And if I can't eat the piglets you may as well plant me at once and raise catsup.
  • Eureka stuck up her nose at such food, but the tiny piglets squealed delightedly at the sight of the crackers and ate them up in a jiffy.
  • "It doesn't look very homelike," said Dorothy, gazing around at the bare room.
  • "Why, there seems to be no night at all in this country," Zeb replied.
  • "The Princess is lovely to look at," continued Dorothy, thoughtfully; "but I don't care much for her, after all.
  • He did it very cleverly, indeed, and the Princess looked at the strange piglets as if she were as truly astonished as any vegetable person could be.
  • Some of the Mangaboos fell down and had to be dragged from the fire, and all were so withered that it would be necessary to plant them at once.
  • The cab-horse, who never slept long at a time, sat upon his haunches and watched the tiny piglets and the kitten with much approval.
  • There she entered in at Dorothy's window in the dome and aroused her from her sleep.
  • "Stop, I command you!" cried the Wizard, in an angry tone, and at once began pulling down the rocks to liberate Jim and the piglets.
  • At once the Mangaboos began piling up the rocks of glass again, and as the little man realized that they were all about to be entombed in the mountain he said to the children:
  • So he carried the lantern back for quite a distance, while Dorothy and the Wizard followed at his side.
  • The others agreed readily to this sensible suggestion, and at once the boy began to harness Jim to the buggy.
  • Jim hastened his lagging steps at this assurance of a quick relief from the dark passage.
  • Several squeals and grunts were instantly heard at his feet, but the Wizard could not discover a single piglet.
  • Two childish voices laughed merrily at this action, and Dorothy was sure they were in no danger among such light-hearted folks, even if those folks couldn't be seen.
  • The strangers took their seats at the table willingly enough, for they were all hungry and the platters were now heaped with good things to eat.
  • The kitten gazed wistfully at the forbidden fruit.
  • The Wizard got out his sword at once, and Zeb grabbed the horse-whip.
  • "Thank you!" cried the Wizard, joyfully, and at once rubbed a leaf upon the soles of Dorothy's shoes and then upon his own.
  • The third time that he thrust out the weapon there was a loud roar and a fall, and suddenly at his feet appeared the form of a great red bear, which was nearly as big as the horse and much stronger and fiercer.
  • His boney legs moved so fast they could scarcely be seen, and the Wizard clung fast to the seat and yelled "Whoa!" at the top of his voice.
  • At the foot of the stairs was a sign reading:
  • At such times they were all glad to wait for him, for continually climbing up stairs is sure to make one's legs ache.
  • Here one side of the mountain had a great hole in it, like the mouth of a cavern, and the stairs stopped at the near edge of the floor and commenced ascending again at the opposite edge.
  • Below them was a vast space, at the bottom of which was a black sea with rolling billows, through which little tongues of flame constantly shot up.
  • Mortals who stand upon the earth and look up at the sky cannot often distinguish these forms, but our friends were now so near to the clouds that they observed the dainty fairies very clearly.
  • "No place at all," answered the man with the braids; "that is, not recently.
  • "It seems we were mistaken," declared a third, looking at the kitten timorously, "no one with such murderous desires should belong to our party, I'm sure."
  • "And that's just what I shall do if you don't let those little balls of pork alone," said Jim, glaring at the kitten with his round, big eyes.
  • The kitten looked at the horse thoughtfully, as if trying to decide whether he meant it or not.
  • I've taken a look at this place, and it's no fit country for real creatures to go to.
  • They made no sounds at all, either in flying or trying to speak, and they conversed mainly by means of quick signals made with their wooden fingers or lips.
  • The group of these queer creatures which was discovered clustered near the stairs at first remained staring and motionless, glaring with evil eyes at the intruders who had so suddenly appeared in their land.
  • "But why fight at all, in that case?" asked the girl.
  • "And fight at the same time," added the Wizard.
  • Even the kitten gave a dreadfully shrill scream and at the same time Jim the cab-horse neighed loudly.
  • The Wizard's sword-blade snapped into a dozen pieces at the first blow he struck against the wooden people.
  • The space underneath the roof, where they stood, permitted them to see on all sides of the tall building, and they looked with much curiosity at the city spread out beneath them.
  • So the prisoners resolved to leave their prison at once.
  • All the way to the great rock the wooden people followed them, and when Jim finally alighted at the mouth of the cavern the pursuers were still some distance away.
  • The flames leaped up at once and the bonfire began to smoke and roar and crackle just as the great army of wooden Gargoyles arrived.
  • "That will prove a barrier for some time to come," said the little man, smiling pleasantly all over his wrinkled face at the success of their stratagem.
  • At such times Dorothy, Zeb and the Wizard all pushed behind, and lifted the wheels over the roughest places; so they managed, by dint of hard work, to keep going.
  • These were motionless at first, but soon began to flicker more brightly and to sway slowly from side to side and then up and down.
  • "No," answered the owner of the big yellow eyes which were blinking at them so steadily; "you are wrong about that.
  • "What's that?" asked Dorothy, gazing fearfully at the great scaley head, the yawning mouth and the big eyes.
  • "How old are you?" enquired Zeb, who stared at the yellow eyes as if fascinated.
  • There was a regretful accent in the creature's voice, and at the words all the other dragonettes sighed dismally.
  • But at length they came unexpectedly upon a huge rock that shut off the passage and blocked them from proceeding a single step farther.
  • This appeared so unexpectedly that they were unprepared to take advantage of it at first, and allowed the rocky wall to swing around again before they had decided to pass over.
  • That meant that their world--the real world--was not very far away, and that the succession of perilous adventures they had encountered had at last brought them near the earth's surface, which meant home to them.
  • "But we're ALMOST on earth again," cried Dorothy, "for there is the sun--the most BEAU'FUL sun that shines!" and she pointed eagerly at the crack in the distant roof.
  • "And were you?" asked Zeb, astonished at what he heard.
  • "Of course; when it is four o'clock," she replied, with a laugh at his startled expression.
  • The little man looked at his watch--a big silver one that he carried in his vest pocket.
  • "Not at all," replied the Wizard.
  • "Gid-dap!" cried the boy, and at the word Jim slowly trotted into the courtyard and drew the buggy along the jewelled driveway to the great entrance of the royal palace.
  • The little man looked at her closely and then took both the maiden's hands in his and shook them cordially.
  • The Wizard turned to look at him.
  • "Did you not wear green whiskers at one time?" he asked.
  • It will seem like being at home again, for I lived in that room for many, many years.
  • "But, at that time," said the Wizard, thoughtfully, "there were two Good Witches and two Wicked Witches ruling in the land."
  • "He's only a humbug Wizard, though," said Dorothy, smiling at him.
  • "Oz can do some good tricks, humbug or no humbug," announced Zeb, who was now feeling more at ease.
  • Dorothy sprang forward and caught the fluffy fowl in her arms, uttering at the same time a glad cry.
  • "Not at all," returned Nick Chopper.
  • Jim accepted it as a mere detail, and at his command the attendants gave his coat a good rubbing, combed his mane and tail, and washed his hoofs and fetlocks.
  • They obeyed at once, and next served a fine large turbot on a silver platter, with drawn gravy poured over it.
  • "You are at least six feet high, and that is higher than any other animal in this country," said the Steward.
  • The Sawhorse stopped at the same time and stared at the other with its queer protruding eyes, which were mere knots in the log that formed its body.
  • Jim's eyes stuck out as much as those of the Sawhorse, and he stared at the creature with his ears erect and his long head drawn back until it rested against his arched neck.
  • There are no real horses here at all.
  • "Look at me!" he cried.
  • This, noble Horse, is my friend the Cowardly Lion, who is the valiant King of the Forest, but at the same time a faithful vassal of Princess Ozma.
  • The brilliantly polished Tin Woodman marched next, at the head of the Royal Army of Oz which consisted of twenty-eight officers, from Generals down to Captains.
  • They applauded all his tricks and at the end of the performance begged him earnestly not to go away again and leave them.
  • This made Zeb laugh, in turn, and the boy felt comforted to find that Ozma laughed as merrily at her weeping subject as she had at him.
  • The object of a race is to see who can win it--or at least that is what my excellent brains think.
  • "Go!" cried Zeb; and at the word the two horses leaped forward and the race was begun.
  • I was wrong to kick the Sawhorse, and I am sorry I became angry at him.
  • There was more applause at this, and then Ozma had the jewelled saddle replaced upon the Sawhorse and herself rode the victor back to the city at the head of the grand procession.
  • Jellia at once departed on the errand, and she was gone so long that they had almost forgotten her mission when the green robed maiden returned with a troubled face.
  • The little girl jumped up at once.
  • At three o'clock the Throne Room was crowded with citizens, men, women and children being eager to witness the great trial.
  • At her right sat the queerly assorted Jury--animals, animated dummies and people--all gravely prepared to listen to what was said.
  • And now, at a signal from Ozma, the Woggle-Bug arose and addressed the jury.
  • Look at the kitten's intelligent eyes;" (here Eureka closed her eyes sleepily) "gaze at her smiling countenance!"
  • (Here Eureka bared her sharp claws and scratched at the bars of the cage.)
  • "But justice prevailed at the last," said Ozma, "for here is my pet, and Eureka is once more free."
  • At this everyone in the Throne Room suddenly became quiet, and the kitten continued, in a calm, mocking tone of voice:
  • The vase had a very small neck, and spread out at the top like a bowl.
  • At first the piglet stuck in the neck of the vase and I thought I should get him, after all, but he wriggled himself through and fell down into the deep bottom part--and I suppose he's there yet.
  • "But why didn't you tell us at first?" she asked.
  • I think this is the loveliest country in the world; but not being fairies Jim and I feel we ought to be where we belong--and that's at the ranch.
  • Some people said that they were what Henry Longfellow wrote on his slate that day at school.
  • Boston is now a great city, but at that time it was only a little town.
  • The big boy looked at him and blew it again.
  • They looked down, and at the bottom they saw some lambs huddled together among the rocks.
  • All at once a light flashed out from the tower.
  • Then, all at once, he heard footsteps.
  • He looked at the beast, and--what do you think it was?
  • "Well, then," answered the stranger, "I will see what they can do for me at the Planters' Tavern, round the corner;" and he rode away.
  • I met him as he rode into town, and he said that he intended to stop at this hotel.
  • One morning there was a loud knock at Dean Swift's door.
  • Then he came back and knocked gently at the door.
  • And so the matter was at last settled.
  • He would not listen to anyone who tried to persuade him to stay at home.
  • At last the day came for the ship to sail.
  • A boat was at the landing, ready to take him on board.
  • I will stay at home and do as you wish.
  • The stranger bent over him and looked at the picture he had made on the rock.
  • He jumped to his feet and looked up at the kind gentleman.
  • In the morning, when he looked at the picture, he saw a fly on the man's nose.
  • At one time he painted the picture of some fruit which was so real that the birds flew down and pecked at it.
  • At one time he painted the picture of some fruit which was so real that the birds flew down and pecked at it.
  • Zeuxis looked at it closely.
  • He looked at the wreaths from every side.
  • "Look at the flowers carefully," said the queen, "and let us have your answer."
  • Not one of the bees so much as looked at those in her left hand.
  • He turned the picture this way and that, and looked at it from every side.
  • The good minister looked at the picture for a long time.
  • He was eight years old when he heard about the ride of Paul Revere and the famous fight at Lexington.
  • At last Charleston, in South Carolina, was taken by the British.
  • Down with you, and clean those boots at once.
  • The academy at Exeter was a famous school for preparing boys for college.
  • There were no railroads at that time, and Exeter was nearly fifty miles away.
  • The people whom they met gazed at them and wondered who they could be.
  • He was honored at home and abroad.
  • First, Tommy Jones whispered to Billy Brown and was at once called out to stand on the floor.
  • Then all became very good and very careful, for no one wished to be standing at the time of dismissal.
  • She was very much ashamed and hurt, for it was the first time that she had ever been in disgrace at school.
  • The boys looked at her and wondered if the master would really be as good as his word.
  • At the same moment the bell struck and school was dismissed.
  • At first his mother tried to answer all his questions.
  • When eight years of age he was the best scholar at the famous school at Harrow.
  • For the other day, when you sat at dinner with your officers, I noticed that the wine made you act queerly.
  • For in that country, people never wear shoes in the house, but take them off at the door.
  • It is the man who rose to go out, and two young princes contended for the honor of giving him his shoes but at last agreed that each should offer him one.
  • This was one of their first lessons at home and at school.
  • At length the chief of the band called to Otanes and said, "Young fellow, have you anything worth taking?"
  • At last, far in the East, he came to a land of which he had never heard.
  • Although they were rich, they lived simply and were at peace with all the world.
  • Something was moving among the rocks at the bottom of the chasm.
  • At last he saw a ray of light far ahead of him.
  • It was the sunlight streaming in at the entrance to the passage.
  • Some days after this the Spartans heard strange news: "Aristomenes is again at the head of the Greek army."
  • The people of Antium were enemies of the Romans and had often been at war with them.
  • Coriolanus began at once to make ready for war against Rome.
  • Soon, at the head of a very great army, he marched toward the city which had once been his home.
  • At last, he could hold out no longer.
  • At last, having become quite rich, he decided to go home.
  • At Christmas time he scattered crumbs of bread under the trees, so that the tiny creatures could feast and be happy.
  • Aesop at once chose the largest one.
  • This answer pleased the rich man so well that he bought Aesop at once, and took him to his home on the island of Samos.
  • The cows came home from the pasture and stood mooing at the gate.
  • His voice was clear and strong, and all knew that he, at least, was not afraid.
  • But I am sure that it is my duty to stand at my post as long as I live.
  • When night came on he stopped at a pleasant roadside inn and asked for lodging.
  • He built him a little hut for shelter at night and in stormy weather.
  • He had written many stories which people at that time liked to read.
  • At last a ship happened to pass that way and Robinson was taken on board.
  • It was Carl's duty to sit outside of the king's bedroom and be ready to serve him at any time.
  • But at last his army was beaten; his men were scattered; and Tamerlane fled alone from the field of battle.
  • Slowly, one little step at a time, it crept up across the rough place where it had slipped and fallen so often.
  • "Yes, here is your money," answered the young gentleman; "and send it to my house at once."
  • "I live at Number 39, Blank Street," answered the young gentleman; "and my name is Johnson."
  • He kept on, planning and thinking and working, until at last he succeeded in making a boat with paddle wheels that could be run by steam.
  • I pray that you will look at them and take them at your own price.
  • "Ride at once to the Black Mountains," he said.
  • The caliph at once gave orders for the gardener to be brought before him the next day.
  • He also ordered that the merchant should come at the same time.
  • At sight of his lost treasure, the merchant began to dance and shout for joy.
  • The gardener answered: A year ago, as I was spading in my garden, I saw something fall at the foot of a palm tree.
  • "Well, then," said the caliph, "why did you not return it to us at once?"
  • "It was this way," said the gardener: "I looked at the gold pieces, and then thought of my own great necessities.
  • At last, just as the blacksmith was in the midst of a stirring song, he rose quietly and went out into the darkness.
  • At first he was so bewildered that he could not answer.
  • At length, others of the servants heard him, and were entranced by his wonderful song.
  • They told him that there were beautiful things at home--why go away to see other things less beautiful?
  • At first he did not see anything that disturbed him; for word had gone before him to remove from sight everything that might be displeasing or painful.
  • Here there were no children at the doors.
  • But suddenly, at a narrow place, they met a very old man, hobbling slowly along over the stony way.
  • "Why is that man lying there at this time of day?" asked the prince.
  • At one end of the room there was a big fireplace, where the mother did the cooking.
  • At the other end were the beds.
  • "There is to be a great feast at the queen's palace to-night," said the mother."
  • The next minute they heard his voice at the door: Be quick, boys, and stir the fire.
  • He opened his eyes and looked around at the small, plain room and at the poor people standing near him.
  • He looked at the fire on the hearth.
  • The two boys stood at his knees, and his wife sat at his side.
  • They sat down at the table.
  • Then there was a knock at the door.
  • He said to a soldier who stood at the door, "Tell your story again."
  • "Well," said the soldier, "about two hours ago I was on guard at the gate of the queen's park.
  • But really, I fell into the pool at the fountain, and this kind man brought me here to get me dry.
  • As the little king went out, he turned at the door and called to Charlot.
  • The boy got up at once, and sat behind the king.
  • Now the oracle at Delphi was supposed to be very wise.
  • He knocked at the door and the wise man himself opened it.
  • He looked at the tripod.
  • The messengers went on until they came at last to the island of Rhodes.
  • At last they were allowed to go before him and state their business.
  • The oracle at Delphi has ordered that it shall be given to the wisest of wise men, and for that reason we have brought it to you.
  • But I hope you will at least believe it to be possible.
  • By looking, in part, at history.
  • When we look at this record of the choices of people, we see a wide range of behaviors.
  • It shows us at our best and at our cruelest.
  • It means progress at an ever increasing pace is inevitable.
  • But at a certain point, you don't need any more, and the technology is mature.
  • At this point, if you follow my reasoning, we have established at least the possibility of a bright future.
  • At this point, if you follow my reasoning, we have established at least the possibility of a bright future.
  • At least a hundred million websites are out there.
  • We are creating at a rate exponentially more than our most recent ancestors.
  • It was not at all clear at the time that his work would transcend the ages.
  • In fact, it's likelier that kids of that day were forbidden by proper parents from hanging out at the Globe Theater.
  • We look at antique furniture today and say, "Man, they sure don't make stuff as good as they used to."
  • And in our Internet Renaissance, aren't we seeing an explosion of these same things at a spectacularly more massive scale?
  • Princip seized the opportunity and fired into the open car at a range of five feet, killing them both.
  • Maybe it was inevitable at that point that some spark would set off the powder keg of Europe.
  • The most famous of these was the Oracle at Delphi.
  • So he commissioned seven emissaries to go out to seven certain oracles around the world and on a predetermined day, let's say July 12, at a predetermined time, say 3:00 p.m.
  • The Oracle at Delphi actually got it right.
  • She said, "At this very moment King Croesus is making turtle and goat soup."
  • And Croesus was so amazed that he endowed the Oracle at Delphi with all kinds of gifts and planned to run all-important questions by this oracle.
  • Or at least they will know the wise choice to make; whether they will choose it is another matter.
  • To avoid privacy issues at this point, let's stipulate that everything is recorded only for your future reference.
  • Everything you saw, that your eyeballs tracked to, how long you looked at it—and not just everything you ever looked at, but your physiological response.
  • I can't really remember what won, though at the time, I thought it all very forward looking and exciting.
  • The Open Directory Project—where fifty thousand editors try to organize the web into a directory of sites for no reward at all—comes instantly to mind.
  • That device can track where you are at any time.
  • Science's progress over the past few hundred years has been determined mainly by the relatively slow speed at which we were able to collect data.
  • Instead of science proceeding at the slow speed of time, the only limit on its progress will be processor speed—and those two speeds hardly can be compared.
  • Or to continue with fictional cases: Why does gasoline made from oil refined at one refinery burn more efficiently?
  • When you look at a product on one of its web pages, Amazon suggests other products you might like as well.
  • I daresay if you have purchased anything on Amazon, you have almost certainly, at some point, purchased an additional item Amazon suggested.
  • Self-teaching algorithms will get better and better at making suggestions.
  • They might balk at getting on an airline flight flown by a computer and prefer having a pilot on board to take over if he "feels in his gut" that something is wrong (even if that feeling is the airport burrito he had for lunch).
  • First, it will consider all your friends, people with whom you have actual intimate relationships, and it will look at where they go for Italian food.
  • Then it will look at everybody in San Francisco.
  • The system has data from all their GPS records and infers that to drive across town several times for a place is a stronger vote than eating at the corner restaurant.
  • This system will look at all the restaurants across the country (even around the world) where you have dined frequently.
  • It will look at all other people who like the same restaurants and see where they repeatedly go for Italian food in San Francisco.
  • This system will look at all the Italian restaurants around the country that you already like and look at all the ingredients they order online and look for restaurants in San Francisco using the same set of ingredients.
  • It will look at the size of your favorite restaurants, the prices of all the dishes.
  • It will look at all this and a million other factors that would seem to be unrelated.
  • None of us has the time to do that—but in the future, with my system, wisdom will operate at processor speeds.
  • What have the professors at that college ordered online that you have ordered as well?
  • How many met their spouses at college and stayed married?
  • It will look at where they went to college and what the outcome was.
  • In the future, every single person will have at his or her disposal the sum total of the life experience of everyone alive.
  • But at times in history, left-handedness was thought to be a malady in need of curing (and in some parts of the world still is).
  • Regarding disorders and disabilities: We should be able to repair, heal, or replace any part of the body not functioning at the level the person with the disability reasonably wishes it to.
  • Let's look at how this happened.
  • In addition, images engraved in walls of what appear to be people infected with polio are found in Egypt dating back to at least 1400 BC.
  • A few years later, with the United States again at war, most of its top medical minds were engaged in the war effort.
  • After the war, in 1947, Jonas Salk was offered his own laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
  • Parents kept their children at home, especially in the summer, and certainly away from public swimming areas.
  • One Gallup poll at the time said more people knew about the trial than knew the full name of the president.
  • At present, there are about one hundred new cases reported per month around the world, infecting about the same number of people as die from lightning strikes.
  • This goal is within our grasp—and with the vaccine presently priced at about thirty cents a child, shame on us for not ending polio once and for all.
  • Two things were known at the time about smallpox, also called variola.
  • If the conditions weren't sterile—a word that was not even comprehended at the time—the inoculation didn't work, or worse, introduced a new disease.
  • Every day, we seem to be getting better at distributing medical resources and information.
  • The factors that enable us to solve for and eliminate disease are getting better all the time, like wind at our back, pushing us forward.
  • Certainly some of the medical practices of the ancient world, such as bloodletting and the use of leeches, seem to us at least misguided and at worst, barbaric.
  • At the same time in Germany, Robert Koch identified the bacteria that caused tuberculosis and the one that caused cholera.
  • Or maybe smart old people just direct that energy to crosswords and it is not the crosswords doing the job at all ...
  • Let's look at this from its beginning.
  • In 1665, physicist Robert Hooke pointed a microscope at a piece of cork and noticed many small compartments he called "cells."
  • Life existed at a scale smaller than the eye could see.
  • Let's look at that.
  • While we have deciphered the genome in that we have written it all down, we aren't at all sure which parts do what, as noted before.
  • Some of it is known, but the function of each of the thirty thousand genes has to be figured out one at a time.
  • By looking at how the genome varies between people with a genetic condition and people without it, we can identify the troublemaking gene.
  • Additionally, we will at some point in the not-too-distant future have enough biological understanding of the genome and enough computer horsepower to model complex interactions in the body.
  • We have looked at the astonishing possibilities afforded by genomics.
  • Now let's look at how the Internet will help end disease in a more traditional, suit-and-tie kind of way.
  • You still worked almost exclusively with people in your lab or at least in your city.
  • Highly specialized experts are a few keystrokes away and can be hired for just a few minutes or hours at a time.
  • You might remember the story of Kyle MacDonald who famously traded up from one red paperclip to a house, one small exchange at a time between July 2005 and July 2006.
  • If you are in a desert dying of thirst, you value the first glass of water very highly, the second glass a bit less, and the 802nd not at all.
  • Governments (and thieves, for that matter) reallocate wealth—but they do it by increasing the wealth of one party at the expense of another party.
  • Trade is not like this at all.
  • They offer millions of products at good prices, delivered tomorrow if that is what I want.
  • For instance, I could hand carve bird calls and then advertise them only to people who are looking at online content about hand-carved bird calls or who search the Internet for information about hand-carved bird calls.
  • When a person learns to do one job and specializes in that one job, she gets really good at it.
  • We won't talk at this point about the distribution of that wealth; that will come later.
  • We know how to power a clock with this energy but haven't yet cracked the code on doing it at scale.
  • And like our example with energy, technology and human innovation could make other things that are now scarce—or that we think of now as scarce—not so at all.
  • (I answered, "They should get jobs at the factory that would make the lawnmowers; it would pay better.") Personal computers and the Internet have come under criticism in this regard.
  • We'll look at their lives, and the social aspects of this change, in a coming chapter called "Left Behind."
  • Even though this allowed cotton prices to plummet and demand for cotton to increase, some of those fifty people got laid off, no doubt shaking their fists at the infernal gin as they stormed off the property.
  • Let's look at another hypothetical.
  • He works from home and has a night job remotely monitoring real-time security cameras after hours at an office building.
  • So here is the situation: You are at the store deciding which ones to buy.
  • The business looks at this new country and decides to move there because, from their standpoint, they can save costs and be more efficient.
  • It is capped at the value your labor adds to the goods or services you create.
  • Then they all agree to set the price per flip at $1,000.
  • I am not saying if you enjoy manual labor and being exhausted at the end of the day, you shouldn't do it.
  • If you like having sore muscles at the end of a day or working a job that requires little of your mental capacity so you can contemplate Nietzsche, hey, more power to you.
  • In the end, the speed at which a human operator can move has a physical limit.
  • Your natural expectation would be that they would talk, at least as well as Scooby does.
  • But in terms of wanting to converse with robots at an emotional level, I just don't see it.
  • To "go nano" is to directly manipulate reality at the atomic level.
  • And the principle at work in this technology could lead to a cure for other autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • When we can build at the molecular level, we can build things I cannot imagine today.
  • If we obtained this ten-thousand-fold increase simply by allowing specialization and dividing work up among people, then what astronomical gains will we achieve by outsourcing that work to robots capable of working with unimaginable precision at unimaginable speed?
  • I remember that in 1993 I needed a big hard drive at work and got a 1GB drive.
  • So a thousandfold increase in capacity at one-fortieth the cost is like the $50,000 Mercedes dropping to a buck and a quarter.
  • Let's look at a few.
  • At the margin, if I buy a can of Wolf Brand chili, I make $8.
  • Its windows will darken at your command; its air will be automatically purified.
  • If you ask it to run your bath, it knows you like the water at 104 degrees.
  • In the future, the price of some things won't go down as much, if at all.
  • An exception worth noting is that the poor who get better products at cheaper prices will see their wealth rise accordingly.
  • A poor person with free access to the Internet at the library is wealthier than a poor person with free access to just a library.
  • Let's address that by looking at two phenomena: the changing definitions of poverty over time, and the effect of a large gap between the incomes of the rich and poor.
  • At that point, people flee the land looking for a better deal.
  • Once a nation shows its willingness to seize foreign-owned property at will, foreign investors are reluctant to do business there again.
  • Although the poor may not believe that wealth is attainable for them, they do not want to rock the boat and risk disrupting the system that guarantees them at least some income.
  • So far we have looked at poverty and how it is redefined as societies grow richer.
  • We have surmised the future widening of the gap between the rich and poor, and looked at how that has played out in history.
  • We have looked at factors that increase animosity between the rich and poor and situations in which they can live harmoniously.
  • Now let's look at the role of government, both philosophically and historically, which also changes over time.
  • People broadly agree that government should do at least this much.
  • Whether you look at a single country over a span of time, or a group of countries at a specific point in history, the result is the same.
  • Roughly speaking, if you look at the poorest forty nations in the world, who have an average income per person of about $1,500 a year, their effective tax rates are about 20 percent.
  • Countries whose average income is $1,500 tax at 20 percent.
  • Countries where it is $33,000 tax at 40 percent.
  • Or, at least you have that purchasing power.
  • We have to work at jobs to create wealth because as we live our lives, we consume wealth.
  • Is there anything wrong with you collecting this dividend check for which you did no work at all?
  • No, not at all.
  • In a world without scarcity, or that has scarcity at such a trivial level it is hardly noticeable, all the conventional theories and dogmas lose their meaning.
  • But in describing that job spectrum, I never said anything about his absolute ability—I said only that he was at the bottom of the list relative to others.
  • And so at an early age, you took a wife, started having children, and supported yourself by farming.
  • People are highly versatile, great at learning new things, naturally curious, and naturally enjoy new things.
  • It may seem intuitive at first glance, this idea that somehow there are only so many jobs and if you replace people with machines, people have fewer jobs.
  • People used to sweep the streets at night until a machine replaced them.
  • It will not be welfare (or, at least depending on how you define the term, it will not be perceived as welfare).
  • If your job numbs your mind by day, why would anyone expect it to instantly come to life at night?
  • Imagine if all the people with boring, dead-end machine jobs were told they never had to work another day in their life at a job they did not like.
  • They work at jobs they do not like, doing work a machine should be doing.
  • But as we grew up, reality set in that market forces did not allow those activities to pay enough to support us, so at some point we all figured out we had to "earn a living."
  • Thus, because Chad is not good at painting, he cannot paint for a living.
  • Won't all people (or at least most people) waste their lives on narcissistic, hedonistic pleasure?
  • Citizens in these countries are grateful for any job that pays anything at all, and their primary concern is simply survival.
  • By comparison, if a country has 99 percent of the people working in agriculture—if it is barely feeding itself, even with everyone working at that—then it is living at a subsistence level, the very definition of poverty.
  • In a speech to the House of Representatives at this same time, Congressman Davy Crockett told the story of getting chewed out by a constituent for voting for a $20,000 emergency relief bill for the homeless in a city just wiped out by a fire.
  • At every turn, this becomes more difficult to study.
  • And second, people are really bad at connecting cause and effect in their lives when it comes to things like this.
  • Next comes China, with the second highest number of hungry people at 130.4 million.
  • At the same time, the percent of income we individually have to spend on feeding ourselves plummeted as well.
  • Even at the retail price, we could feed all the world's hungry for a billion dollars a day or $365 billion a year.
  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.
  • Given these agricultural strengths, is there anyone who believes the United States alone couldn't produce an extra $365 billion worth of food, at full retail price, if there were a ready buyer for it?
  • Without this, it is impossible to farm at scale.
  • You can be a subsistence farmer and perhaps produce some excess, but given the prior observation about the fundamental volatility of farming, you will always be at risk of not producing enough.
  • Regardless of who is "right," the harm comes if you try to do all these things at once.
  • Heck, even Japan only recently allowed imports of rice and taxes the imports at 500 percent in order to protect their rice farmers.
  • Food security is a real issue, and nations that do not at least produce some kinds of food are at risk.
  • Say the poor decide they cannot compete with a modern farm, so they move to the city and get a job at a factory.
  • I think we are still at the donkey stage—and this is good news!
  • Many of the people Borlaug worked with at this time were poor, even starving.
  • Stakman had determined that immunity to these diseases, or at least resistance, could be bred into crops.
  • To further enhance yield, at the same time Borlaug bred wheat strains with short, stubby stalks, which were able to better handle more weight of grain.
  • Although Borlaug and company encountered many obstacles, they pressed on, planting seed at night illuminated by flashes of artillery fire.
  • By the time Norman Borlaug passed away in 2009 at the age of ninety-five, he had become one of only six people to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the Congressional Gold Medal.
  • Plants themselves are pretty inefficient machines, at least from the standpoint of being good food sources for us.
  • Operating at basically 5 percent efficiency, they are less than half as efficient as solar panels now on the market.
  • To describe ending hunger in the future, I have only these tarnished terms of the present at my disposal.
  • Because the most efficient farms in the world are those that operate at vast scale.
  • At present, they win hands down on "less expensive" and put in a decent showing on a couple more factors.
  • A century ago, cars were made one at a time by a half dozen people working together.
  • At times, it may be best to just enjoy the meal and not ask too many questions.
  • Fast food chains optimize for two of them: taste and price, at the expense of nutrition.
  • Other businesses in the food industry—say those pricey health foods you see at fancy grocery stores—optimize for taste and nutrition at the expense of price.
  • In 1961 in Perthshire, Scotland, a white barn cat named Susie was found at a farm.
  • At this point, things get harder.
  • We don't fault, at the first order, Native Americans or Norman Borlaug for cross-breeding better corn or wheat.
  • Now we are at the third order: splicing genes within a species.
  • Let's look at a real-life example.
  • Me ordering a second helping of corn on the cob while dining at the Black Eyed Pea also increases demand for corn, but for doing so, I shouldn't stand trial for murder.
  • For environmentalist organizations like Greenpeace to be against GMO in all its forms under all conditions does nothing at all to serve them or the constituencies they purport to represent.
  • That is also the case because humans couldn't do a very good job at a stalk-by-stalk approach.
  • If this sounds absurd, at present it is—but in the future, the price of technologies to do this will fall to nearly zero.
  • Farming will be done on such a scale that thousands of experiments can be happening at any one time, putting a tiny fraction of the produce at risk.
  • The principle here is to agree to buy a certain amount of a commodity at a certain price from farmers in these countries.
  • The farmers, with these contracts in hand, can plant aggressively knowing they have a ready buyer at a fixed price.
  • If politicians are demonstrably good at one thing, it is getting elected, and people who are starving don't normally re-elect their representatives.
  • At some point, the loan is repaid to the local agency and your money comes back to you.
  • I don't recall ever being in a department store, drinking from the water fountain, and having the staff look at me disapprovingly because I was running up the water bill.
  • The individual had no liberties, or at least very few, but in exchange was, in theory, entitled to certain economic rights.
  • But what if everyone in the nation, rich and poor, were to be mailed a $2,000 food card annually, redeemable at the grocery store for any of several hundred nutritious foods?
  • But I also believe that hunger will end when we decide to end it, not only at the point when we are able to end it.
  • The implication is that any time they nursed, they felt pain as well, to learn at an early age that there is no pleasure to be had in life without pain.
  • It should be noted that the Byzantines were among the most civilized people in all the world at that time.
  • We have ended pain as entertainment—or at least, involuntary participation in pain as entertainment.
  • At a farmers' market I recently visited, one vendor boasted that all his chickens "retained their dignity throughout their life."
  • Scandinavia was at forty-six in the 1400s and has fallen to one today.
  • War occurs for a very simple reason: To some nations at some time, war is preferable to peace.
  • At the world level is no equivalent.
  • Accountability must be at as low a level as possible, so that if government officials mess up, they answer to constituents in their locality.
  • When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, I was an undergraduate at Rice University.
  • Then someone else decides to send that child, at eighteen, to another land to kill people and to die?
  • Second, in the past, technological improvements did not decrease human beings' propensity to wage war; they only made people better at killing.
  • As we get better at killing, we don't seem less likely to.
  • Trivia question: How old was Colonel William Travis when he died leading the Texans at the Alamo?
  • George Armstrong Custer, of "Custer's Last Stand" fame, became a major general at twenty-four.
  • But at the time the doctrine was in force, MAD was effective (or at least, not proven ineffective).
  • While the previous two points focused at the macro level and the overall costs of war, I speak here of consumers' perspective on war.
  • Civilization and the division of labor have gotten ever better at creating and adding value, thereby making things we love.
  • Making swords actually paid better or at least as well as making plowshares.
  • If the nation stays at peace, you will still sell the C2000.
  • Now we have an interlocked banking system that moves money around the world at light speed.
  • Electronic transfers mean the money of a government, business, or individual might be anywhere at any time.
  • At the end of their day, the loan is repaid with a slight bit of interest.
  • Weakness in neighbors is regarded as an opportunity for conquest or, at least, coercion.
  • One country angry at another one.
  • The demise of war will be hastened when every impulse to war is regarded, at least initially, with a healthy measure of distrust.
  • In a fine Alfred Hitchcock movie called Notorious, the troubled character played by Ingrid Bergman gets very drunk at a party and asks Cary Grant to come for a drive.
  • Under Hollywood's production code at the time, movies could not include nudity, criminal activity, or offensive language, or depict illegal drug use, venereal disease, or childbirth.
  • Having covered the financial and political factors, let's look at thirteen ways communication and information will help bring about war's demise.
  • For instance, if you have a Facebook friend Abigail in Albania whom you only met once at a rock-paper-scissors competition years ago, you will generally regard Abigail's first-hand account as authoritative, even though you don't really know Abigail all that well.
  • According to Portio Research7.8 trillion SMS messages were sent in 2011, and it is expected that 2012's number will come in at ten trillion.
  • But learning two languages comes at a cost.
  • Keeping that one comes at a large financial price: Learn proficiency at two languages or remain separate from the world economy.
  • Computers will be able to reproduce them at will and hobbyists will still study them.
  • The world is becoming more educated at an amazing rate.
  • However, at present—and for the future as far as we can see—growth in technology outpaces growth in wealth.
  • Now, instead of just intellectually engaging with the news, we feel the government brutality, we experience the war, we are electrified by the demonstrations, and we are horrified at the suffering.
  • They view the opposition by others to the actions of their country as treason, or at least, inexplicably self-destructive.
  • The population at that time was a tenth of what it is today.
  • Whether it is the notion of manufacturing meat or having the computer tell you what you should order at the restaurant, you may have cringed and thought, "Man, that's kind of creepy."
  • But first we must go further back, from Shakespeare at the end of the sixteenth century to Plato around 370 BC.
  • Later that evening when Simonides was at a banquet with Scopas, he got word that two young men were outside looking for him.
  • That's what interests me about this story (which may or may not be purely true): What Simonides did—recalling the names and locations of everyone at a large banquet—is described as entirely possible and an enviable, practical skill.
  • Augustine describes a day when he saw his mentor, Ambrose, looking intently at an open book.
  • Ambrose replied that he was looking at the words and reading them that way.
  • The libraries that existed, such as the one at Alexandria, contained reading rooms because when you read a book, you read it aloud.
  • At times, we still do this today.
  • And it will come at no cost to our humanity.
  • Yet at the time that we devised each plan, we were confident it would succeed.
  • The title of Ralph Nader's book was right: That car was Unsafe at Any Speed, at least with the master cylinder removed.
  • At that point, the iffy parts of human history are behind us and it is blue skies and clean sailing ahead.
  • We are entering a point where technology will change at extreme speeds.
  • So while such an attack and its aftermath would not derail our eventual arrival at the next golden age, it quite possibly would delay it.
  • We live at a defining moment for humanity, as the compounding effects of technology and civilization reach an inflection point.
  • At the time in history when our future has never looked brighter, it is baffling that some people are more pessimistic than ever.
  • This made me so angry at times that I kicked and screamed until I was exhausted.
  • My parents at once determined to take me to Baltimore to see if anything could be done for my eyes.
  • Child as I was, I at once felt the tenderness and sympathy which endeared Dr. Bell to so many hearts, as his wonderful achievements enlist their admiration.
  • He understood my signs, and I knew it and loved him at once.
  • The little blind children at the Perkins Institution had sent it and Laura Bridgman had dressed it; but I did not know this until afterward.
  • In despair she had dropped the subject for the time, only to renew it at the first opportunity.
  • I became impatient at her repeated attempts and, seizing the new doll, I dashed it upon the floor.
  • I was keenly delighted when I felt the fragments of the broken doll at my feet.
  • The morning had been fine, but it was growing warm and sultry when at last we turned our faces homeward.
  • I knew it, it was the odour that always precedes a thunderstorm, and a nameless fear clutched at my heart.
  • I felt my way to the end of the garden, knowing that the mimosa tree was near the fence, at the turn of the path.
  • At first, when my teacher told me about a new thing I asked very few questions.
  • But it was a long time before I ventured to take the initiative, and still longer before I could find something appropriate to say at the right time.
  • My teacher and I played it for hours at a time.
  • Sometimes I rose at dawn and stole into the garden while the heavy dew lay on the grass and flowers.
  • The large, downy peaches would reach themselves into my hand, and as the joyous breezes flew about the trees the apples tumbled at my feet.
  • There we spent many happy hours and played at learning geography.
  • I never had patience to arrange more than five or six groups at a time.
  • Then he went to live in the leafy pool at the end of the garden, where he made the summer nights musical with his quaint love-song.
  • At the beginning I was only a little mass of possibilities.
  • In the pleasure of doing this, I did not stop to look at my own gifts; but when I was ready for them, my impatience for the real Christmas to begin almost got beyond control.
  • At last I fell asleep with a new doll and a white bear in my arms.
  • I found surprises, not in the stocking only, but on the table, on all the chairs, at the door, on the very window-sill; indeed, I could hardly walk without stumbling on a bit of Christmas wrapped up in tissue paper.
  • On the seat opposite me sat my big rag doll, Nancy, in a new gingham dress and a beruffled sunbonnet, looking at me out of two bead eyes.
  • The laundress at the Perkins Institution secretly carried her off to give her a bath.
  • When I next saw her she was a formless heap of cotton, which I should not have recognized at all except for the two bead eyes which looked out at me reproachfully.
  • When the train at last pulled into the station at Boston it was as if a beautiful fairy tale had come true.
  • We had scarcely arrived at the Perkins Institution for the Blind when I began to make friends with the little blind children.
  • One day spent with the blind children made me feel thoroughly at home in my new environment, and I looked eagerly from one pleasant experience to another as the days flew swiftly by.
  • I have often held in my hand a little model of the Plymouth Rock which a kind gentleman gave me at Pilgrim Hall, and I have fingered its curves, the split in the centre and the embossed figures "1620," and turned over in my mind all that I knew about the wonderful story of the Pilgrims.
  • One day we visited their beautiful home at Beverly Farms.
  • It was hard, smooth sand, very different from the loose, sharp sand, mingled with kelp and shells, at Brewster.
  • Just before the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, it was arranged that my teacher and I should spend our vacation at Brewster, on Cape Cod, with our dear friend, Mrs. Hopkins.
  • So my little heart leaped high with eager excitement when I knew that my wish was at last to be realized.
  • I thrust out my hands to grasp some support, I clutched at the water and at the seaweed which the waves tossed in my face.
  • At last, however, the sea, as if weary of its new toy, threw me back on the shore, and in another instant I was clasped in my teacher's arms.
  • The treasures of a new, beautiful world were laid at my feet, and I took in pleasure and information at every turn.
  • I spent the autumn months with my family at our summer cottage, on a mountain about fourteen miles from Tuscumbia.
  • It was delightful to lose ourselves in the green hollows of that tangled wood in the late afternoon, and to smell the cool, delicious odours that came up from the earth at the close of day.
  • At dawn I was awakened by the smell of coffee, the rattling of guns, and the heavy footsteps of the men as they strode about, promising themselves the greatest luck of the season.
  • At last the men mounted, and, as they say in the old songs, away went the steeds with bridles ringing and whips cracking and hounds racing ahead, and away went the champion hunters "with hark and whoop and wild halloo!"
  • A fire was kindled at the bottom of a deep hole in the ground, big sticks were laid crosswise at the top, and meat was hung from them and turned on spits.
  • At the foot of the mountain there was a railroad, and the children watched the trains whiz by.
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • Shrunk and cold, As if her veins were sapless and old, And she rose up decrepitly For a last dim look at earth and sea.
  • At intervals the trees lost their icy covering, and the bulrushes and underbrush were bare; but the lake lay frozen and hard beneath the sun.
  • Only such a one can appreciate the eagerness with which I talked to my toys, to stones, trees, birds and dumb animals, or the delight I felt when at my call Mildred ran to me or my dogs obeyed my commands.
  • All teachers of the deaf know what this means, and only they can at all appreciate the peculiar difficulties with which I had to contend.
  • In reading my teacher's lips I was wholly dependent on my fingers: I had to use the sense of touch in catching the vibrations of the throat, the movements of the mouth and the expression of the face; and often this sense was at fault.
  • Discouragement and weariness cast me down frequently; but the next moment the thought that I should soon be at home and show my loved ones what I had accomplished, spurred me on, and I eagerly looked forward to their pleasure in my achievement.
  • At last the happiest of happy moments arrived.
  • Almost before I knew it, the train stopped at the Tuscumbia station, and there on the platform stood the whole family.
  • A little story called "The Frost King," which I wrote and sent to Mr. Anagnos, of the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was at the root of the trouble.
  • I wrote the story when I was at home, the autumn after I had learned to speak.
  • At that time I eagerly absorbed everything I read without a thought of authorship, and even now I cannot be quite sure of the boundary line between my ideas and those I find in books.
  • At dinner it was read to the assembled family, who were surprised that I could write so well.
  • At first Mr. Anagnos, though deeply troubled, seemed to believe me.
  • How well I remember the graceful draperies that enfolded me, the bright autumn leaves that wreathed my head, and the fruit and grain at my feet and in my hands, and beneath all the piety of the masque the oppressive sense of coming ill that made my heart heavy.
  • He believed, or at least suspected, that Miss Sullivan and I had deliberately stolen the bright thoughts of another and imposed them on him to win his admiration.
  • At the time I was writing "The Frost King," and this letter, like many others, contains phrases which show that my mind was saturated with the story.
  • This habit of assimilating what pleased me and giving it out again as my own appears in much of my early correspondence and my first attempts at writing.
  • Since the publication of "The Story of My Life" in the Ladies' Home Journal, Mr. Anagnos has made a statement, in a letter to Mr. Macy, that at the time of the "Frost King" matter, he believed I was innocent.
  • At other times, in the midst of a paragraph I was writing, I said to myself, "Suppose it should be found that all this was written by some one long ago!"
  • At a little distance from this ship there was a model of the Santa Maria, which I also examined.
  • At the Cape of Good Hope exhibit, I learned much about the processes of mining diamonds.
  • Miss Sullivan and I were at that time in Hulton, Pennsylvania, visiting the family of Mr. William Wade.
  • At first I was rather unwilling to study Latin grammar.
  • Miss Sullivan sat beside me at my lessons, spelling into my hand whatever Mr. Irons said, and looking up new words for me.
  • When I was not guessing, I was jumping at conclusions, and this fault, in addition to my dullness, aggravated my difficulties more than was right or necessary.
  • The teachers at the Wright-Humason School were always planning how they might give the pupils every advantage that those who hear enjoy--how they might make much of few tendencies and passive memories in the cases of the little ones--and lead them out of the cramping circumstances in which their lives were set.
  • I could not make notes in class or write exercises; but I wrote all my compositions and translations at home on my typewriter.
  • At the Cambridge school, for the first time in my life, I enjoyed the companionship of seeing and hearing girls of my own age.
  • He had to pass five hours at a time to have them counted.
  • The examination papers were given out at nine o'clock at Harvard and brought to Radcliffe by a special messenger.
  • A man was placed on guard at the door to prevent interruption.
  • At Radcliffe no one reads the papers to me after they are written, and I have no opportunity to correct errors unless I finish before the time is up.
  • In that case I correct only such mistakes as I can recall in the few minutes allowed, and make notes of these corrections at the end of my paper.
  • In the finals, no one read my work over to me, and in the preliminaries I offered subjects with some of which I was in a measure familiar before my work in the Cambridge school; for at the beginning of the year I had passed examinations in English, History, French and German, which Mr. Gilman gave me from previous Harvard papers.
  • At the beginning we had agreed that I should, if necessary, take five years to prepare for college, but at the end of the first year the success of my examinations showed Miss Sullivan, Miss Harbaugh (Mr.
  • At the beginning we had agreed that I should, if necessary, take five years to prepare for college, but at the end of the first year the success of my examinations showed Miss Sullivan, Miss Harbaugh (Mr.
  • Mr. Gilman at first agreed to this; but when my tasks had become somewhat perplexing, he insisted that I was overworked, and that I should remain at his school three years longer.
  • The college authorities did not allow Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in American braille.
  • Last year, my second year at Radcliffe, I studied English composition, the Bible as English composition, the governments of America and Europe, the Odes of Horace, and Latin comedy.
  • It is most perplexing and exasperating that just at the moment when you need your memory and a nice sense of discrimination, these faculties take to themselves wings and fly away.
  • You are amazed at all the things you know which are not on the examination paper.
  • While my days at Radcliffe were still in the future, they were encircled with a halo of romance, which they have lost; but in the transition from romantic to actual I have learned many things I should never have known had I not tried the experiment.
  • At first I had only a few books in raised print--"readers" for beginners, a collection of stories for children, and a book about the earth called "Our World."
  • But we did not begin the story until August; the first few weeks of my stay at the seashore were so full of discoveries and excitement that I forgot the very existence of books.
  • We were sitting together in a hammock which swung from two solemn pines at a short distance from the house.
  • During the next two years I read many books at my home and on my visits to Boston.
  • They laid their treasures at my feet, and I accepted them as we accept the sunshine and the love of our friends.
  • I cannot tell exactly when I began Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare"; but I know that I read them at first with a child's understanding and a child's wonder.
  • The bright, gentle, fanciful plays--the ones I like best now--appear not to have impressed me at first, perhaps because they reflected the habitual sunshine and gaiety of a child's life.
  • I have felt it on cold, stormy days and at night.
  • And at night what soothing, wondrous hours we spent in the shadow of the great, silent men-of-war.
  • At last, cold, hungry and weary, we reached our pier.
  • I had another tree friend, gentle and more approachable than the great oak--a linden that grew in the dooryard at Red Farm.
  • At present the lord of my affections is one of these bull terriers.
  • The first time I saw him act was while at school in New York.
  • Then they rose to fight the duel, and I followed the swift thrusts and parries of the swords and the waverings of poor Bob as his courage oozed out at his finger ends.
  • Is it not true, then, that my life with all its limitations touches at many points the life of the World Beautiful?
  • Sometimes, it is true, a sense of isolation enfolds me like a cold mist as I sit alone and wait at life's shut gate.
  • In spite of the lapse of years, they seem so close to me that I should not think it strange if at any moment they should clasp my hand and speak words of endearment as they used to before they went away.
  • He made me sit in his armchair, while he brought different interesting things for me to examine, and at his request I recited "The Chambered Nautilus," which was then my favorite poem.
  • He looked at my eyes.
  • This letter is to a school-mate at the Perkins Institution.
  • While at Memphis she went over one of the large Mississippi steamers.
  • I had a very pleasant time at Brewster.
  • I saw a very large bell at Wellesley.
  • I have been at home a great many weeks now.
  • He will not let anything harm us at night.
  • "I will stay with you," said she to the doll, although she was not at all courageous.
  • I have laughed at the poor duck, with the red rag tied round its leg.
  • It hobbled, and that made me laugh; but it is wrong to laugh at the poor animals!
  • Only once afterward in fifteen years was their constant companionship broken for more than a few days at a time.
  • At eight I study arithmetic.
  • At nine I go to the gymnasium with the little girls and we have great fun.
  • At ten I study about the earth on which we all live.
  • At eleven I talk with teacher and at twelve I study zoology.
  • At eleven I talk with teacher and at twelve I study zoology.
  • I should like to be at home on Christmas day.
  • I have not been sick at all.
  • Love is at the soul of everything.
  • And so He loved men Himself and though they were very cruel to Him and at last killed Him, He was willing to die for them because He loved them so.
  • I am surprised at the mastery of language which your letter shows.
  • Please tell the brave sailors, who have charge of the HELEN KELLER, that little Helen who stays at home will often think of them with loving thoughts.
  • When we got to Jersey City at six o'clock Friday evening we were obliged to cross the Harlem River in a ferry-boat.
  • We surprised our dear friends, however, for they did not expect us Saturday; but when the bell rung Miss Marrett guessed who was at the door, and Mrs. Hopkins jumped up from the breakfast table and ran to the door to meet us; she was indeed much astonished to see us.
  • At first I was very sorry when I found that the sun had hidden his shining face behind dull clouds, but afterwards I thought why he did it, and then I was happy.
  • I must tell thee about how the day passed at Oak Knoll.
  • I am glad thee is at the Institution; it is an excellent place.
  • For a while he was kept in the general hospital at Allegheny.
  • From here he was to be sent to an almshouse, for at that time there was no other place for him in Pennsylvania.
  • Before a teacher was found for Tommy and while he was still in the care of Helen and Miss Sullivan, a reception was held for him at the kindergarten.
  • At Helen's request Bishop Brooks made an address.
  • He is very happy indeed at the kindergarten, and is learning something every day.
  • At the time this trouble seemed very grave and brought them much unhappiness.
  • Perhaps the Old Sea God as he lay asleep upon the shore, heard the soft music of growing things--the stir of life in the earth's bosom, and his stormy heart was angry, because he knew that his and Winter's reign was almost at an end.
  • At the end of June Miss Sullivan and Helen went home to Tuscumbia.
  • I had a beautiful visit at Hulton.
  • I rode horseback nearly every evening and once I rode five miles at a fast gallop.
  • I was greatly amused at the idea of your writing the square hand.
  • You could not read Braille; for it is written in dots, not at all like ordinary letters.
  • The reports which you have read in the paper about me are not true at all.
  • I must confess I was puzzled at first.
  • It is thrown across the gorge at a height of two hundred and fifty-eight feet above the water and is supported on each bank by towers of solid rock, which are eight hundred feet apart.
  • ...Every one at the Fair was very kind to me...
  • I believe they gave me more pleasure than anything else at the Fair: they were so lifelike and wonderful to my touch.
  • I saw the one through which Emperor Dom Pedro listened to the words, "To be, or not to be," at the Centennial.
  • At the Woman's building we met the Princess Maria Schaovskoy of Russia, and a beautiful Syrian lady.
  • At present there is no library of any sort in the town.
  • She had taken a few piano lessons at the Perkins Institution.
  • Dr. Humason, Teacher, and I left the others at the Dog Show and went to a reception given by the "Metropolitan Club."...
  • TO MRS. KATE ADAMS KELLER New York, March 31, 1895. ...Teacher and I spent the afternoon at Mr. Hutton's, and had a most delightful time!...
  • We had to change cars at Philadelphia; but we did not mind it much.
  • He said no, it would not be called for about fifteen minutes; so we sat down to wait; but in a moment the man came back and asked Teacher if we would like to go to the train at once.
  • Almost two weeks ago we called at Mr. Hutton's and had a delightful time.
  • Surely we shall all find at last the ideals we are seeking....
  • Teacher and I spent nine days at Philadelphia.
  • Have you ever been at Dr. Crouter's Institution?
  • After my little "speech," we attended a reception at which over six hundred people were present.
  • We visited our good friends, Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlin, at Wrentham, out in the country, where they have a lovely home.
  • He died last Saturday at my home in Tuscumbia, and I was not there.
  • Sometimes it really seems as if the task which we have set ourselves were more than we can accomplish; but at other times I enjoy my work more than I can say.
  • ...What a splendid time we had at the "Players' Club."
  • July 9, 1897. ...Teacher and I are going to spend the summer at Wrentham, Mass. with our friends, the Chamberlins.
  • Some one balances the toboggan on the very crest of the hill, while we get on, and when we are ready, off we dash down the side of the hill in a headlong rush, and, leaping a projection, plunge into a snow-drift and go swimming far across the pond at a tremendous rate!...
  • I find I get on faster, and do better work with Mr. Keith than I did in the classes at the Cambridge School, and I think it was well that I gave up that kind of work.
  • Keith comes here at half past three every day except Saturday.
  • Of course you have read about the "Gordon Memorial College," which the English people are to erect at Khartoum.
  • Would a college at Havana not be the noblest and most enduring monument that could be raised to the brave men of the "Maine," as well as a source of infinite good to all concerned?
  • There is but one cloud in my sky at present; but that is one which casts a dark shadow over my life, and makes me very anxious at times.
  • I feel as if I ought to give up the idea of going to college altogether: for not all the knowledge in the world could make me happy, if obtained at such a cost.
  • I have at least the satisfaction of seeing them through the eyes of my friends, which is a real pleasure.
  • We shall all live together in a small cottage on one of the lakes at Wrentham, while my dear teacher takes a much needed rest.
  • She showed me how very foolish it would be for me to pursue a four years' course of study at Radcliffe, simply to be like other girls, when I might better be cultivating whatever ability I had for writing.
  • But, while we were discussing plans for the winter, a suggestion which Dr. Hale had made long ago flashed across Teacher's mind--that I might take courses somewhat like those offered at Radcliffe, under the instruction of the professors in these courses.
  • Ignorance seems to be at the bottom of all these contradictions.
  • The college authorities would not permit Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in braille.
  • TO MISS MILDRED KELLER 138 Brattle Street, Cambridge, November 26, 1899. ...At last we are settled for the winter, and our work is going smoothly.
  • Mr. Keith comes every afternoon at four o'clock, and gives me a "friendly lift" over the rough stretches of road, over which every student must go.
  • There were about twenty-five thousand people at the game, and, when we went out, the noise was so terrific, we nearly jumped out of our skins, thinking it was the din of war, and not of a football game that we heard.
  • We went to St. Bartholomew's Sunday, and I have not felt so much at home in a church since dear Bishop Brooks died.
  • His people must have wondered at his unusual deliberation.
  • I stood in the middle of the church, where the vibrations from the great organ were strongest, and I felt the mighty waves of sound beat against me, as the great billows beat against a little ship at sea.
  • In college she, or possibly in some subjects some one else, would of necessity be with me in the lecture-room and at recitations.
  • Is it possible for the College to accommodate itself to these unprecedented conditions, so as to enable me to pursue my studies at Radcliffe?
  • At the same time Dr. Bell added that I could rest content and fight my way through Radcliffe in competition with seeing and hearing girls, while the great desire of my heart was being fulfilled.
  • It is hard, very hard at times; but it hasn't swamped me yet.
  • The courses at Radcliffe are elective, only certain courses in English are prescribed.
  • I also know a child at the Institution for the Deaf in Mississippi.
  • A few days ago I met Tommy Stringer in the railroad station at Wrentham.
  • After we left Halifax, we visited Dr. Bell at Cape Breton.
  • After that he asked me if the strings were all right and changed them at once when I answered in the negative.
  • TO DR. EDWARD EVERETT HALE [Read by Dr. Hale at the celebration of the centenary of Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, at Tremont Temple, Boston, Nov. 11, 1901.] Cambridge, Nov. 10, 1901.
  • If he had not taken upon himself the responsibility of Laura Bridgman's education and led her out of the pit of Acheron back to her human inheritance, should I be a sophomore at Radcliffe College to-day--who can say?
  • It is fitting that Miss Keller's "Story of My Life" should appear at this time.
  • Whatever doubts Miss Keller herself may have had are now at rest.
  • Then for the first time she had her whole manuscript under her finger at once.
  • Miss Sullivan, who is an excellent critic, made suggestions at many points in the course of composition and revision.
  • Indeed, at one time it was believed that the best way for them to communicate was through systematized gestures, the sign language invented by the Abbe de l'Epee.
  • If any one whom she is touching laughs at a joke, she laughs, too, just as if she had heard it.
  • Most that she knows at first hand comes from her sense of touch.
  • When she was at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston she stood on a step-ladder and let both hands play over the statues.
  • The deaf person with sight looks at the fingers of his companion, but it is also possible to feel them.
  • If more people knew this, and the friends and relatives of deaf children learned the manual alphabet at once the deaf all over the world would be happier and better educated.
  • If she had any conception, there is no way of discovering it now; for she cannot remember, and obviously there was no record at the time.
  • Then her teacher calls her an incorrigible little sermonizer, and she laughs at herself.
  • Often, however, her sober ideas are not to be laughed at, for her earnestness carries her listeners with her.
  • In the diary that she kept at the Wright-Humason School in New York she wrote on October 18, 1894, "I find that I have four things to learn in my school life here, and indeed, in life--to think clearly without hurry or confusion, to love everybody sincerely, to act in everything with the highest motives, and to trust in dear God unhesitatingly."
  • Laura Bridgman was born at Hanover, New Hampshire, December 21, 1829; so she was almost eight years old when Dr. Howe began his experiments with her.
  • At the age of twenty-six months scarlet fever left her without sight or hearing.
  • Miss Sullivan knew at the beginning that Helen Keller would be more interesting and successful than Laura Bridgman, and she expresses in one of her letters the need of keeping notes.
  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.
  • Although Miss Sullivan is still rather amused than distressed when some one, even one of her friends, makes mistakes in published articles about her and Miss Keller, still she sees that Miss Keller's book should include all the information that the teacher could at present furnish.
  • Miss Anne Mansfield Sullivan was born at Springfield, Massachusetts.
  • Mr. Anagnos wrote in the report of the Perkins Institution, dated November 27, 1888: At my urgent request, Helen, accompanied by her mother and her teacher, came to the North in the last week of May, and spent several months with us as our guests....
  • But whether Helen stays at home or makes visits in other parts of the country, her education is always under the immediate direction and exclusive control of her teacher.
  • That remains for her to do at another time.
  • At present we have here the fullest record that has been published.
  • Her mother interfered at this point and showed Helen by signs that she must not touch the bag.
  • You see at a glance that she is blind.
  • I shall go rather slowly at first and try to win her love.
  • She nodded and began at once to fill the string with wooden beads.
  • As I wrote you, I meant to go slowly at first.
  • I told her that in my opinion the child ought to be separated from the family for a few weeks at least--that she must learn to depend on and obey me before I could make any headway.
  • No doubt they were signs for the different members of the family at Ivy Green.
  • Mr. Wilson, a teacher at Florence, and a friend of the Kellers', studied at Harvard the summer before and went to the Perkins Institution to learn if anything could be done for his friend's child.
  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"
  • Helen was giving Nancy a bath, and didn't notice the dog at first.
  • And I don't intend that the lesson she has learned at the cost of so much pain and trouble shall be unlearned.
  • Only a few hours after my talk with Captain and Mrs. Keller (and they had agreed to everything), Helen took a notion that she wouldn't use her napkin at table.
  • She was at her place when I came down.
  • She had put the napkin under her chin, instead of pinning it at the back, as was her custom.
  • She noticed this at once and made the sign for it.
  • After breakfast we go out and watch the men at work.
  • At ten we come in and string beads for a few minutes.
  • At eleven we have gymnastics.
  • Often, when the weather is fine, we drive from four to six, or go to see her aunt at Ivy Green or her cousins in the town.
  • Wherever we go, she asks eagerly for the names of things she has not learned at home.
  • When we first played this game two or three days ago, she showed no ingenuity at all in finding the object.
  • I used my little stock of beads, cards and straws at first because I didn't know what else to do; but the need for them is past, for the present at any rate.
  • Let him go and come freely, let him touch real things and combine his impressions for himself, instead of sitting indoors at a little round table, while a sweet-voiced teacher suggests that he build a stone wall with his wooden blocks, or make a rainbow out of strips of coloured paper, or plant straw trees in bead flower-pots.
  • The other day I substituted the words SMALL and LARGE for these signs, and she at once adopted the words and discarded the signs.
  • I couldn't make out at first what it was all about.
  • My first thought was, one of the dogs has hurt Mildred; but Helen's beaming face set my fears at rest.
  • She noticed that one of the puppies was much smaller than the others, and she spelled "small," making the sign at the same time, and I said "very small."
  • She is delighted with action-words; so it is no trouble at all to teach her verbs.
  • I hear there is a deaf and blind child being educated at the Baltimore Institution.
  • She is restless at night and has no appetite.
  • They tell us that Helen is "overdoing," that her mind is too active (these very people thought she had no mind at all a few months ago!) and suggest many absurd and impossible remedies.
  • She was greatly amused, and began at once to find analogies between her movements and those of the plants.
  • My little pupil continues to manifest the same eagerness to learn as at first.
  • The same day she had learned, at different times, the words: hOUSE, WEED, DUST, SWING, MOLASSES, FAST, SLOW, MAPLE-SUGAR and COUNTER, and she had not forgotten one of these last.
  • At all events, there she was, tearing and scratching and biting Viney like some wild thing.
  • At the dinner-table she was greatly disturbed because I didn't eat, and suggested that "Cook make tea for teacher."
  • I read the letter at the supper-table, and Mrs. Keller exclaimed: "My, Miss Annie, Helen writes almost as well as that now!"
  • "New puppies," "new calves" and "new babies" keep Helen's interest in the why and wherefore of things at white heat.
  • From the beginning, I HAVE MADE IT A PRACTICE TO ANSWER ALL HELEN'S QUESTIONS TO THE BEST OF MY ABILITY IN A WAY INTELLIGIBLE TO HER, and at the same time truthfully.
  • He invited her to come to see him at Hot Springs.
  • She has the true language-impulse, and shows great fertility of resource in making the words at her command convey her meaning.
  • I couldn't help laughing, for at that very moment Viney was shouting at the top of her voice:
  • At the end of August she knew 625 words.
  • She perceived the difference in size at once.
  • Next I turned to the first page of the primer and made her touch the word CAT, spelling it on my fingers at the same time.
  • For a whole evening she will sit at the table writing whatever comes into her busy brain; and I seldom find any difficulty in reading what she has written.
  • At present I feel like a jungle on wheels!
  • Helen has learned to tell the time at last, and her father is going to give her a watch for Christmas.
  • She placed them in a chair, resisting all temptation to look at them until every child had received his gifts.
  • The exercises began at nine, and it was one o'clock before we could leave.
  • You know how the children at the Institution detest it.
  • Captain Keller said at breakfast this morning that he wished I would take Helen to church.
  • The children were so pleased to see her at Sunday-school, they paid no attention to their teachers, but rushed out of their seats and surrounded us.
  • She seemed to think at first that the children all belonged to the visiting ministers; but soon she recognized some little friends among them, and I told her the ministers didn't bring their children with them.
  • I tried to hurry Helen out-of-doors, but she kept her arm extended, and every coat-tail she touched must needs turn round and give an account of the children he left at home, and receive kisses according to their number.
  • Everybody laughed at her antics, and you would have thought they were leaving a place of amusement rather than a church.
  • We stayed at the Burnet House.
  • All the learned men marveled at her intelligence and gaiety.
  • She was delighted with the orchestra at the hotel, and whenever the music began she danced round the room, hugging and kissing every one she happened to touch.
  • It seems strange that people should marvel at what is really so simple.
  • They were astonished at her command of language.
  • I was incredulous when he first told me the secret.
  • Nobody thinks of making a hearing child say, "I have a pretty new dress," at the beginning.
  • At my suggestion, one of the gentlemen took her hand, and the tests were repeated.
  • At last it became necessary to kill him, and, when Helen next asked to go and see him, I told her that he was DEAD.
  • While making a visit at Brewster, Massachusetts, she one day accompanied my friend and me through the graveyard.
  • This was true, although we were at a loss to understand how she guessed it.
  • She has a very sociable disposition, and delights in the companionship of those who can follow the rapid motions of her fingers; but if left alone she will amuse herself for hours at a time with her knitting or sewing.
  • She is very fond of all the living things at home, and she will not have them unkindly treated.
  • Helen expressed a great deal of sympathy, and at every opportunity during the day she would find Pearl and carry the burden from place to place.
  • Naturally, there was at first a strong tendency on her part to use only the important words in a sentence.
  • She continues to manifest the same eagerness to learn as at first.
  • There was a hopeless look in the dull eye that I could not help noticing, and then, as I was thinking where I had seen that horse before, she looked full at me and said, 'Black Beauty, is that you?'
  • At this point Helen pressed my hand to stop me.
  • "It was poor Ginger," was all she could say at first.
  • When she came to the line, "There's freedom at thy gates, and rest," she exclaimed: "It means America!
  • She is at once transported into the midst of the events of a story.
  • Here I made the cat look at the mouse, and let Helen feel the cat.
  • She ran her fingers along the lines, finding the words she knew and guessing at the meaning of others, in a way that would convince the most conservative of educators that a little deaf child, if given the opportunity, will learn to read as easily and naturally as ordinary children.
  • I have found it a convenient medium of communicating with Helen when she is at some distance from me, for it enables me to talk with her by tapping upon the floor with my foot.
  • Can any one doubt after reading these questions that the child who was capable of asking them was also capable of understanding at least their elementary answers?
  • At another time she asked, "What is a soul?"
  • At this moment another thought seemed to flash through her mind, and she added, "But Mr. Anagnos did not speak to my soul."
  • At another time she asked, "Do you not think we would be very much happier always, if we did not have to die?"
  • At first, the words, phrases and sentences which she used in expressing her thoughts were all reproductions of what we had used in conversation with her, and which her memory had unconsciously retained.
  • At first my little pupil's mind was all but vacant.
  • When at the age of fourteen she had had but a few lessons in German, she read over the words of "Wilhelm Tell" and managed to get the story.
  • Often I found her, when she had a little leisure, sitting in her favourite corner, in a chair whose arms supported the big volume prepared for the blind, and passing her finger slowly over the lines of Moliere's 'Le Medecin Malgre Lui,' chuckling to herself at the comical situations and humorous lines.
  • But it is evident that precisely what the deaf child needs to be taught is what other children learn before they go to school at all.
  • When Miss Sullivan went out in the barnyard and picked up a little chicken and talked to Helen about it, she was giving a kind of instruction impossible inside four walls, and impossible with more than one pupil at a time.
  • When she was at the Wright-Humason School in New York, Dr. Humason tried to improve her voice, not only her word pronunciation, but the voice itself, and gave her lessons in tone and vocal exercises.
  • Miss Sullivan's account in her address at Chautauqua, in July, 1894, at the meeting of The American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf, is substantially like Miss Keller's in points of fact.
  • She at once resolved to learn to speak, and from that day to this she has never wavered in that resolution.
  • When she was stricken down with the illness which resulted in her loss of sight and hearing, at the age of nineteen months, she was learning to talk.
  • At the time when I became her teacher, she had made for herself upward of sixty signs, all of which were imitative and were readily understood by those who knew her.
  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.
  • Of course, it was not easy at first to fly.
  • At the same time the inborn gift of style can be starved or stimulated.
  • If Miss Sullivan wrote fine English, the beauty of Helen Keller's style would, in part, be explicable at once.
  • Miss Keller has given her account of it, and the whole matter was discussed in the first Volta Bureau Souvenir from which I quote at length:
  • The teachers at the Institution expressed the opinion that the description did not appear in any book in raised print in that library; but one lady, Miss Marrett, took upon herself the task of examining books of poems in ordinary type, and was rewarded by finding the following lines in one of Longfellow's minor poems, entitled 'Snowflakes':
  • One warm, sunny day in early spring, when we were at the North, the balmy atmosphere appears to have brought to her mind the sentiment expressed by Longfellow in "Hiawatha," and she almost sings with the poet: "The ground was all aquiver with the stir of new life.
  • In a letter to a friend at the Perkins Institution, dated May 17, 1889, she gives a reproduction from one of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, which I had read to her not long before.
  • The next year at Andover she said: It seems to me the world is full of goodness, beauty, and love; and how grateful we must be to our heavenly Father, who has given us so much to enjoy!
  • The anemone, the wild violet, the hepatica, and the funny little curled-up ferns all peeped out at us from beneath the brown leaves.
  • This is shown in a little story she wrote in October last at the home of her parents in Tuscumbia, which she called "Autumn Leaves."
  • She was at work upon it about two weeks, writing a little each day, at her own pleasure.
  • Helen and I spent the summer of 1888 with Mrs. Hopkins at her home in Brewster, Mass., where she kindly relieved me a part of the time, of the care of Helen.
  • But as she was not able to find her copy, and applications for the volume at bookstores in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and other places resulted only in failure, search was instituted for the author herself.
  • This became a difficult task, as her publishers in Philadelphia had retired from business many years ago; however, it was eventually discovered that her residence is at Wilmington, Delaware, and copies of the second edition of the book, 1889, were obtained from her.
  • As he came in sight of the rose-bushes that grew near the side of the house, he suddenly clapped his hands, and with a little shout of joy stopped to look at them; they were all covered with lovely rosebuds.
  • After awhile he went nearer, and looking closely at the buds, found that they were folded up, leaf over leaf, as eyelids are folded over sleeping eyes, so that Birdie thought they must be asleep.
  • One pleasant morning in the beautiful springtime, I thought I was sitting on the soft grass under my dear mother's window, looking very earnestly at the rose-bushes which were growing all around me.
  • The fresh morning air blew gently in my face, as if to welcome me, and be my merry playmate, and the sun looked at me with a warm and tender smile.
  • He has two neighbours, who live still farther north; one is King Winter, a cross and churlish old monarch, who is hard and cruel, and delights in making the poor suffer and weep; but the other neighbour is Santa Claus, a fine, good-natured, jolly old soul, who loves to do good, and who brings presents to the poor, and to nice little children at Christmas.
  • The fairies promised obedience and soon started on their journey, dragging the great glass jars and vases along, as well as they could, and now and then grumbling a little at having such hard work to do, for they were idle fairies, and liked play better than work.
  • At last they reached a great forest, and, being quite tired, they decided to rest awhile and look for nuts before going any further.
  • Still, for awhile, the frost fairies did not notice this strange occurrence, for they were down on the grass, so far below the tree-tops that the wonderful shower of treasure was a long time in reaching them; but at last one of them said, Hark!
  • Then looking more closely at the trees around, they saw that the treasure was all melting away, and that much of it was already spread over the leaves of the oak trees and maples, which were shining with their gorgeous dress of gold and bronze, crimson and emerald.
  • It was very beautiful; but the idle fairies were too much frightened at the mischief their disobedience had caused, to admire the beauty of the forest, and at once tried to hide themselves among the bushes, lest King Frost should come and punish them.
  • Their pleasure charmed away King Frost's anger, and he, too, began to admire the painted trees, and at last he said to himself, My treasures are not wasted if they make little children happy.
  • At a little distance from the palace we might easily mistake it for a mountain whose peaks were mounting heavenward to receive the last kiss of the departing day.
  • The entrance to the palace is at the end of an arched recess, and it is guarded night and day by twelve soldierly-looking white Bears.
  • The fairies promised obedience, and were off in a twinkling, dragging the heavy jars and vases along after them as well as they could, now and then grumbling a little at having such a hard task, for they were idle fairies and loved to play better than to work.
  • At length every jar and vase was cracked or broken, and the precious stones they contained were melting, too, and running in little streams over the trees and bushes of the forest.
  • At first King Frost was very angry, and the fairies trembled and crouched lower in their hiding-places, and I do not know what might have happened to them if just then a party of boys and girls had not entered the wood.
  • I thought very much about the sad news when teacher went to the doctor's; she was not here at dinner and I missed her.'
  • At my request, one of the teachers in the girls' department examined Helen in regard to the construction of the story.
  • The only person that we supposed might possibly have read the story to Helen was her friend, Mrs. Hopkins, whom she was visiting at the time in Brewster.
  • I asked Miss Sullivan to go at once to see Mrs. Hopkins and ascertain the facts in the matter.
  • In this case Helen Keller held almost intact in her mind, unmixed with other ideas, the words of a story which at the time it was read to her she did not fully understand.
  • The reason that we do not observe this process in ordinary children is, because we seldom observe them at all, and because they are fed from so many sources that the memories are confused and mutually destructive.
  • When I was a little older I felt the need of some means of communication with those around me, and I began to make simple signs which my parents and friends readily understood; but it often happened that I was unable to express my thoughts intelligibly, and at such times I would give way to my angry feelings utterly....
  • At last she got up, gave me the mug, and led me out of the door to the pump-house.
  • I met Teacher in the hall, and begged to be taken to the sea at once.
  • Suddenly we stopped, and I knew, without being told, the Sea was at my feet.
  • At times Miss Keller seemed to lack flexibility, her thoughts ran in set phrases which she seemed to have no power to revise or turn over in new ways.
  • Then came the work in college--original theme writing with new ideals of composition or at least new methods of suggesting those ideals.
  • These extracts are from her exercises in her course in composition, where she showed herself at the beginning of her college life quite without rival among her classmates.
  • They are regarded generally as far more appropriate in books and in public discourses than in the parlor or at the table.
  • Methinks "they are jesters at the Court of Heaven."
  • I rode a fiery hunter--I can feel the impatient toss of his head now and the quiver that ran through him at the first roar of the cannon.
  • At all events, I slipped down from the bed and nestled close to the fire which had not flickered out.
  • At last sleep surprised me, and when Miss Sullivan returned she found me wrapped in a blanket by the hearth.
  • I determined to go into business at once, and not wait to acquire the usual capital, using such slender means as I had already got.
  • Beside, clothes introduced sewing, a kind of work which you may call endless; a woman's dress, at least, is never done.
  • A man who has at length found something to do will not need to get a new suit to do it in; for him the old will do, that has lain dusty in the garret for an indeterminate period.
  • The head monkey at Paris puts on a traveller's cap, and all the monkeys in America do the same.
  • At present men make shift to wear what they can get.
  • Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new.
  • We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII, or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.
  • The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that corporations may be enriched.
  • In our climate, in the summer, it was formerly almost solely a covering at night.
  • Who does not remember the interest with which, when young, he looked at shelving rocks, or any approach to a cave?
  • At last, we know not what it is to live in the open air, and our lives are domestic in more senses than we think.
  • If you would know the history of these homesteads, inquire at the bank where they are mortgaged.
  • Granted that the majority are able at last either to own or hire the modern house with all its improvements.
  • The mason who finishes the cornice of the palace returns at night perchance to a hut not so good as a wigwam.
  • It certainly is fair to look at that class by whose labor the works which distinguish this generation are accomplished.
  • When I think of the benefactors of the race, whom we have apotheosized as messengers from heaven, bearers of divine gifts to man, I do not see in my mind any retinue at their heels, any carload of fashionable furniture.
  • At present our houses are cluttered and defiled with it, and a good housewife would sweep out the greater part into the dust hole, and not leave her morning's work undone.
  • Answer me these questions, and then perhaps I may look at your bawbles and find them ornamental.
  • When I called to see it he was not at home.
  • I walked about the outside, at first unobserved from within, the window was so deep and high.
  • At six I passed him and his family on the road.
  • One large bundle held their all--bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens--all but the cat; she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.
  • The house is still but a sort of porch at the entrance of a burrow.
  • At length, in the beginning of May, with the help of some of my acquaintances, rather to improve so good an occasion for neighborliness than from any necessity, I set up the frame of my house.
  • No man was ever more honored in the character of his raisers than I. They are destined, I trust, to assist at the raising of loftier structures one day.
  • A sentimental reformer in architecture, he began at the cornice, not at the foundation.
  • One man says, in his despair or indifference to life, take up a handful of the earth at your feet, and paint your house that color.
  • I have thus a tight shingled and plastered house, ten feet wide by fifteen long, and eight-feet posts, with a garret and a closet, a large window on each side, two trap doors, one door at the end, and a brick fireplace opposite.
  • Those conveniences which the student requires at Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides.
  • I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not play life, or study it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly live it from beginning to end.
  • How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living?
  • They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at; as railroads lead to Boston or New York.
  • He should have gone up garret at once.
  • A simple and independent mind does not toil at the bidding of any prince.
  • Bread I at first made of pure Indian meal and salt, genuine hoe-cakes, which I baked before my fire out of doors on a shingle or the end of a stick of timber sawed off in building my house; but it was wont to get smoked and to have a piny flavor.
  • I tried flour also; but have at last found a mixture of rye and Indian meal most convenient and agreeable.
  • For the most part the farmer gives to his cattle and hogs the grain of his own producing, and buys flour, which is at least no more wholesome, at a greater cost, at the store.
  • As for a habitat, if I were not permitted still to squat, I might purchase one acre at the same price for which the land I cultivated was sold--namely, eight dollars and eight cents.
  • Pray, for what do we move ever but to get rid of our furniture, our exuviæ: at last to go from this world to another newly furnished, and leave this to be burned?
  • How often he is at a dead set!
  • I think that the man is at a dead set who has got through a knot-hole or gateway where his sledge load of furniture cannot follow him.
  • Throw away the first three at least.
  • The Mexicans also practised a similar purification at the end of every fifty-two years, in the belief that it was time for the world to come to an end.
  • We may not arrive at our port within a calculable period, but we would preserve the true course.
  • It was easy to see that they could not long be companions or co-operate, since one would not operate at all.
  • They would part at the first interesting crisis in their adventures.
  • While my townsmen and women are devoted in so many ways to the good of their fellows, I trust that one at least may be spared to other and less humane pursuits.
  • If I were to preach at all in this strain, I should say rather, Set about being good.
  • At a certain season of our life we are accustomed to consider every spot as the possible site of a house.
  • I have no doubt that time discriminates between the good and the bad; and when at last I shall plant, I shall be less likely to be disappointed.
  • I think I shall not buy greedily, but go round and round it as long as I live, and be buried in it first, that it may please me the more at last.
  • The present was my next experiment of this kind, which I purpose to describe more at length, for convenience putting the experience of two years into one.
  • A lake like this is never smoother than at such a time; and the clear portion of the air above it being, shallow and darkened by clouds, the water, full of light and reflections, becomes a lower heaven itself so much the more important.
  • I was as much affected by the faint hum of a mosquito making its invisible and unimaginable tour through my apartment at earliest dawn, when I was sitting with door and windows open, as I could be by any trumpet that ever sang of fame.
  • Then there is least somnolence in us; and for an hour, at least, some part of us awakes which slumbers all the rest of the day and night.
  • All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the children of Aurora, and emit their music at sunrise.
  • Our life is like a German Confederacy, made up of petty states, with its boundary forever fluctuating, so that even a German cannot tell you how it is bounded at any moment.
  • But if we stay at home and mind our business, who will want railroads?
  • I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is.
  • I kept Homer's Iliad on my table through the summer, though I looked at his page only now and then.
  • Incessant labor with my hands, at first, for I had my house to finish and my beans to hoe at the same time, made more study impossible.
  • It is something at once more intimate with us and more universal than any other work of art.
  • By such a pile we may hope to scale heaven at last.
  • Or suppose he comes from reading a Greek or Latin classic in the original, whose praises are familiar even to the so-called illiterate; he will find nobody at all to speak to, but must keep silence about it.
  • We are underbred and low-lived and illiterate; and in this respect I confess I do not make any very broad distinction between the illiterateness of my townsman who cannot read at all and the illiterateness of him who has learned to read only what is for children and feeble intellects.
  • The at present unutterable things we may find somewhere uttered.
  • Instead of singing like the birds, I silently smiled at my incessant good fortune.
  • I had this advantage, at least, in my mode of life, over those who were obliged to look abroad for amusement, to society and the theatre, that my life itself was become my amusement and never ceased to be novel.
  • Or perchance, at evening, I hear him in his stable blowing off the superfluous energy of the day, that he may calm his nerves and cool his liver and brain for a few hours of iron slumber.
  • When the old bell-wether at the head rattles his bell, the mountains do indeed skip like rams and the little hills like lambs.
  • They will not be in at the death.
  • At a sufficient distance over the woods this sound acquires a certain vibratory hum, as if the pine needles in the horizon were the strings of a harp which it swept.
  • At evening, the distant lowing of some cow in the horizon beyond the woods sounded sweet and melodious, and at first I would mistake it for the voices of certain minstrels by whom I was sometimes serenaded, who might be straying over hill and dale; but soon I was not unpleasantly disappointed when it was prolonged into the cheap and natural music of the cow.
  • At evening, the distant lowing of some cow in the horizon beyond the woods sounded sweet and melodious, and at first I would mistake it for the voices of certain minstrels by whom I was sometimes serenaded, who might be straying over hill and dale; but soon I was not unpleasantly disappointed when it was prolonged into the cheap and natural music of the cow.
  • Regularly at half-past seven, in one part of the summer, after the evening train had gone by, the whip-poor-wills chanted their vespers for half an hour, sitting on a stump by my door, or upon the ridge-pole of the house.
  • They sang at intervals throughout the night, and were again as musical as ever just before and about dawn.
  • The thick wood is not just at our door, nor the pond, but somewhat is always clearing, familiar and worn by us, appropriated and fenced in some way, and reclaimed from Nature.
  • But I was at the same time conscious of a slight insanity in my mood, and seemed to foresee my recovery.
  • We meet at very short intervals, not having had time to acquire any new value for each other.
  • We meet at meals three times a day, and give each other a new taste of that old musty cheese that we are.
  • When the night arrived, to quote their own words--He laid us on the bed with himself and his wife, they at the one end and we at the other, it being only planks laid a foot from the ground and a thin mat upon them.
  • At one o'clock the next day Massasoit "brought two fishes that he had shot," about thrice as big as a bream.
  • These being boiled, there were at least forty looked for a share in them; the most eat of them.
  • I had more visitors while I lived in the woods than at any other period in my life; I mean that I had some.
  • He was about twenty-eight years old, and had left Canada and his father's house a dozen years before to work in the States, and earn money to buy a farm with at last, perhaps in his native country.
  • He cut his trees level and close to the ground, that the sprouts which came up afterward might be more vigorous and a sled might slide over the stumps; and instead of leaving a whole tree to support his corded wood, he would pare it away to a slender stake or splinter which you could break off with your hand at last.
  • Sometimes I saw him at his work in the woods, felling trees, and he would greet me with a laugh of inexpressible satisfaction, and a salutation in Canadian French, though he spoke English as well.
  • Such an exuberance of animal spirits had he that he sometimes tumbled down and rolled on the ground with laughter at anything which made him think and tickled him.
  • In the winter he had a fire by which at noon he warmed his coffee in a kettle; and as he sat on a log to eat his dinner the chickadees would sometimes come round and alight on his arm and peck at the potato in his fingers; and he said that he "liked to have the little fellers about him."
  • I asked him once if he was not sometimes tired at night, after working all day; and he answered, with a sincere and serious look, "Gorrappit, I never was tired in my life."
  • I loved to sound him on the various reforms of the day, and he never failed to look at them in the most simple and practical light.
  • If an ox were his property, and he wished to get needles and thread at the store, he thought it would be inconvenient and impossible soon to go on mortgaging some portion of the creature each time to that amount.
  • I told them that I drank at the pond, and pointed thither, offering to lend them a dipper.
  • I did not know at first but it was the result of a wise policy.
  • One man proposed a book in which visitors should write their names, as at the White Mountains; but, alas!
  • They looked in the pond and at the flowers, and improved their time.
  • Men of business, even farmers, thought only of solitude and employment, and of the great distance at which I dwelt from something or other; and though they said that they loved a ramble in the woods occasionally, it was obvious that they did not.
  • Near at hand, upon the topmost spray of a birch, sings the brown thrasher--or red mavis, as some love to call him--all the morning, glad of your society, that would find out another farmer's field if yours were not here.
  • That's Roman wormwood--that's pigweed--that's sorrel--that's piper-grass--have at him, chop him up, turn his roots upward to the sun, don't let him have a fibre in the shade, if you do he'll turn himself t' other side up and be as green as a leek in two days.
  • I saw an old man the other day, to my astonishment, making the holes with a hoe for the seventieth time at least, and not for himself to lie down in!
  • Why concern ourselves so much about our beans for seed, and not be concerned at all about a new generation of men?
  • This broad field which I have looked at so long looks not to me as the principal cultivator, but away from me to influences more genial to it, which water and make it green.
  • The village appeared to me a great news room; and on one side, to support it, as once at Redding & Company's on State Street, they kept nuts and raisins, or salt and meal and other groceries.
  • I observed that the vitals of the village were the grocery, the bar-room, the post-office, and the bank; and, as a necessary part of the machinery, they kept a bell, a big gun, and a fire-engine, at convenient places; and the houses were so arranged as to make the most of mankind, in lanes and fronting one another, so that every traveller had to run the gauntlet, and every man, woman, and child might get a lick at him.
  • Besides, there was a still more terrible standing invitation to call at every one of these houses, and company expected about these times.
  • For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger."
  • Sometimes I bolted suddenly, and nobody could tell my whereabouts, for I did not stand much about gracefulness, and never hesitated at a gap in a fence.
  • It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • Sometimes, after staying in a village parlor till the family had all retired, I have returned to the woods, and, partly with a view to the next day's dinner, spent the hours of midnight fishing from a boat by moonlight, serenaded by owls and foxes, and hearing, from time to time, the creaking note of some unknown bird close at hand.
  • At length you slowly raise, pulling hand over hand, some horned pout squeaking and squirming to the upper air.
  • All our Concord waters have two colors at least; one when viewed at a distance, and another, more proper, close at hand.
  • In clear weather, in summer, they appear blue at a little distance, especially if agitated, and at a great distance all appear alike.
  • Walden is blue at one time and green at another, even from the same point of view.
  • Viewed from a hilltop it reflects the color of the sky; but near at hand it is of a yellowish tint next the shore where you can see the sand, then a light green, which gradually deepens to a uniform dark green in the body of the pond.
  • The water is so transparent that the bottom can easily be discerned at the depth of twenty-five or thirty feet.
  • Successive nations perchance have drank at, admired, and fathomed it, and passed away, and still its water is green and pellucid as ever.
  • This is particularly distinct to one standing on the middle of the pond in winter, just after a light snow has fallen, appearing as a clear undulating white line, unobscured by weeds and twigs, and very obvious a quarter of a mile off in many places where in summer it is hardly distinguishable close at hand.
  • I can remember when it was a foot or two lower, and also when it was at least five feet higher, than when I lived by it.
  • Flint's Pond, a mile eastward, allowing for the disturbance occasioned by its inlets and outlets, and the smaller intermediate ponds also, sympathize with Walden, and recently attained their greatest height at the same time with the latter.
  • For four months in the year its water is as cold as it is pure at all times; and I think that it is then as good as any, if not the best, in the town.
  • At most, it tolerates one annual loon.
  • Standing on the smooth sandy beach at the east end of the pond, in a calm September afternoon, when a slight haze makes the opposite shore-line indistinct, I have seen whence came the expression, "the glassy surface of a lake."
  • Ay, every leaf and twig and stone and cobweb sparkles now at mid-afternoon as when covered with dew in a spring morning.
  • Nothing so fair, so pure, and at the same time so large, as a lake, perchance, lies on the surface of the earth.
  • At length the wind rose, the mist increased, and the waves began to run, and the perch leaped much higher than before, half out of water, a hundred black points, three inches long, at once above the surface.
  • At length the wind rose, the mist increased, and the waves began to run, and the perch leaped much higher than before, half out of water, a hundred black points, three inches long, at once above the surface.
  • It was made of two white pine logs dug out and pinned together, and was cut off square at the ends.
  • Where is the country's champion, the Moore of Moore Hill, to meet him at the Deep Cut and thrust an avenging lance between the ribs of the bloated pest?
  • The engineer does not forget at night, or his nature does not, that he has beheld this vision of serenity and purity once at least during the day.
  • Let our lakes receive as true names at least as the Icarian Sea, where "still the shore" a "brave attempt resounds."
  • It was about a foot in diameter at the big end, and he had expected to get a good saw-log, but it was so rotten as to be fit only for fuel, if for that.
  • This was probably the same phenomenon to which I have referred, which is especially observed in the morning, but also at other times, and even by moonlight.
  • They stood and looked in my eye or pecked at my shoe significantly.
  • But the only true America is that country where you are at liberty to pursue such a mode of life as may enable you to do without these, and where the state does not endeavor to compel you to sustain the slavery and war and other superfluous expenses which directly or indirectly result from the use of such things.
  • Let the noon find thee by other lakes, and the night overtake thee everywhere at home.
  • Men come tamely home at night only from the next field or street, where their household echoes haunt, and their life pines because it breathes its own breath over again; their shadows, morning and evening, reach farther than their daily steps.
  • They early introduce us to and detain us in scenery with which otherwise, at that age, we should have little acquaintance.
  • The traveller on the prairie is naturally a hunter, on the head waters of the Missouri and Columbia a trapper, and at the Falls of St. Mary a fisherman.
  • He who is only a traveller learns things at second-hand and by the halves, and is poor authority.
  • Moreover, when at the pond, I wished sometimes to add fish to my fare for variety.
  • Yet even they expect to go to heaven at last.
  • The faintest assured objection which one healthy man feels will at length prevail over the arguments and customs of mankind.
  • But to tell the truth, I find myself at present somewhat less particular in these respects.
  • Though the youth at last grows indifferent, the laws of the universe are not indifferent, but are forever on the side of the most sensitive.
  • Man flows at once to God when the channel of purity is open.
  • If you would avoid uncleanness, and all the sins, work earnestly, though it be at cleaning a stable.
  • Any nobleness begins at once to refine a man's features, any meanness or sensuality to imbrute them.
  • John Farmer sat at his door one September evening, after a hard day's work, his mind still running on his labor more or less.
  • Methinks I was nearly in this frame of mind; the world lay about at this angle.
  • When I was building, one of these had its nest underneath the house, and before I had laid the second floor, and swept out the shavings, would come out regularly at lunch time and pick up the crumbs at my feet.
  • At length, as I leaned with my elbow on the bench one day, it ran up my clothes, and along my sleeve, and round and round the paper which held my dinner, while I kept the latter close, and dodged and played at bopeep with it; and when at last I held still a piece of cheese between my thumb and finger, it came and nibbled it, sitting in my hand, and afterward cleaned its face and paws, like a fly, and walked away.
  • At length, as I leaned with my elbow on the bench one day, it ran up my clothes, and along my sleeve, and round and round the paper which held my dinner, while I kept the latter close, and dodged and played at bopeep with it; and when at last I held still a piece of cheese between my thumb and finger, it came and nibbled it, sitting in my hand, and afterward cleaned its face and paws, like a fly, and walked away.
  • I formerly saw the raccoon in the woods behind where my house is built, and probably still heard their whinnering at night.
  • I watched a couple that were fast locked in each other's embraces, in a little sunny valley amid the chips, now at noonday prepared to fight till the sun went down, or life went out.
  • Once, when berrying, I met with a cat with young kittens in the woods, quite wild, and they all, like their mother, had their backs up and were fiercely spitting at me.
  • At rumor of his arrival all the Mill-dam sportsmen are on the alert, in gigs and on foot, two by two and three by three, with patent rifles and conical balls and spy-glasses.
  • They come rustling through the woods like autumn leaves, at least ten men to one loon.
  • He led me at once to the widest part of the pond, and could not be driven from it.
  • But after an hour he seemed as fresh as ever, dived as willingly, and swam yet farther than at first.
  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
  • Already, by the first of September, I had seen two or three small maples turned scarlet across the pond, beneath where the white stems of three aspens diverged, at the point of a promontory, next the water.
  • When I began to have a fire at evening, before I plastered my house, the chimney carried smoke particularly well, because of the numerous chinks between the boards.
  • Should not every apartment in which man dwells be lofty enough to create some obscurity overhead, where flickering shadows may play at evening about the rafters?
  • Nowadays the host does not admit you to his hearth, but has got the mason to build one for yourself somewhere in his alley, and hospitality is the art of keeping you at the greatest distance.
  • I amused myself one winter day with sliding this piecemeal across the pond, nearly half a mile, skating behind with one end of a log fifteen feet long on my shoulder, and the other on the ice; or I tied several logs together with a birch withe, and then, with a longer birch or alder which had a hook at the end, dragged them across.
  • Every man looks at his wood-pile with a kind of affection.
  • If it was dull, it was at least hung true.
  • Stumps thirty or forty years old, at least, will still be sound at the core, though the sapwood has all become vegetable mould, as appears by the scales of the thick bark forming a ring level with the earth four or five inches distant from the heart.
  • But the most luxuriously housed has little to boast of in this respect, nor need we trouble ourselves to speculate how the human race may be at last destroyed.
  • The laborer, looking into it at evening, purifies his thoughts of the dross and earthiness which they have accumulated during the day.
  • In some places, within my own remembrance, the pines would scrape both sides of a chaise at once, and women and children who were compelled to go this way to Lincoln alone and on foot did it with fear, and often ran a good part of the distance.
  • There are a few who remember his little patch among the walnuts, which he let grow up till he should be old and need them; but a younger and whiter speculator got them at last.
  • He too, however, occupies an equally narrow house at present.
  • At length, in the war of 1812, her dwelling was set on fire by English soldiers, prisoners on parole, when she was away, and her cat and dog and hens were all burned up together.
  • At first we thought to throw a frog-pond on to it; but concluded to let it burn, it was so far gone and so worthless.
  • It chanced that I walked that way across the fields the following night, about the same hour, and hearing a low moaning at this spot, I drew near in the dark, and discovered the only survivor of the family that I know, the heir of both its virtues and its vices, who alone was interested in this burning, lying on his stomach and looking over the cellar wall at the still smouldering cinders beneath, muttering to himself, as is his wont.
  • The house being gone, he looked at what there was left.
  • He died in the road at the foot of Brister's Hill shortly after I came to the woods, so that I have not remembered him as a neighbor.
  • His pipe lay broken on the hearth.
  • Ay, the deep Walden Pond and cool Brister's Spring--privilege to drink long and healthy draughts at these, all unimproved by these men but to dilute their glass.
  • But no friendly Indian concerned himself about me; nor needed he, for the master of the house was at home.
  • Sometimes, notwithstanding the snow, when I returned from my walk at evening I crossed the deep tracks of a woodchopper leading from my door, and found his pile of whittlings on the hearth, and my house filled with the odor of his pipe.
  • His business calls him out at all hours, even when doctors sleep.
  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
  • The Vishnu Purana says, "The house-holder is to remain at eventide in his courtyard as long as it takes to milk a cow, or longer if he pleases, to await the arrival of a guest."
  • What do you mean by alarming the citadel at this time of night consecrated to me?
  • Sometimes one came near to my window, attracted by my light, barked a vulpine curse at me, and then retreated.
  • They were manifestly thieves, and I had not much respect for them; but the squirrels, though at first shy, went to work as if they were taking what was their own.
  • A little flock of these titmice came daily to pick a dinner out of my woodpile, or the crumbs at my door, with faint flitting lisping notes, like the tinkling of icicles in the grass, or else with sprightly day day day, or more rarely, in spring-like days, a wiry summery phe-be from the woodside.
  • They were so familiar that at length one alighted on an armful of wood which I was carrying in, and pecked at the sticks without fear.
  • The squirrels also grew at last to be quite familiar, and occasionally stepped upon my shoe, when that was the nearest way.
  • I used to start them in the open land also, where they had come out of the woods at sunset to "bud" the wild apple trees.
  • I am glad that the partridge gets fed, at any rate.
  • In dark winter mornings, or in short winter afternoons, I sometimes heard a pack of hounds threading all the woods with hounding cry and yelp, unable to resist the instinct of the chase, and the note of the hunting-horn at intervals, proving that man was in the rear.
  • And perhaps at evening I see the hunters returning with a single brush trailing from their sleigh for a trophy, seeking their inn.
  • At length the old hound burst into view with muzzle to the ground, and snapping the air as if possessed, and ran directly to the rock; but, spying the dead fox, she suddenly ceased her hounding as if struck dumb with amazement, and walked round and round him in silence; and one by one her pups arrived, and, like their mother, were sobered into silence by the mystery.
  • They waited in silence while he skinned the fox, then followed the brush a while, and at length turned off into the woods again.
  • At midnight, when there was a moon, I sometimes met with hounds in my path prowling about the woods, which would skulk out of my way, as if afraid, and stand silent amid the bushes till I had passed.
  • These trees were alive and apparently flourishing at midsummer, and many of them had grown a foot, though completely girdled; but after another winter such were without exception dead.
  • Near at hand they only excited my pity.
  • These alders loomed through the mist at regular intervals as you walked half way round the pond.
  • But I can assure my readers that Walden has a reasonably tight bottom at a not unreasonable, though at an unusual, depth.
  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.
  • William Gilpin, who is so admirable in all that relates to landscapes, and usually so correct, standing at the head of Loch Fyne, in Scotland, which he describes as "a bay of salt water, sixty or seventy fathoms deep, four miles in breadth," and about fifty miles long, surrounded by mountains, observes, "If we could have seen it immediately after the diluvian crash, or whatever convulsion of nature occasioned it, before the waters gushed in, what a horrid chasm must it have appeared!
  • As I sounded through the ice I could determine the shape of the bottom with greater accuracy than is possible in surveying harbors which do not freeze over, and I was surprised at its general regularity.
  • We know that a hill is not highest at its narrowest part.
  • Every harbor on the sea-coast, also, has its bar at its entrance.
  • In order to see how nearly I could guess, with this experience, at the deepest point in a pond, by observing the outlines of a surface and the character of its shores alone, I made a plan of White Pond, which contains about forty-one acres, and, like this, has no island in it, nor any visible inlet or outlet; and as the line of greatest breadth fell very near the line of least breadth, where two opposite capes approached each other and two opposite bays receded, I ventured to mark a point a short distance from the latter line, but still on the line of greatest length, as the deepest.
  • At the advent of each individual into this life, may we not suppose that such a bar has risen to the surface somewhere?
  • At one rod from the shore its greatest fluctuation, when observed by means of a level on land directed toward a graduated staff on the ice, was three quarters of an inch, though the ice appeared firmly attached to the shore.
  • Like the water, the Walden ice, seen near at hand, has a green tint, but at a distance is beautifully blue, and you can easily tell it from the white ice of the river, or the merely greenish ice of some ponds, a quarter of a mile off.
  • They told me that they had some in the ice-houses at Fresh Pond five years old which was as good as ever.
  • A thermometer thrust into the middle of Walden on the 6th of March, 1847, stood at 32º, or freezing point; near the shore at 33º; in the middle of Flint's Pond, the same day, at 32º; at a dozen rods from the shore, in shallow water, under ice a foot thick, at 36º.
  • The ice in the shallowest part was at this time several inches thinner than in the middle.
  • Ice has its grain as well as wood, and when a cake begins to rot or "comb," that is, assume the appearance of honeycomb, whatever may be its position, the air cells are at right angles with what was the water surface.
  • It took a short siesta at noon, and boomed once more toward night, as the sun was withdrawing his influence.
  • The ice in the pond at length begins to be honeycombed, and I can set my heel in it as I walk.
  • When the warmer days come, they who dwell near the river hear the ice crack at night with a startling whoop as loud as artillery, as if its icy fetters were rent from end to end, and within a few days see it rapidly going out.
  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.
  • What Champollion will decipher this hieroglyphic for us, that we may turn over a new leaf at last?
  • What at such a time are histories, chronologies, traditions, and all written revelations?
  • It is almost identical with that, for in the growing days of June, when the rills are dry, the grass-blades are their channels, and from year to year the herds drink at this perennial green stream, and the mower draws from it betimes their winter supply.
  • There is a canal two rods wide along the northerly and westerly sides, and wider still at the east end.
  • It is seemingly instantaneous at last.
  • Suddenly an influx of light filled my house, though the evening was at hand, and the clouds of winter still overhung it, and the eaves were dripping with sleety rain.
  • This at least is not the Turdus migratorius.
  • You may tell by looking at any twig of the forest, ay, at your very wood-pile, whether its winter is past or not.
  • As it grew darker, I was startled by the honking of geese flying low over the woods, like weary travellers getting in late from Southern lakes, and indulging at last in unrestrained complaint and mutual consolation.
  • But when I stood on the shore they at once rose up with a great flapping of wings at the signal of their commander, and when they had got into rank circled about over my head, twenty-nine of them, and then steered straight to Canada, with a regular honk from the leader at intervals, trusting to break their fast in muddier pools.
  • A "plump" of ducks rose at the same time and took the route to the north in the wake of their noisier cousins.
  • At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable, that land and sea be infinitely wild, unsurveyed and unfathomed by us because unfathomable.
  • The phÅ“be had already come once more and looked in at my door and window, to see if my house was cavern-like enough for her, sustaining herself on humming wings with clinched talons, as if she held by the air, while she surveyed the premises.
  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
  • Shall we with pains erect a heaven of blue glass over ourselves, though when it is done we shall be sure to gaze still at the true ethereal heaven far above, as if the former were not?
  • No face which we can give to a matter will stead us so well at last as the truth.
  • Let us not play at kittly-benders.
  • Drive a nail home and clinch it so faithfully that you can wake up in the night and think of your work with satisfaction--a work at which you would not be ashamed to invoke the Muse.
  • I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.
  • Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,--"That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
  • Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient.
  • The only obligation which I have a right to assume is to do at any time what I think right.
  • At any rate, it is a great evil to make a stir about it.
  • I quarrel not with far-off foes, but with those who, near at home, co-operate with, and do the bidding of those far away, and without whom the latter would be harmless.
  • At most, they give only a cheap vote, and a feeble countenance and Godspeed, to the right, as it goes by them.
  • When the majority shall at length vote for the abolition of slavery, it will be because they are indifferent to slavery, or because there is but little slavery left to be abolished by their vote.
  • It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.
  • If I devote myself to other pursuits and contemplations, I must first see, at least, that I do not pursue them sitting upon another man's shoulders.
  • I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.
  • This makes it impossible for a man to live honestly, and at the same time comfortably in outward respects.
  • The rooms were whitewashed once a month; and this one, at least, was the whitest, most simply furnished, and probably the neatest apartment in the town.
  • I pumped my fellow-prisoner as dry as I could, for fear I should never see him again; but at length he showed me which was my bed, and left me to blow out the lamp.
  • Soon after he was let out to work at haying in a neighboring field, whither he went every day, and would not be back till noon; so he bade me good-day, saying that he doubted if he should see me again.
  • My neighbors did not thus salute me, but first looked at me, and then at one another, as if I had returned from a long journey.
  • This, then, is my position at present.
  • His words are wisdom to those legislators who contemplate no essential reform in the existing government; but for thinkers, and those who legislate for all time, he never once glances at the subject.
  • And the fete at the English ambassador's?
  • She suddenly paused, smiling at her own impetuosity.
  • Everyone brightened at the sight of this pretty young woman, so soon to become a mother, so full of life and health, and carrying her burden so lightly.
  • One of the next arrivals was a stout, heavily built young man with close-cropped hair, spectacles, the light-colored breeches fashionable at that time, a very high ruffle, and a brown dress coat.
  • The vicomte was a nice-looking young man with soft features and polished manners, who evidently considered himself a celebrity but out of politeness modestly placed himself at the disposal of the circle in which he found himself.
  • From time to time she smoothed the folds of her dress, and whenever the story produced an effect she glanced at Anna Pavlovna, at once adopted just the expression she saw on the maid of honor's face, and again relapsed into her radiant smile.
  • The story was very pretty and interesting, especially at the point where the rivals suddenly recognized one another; and the ladies looked agitated.
  • "Charming!" said Anna Pavlovna with an inquiring glance at the little princess.
  • It is only necessary for one powerful nation like Russia--barbaric as she is said to be--to place herself disinterestedly at the head of an alliance having for its object the maintenance of the balance of power of Europe, and it would save the world!
  • At that moment Anna Pavlovna came up and, looking severely at Pierre, asked the Italian how he stood Russian climate.
  • At that moment Anna Pavlovna came up and, looking severely at Pierre, asked the Italian how he stood Russian climate.
  • It was evident that he not only knew everyone in the drawing room, but had found them to be so tiresome that it wearied him to look at or listen to them.
  • He wished to say something more, but at that moment Prince Vasili and his daughter got up to go and the two young men rose to let them pass.
  • This unfortunate fete at the ambassador's deprives me of a pleasure, and obliges me to interrupt you.
  • Pierre gazed at her with rapturous, almost frightened, eyes as she passed him.
  • "And what do you think of this latest comedy, the coronation at Milan?" asked Anna Pavlovna, "and of the comedy of the people of Genoa and Lucca laying their petitions before Monsieur Buonaparte, and Monsieur Buonaparte sitting on a throne and granting the petitions of the nations?
  • "It is the Buonapartists who say that," replied the vicomte without looking at Pierre.
  • At the present time it is difficult to know the real state of French public opinion.
  • It was evident that he did not like the vicomte and was aiming his remarks at him, though without looking at him.
  • Pierre looked solemnly at his audience over his spectacles and continued.
  • It was a swindle, and not at all like the conduct of a great man!
  • Pierre, not knowing whom to answer, looked at them all and smiled.
  • "How do you expect him to answer you all at once?" said Prince Andrew.
  • Pierre chimed in, pleased at the arrival of this reinforcement.
  • Prince Hippolyte stood close to the pretty, pregnant princess, and stared fixedly at her through his eyeglass.
  • Write to her and let me know how her father looks at the matter.
  • Still smiling, she gracefully moved away, turning and glancing at her husband.
  • Pierre reaching the house first went into Prince Andrew's study like one quite at home, and from habit immediately lay down on the sofa, took from the shelf the first book that came to his hand (it was Caesar's Commentaries), and resting on his elbow, began reading it in the middle.
  • Well, have you at last decided on anything?
  • Prince Andrew only shrugged his shoulders at Pierre's childish words.
  • The other day at the Apraksins' I heard a lady asking, 'Is that the famous Prince Andrew?'
  • Pierre looked at his friend and, noticing that he did not like the conversation, gave no reply.
  • (she looked significantly at her husband) "I'm afraid, I'm afraid!" she whispered, and a shudder ran down her back.
  • Pierre looked over his spectacles with naive surprise, now at him and now at her, moved as if about to rise too, but changed his mind.
  • Her beautiful eyes glanced askance at her husband's face, and her own assumed the timid, deprecating expression of a dog when it rapidly but feebly wags its drooping tail.
  • Pierre continually glanced at Prince Andrew; Prince Andrew rubbed his forehead with his small hand.
  • Don't look at me with such surprise.
  • Pierre took off his spectacles, which made his face seem different and the good-natured expression still more apparent, and gazed at his friend in amazement.
  • It was evident that the more lifeless he seemed at ordinary times, the more impassioned he became in these moments of almost morbid irritation.
  • Pierre was always astonished at Prince Andrew's calm manner of treating everybody, his extraordinary memory, his extensive reading (he had read everything, knew everything, and had an opinion about everything), but above all at his capacity for work and study.
  • Let us talk about you, he added after a silence, smiling at his reassuring thoughts.
  • Pierre was staying at Prince Vasili Kuragin's and sharing the dissipated life of his son Anatole, the son whom they were planning to reform by marrying him to Prince Andrew's sister.
  • Reaching the large house near the Horse Guards' barracks, in which Anatole lived, Pierre entered the lighted porch, ascended the stairs, and went in at the open door.
  • "At one draught, or he loses!" shouted a fourth.
  • Pierre drank one glass after another, looking from under his brows at the tipsy guests who were again crowding round the window, and listening to their chatter.
  • Both Kuragin and Dolokhov were at that time notorious among the rakes and scapegraces of Petersburg.
  • Pushing away the footmen he tugged at the frame, but could not move it.
  • Anatole turned to the Englishman and taking him by one of the buttons of his coat and looking down at him--the Englishman was short--began repeating the terms of the wager to him in English.
  • Oh! he muttered, looking down from the window at the stones of the pavement.
  • The conversation was on the chief topic of the day: the illness of the wealthy and celebrated beau of Catherine's day, Count Bezukhov, and about his illegitimate son Pierre, the one who had behaved so improperly at Anna Pavlovna's reception.
  • How can you laugh at it, Count?
  • "Why do you say this young man is so rich?" asked the countess, turning away from the girls, who at once assumed an air of inattention.
  • He's also my Bory's godfather, she added, as if she attached no importance at all to the fact.
  • The countess looked at her callers, smiling affably, but not concealing the fact that she would not be distressed if they now rose and took their leave.
  • Natasha, raising her face for a moment from her mother's mantilla, glanced up at her through tears of laughter, and again hid her face.
  • The visitor, compelled to look on at this family scene, thought it necessary to take some part in it.
  • She did not reply, but looked at her seriously.
  • Now and then they glanced at one another, hardly able to suppress their laughter.
  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.
  • Having said this he glanced at Natasha.
  • As he spoke he kept glancing with the flirtatiousness of a handsome youth at Sonya and the young lady visitor.
  • The little kitten, feasting her eyes on him, seemed ready at any moment to start her gambols again and display her kittenish nature.
  • What a pity you weren't at the Arkharovs' on Thursday.
  • In the midst of his talk he glanced round at her.
  • Especially just at this age, so dangerous both for girls and boys.
  • I have heard that it harms the voice to train it at that age.
  • "Oh no, not at all too young!" replied the count.
  • Why, our mothers used to be married at twelve or thirteen.
  • She's turned out splendidly all the same, he added, winking at Vera.
  • She was already growing impatient, and stamped her foot, ready to cry at his not coming at once, when she heard the young man's discreet steps approaching neither quickly nor slowly.
  • At this Natasha dashed swiftly among the flower tubs and hid there.
  • Hardly had Boris gone than Sonya, flushed, in tears, and muttering angrily, came in at the other door.
  • Boris looked attentively and kindly at her eager face, but did not reply.
  • Would you like to kiss me? she whispered almost inaudibly, glancing up at him from under her brows, smiling, and almost crying from excitement.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna looked at Vera and paused.
  • The handsome Vera smiled contemptuously but did not seem at all hurt.
  • But as she passed the sitting room she noticed two couples sitting, one pair at each window.
  • Boris and Natasha were at the other window and ceased talking when Vera entered.
  • Sonya and Natasha looked at Vera with guilty, happy faces.
  • "You always manage to do things at the wrong time," continued Vera.
  • Though what she said was quite just, perhaps for that very reason no one replied, and the four simply looked at one another.
  • And at your age what secrets can there be between Natasha and Boris, or between you two?
  • Don't I know that at the rate we are living our means won't last long?
  • I have not seen him since we acted together at the Rumyantsovs' theatricals.
  • His position has not turned his head at all.
  • Still, I will take Boris and go to see him at once, and I shall speak to him straight out.
  • Let people think what they will of me, it's really all the same to me when my son's fate is at stake.
  • It's now two o'clock and you dine at four.
  • Boris said no more, but looked inquiringly at his mother without taking off his cloak.
  • Prince Vasili stared at her and at Boris questioningly and perplexed.
  • Evidently the prince understood her, and also understood, as he had done at Anna Pavlovna's, that it would be difficult to get rid of Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • But one cannot delay, Prince, at such a moment!
  • Consider that the welfare of his soul is at stake.
  • "Still the same; but what can you expect, this noise..." said the princess, looking at Anna Mikhaylovna as at a stranger.
  • I have come, and am at your service to help you nurse my uncle.
  • The story told about him at Count Rostov's was true.
  • He had now been for some days in Moscow and was staying as usual at his father's house.
  • Entering the drawing room, where the princesses spent most of their time, he greeted the ladies, two of whom were sitting at embroidery frames while a third read aloud.
  • Pierre stood looking at the sisters; then he bowed and said: Then I will go to my rooms.
  • The count is very, very ill, and you must not see him at all.
  • "England is done for," said he, scowling and pointing his finger at someone unseen.
  • But before Pierre--who at that moment imagined himself to be Napoleon in person and to have just effected the dangerous crossing of the Straits of Dover and captured London--could pronounce Pitt's sentence, he saw a well-built and handsome young officer entering his room.
  • Only fancy, I didn't know you at first.
  • Will you come to dinner at the Rostovs'?
  • After he had gone Pierre continued pacing up and down the room for a long time, no longer piercing an imaginary foe with his imaginary sword, but smiling at the remembrance of that pleasant, intelligent, and resolute young man.
  • At last she rang.
  • Do you wish it brought at once?
  • Anna Mikhaylovna instantly guessed her intention and stooped to be ready to embrace the countess at the appropriate moment.
  • His favorite occupation when not playing boston, a card game he was very fond of, was that of listener, especially when he succeeded in setting two loquacious talkers at one another.
  • It was just the moment before a big dinner when the assembled guests, expecting the summons to zakuska, * avoid engaging in any long conversation but think it necessary to move about and talk, in order to show that they are not at all impatient for their food.
  • Pierre had come just at dinnertime and was sitting awkwardly in the middle of the drawing room on the first chair he had come across, blocking the way for everyone.
  • Marya Dmitrievna paused at the door.
  • She took a pair of pear-shaped ruby earrings from her huge reticule and, having given them to the rosy Natasha, who beamed with the pleasure of her saint's-day fete, turned away at once and addressed herself to Pierre.
  • Pierre approached, looking at her in a childlike way through his spectacles.
  • "Well, I suppose it is time we were at table?" said Marya Dmitrievna.
  • At one end of the table sat the countess with Marya Dmitrievna on her right and Anna Mikhaylovna on her left, the other lady visitors were farther down.
  • From behind the crystal decanters and fruit vases, the count kept glancing at his wife and her tall cap with its light-blue ribbons, and busily filled his neighbors' glasses, not neglecting his own.
  • The countess in turn, without omitting her duties as hostess, threw significant glances from behind the pineapples at her husband whose face and bald head seemed by their redness to contrast more than usual with his gray hair.
  • At the ladies' end an even chatter of voices was heard all the time, at the men's end the voices sounded louder and louder, especially that of the colonel of hussars who, growing more and more flushed, ate and drank so much that the count held him up as a pattern to the other guests.
  • At the ladies' end an even chatter of voices was heard all the time, at the men's end the voices sounded louder and louder, especially that of the colonel of hussars who, growing more and more flushed, ate and drank so much that the count held him up as a pattern to the other guests.
  • Of the four crystal glasses engraved with the count's monogram that stood before his plate, Pierre held out one at random and drank with enjoyment, gazing with ever- increasing amiability at the other guests.
  • Natasha, who sat opposite, was looking at Boris as girls of thirteen look at the boy they are in love with and have just kissed for the first time.
  • Nicholas sat at some distance from Sonya, beside Julie Karagina, to whom he was again talking with the same involuntary smile.
  • At the men's end of the table the talk grew more and more animated.
  • "Connaissez-vous le Proverbe: * 'Jerome, Jerome, do not roam, but turn spindles at home!'?" said Shinshin, puckering his brows and smiling.
  • Zat is how ve old hussars look at it, and zere's an end of it!
  • Once more the conversations concentrated, the ladies' at the one end and the men's at the other.
  • Most of the guests, uncertain how to regard this sally, looked at the elders.
  • I have asked, whispered Natasha to her little brother and to Pierre, glancing at him again.
  • The count, holding his cards fanwise, kept himself with difficulty from dropping into his usual after-dinner nap, and laughed at everything.
  • The young people, at the countess' instigation, gathered round the clavichord and harp.
  • Natasha, who was treated as though she were grown up, was evidently very proud of this but at the same time felt shy.
  • Nicholas will tell her himself, and he doesn't care at all for Julie.
  • And she set off at a run along the passage.
  • At the visitors' request the young people sang the quartette, "The Brook," with which everyone was delighted.
  • At nighttime in the moon's fair glow How sweet, as fancies wander free, To feel that in this world there's one Who still is thinking but of thee!
  • Just look at her! exclaimed the countess as she crossed the ballroom, pointing to Natasha.
  • "Look at Papa!" shouted Natasha to the whole company, and quite forgetting that she was dancing with a grown-up partner she bent her curly head to her knees and made the whole room ring with her laughter.
  • Just look at the master!
  • Natasha kept pulling everyone by sleeve or dress, urging them to "look at Papa!" though as it was they never took their eyes off the couple.
  • The Military Governor himself? was being asked at the other side of the room.
  • The doctor glanced at his watch.
  • Then she shook her head and glanced up at the icons with a sigh.
  • His eyes too seemed strange; at one moment they looked impudently sly and at the next glanced round in alarm.
  • The princess continued to look at him without moving, and with the same dull expression.
  • "And then of course my family has also to be considered," Prince Vasili went on, testily pushing away a little table without looking at her.
  • Prince Vasili looked questioningly at the princess, but could not make out whether she was considering what he had just said or whether she was simply looking at him.
  • We will take it at once and show it to the count.
  • We've got to it at last--why did you not tell me about it sooner?
  • These men pressed close to the wall to let Pierre and Anna Mikhaylovna pass and did not evince the least surprise at seeing them there.
  • "But really, hadn't I better go away?" he asked, looking kindly at her over his spectacles.
  • All became silent and turned to look at the pale tear-worn Anna Mikhaylovna as she entered, and at the big stout figure of Pierre who, hanging his head, meekly followed her.
  • He noticed that they whispered to one another, casting significant looks at him with a kind of awe and even servility.
  • He looked at Prince Vasili in perplexity, and only later grasped that a stroke was an attack of illness.
  • He could not walk well on tiptoe and his whole body jerked at each step.
  • The eldest princess followed him, and the priests and deacons and some servants also went in at the door.
  • She evidently felt unable to look at him without laughing, but could not resist looking at him: so to be out of temptation she slipped quietly behind one of the columns.
  • When Pierre came up the count was gazing straight at him, but with a look the significance of which could not be understood by mortal man.
  • Pierre hesitated, not knowing what to do, and glanced inquiringly at his guide.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna made a hurried sign with her eyes, glancing at the sick man's hand and moving her lips as if to send it a kiss.
  • Once more Pierre looked questioningly at Anna Mikhaylovna to see what he was to do next.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna looked attentively at the sick man's eyes, trying to guess what he wanted; she pointed first to Pierre, then to some drink, then named Prince Vasili in an inquiring whisper, then pointed to the quilt.
  • He made an effort to look at the servant who stood constantly at the head of the bed.
  • "He is dozing," said Anna Mikhaylovna, observing that one of the princesses was coming to take her turn at watching.
  • Around the table all who were at Count Bezukhov's house that night had gathered to fortify themselves.
  • He looked inquiringly at his monitress and saw that she was again going on tiptoe to the reception room where they had left Prince Vasili and the eldest princess.
  • "But, my dear princess," answered Anna Mikhaylovna blandly but impressively, blocking the way to the bedroom and preventing the other from passing, "won't this be too much for poor Uncle at a moment when he needs repose?
  • Worldly conversation at a moment when his soul is already prepared...
  • Intriguer! she hissed viciously, and tugged with all her might at the portfolio.
  • Here, Pierre, tell them your opinion, said she, turning to the young man who, having come quite close, was gazing with astonishment at the angry face of the princess which had lost all dignity, and at the twitching cheeks of Prince Vasili.
  • "Vile woman!" shouted the princess, darting unexpectedly at Anna Mikhaylovna and snatching the portfolio from her.
  • At this moment that terrible door burst noisily open and banged against the wall.
  • Pierre looked at her over his spectacles.
  • Pierre understood nothing of all this and coloring shyly looked in silence at Princess Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • At Bald Hills, Prince Nicholas Andreevich Bolkonski's estate, the arrival of young Prince Andrew and his wife was daily expected, but this expectation did not upset the regular routine of life in the old prince's household.
  • He was himself always occupied: writing his memoirs, solving problems in higher mathematics, turning snuffboxes on a lathe, working in the garden, or superintending the building that was always going on at his estate.
  • He always came to table under precisely the same conditions, and not only at the same hour but at the same minute.
  • On the morning of the day that the young couple were to arrive, Princess Mary entered the antechamber as usual at the time appointed for the morning greeting.
  • She paused at the entrance.
  • The prince was working at the lathe and after glancing round continued his work.
  • At the sight of the letter red patches showed themselves on the princess' face.
  • I have looked at it.
  • She sat down at her writing table, on which stood miniature portraits and which was littered with books and papers.
  • Her eyes, always sad, now looked with particular hopelessness at her reflection in the glass.
  • I have had a letter from my brother, who announces his speedy arrival at Bald Hills with his wife.
  • The princess glanced at her watch and, seeing that she was five minutes late in starting her practice on the clavichord, went into the sitting room with a look of alarm.
  • Prince Andrew apparently knew this as well as Tikhon; he looked at his watch as if to ascertain whether his father's habits had changed since he was at home last, and, having assured himself that they had not, he turned to his wife.
  • "Why, this is a palace!" she said to her husband, looking around with the expression with which people compliment their host at a ball.
  • And with a glance round, she smiled at Tikhon, at her husband, and at the footman who accompanied them.
  • "Ah! what joy for the princess!" exclaimed she: "At last!
  • When Prince Andrew went in the two princesses, who had only met once before for a short time at his wedding, were in each other's arms warmly pressing their lips to whatever place they happened to touch.
  • "I knew the princess at once," put in Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • Princess Mary had turned toward her brother, and through her tears the loving, warm, gentle look of her large luminous eyes, very beautiful at that moment, rested on Prince Andrew's face.
  • Princess Mary was still looking silently at her brother and her beautiful eyes were full of love and sadness.
  • Princess Mary did not listen to the end, but continuing her train of thought turned to her sister-in-law with a tender glance at her figure.
  • You at least must tackle him properly, or else if he goes on like this he'll soon have us, too, for his subjects!
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • At the appointed hour the prince, powdered and shaven, entered the dining room.
  • At dinner the prince usually spoke to the taciturn Michael Ivanovich more often than to anyone else.
  • Prince Andrew, looking again at that genealogical tree, shook his head, laughing as a man laughs who looks at a portrait so characteristic of the original as to be amusing.
  • Princess Mary looked at her brother in surprise.
  • At that moment the great clock struck two and another with a shrill tone joined in from the drawing room.
  • As she became animated the prince looked at her more and more sternly, and suddenly, as if he had studied her sufficiently and had formed a definite idea of her, he turned away and addressed Michael Ivanovich.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • I don't sleep at night.
  • The little princess during the whole discussion and the rest of the dinner sat silent, glancing with a frightened look now at her father-in- law and now at Princess Mary.
  • At such moments one reviews the past and plans for the future.
  • Prince Andrew smiled as he looked at his sister, as we smile at those we think we thoroughly understand.
  • "I don't like your Mademoiselle Bourienne at all," said Prince Andrew.
  • Princess Mary was first surprised and then aghast at this question.
  • She looked timidly at her brother.
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • Prince Andrew looked sternly at her and an expression of anger suddenly came over his face.
  • He said nothing to her but looked at her forehead and hair, without looking at her eyes, with such contempt that the Frenchwoman blushed and went away without a word.
  • The coach with six horses was waiting at the porch.
  • When Prince Andrew entered the study the old man in his old-age spectacles and white dressing gown, in which he received no one but his son, sat at the table writing.
  • What? asked both princesses when they saw for a moment at the door Prince Andrew and the figure of the old man in a white dressing gown, spectacled and wigless, shouting in an angry voice.
  • "Andrew, already!" said the little princess, turning pale and looking with dismay at her husband.
  • Princess Mary, supporting her sister-in-law, still looked with her beautiful eyes full of tears at the door through which Prince Andrew had gone and made the sign of the cross in his direction.
  • That's all right! said he; and looking angrily at the unconscious little princess, he shook his head reprovingly and slammed the door.
  • Though the words of the order were not clear to the regimental commander, and the question arose whether the troops were to be in marching order or not, it was decided at a consultation between the battalion commanders to present the regiment in parade order, on the principle that it is always better to "bow too low than not bow low enough."
  • He walked about in front of the line and at every step pulled himself up, slightly arching his back.
  • What is this? shouted the regimental commander, thrusting forward his jaw and pointing at a soldier in the ranks of the third company in a greatcoat of bluish cloth, which contrasted with the others.
  • And the commander, turning to look at the adjutant, directed his jerky steps down the line.
  • Having snapped at an officer for an unpolished badge, at another because his line was not straight, he reached the third company.
  • "He's coming!" shouted the signaler at that moment.
  • Along the broad country road, edged on both sides by trees, came a high, light blue Viennese caleche, slightly creaking on its springs and drawn by six horses at a smart trot.
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian general were talking in low voices and Kutuzov smiled slightly as treading heavily he stepped down from the carriage just as if those two thousand men breathlessly gazing at him and the regimental commander did not exist.
  • At first Kutuzov stood still while the regiment moved; then he and the general in white, accompanied by the suite, walked between the ranks.
  • Thanks to the strictness and assiduity of its commander the regiment, in comparison with others that had reached Braunau at the same time, was in splendid condition.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • Behind Kutuzov, at a distance that allowed every softly spoken word to be heard, followed some twenty men of his suite.
  • Nesvitski laughed and nudged the others to make them look at the wag.
  • The hussar at that moment noticed the face of the red-nosed captain and his drawn-in stomach, and mimicked his expression and pose with such exactitude that Nesvitski could not help laughing.
  • When he looked at my feet, friend... well, thinks I...
  • Everybody said that Buonaparte himself was at Braunau.
  • Having jerked out these last words as soldiers do and waved his arms as if flinging something to the ground, the drummer--a lean, handsome soldier of forty--looked sternly at the singers and screwed up his eyes.
  • The commander-in-chief made a sign that the men should continue to march at ease, and he and all his suite showed pleasure at the sound of the singing and the sight of the dancing soldier and the gay and smartly marching men.
  • It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
  • Hussar cornet Zherkov had at one time, in Petersburg, belonged to the wild set led by Dolokhov.
  • One can at least be of use on the staff...
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian member of the Hofkriegsrath were sitting at the table on which a plan was spread out.
  • And Kutuzov smiled in a way that seemed to say, You are quite at liberty not to believe me and I don't even care whether you do or not, but you have no grounds for telling me so.
  • Kutuzov sighed deeply on finishing this paragraph and looked at the member of the Hofkriegsrath mildly and attentively.
  • Coming out of Kutuzov's room into the waiting room with the papers in his hand Prince Andrew came up to his comrade, the aide-de-camp on duty, Kozlovski, who was sitting at the window with a book.
  • But at that instant a tall Austrian general in a greatcoat, with the order of Maria Theresa on his neck and a black bandage round his head, who had evidently just arrived, entered quickly, slamming the door.
  • The unknown general looked disdainfully down at Kozlovski, who was rather short, as if surprised that anyone should not know him.
  • He took out a notebook, hurriedly scribbled something in pencil, tore out the leaf, gave it to Kozlovski, stepped quickly to the window, and threw himself into a chair, gazing at those in the room as if asking, "Why do they look at me?"
  • Involuntarily he felt a joyful agitation at the thought of the humiliation of arrogant Austria and that in a week's time he might, perhaps, see and take part in the first Russian encounter with the French since Suvorov met them.
  • He feared that Bonaparte's genius might outweigh all the courage of the Russian troops, and at the same time could not admit the idea of his hero being disgraced.
  • He bowed his head and scraped first with one foot and then with the other, awkwardly, like a child at a dancing lesson.
  • The nervous irritation aroused by the appearance of Mack, the news of his defeat, and the thought of what lay before the Russian army found vent in anger at Zherkov's untimely jest.
  • Nesvitski and Zherkov were so surprised by this outburst that they gazed at Bolkonski silently with wide-open eyes.
  • Don't you understand that either we are officers serving our Tsar and our country, rejoicing in the successes and grieving at the misfortunes of our common cause, or we are merely lackeys who care nothing for their master's business.
  • On October 11, the day when all was astir at headquarters over the news of Mack's defeat, the camp life of the officers of this squadron was proceeding as usual.
  • Then he remained silent for a while, and all at once looked cheerfully with his glittering, black eyes at Rostov.
  • If at least we had some women here; but there's nothing foh one to do but dwink.
  • At Bykov's, at the rat's...
  • At Bykov's, at the rat's...
  • "Wait, haven't you dropped it?" said Rostov, picking up the pillows one at a time and shaking them.
  • "Now then, you devil's puppet, look alive and hunt for it!" shouted Denisov, suddenly, turning purple and rushing at the man with a threatening gesture.
  • Denisov paused, thought a moment, and, evidently understanding what Rostov hinted at, seized his arm.
  • "And I tell you, don't you dahe to do it!" shouted Denisov, rushing at the cadet to restrain him.
  • "Has something happened?" he added, surprised at the cadet's troubled face.
  • Rostov rode up to it and saw Telyanin's horse at the porch.
  • "Yes," said Rostov as if it cost him a great deal to utter the word; and he sat down at the nearest table.
  • "Allow me to look at your purse," he said in a low, almost inaudible, voice.
  • Yes, yes," he said, growing suddenly pale, and added, "Look at it, young man."
  • Rostov took the purse in his hand, examined it and the money in it, and looked at Telyanin.
  • He was glad, and at the same instant began to pity the miserable man who stood before him, but the task he had begun had to be completed.
  • But at the door he stopped and then retraced his steps.
  • Is that how you look at it?
  • You are offended at being put on duty a bit, but why not apologize to an old and honorable officer?
  • You're quick at taking offense, but you don't mind disgracing the whole regiment!
  • Denisov remained silent and did not move, but occasionally looked with his glittering black eyes at Rostov.
  • Rostov, growing red and pale alternately, looked first at one officer and then at the other.
  • Kutuzov fell back toward Vienna, destroying behind him the bridges over the rivers Inn (at Braunau) and Traun (near Linz).
  • At midday the Russian baggage train, the artillery, and columns of troops were defiling through the town of Enns on both sides of the bridge.
  • The wide expanse that opened out before the heights on which the Russian batteries stood guarding the bridge was at times veiled by a diaphanous curtain of slanting rain, and then, suddenly spread out in the sunlight, far-distant objects could be clearly seen glittering as though freshly varnished.
  • They'll be fired on at the crossing.
  • The faces of officers and men brightened up at the sound.
  • At the same instant the sun came fully out from behind the clouds, and the clear sound of the solitary shot and the brilliance of the bright sunshine merged in a single joyous and spirited impression.
  • But the convoyman took no notice of the word "general" and shouted at the soldiers who were blocking his way.
  • The eyes of all the soldiers turned toward the women, and while the vehicle was passing at foot pace all the soldiers' remarks related to the two young ones.
  • "Where are you going?" asked an infantry officer who was eating an apple, also half smiling as he looked at the handsome girl.
  • When they had gone by, the same stream of soldiers followed, with the same kind of talk, and at last all stopped.
  • As often happens, the horses of a convoy wagon became restive at the end of the bridge, and the whole crowd had to wait.
  • See, here's an officer jammed in too-- different voices were saying in the crowd, as the men looked at one another, and all pressed toward the exit from the bridge.
  • Looking down at the waters of the Enns under the bridge, Nesvitski suddenly heard a sound new to him, of something swiftly approaching... something big, that splashed into the water.
  • "Just see where it carries to!" a soldier near by said sternly, looking round at the sound.
  • "What a dandy you are today!" said Nesvitski, looking at Denisov's new cloak and saddlecloth.
  • Having cleared the way Denisov stopped at the end of the bridge.
  • At last the baggage wagons had all crossed, the crush was less, and the last battalion came onto the bridge.
  • At the foot of the hill lay wasteland over which a few groups of our Cossack scouts were moving.
  • Suddenly on the road at the top of the high ground, artillery and troops in blue uniform were seen.
  • A group of Cossack scouts retired down the hill at a trot.
  • It was calm, and at intervals the bugle calls and the shouts of the enemy could be heard from the hill.
  • All were looking at the enemy in front and at the squadron commander, awaiting the word of command.
  • Evidently they were firing at the hussars, but the balls with rapid rhythmic whistle flew over the heads of the horsemen and fell somewhere beyond them.
  • The soldiers without turning their heads glanced at one another, curious to see their comrades' impression.
  • The quartermaster frowned, looking at the soldiers as if threatening to punish them.
  • He was glancing at everyone with a clear, bright expression, as if asking them to notice how calmly he sat under fire.
  • Look at me, cried Denisov who, unable to keep still on one spot, kept turning his horse in front of the squadron.
  • The staff captain on his broad-backed, steady mare came at a walk to meet him.
  • "Ah, Wostov," he cried noticing the cadet's bright face, "you've got it at last."
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • The colonel looked silently at the officer of the suite, at the stout staff officer, and at Zherkov, and he frowned.
  • Rostov no longer looked at the colonel, he had no time.
  • Rostov did not think what this call for stretchers meant; he ran on, trying only to be ahead of the others; but just at the bridge, not looking at the ground, he came on some sticky, trodden mud, stumbled, and fell on his hands.
  • "At boss zides, Captain," he heard the voice of the colonel, who, having ridden ahead, had pulled up his horse near the bridge, with a triumphant, cheerful face.
  • Rostov wiping his muddy hands on his breeches looked at his enemy and was about to run on, thinking that the farther he went to the front the better.
  • But Bogdanich, without looking at or recognizing Rostov, shouted to him:
  • How you look at things!
  • On the French side, amid the groups with cannon, a cloud of smoke appeared, then a second and a third almost simultaneously, and at the moment when the first report was heard a fourth was seen.
  • The infantry in their blue uniforms advanced toward the bridge at a run.
  • Nicholas Rostov turned away and, as if searching for something, gazed into the distance, at the waters of the Danube, at the sky, and at the sun.
  • At that instant the sun began to hide behind the clouds, and other stretchers came into view before Rostov.
  • Hacking away at the dogs!
  • But this sort of thing is the very devil, with them shooting at you like a target.
  • Austrian troops that had escaped capture at Ulm and had joined Kutuzov at Braunau now separated from the Russian army, and Kutuzov was left with only his own weak and exhausted forces.
  • As a mark of the commander-in-chief's special favor he was sent with the news of this victory to the Austrian court, now no longer at Vienna (which was threatened by the French) but at Brunn.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • Reviewing his impressions of the recent battle, picturing pleasantly to himself the impression his news of a victory would create, or recalling the send-off given him by the commander-in-chief and his fellow officers, Prince Andrew was galloping along in a post chaise enjoying the feelings of a man who has at length begun to attain a long-desired happiness.
  • At one of the post stations he overtook a convoy of Russian wounded.
  • Some of them were talking (he heard Russian words), others were eating bread; the more severely wounded looked silently, with the languid interest of sick children, at the envoy hurrying past them.
  • He expected to be at once presented to the Emperor.
  • At the chief entrance to the palace, however, an official came running out to meet him, and learning that he was a special messenger led him to another entrance.
  • The adjutant by his elaborate courtesy appeared to wish to ward off any attempt at familiarity on the part of the Russian messenger.
  • A wax candle stood at each side of the minister's bent bald head with its gray temples.
  • He went on reading to the end, without raising his eyes at the opening of the door and the sound of footsteps.
  • Having glanced through the dispatch he laid it on the table and looked at Prince Andrew, evidently considering something.
  • Be at the levee tomorrow after the parade.
  • Prince Andrew stayed at Brunn with Bilibin, a Russian acquaintance of his in the diplomatic service.
  • Besides it was pleasant, after his reception by the Austrians, to speak if not in Russian (for they were speaking French) at least with a Russian who would, he supposed, share the general Russian antipathy to the Austrians which was then particularly strong.
  • He was one of those, who, liking work, knew how to do it, and despite his indolence would sometimes spend a whole night at his writing table.
  • We had expected, as I told you, to get at their rear by seven in the morning but had not reached it by five in the afternoon.
  • And why didn't you do it at seven in the morning?
  • He looked straight at Prince Andrew and suddenly unwrinkled his forehead.
  • Kutuzov alone at last gains a real victory, destroying the spell of the invincibility of the French, and the Minister of War does not even care to hear the details.
  • Not only occupied, but Bonaparte is at Schonbrunn, and the count, our dear Count Vrbna, goes to him for orders.
  • "Really I don't care about that, I don't care at all," said Prince Andrew, beginning to understand that his news of the battle before Krems was really of small importance in view of such events as the fall of Austria's capital.
  • "If we live we shall see," replied Bilibin, his face again becoming smooth as a sign that the conversation was at an end.
  • Having dressed for his attendance at court in full parade uniform, which he had not worn for a long time, he went into Bilibin's study fresh, animated, and handsome, with his hand bandaged.
  • "La femme est la compagne de l'homme," * announced Prince Hippolyte, and began looking through a lorgnette at his elevated legs.
  • "The Berlin cabinet cannot express a feeling of alliance," began Hippolyte gazing round with importance at the others, "without expressing... as in its last note... you understand...
  • "I shall scarcely be able to avail myself of your hospitality, gentlemen, it is already time for me to go," replied Prince Andrew looking at his watch.
  • "At what o'clock did the battle begin?" asked the Emperor.
  • "I cannot inform Your Majesty at what o'clock the battle began at the front, but at Durrenstein, where I was, our attack began after five in the afternoon," replied Bolkonski growing more animated and expecting that he would have a chance to give a reliable account, which he had ready in his mind, of all he knew and had seen.
  • At what o'clock was General Schmidt killed?
  • At seven o'clock, I believe.
  • Yesterday's adjutant reproached him for not having stayed at the palace, and offered him his own house.
  • At the door he found a vehicle half full of luggage.
  • The scoundrel is again at our heels!
  • This affair of the Thabor Bridge, at Vienna....
  • Listening to Bilibin he was already imagining how on reaching the army he would give an opinion at the war council which would be the only one that could save the army, and how he alone would be entrusted with the executing of the plan.
  • Prince Auersperg feels his dignity at stake and orders the sergeant to be arrested.
  • "It's not treachery nor rascality nor stupidity: it is just as at Ulm... it is..."--he seemed to be trying to find the right expression.
  • But now I am off at once.
  • Prince Andrew looked inquiringly at him and gave no reply.
  • "Not at all," said Prince Andrew.
  • But as you are a philosopher, be a consistent one, look at the other side of the question and you will see that your duty, on the contrary, is to take care of yourself.
  • At each ascent or descent of the road the crowds were yet denser and the din of shouting more incessant.
  • The officer glanced at him, and without replying turned again to the soldier.
  • I was wrong to laugh at Mack, we're getting it still worse, said Nesvitski.
  • You must be ill to shiver like that, he added, noticing that Prince Andrew winced as at an electric shock.
  • "I can't make out at all," said Nesvitski.
  • The clerk, with cuffs turned up, was hastily writing at a tub turned bottom upwards.
  • He glanced at Prince Andrew and did not even nod to him.
  • "One can't write so fast, your honor," said the clerk, glancing angrily and disrespectfully at Kozlovski.
  • He looked straight at his adjutant's face without recognizing him.
  • Prince Andrew glanced at Kutuzov's face only a foot distant from him and involuntarily noticed the carefully washed seams of the scar near his temple, where an Ismail bullet had pierced his skull, and the empty eye socket.
  • The spy reported that the French, after crossing the bridge at Vienna, were advancing in immense force upon Kutuzov's line of communication with the troops that were arriving from Russia.
  • If Kutuzov decided to remain at Krems, Napoleon's army of one hundred and fifty thousand men would cut him off completely and surround his exhausted army of forty thousand, and he would find himself in the position of Mack at Ulm.
  • Marching thirty miles that stormy night across roadless hills, with his hungry, ill-shod soldiers, and losing a third of his men as stragglers by the way, Bagration came out on the Vienna-Znaim road at Hollabrunn a few hours ahead of the French who were approaching Hollabrunn from Vienna.
  • At eight o'clock in the morning
  • The Austrians let themselves be tricked at the crossing of the Vienna bridge, you are letting yourself be tricked by an aide-de-camp of the Emperor.
  • Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon Prince Andrew, who had persisted in his request to Kutuzov, arrived at Grunth and reported himself to Bagration.
  • Several officers, with flushed and weary faces, were sitting at the table eating and drinking.
  • Prince Andrew smiled involuntarily as he looked at the artillery officer Tushin, who silent and smiling, shifting from one stockinged foot to the other, glanced inquiringly with his large, intelligent, kindly eyes from Prince Andrew to the staff officer.
  • Prince Andrew glanced again at the artillery officer's small figure.
  • Prince Andrew and the officer rode up, looked at the entrenchment, and went on again.
  • At Grunth also some apprehension and alarm could be felt, but the nearer Prince Andrew came to the French lines the more confident was the appearance of our troops.
  • All their faces were as serene as if all this were happening at home awaiting peaceful encampment, and not within sight of the enemy before an action in which at least half of them would be left on the field.
  • A young officer with a bewildered and pained expression on his face stepped away from the man and looked round inquiringly at the adjutant as he rode by.
  • Besides the soldiers who formed the picket line on either side, there were many curious onlookers who, jesting and laughing, stared at their strange foreign enemies.
  • The soldiers forming the picket line, like showmen exhibiting a curiosity, no longer looked at the French but paid attention to the sight-seers and grew weary waiting to be relieved.
  • Prince Andrew halted to have a look at the French.
  • It's fine! answered Sidorov, who was considered an adept at French.
  • And Dolokhov swore at him in coarse soldier's Russian and shouldering his musket walked away.
  • Before the guns an artillery sentry was pacing up and down; he stood at attention when the officer arrived, but at a sign resumed his measured, monotonous pacing.
  • Our infantry were stationed there, and at the farthest point the dragoons.
  • The ground seemed to groan at the terrible impact.
  • Mounting his horse again Prince Andrew lingered with the battery, looking at the puff from the gun that had sent the ball.
  • Lemarrois had just arrived at a gallop with Bonaparte's stern letter, and Murat, humiliated and anxious to expiate his fault, had at once moved his forces to attack the center and outflank both the Russian wings, hoping before evening and before the arrival of the Emperor to crush the contemptible detachment that stood before him.
  • Prince Andrew gazed with anxious curiosity at that impassive face and wished he could tell what, if anything, this man was thinking and feeling at that moment.
  • Is there anything at all behind that impassive face?
  • Behind Prince Bagration rode an officer of the suite, the prince's personal adjutant, Zherkov, an orderly officer, the staff officer on duty, riding a fine bobtailed horse, and a civilian--an accountant who had asked permission to be present at the battle out of curiosity.
  • Prince Andrew remembered the story of Suvorov giving his saber to Bagration in Italy, and the recollection was particularly pleasant at that moment.
  • No one had given Tushin orders where and at what to fire, but after consulting his sergeant major, Zakharchenko, for whom he had great respect, he had decided that it would be a good thing to set fire to the village.
  • Prince Bagration turned to the officer and with his dull eyes looked at him in silence.
  • He rode off at a walk to the right and sent an adjutant to the dragoons with orders to attack the French.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • All he knew was that at the commencement of the action balls and shells began flying all over his regiment and hitting men and that afterwards someone had shouted "Cavalry!" and our men had begun firing.
  • They were still firing, not at the cavalry which had disappeared, but at French infantry who had come into the hollow and were firing at our men.
  • Prince Andrew was struck by the changed expression on Prince Bagration's face at this moment.
  • "Please, your excellency, for God's sake!" he kept saying, glancing for support at an officer of the suite who turned away from him.
  • At that moment he was clearly thinking of nothing but how dashing a fellow he would appear as he passed the commander.
  • He carried close to his leg a narrow unsheathed sword (small, curved, and not like a real weapon) and looked now at the superior officers and now back at the men without losing step, his whole powerful body turning flexibly.
  • A fat major skirted a bush, puffing and falling out of step; a soldier who had fallen behind, his face showing alarm at his defection, ran at a trot, panting to catch up with his company.
  • But at the moment the first report was heard, Bagration looked round and shouted, "Hurrah!"
  • The retirement of the center to the other side of the dip in the ground at the rear was hurried and noisy, but the different companies did not get mixed.
  • The command of the left flank belonged by seniority to the commander of the regiment Kutuzov had reviewed at Braunau and in which Dolokhov was serving as a private.
  • The general and colonel looked sternly and significantly at one another like two fighting cocks preparing for battle, each vainly trying to detect signs of cowardice in the other.
  • "If only they would be quick!" thought Rostov, feeling that at last the time had come to experience the joy of an attack of which he had so often heard from his fellow hussars.
  • At a twot fo'ward!
  • Rook pulled at the reins and started of his own accord.
  • "Oh, how I will slash at him!" thought Rostov, gripping the hilt of his saber.
  • "Let anyone come my way now," thought Rostov driving his spurs into Rook and letting him go at a full gallop so that he outstripped the others.
  • Rostov asked and answered at the same instant.
  • "Can something bad have happened to me?" he wondered as he got up: and at that moment he felt that something superfluous was hanging on his benumbed left arm.
  • Can they be coming at me?
  • He seized his pistol and, instead of firing it, flung it at the Frenchman and ran with all his might toward the bushes.
  • Rapidly leaping the furrows, he fled across the field with the impetuosity he used to show at catchplay, now and then turning his good-natured, pale, young face to look back.
  • But at the same time, his left arm felt as heavy as if a seventy-pound weight were tied to it.
  • But at that moment the French who were attacking, suddenly and without any apparent reason, ran back and disappeared from the outskirts, and Russian sharpshooters showed themselves in the copse.
  • Timokhin, armed only with a sword, had rushed at the enemy with such a desperate cry and such mad, drunken determination that, taken by surprise, the French had thrown down their muskets and run.
  • Dolokhov, running beside Timokhin, killed a Frenchman at close quarters and was the first to seize the surrendering French officer by his collar.
  • Our reserve units were able to join up, and the fight was at an end.
  • I remained at the front.
  • Look at them scurrying!
  • Look at the smoke, the smoke! exclaimed the artillerymen, brightening up.
  • As if urging each other on, the soldiers cried at each shot: Fine!
  • The French columns that had advanced beyond the village went back; but as though in revenge for this failure, the enemy placed ten guns to the right of the village and began firing them at Tushin's battery.
  • Little Tushin, moving feebly and awkwardly, kept telling his orderly to "refill my pipe for that one!" and then, scattering sparks from it, ran forward shading his eyes with his small hand to look at the French.
  • "Smack at 'em, lads!" he kept saying, seizing the guns by the wheels and working the screws himself.
  • Only when a man was killed or wounded did he frown and turn away from the sight, shouting angrily at the men who, as is always the case, hesitated about lifting the injured or dead.
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer--all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
  • In that world, the handsome drunkard Number One of the second gun's crew was "uncle"; Tushin looked at him more often than at anyone else and took delight in his every movement.
  • The sound of musketry at the foot of the hill, now diminishing, now increasing, seemed like someone's breathing.
  • He imagined himself as an enormously tall, powerful man who was throwing cannon balls at the French with both hands.
  • It was the staff officer who had turned him out of the booth at Grunth.
  • "Why are they down on me?" thought Tushin, looking in alarm at his superior.
  • Tushin gave no orders, and, silently-- fearing to speak because at every word he felt ready to weep without knowing why--rode behind on his artillery nag.
  • At the foot of the hill, a pale hussar cadet, supporting one hand with the other, came up to Tushin and asked for a seat.
  • How they shot at their own fellows!
  • He kept closing his eyes and then again looking at the fire, which seemed to him dazzlingly red, and at the feeble, round-shouldered figure of Tushin who was sitting cross-legged like a Turk beside him.
  • Rostov looked at and listened listlessly to what passed before and around him.
  • Our officers were flocking in to look at him.
  • Several of those present smiled at Zherkov's words, expecting one of his usual jokes, but noticing that what he was saying redounded to the glory of our arms and of the day's work, they assumed a serious expression, though many of them knew that what he was saying was a lie devoid of any foundation.
  • Tushin appeared at the threshold and made his way timidly from behind the backs of the generals.
  • "How was it a gun was abandoned?" asked Bagration, frowning, not so much at the captain as at those who were laughing, among whom Zherkov laughed loudest.
  • He was afraid of getting some other officer into trouble, and silently fixed his eyes on Bagration as a schoolboy who has blundered looks at an examiner.
  • Prince Andrew looked at Tushin from under his brows and his fingers twitched nervously.
  • I went there and found two thirds of the men and horses knocked out, two guns smashed, and no supports at all.
  • Prince Bagration and Tushin looked with equal intentness at Bolkonski, who spoke with suppressed agitation.
  • And when will all this end? thought Rostov, looking at the changing shadows before him.
  • He was alone now, except for a soldier who was sitting naked at the other side of the fire, warming his thin yellow body.
  • Yet I was once at home, strong, happy, and loved.
  • He looked at the snowflakes fluttering above the fire and remembered a Russian winter at his warm, bright home, his fluffy fur coat, his quickly gliding sleigh, his healthy body, and all the affection and care of his family.
  • He had Pierre at hand in Moscow and procured for him an appointment as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, which at that time conferred the status of Councilor of State, and insisted on the young man accompanying him to Petersburg and staying at his house.
  • She could not refrain from weeping at these words.
  • His whole time was taken up with dinners and balls and was spent chiefly at Prince Vasili's house in the company of the stout princess, his wife, and his beautiful daughter Helene.
  • Another group was at the tea table.
  • (She glanced at Helene and smiled at her.)
  • She looked at her niece, as if inquiring what she was to do with these people.
  • "That is probably the work of Vinesse," said Pierre, mentioning a celebrated miniaturist, and he leaned over the table to take the snuffbox while trying to hear what was being said at the other table.
  • She was, as always at evening parties, wearing a dress such as was then fashionable, cut very low at front and back.
  • And at that moment Pierre felt that Helene not only could, but must, be his wife, and that it could not be otherwise.
  • It is good to have a friend like the prince, she said, smiling at Prince Vasili.
  • Pierre did not look at Helene nor she at him.
  • But at the very time he was expressing this conviction to himself, in another part of his mind her image rose in all its womanly beauty.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • Pierre knew that everyone was waiting for him to say a word and cross a certain line, and he knew that sooner or later he would step across it, but an incomprehensible terror seized him at the thought of that dreadful step.
  • Pierre was one of those who are only strong when they feel themselves quite innocent, and since that day when he was overpowered by a feeling of desire while stooping over the snuffbox at Anna Pavlovna's, an unacknowledged sense of the guilt of that desire paralyzed his will.
  • On Helene's name day, a small party of just their own people--as his wife said--met for supper at Prince Vasili's.
  • The visitors were seated at supper.
  • At the other end sat the younger and less important guests, and there too sat the members of the family, and Pierre and Helene, side by side.
  • At one end of the table, the old chamberlain was heard assuring an old baroness that he loved her passionately, at which she laughed; at the other could be heard the story of the misfortunes of some Mary Viktorovna or other.
  • At one end of the table, the old chamberlain was heard assuring an old baroness that he loved her passionately, at which she laughed; at the other could be heard the story of the misfortunes of some Mary Viktorovna or other.
  • At the center of the table, Prince Vasili attracted everybody's attention.
  • And again his handkerchief, and again: 'Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides,'... and tears, till at last somebody else was asked to read it.
  • At the head of the table, where the honored guests sat, everyone seemed to be in high spirits and under the influence of a variety of exciting sensations.
  • But much as all the rest laughed, talked, and joked, much as they enjoyed their Rhine wine, saute, and ices, and however they avoided looking at the young couple, and heedless and unobservant as they seemed of them, one could feel by the occasional glances they gave that the story about Sergey Kuzmich, the laughter, and the food were all a pretense, and that the whole attention of that company was directed to-- Pierre and Helene.
  • Prince Vasili mimicked the sobbing of Sergey Kuzmich and at the same time his eyes glanced toward his daughter, and while he laughed the expression on his face clearly said: "Yes... it's getting on, it will all be settled today."
  • Anna Pavlovna threatened him on behalf of "our dear Vyazmitinov," and in her eyes, which, for an instant, glanced at Pierre, Prince Vasili read a congratulation on his future son-in-law and on his daughter's happiness.
  • The old princess sighed sadly as she offered some wine to the old lady next to her and glanced angrily at her daughter, and her sigh seemed to say: "Yes, there's nothing left for you and me but to sip sweet wine, my dear, now that the time has come for these young ones to be thus boldly, provocatively happy."
  • "And what nonsense all this is that I am saying!" thought a diplomatist, glancing at the happy faces of the lovers.
  • I do not know, but it will certainly happen! thought Pierre, glancing at those dazzling shoulders close to his eyes.
  • So why should I not stay at his house?
  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
  • Prince Vasili smiled, and Pierre noticed that everyone was smiling at him and Helene.
  • The old general grumbled at his wife when she asked how his leg was.
  • The sight of the discomposure of that old man of the world touched Pierre: he looked at Helene and she too seemed disconcerted, and her look seemed to say: "Well, it is your own fault."
  • Pierre held the hand of his betrothed in silence, looking at her beautiful bosom as it rose and fell.
  • He looked at her face.
  • Whether he was in a bad temper because Prince Vasili was coming, or whether his being in a bad temper made him specially annoyed at Prince Vasili's visit, he was in a bad temper, and in the morning Tikhon had already advised the architect not to go to the prince with his report.
  • However, at nine o'clock the prince, in his velvet coat with a sable collar and cap, went out for his usual walk.
  • The prince looked at his daughter's frightened face and snorted.
  • When the little princess had grown accustomed to life at Bald Hills, she took a special fancy to Mademoiselle Bourienne, spent whole days with her, asked her to sleep in her room, and often talked with her about the old prince and criticized him.
  • (He looked at his blushing daughter.)
  • The little princess was sitting at a small table, chattering with Masha, her maid.
  • It can never happen! she said, looking at herself in the glass.
  • The little princess and Mademoiselle Bourienne had already received from Masha, the lady's maid, the necessary report of how handsome the minister's son was, with his rosy cheeks and dark eyebrows, and with what difficulty the father had dragged his legs upstairs while the son had followed him like an eagle, three steps at a time.
  • They'll be announcing that the gentlemen are in the drawing room and we shall have to go down, and you have not smartened yourself up at all!
  • "No really, my dear, this dress is not pretty," said Lise, looking sideways at Princess Mary from a little distance.
  • You know the fate of your whole life may be at stake.
  • The three voices, hers, Mademoiselle Bourienne's, and Katie's, who was laughing at something, mingled in a merry sound, like the chirping of birds.
  • Her voice sounded so serious and so sad that the chirping of the birds was silenced at once.
  • They looked at the beautiful, large, thoughtful eyes full of tears and of thoughts, gazing shiningly and imploringly at them, and understood that it was useless and even cruel to insist.
  • "At least, change your coiffure," said the little princess.
  • She was looking at them with an expression they both knew, an expression thoughtful and sad.
  • She fancied a child, her own--such as she had seen the day before in the arms of her nurse's daughter--at her own breast, the husband standing by and gazing tenderly at her and the child.
  • The prince will be out in a moment, came the maid's voice at the door.
  • She saw Prince Vasili's face, serious for an instant at the sight of her, but immediately smiling again, and the little princess curiously noting the impression "Marie" produced on the visitors.
  • When she looked up at him she was struck by his beauty.
  • Anatole stood with his right thumb under a button of his uniform, his chest expanded and his back drawn in, slightly swinging one foot, and, with his head a little bent, looked with beaming face at the princess without speaking and evidently not thinking about her at all.
  • It's not as at Annette's * receptions where you always ran away; you remember cette chere Annette!
  • "Why is it you were never at Annette's?" the little princess asked Anatole.
  • Oh!" and she shook her finger at him, "I have even heard of your doings in Paris!"
  • Anatole answered the Frenchwoman very readily and, looking at her with a smile, talked to her about her native land.
  • "Not at all bad!" he thought, examining her, "not at all bad, that little companion!
  • "Got herself up like a fool!" he thought, looking irritably at her.
  • Anatole kissed the old man, and looked at him with curiosity and perfect composure, waiting for a display of the eccentricities his father had told him to expect.
  • He seemed to listen attentively to what Prince Vasili said, but kept glancing at Princess Mary.
  • So her future shaped itself in Mademoiselle Bourienne's head at the very time she was talking to Anatole about Paris.
  • Can it be possible? she thought, not daring to look at his face, but still feeling his eyes gazing at her.
  • And smilingly raising a finger at him, she left the room.
  • If she has no pride for herself she might at least have some for my sake!
  • She must be shown that the blockhead thinks nothing of her and looks only at Bourienne.
  • When Princess Mary went to her father's room at the usual hour, Mademoiselle Bourienne and Anatole met in the conservatory.
  • He came to the point at once, treating her ceremoniously.
  • Princess Mary looked at them in silence.
  • At last Mademoiselle Bourienne gave a scream and ran away.
  • The princess' beautiful eyes with all their former calm radiance were looking with tender affection and pity at Mademoiselle Bourienne's pretty face.
  • I don't wish to marry, she answered positively, glancing at Prince Vasili and at her father with her beautiful eyes.
  • Not till midwinter was the count at last handed a letter addressed in his son's handwriting.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who always knew everything that passed in the house, on hearing of the arrival of the letter went softly into the room and found the count with it in his hand, sobbing and laughing at the same time.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna sat down beside him, with her own handkerchief wiped the tears from his eyes and from the letter, then having dried her own eyes she comforted the count, and decided that at dinner and till teatime she would prepare the countess, and after tea, with God's help, would inform her.
  • Each time that these hints began to make the countess anxious and she glanced uneasily at the count and at Anna Mikhaylovna, the latter very adroitly turned the conversation to insignificant matters.
  • After dinner, she rushed head long after Anna Mikhaylovna and, dashing at her, flung herself on her neck as soon as she overtook her in the sitting room.
  • Then I will go and tell at once.
  • "No, on my true word of honor," said Natasha, crossing herself, "I won't tell anyone!" and she ran off at once to Sonya.
  • No! there's nothing at all.
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with wondering and inquisitive eyes, and said nothing.
  • At first he heard the sound of indifferent voices, then Anna Mikhaylovna's voice alone in a long speech, then a cry, then silence, then both voices together with glad intonations, and then footsteps.
  • When she saw the count, she stretched out her arms to him, embraced his bald head, over which she again looked at the letter and the portrait, and in order to press them again to her lips, she slightly pushed away the bald head.
  • When she heard this Sonya blushed so that tears came into her eyes and, unable to bear the looks turned upon her, ran away into the dancing hall, whirled round it at full speed with her dress puffed out like a balloon, and, flushed and smiling, plumped down on the floor.
  • This was quite true, but the count, the countess, and Natasha looked at her reproachfully.
  • The Guards, just arrived from Russia, spent the night ten miles from Olmutz and next morning were to come straight to the review, reaching the field at Olmutz by ten o'clock.
  • They had come by easy stages, their knapsacks conveyed on carts, and the Austrian authorities had provided excellent dinners for the officers at every halting place.
  • The regiments had entered and left the town with their bands playing, and by the Grand Duke's orders the men had marched all the way in step (a practice on which the Guards prided themselves), the officers on foot and at their proper posts.
  • Berg and Boris, having rested after yesterday's march, were sitting, clean and neatly dressed, at a round table in the clean quarters allotted to them, playing chess.
  • At that moment the door opened.
  • "Here he is at last!" shouted Rostov.
  • Oh, you petisenfans, allay cushay dormir! he exclaimed, imitating his Russian nurse's French, at which he and Boris used to laugh long ago.
  • They had not met for nearly half a year and, being at the age when young men take their first steps on life's road, each saw immense changes in the other, quite a new reflection of the society in which they had taken those first steps.
  • The German landlady, hearing Rostov's loud voice, popped her head in at the door.
  • Without answering, Rostov shook the soldier's Cross of St. George fastened to the cording of his uniform and, indicating a bandaged arm, glanced at Berg with a smile.
  • After reading a few lines, he glanced angrily at Berg, then, meeting his eyes, hid his face behind the letter.
  • So far everything's all right, but I confess I should much like to be an adjutant and not remain at the front.
  • Would you believe it, Count, I was not at all alarmed, because I knew I was right.
  • So, Count, there never is any negligence in my company, and so my conscience was at ease.
  • Well, he stormed at me, as the saying is, stormed and stormed and stormed!
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • His hearers expected a story of how beside himself and all aflame with excitement, he had flown like a storm at the square, cut his way in, slashed right and left, how his saber had tasted flesh and he had fallen exhausted, and so on.
  • Glancing, however, at Boris, he saw that he too seemed ashamed of the hussar of the line.
  • "As to your business," Prince Andrew continued, addressing Boris, "we will talk of it later" (and he looked round at Rostov).
  • "Yes, stories!" repeated Rostov loudly, looking with eyes suddenly grown furious, now at Boris, now at Bolkonski.
  • And he was still more angry at having omitted to say it.
  • He ordered his horse at once and, coldly taking leave of Boris, rode home.
  • And at that moment, though the day was still, a light gust of wind blowing over the army slightly stirred the streamers on the lances and the unfolded standards fluttered against their staffs.
  • It looked as if by that slight motion the army itself was expressing its joy at the approach of the Emperors.
  • Then, like the crowing of cocks at sunrise, this was repeated by others from various sides and all became silent.
  • It seemed as though not the trumpeters were playing, but as if the army itself, rejoicing at the Emperors' approach, had naturally burst into music.
  • How gladly would he have died at once for his Tsar!
  • Farther and farther he rode away, stopping at other regiments, till at last only his white plumes were visible to Rostov from amid the suites that surrounded the Emperors.
  • Is it worth thinking or speaking of it at such a moment?
  • At a time of such love, such rapture, and such self-sacrifice, what do any of our quarrels and affronts matter?
  • When the Emperor had passed nearly all the regiments, the troops began a ceremonial march past him, and Rostov on Bedouin, recently purchased from Denisov, rode past too, at the rear of his squadron--that is, alone and in full view of the Emperor.
  • One adjutant, nearest the door, was sitting at the table in a Persian dressing gown, writing.
  • Only let me report this gentleman's business, and I shall be at your disposal.
  • It was late in the evening when they entered the palace at Olmutz occupied by the Emperors and their retinues.
  • The council of war was just over when Prince Andrew accompanied by Boris arrived at the palace to find Dolgorukov.
  • Everyone at headquarters was still under the spell of the day's council, at which the party of the young had triumphed.
  • Prince Andrew introduced his protege, but Prince Dolgorukov politely and firmly pressing his hand said nothing to Boris and, evidently unable to suppress the thoughts which were uppermost in his mind at that moment, addressed Prince Andrew in French.
  • And the talkative Dolgorukov, turning now to Boris, now to Prince Andrew, told how Bonaparte wishing to test Markov, our ambassador, purposely dropped a handkerchief in front of him and stood looking at Markov, probably expecting Markov to pick it up for him, and how Markov immediately dropped his own beside it and picked it up without touching Bonaparte's.
  • Boris was excited by the thought of being so close to the higher powers as he felt himself to be at that moment.
  • This short man nodded to Dolgorukov as to an intimate friend and stared at Prince Andrew with cool intensity, walking straight toward him and evidently expecting him to bow or to step out of his way.
  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
  • He was breathless with agitation, his face was red, and when he heard some French spoken he at once began speaking to the officers, addressing first one, then another.
  • And at every word he added: "But don't hurt my little horse!" and stroked the animal.
  • He was filled with happiness at his nearness to the Emperor.
  • Then all at once he raised his eyebrows, abruptly touched his horse with his left foot, and galloped on.
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • The troops of the vanguard were stationed before Wischau, within sight of the enemy's lines, which all day long had yielded ground to us at the least firing.
  • "Not 'our Sovereign, the Emperor,' as they say at official dinners," said he, "but the health of our Sovereign, that good, enchanting, and great man!
  • "If we fought before," he said, "not letting the French pass, as at Schon Grabern, what shall we not do now when he is at the front?
  • The next day the Emperor stopped at Wischau, and Villier, his physician, was repeatedly summoned to see him.
  • At headquarters and among the troops near by the news spread that the Emperor was unwell.
  • At midday he was admitted to the Emperor, and an hour later he rode off with Prince Dolgorukov to the advanced post of the French army.
  • To the joy and pride of the whole army, a personal interview was refused, and instead of the Sovereign, Prince Dolgorukov, the victor at Wischau, was sent with Savary to negotiate with Napoleon if, contrary to expectations, these negotiations were actuated by a real desire for peace.
  • The concentrated activity which had begun at the Emperor's headquarters in the morning and had started the whole movement that followed was like the first movement of the main wheel of a large tower clock.
  • At six in the evening, Kutuzov went to the Emperor's headquarters and after staying but a short time with the Tsar went to see the grand marshal of the court, Count Tolstoy.
  • "Well, how d'you do, my dear fellow?" said Dolgorukov, who was sitting at tea with Bilibin.
  • But they heard him at the council of war and will hear him when he talks sense, but to temporize and wait for something now when Bonaparte fears nothing so much as a general battle is impossible.
  • That's the sort of man he is, and nothing more, replied Dolgorukov, looking round at Bilibin with a smile.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew began to demonstrate the defects of the latter and the merits of his own plan, Prince Dolgorukov ceased to listen to him and gazed absent-mindedly not at the map, but at Prince Andrew's face.
  • Kutuzov looked sternly at his adjutant and, after a pause, replied: I think the battle will be lost, and so I told Count Tolstoy and asked him to tell the Emperor.
  • Weyrother evidently felt himself to be at the head of a movement that had already become unrestrainable.
  • Whether he was pulling it or being pushed by it he did not know, but rushed along at headlong speed with no time to consider what this movement might lead to.
  • He interrupted him, talked rapidly and indistinctly, without looking at the man he was addressing, and did not reply to questions put to him.
  • He was bespattered with mud and had a pitiful, weary, and distracted air, though at the same time he was haughty and self-confident.
  • At last Bagration's orderly came with the news that the prince could not attend.
  • Prince Andrew came in to inform the commander-in-chief of this and, availing himself of permission previously given him by Kutuzov to be present at the council, he remained in the room.
  • At the sound of Weyrother's voice, he opened his one eye with an effort.
  • If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander-in-chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else--he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.
  • Weyrother, with the gesture of a man too busy to lose a moment, glanced at Kutuzov and, having convinced himself that he was asleep, took up a paper and in a loud, monotonous voice began to read out the dispositions for the impending battle, under a heading which he also read out:
  • He remained stubbornly silent, gazing at Weyrother's face, and only turned away his eyes when the Austrian chief of staff finished reading.
  • Then Miloradovich looked round significantly at the other generals.
  • But the Austrian general, continuing to read, frowned angrily and jerked his elbows, as if to say: "You can tell me your views later, but now be so good as to look at the map and listen."
  • When the reading which lasted more than an hour was over, Langeron again brought his snuffbox to rest and, without looking at Weyrother or at anyone in particular, began to say how difficult it was to carry out such a plan in which the enemy's position was assumed to be known, whereas it was perhaps not known, since the enemy was in movement.
  • He listened to what Langeron said, as if remarking, "So you are still at that silly business!" quickly closed his eye again, and let his head sink still lower.
  • But Miloradovich was at that moment evidently thinking of anything rather than of what the generals were disputing about.
  • Kutuzov here woke up, coughed heavily, and looked round at the generals.
  • And suddenly, at this thought of death, a whole series of most distant, most intimate, memories rose in his imagination: he remembered his last parting from his father and his wife; he remembered the days when he first loved her.
  • And his fancy pictured the battle, its loss, the concentration of fighting at one point, and the hesitation of all the commanders.
  • And then that happy moment, that Toulon for which he had so long waited, presents itself to him at last.
  • On this knoll there was a white patch that Rostov could not at all make out: was it a glade in the wood lit up by the moon, or some unmelted snow, or some white houses?
  • How he looked at me and wished to say something, but dared not....
  • All at once it seemed to him that he was being fired at.
  • At the moment he opened his eyes he heard in front of him, where the enemy was, the long-drawn shouts of thousands of voices.
  • His horse and the horse of the hussar near him pricked their ears at these shouts.
  • Rostov's horse was also getting restive: it pawed the frozen ground, pricking its ears at the noise and looking at the lights.
  • Having descended the hill at a trot, he no longer saw either our own or the enemy's fires, but heard the shouting of the French more loudly and distinctly.
  • Four more reports followed at intervals, and the bullets passed somewhere in the fog singing in different tones.
  • Rostov reined in his horse, whose spirits had risen, like his own, at the firing, and went back at a footpace.
  • Only when approaching Bagration did Rostov let his horse gallop again, and with his hand at the salute rode up to the general.
  • They are the same battalions you broke at Hollabrunn and have pursued ever since to this place.
  • At five in the morning it was still quite dark.
  • Last night I looked at the campfires and there was no end of them.
  • We were ordered to be at the place before nine, but we haven't got halfway.
  • And the feeling of energy with which the troops had started began to turn into vexation and anger at the stupid arrangements and at the Germans.
  • At the front an altercation occurred between an Austrian guide and a Russian general.
  • After an hour's delay they at last moved on, descending the hill.
  • In front in the fog a shot was heard and then another, at first irregularly at varying intervals--trata... tat--and then more and more regularly and rapidly, and the action at the Goldbach Stream began.
  • The fog lay unbroken like a sea down below, but higher up at the village of Schlappanitz where Napoleon stood with his marshals around him, it was quite light.
  • He gazed silently at the hills which seemed to rise out of the sea of mist and on which the Russian troops were moving in the distance, and he listened to the sounds of firing in the valley.
  • He looked now at the Pratzen Heights, now at the sun floating up out of the mist.
  • At eight o'clock Kutuzov rode to Pratzen at the head of the fourth column, Miloradovich's, the one that was to take the place of Przebyszewski's and Langeron's columns which had already gone down into the valley.
  • At eight o'clock Kutuzov rode to Pratzen at the head of the fourth column, Miloradovich's, the one that was to take the place of Przebyszewski's and Langeron's columns which had already gone down into the valley.
  • He was in a state of suppressed excitement and irritation, though controlledly calm as a man is at the approach of a long-awaited moment.
  • He could not look calmly at the standards of the passing battalions.
  • The commander-in-chief was standing at the end of the village letting the troops pass by him.
  • The colonel at the head of the regiment was much surprised at the commander-in-chief's order to throw out skirmishers.
  • He had felt perfectly sure that there were other troops in front of him and that the enemy must be at least six miles away.
  • Just then at a distance behind Kutuzov was heard the sound of regiments saluting, and this sound rapidly came nearer along the whole extended line of the advancing Russian columns.
  • Two of them rode side by side in front, at full gallop.
  • Kutuzov, affecting the manners of an old soldier at the front, gave the command "Attention!" and rode up to the Emperors with a salute.
  • At the Olmutz review he had seemed more majestic; here he seemed brighter and more energetic.
  • He was slightly flushed after galloping two miles, and reining in his horse he sighed restfully and looked round at the faces of his suite, young and animated as his own.
  • The Tsar heard but obviously did not like the reply; he shrugged his rather round shoulders and glanced at Novosiltsev who was near him, as if complaining of Kutuzov.
  • "You know, Michael Ilarionovich, we are not on the Empress' Field where a parade does not begin till all the troops are assembled," said the Tsar with another glance at the Emperor Francis, as if inviting him if not to join in at least to listen to what he was saying.
  • The Apsheron men, excited by the Tsar's presence, passed in step before the Emperors and their suites at a bold, brisk pace.
  • The Emperor's horse started at the sudden cry.
  • Kutuzov accompanied by his adjutants rode at a walking pace behind the carabineers.
  • Prince Andrew, who was a little behind looking at them, turned to an adjutant to ask him for a field glass.
  • "Look, look!" said this adjutant, looking not at the troops in the distance, but down the hill before him.
  • But at that very instant a cloud of smoke spread all round, firing was heard quite close at hand, and a voice of naive terror barely two steps from Prince Andrew shouted, Brothers!
  • And at this as if at a command, everyone began to run.
  • Nesvitski with an angry face, red and unlike himself, was shouting to Kutuzov that if he did not ride away at once he would certainly be taken prisoner.
  • "Stop them!" he shouted, and at the same moment, probably realizing that it was impossible to stop them, spurred his horse and rode to the right.
  • "Stop those wretches!" gasped Kutuzov to the regimental commander, pointing to the flying soldiers; but at that instant, as if to punish him for those words, bullets flew hissing across the regiment and across Kutuzov's suite like a flock of little birds.
  • The French had attacked the battery and, seeing Kutuzov, were firing at him.
  • After this volley the regimental commander clutched at his leg; several soldiers fell, and a second lieutenant who was holding the flag let it fall from his hands.
  • "Here it is!" thought he, seizing the staff of the standard and hearing with pleasure the whistle of bullets evidently aimed at him.
  • But he did not look at them: he looked only at what was going on in front of him--at the battery.
  • He now saw clearly the figure of a red-haired gunner with his shako knocked awry, pulling one end of a mop while a French soldier tugged at the other.
  • "What are they about?" thought Prince Andrew as he gazed at them.
  • "How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew--"not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky!
  • And how happy I am to have found it at last!
  • On our right flank commanded by Bagration, at nine o'clock the battle had not yet begun.
  • Give it them! he mentally exclaimed at these sounds, and again proceeded to gallop along the line, penetrating farther and farther into the region where the army was already in action.
  • At that moment, as the Horse Guards, having passed him, disappeared in the smoke, Rostov hesitated whether to gallop after them or to go where he was sent.
  • "Can you imagine it?" and he began describing how the Guards, having taken up their position and seeing troops before them, thought they were Austrians, and all at once discovered from the cannon balls discharged by those troops that they were themselves in the front line and had unexpectedly to go into action.
  • And here, where at any moment the Emperor may see them....
  • At last seizing a soldier by his collar he forced him to answer.
  • Rostov rode on at a footpace not knowing why or to whom he was now going.
  • "Take this road, your honor, that way you will be killed at once!" a soldier shouted to him.
  • The French, who had ceased firing at this field strewn with dead and wounded where there was no one left to fire at, on seeing an adjutant riding over it trained a gun on him and fired several shots.
  • At that moment Alexander turned his head and Rostov saw the beloved features that were so deeply engraved on his memory.
  • Those speeches were intended for quite other conditions, they were for the most part to be spoken at a moment of victory and triumph, generally when he was dying of wounds and the sovereign had thanked him for heroic deeds, and while dying he expressed the love his actions had proved.
  • Better die a thousand times than risk receiving an unkind look or bad opinion from him, Rostov decided; and sorrowfully and with a heart full despair he rode away, continually looking back at the Tsar, who still remained in the same attitude of indecision.
  • After five o'clock it was only at the Augesd Dam that a hot cannonade (delivered by the French alone) was still to be heard from numerous batteries ranged on the slopes of the Pratzen Heights, directed at our retreating forces.
  • The men looked at him and pressed to the bank, hesitating to step onto the ice.
  • The general on horseback at the entrance to the dam raised his hand and opened his mouth to address Dolokhov.
  • Yes, I did not know anything, anything at all till now.
  • Bonaparte riding over the battlefield had given final orders to strengthen the batteries firing at the Augesd Dam and was looking at the killed and wounded left on the field.
  • "Fine men!" remarked Napoleon, looking at a dead Russian grenadier, who, with his face buried in the ground and a blackened nape, lay on his stomach with an already stiffened arm flung wide.
  • "The ammunition for the guns in position is exhausted, Your Majesty," said an adjutant who had come from the batteries that were firing at Augesd.
  • "That's a fine death!" said Napoleon as he gazed at Bolkonski.
  • Not only did they not interest him, but he took no notice of them and at once forgot them.
  • He knew it was Napoleon--his hero--but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him such a small, insignificant creature compared with what was passing now between himself and that lofty infinite sky with the clouds flying over it.
  • Bonaparte, having come up at a gallop, stopped his horse.
  • After looking at him Napoleon smiled.
  • There is nothing certain, nothing at all except the unimportance of everything I understand, and the greatness of something incomprehensible but all-important.
  • At every jolt he again felt unendurable pain; his feverishness increased and he grew delirious.
  • He was already enjoying that happiness when that little Napoleon had suddenly appeared with his unsympathizing look of shortsighted delight at the misery of others, and doubts and torments had followed, and only the heavens promised peace.
  • Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
  • There's the corner at the crossroads, where the cabman, Zakhar, has his stand, and there's Zakhar himself and still the same horse!
  • Why, that one, right at the end, the big one.
  • It seemed to him the horses were not moving at all.
  • At last the sleigh bore to the right, drew up at an entrance, and Rostov saw overhead the old familiar cornice with a bit of plaster broken off, the porch, and the post by the side of the pavement.
  • At last the sleigh bore to the right, drew up at an entrance, and Rostov saw overhead the old familiar cornice with a bit of plaster broken off, the porch, and the post by the side of the pavement.
  • He looked up at the opening door and his expression of sleepy indifference suddenly changed to one of delighted amazement.
  • Let me have a look at you, your excellency.
  • Everyone shouted, talked, and kissed him at the same time.
  • Sonya now was sixteen and she was very pretty, especially at this moment of happy, rapturous excitement.
  • She gazed at him, not taking her eyes off him, and smiling and holding her breath.
  • But now steps were heard at the door, steps so rapid that they could hardly be his mother's.
  • Denisov, who had come into the room unnoticed by anyone, stood there and wiped his eyes at the sight.
  • "Vasili Denisov, your son's friend," he said, introducing himself to the count, who was looking inquiringly at him.
  • Natasha's voice was again heard at the door.
  • Denisov hid his hairy legs under the blanket, looking with a scared face at his comrade for help.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • It makes it as if you were marrying her because you must, and that wouldn't do at all.
  • After a short period of adapting himself to the old conditions of life, Nicholas found it very pleasant to be at home again.
  • At the beginning of March, old Count Ilya Rostov was very busy arranging a dinner in honor of Prince Bagration at the English Club.
  • At the beginning of March, old Count Ilya Rostov was very busy arranging a dinner in honor of Prince Bagration at the English Club.
  • Gallop off to our Moscow estate, he said to the factotum who appeared at his call.
  • A light footstep and the clinking of spurs were heard at the door, and the young count, handsome, rosy, with a dark little mustache, evidently rested and made sleeker by his easy life in Moscow, entered the room.
  • And the count turned to the cook, who, with a shrewd and respectful expression, looked observantly and sympathetically at the father and son.
  • Laughing at us old fellows!
  • "That's it, that's it!" exclaimed the count, and gaily seizing his son by both hands, he cried, "Now I've got you, so take the sleigh and pair at once, and go to Bezukhov's, and tell him 'Count Ilya has sent you to ask for strawberries and fresh pineapples.'
  • "No matter at all, my dear count," she said, meekly closing her eyes.
  • The count was delighted at Anna Mikhaylovna's taking upon herself one of his commissions and ordered the small closed carriage for her.
  • How little we dreamed of such a thing when we were rejoicing at his happiness!
  • At that time, the Russians were so used to victories that on receiving news of the defeat some would simply not believe it, while others sought some extraordinary explanation of so strange an event.
  • The men who set the tone in conversation--Count Rostopchin, Prince Yuri Dolgorukov, Valuev, Count Markov, and Prince Vyazemski--did not show themselves at the club, but met in private houses in intimate circles, and the Moscovites who took their opinions from others--Ilya Rostov among them--remained for a while without any definite opinion on the subject of the war and without leaders.
  • On all sides, new and fresh anecdotes were heard of individual examples of heroism shown by our officers and men at Austerlitz.
  • Powdered footmen, in livery with buckled shoes and smart stockings, stood at every door anxiously noting visitors' every movement in order to offer their services.
  • Pierre, who at his wife's command had let his hair grow and abandoned his spectacles, went about the rooms fashionably dressed but looking sad and dull.
  • In the third circle, Naryshkin was speaking of the meeting of the Austrian Council of War at which Suvorov crowed like a cock in reply to the nonsense talked by the Austrian generals.
  • Young Rostov stood at a window with Dolokhov, whose acquaintance he had lately made and highly valued.
  • Bekleshev and Theodore Uvarov, who had arrived with him, paused at the doorway to allow him, as the guest of honor, to enter first.
  • Bagration was embarrassed, not wishing to avail himself of their courtesy, and this caused some delay at the doors, but after all he did at last enter first.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • The committeemen met him at the first door and, expressing their delight at seeing such a highly honored guest, took possession of him as it were, without waiting for his reply, surrounded him, and led him to the drawing room.
  • It was at first impossible to enter the drawing-room door for the crowd of members and guests jostling one another and trying to get a good look at Bagration over each other's shoulders, as if he were some rare animal.
  • A dreaded foe be thou, kindhearted as a man, A Rhipheus at home, a Caesar in the field!
  • And Count Rostov, glancing angrily at the author who went on reading his verses, bowed to Bagration.
  • Nicholas Rostov, with Denisov and his new acquaintance, Dolokhov, sat almost at the middle of the table.
  • The dinner, both the Lenten and the other fare, was splendid, yet he could not feel quite at ease till the end of the meal.
  • He winked at the butler, whispered directions to the footmen, and awaited each expected dish with some anxiety.
  • "To the health of our Sovereign, the Emperor!" he cried, and at the same moment his kindly eyes grew moist with tears of joy and enthusiasm.
  • Bagration also rose and shouted "Hurrah!" in exactly the same voice in which he had shouted it on the field at Schon Grabern.
  • "To the health of our Sovereign, the Emperor!" he roared, "Hurrah!" and emptying his glass at one gulp he dashed it to the floor.
  • When the voices subsided, the footmen cleared away the broken glass and everybody sat down again, smiling at the noise they had made and exchanging remarks.
  • The old count rose once more, glanced at a note lying beside his plate, and proposed a toast, "To the health of the hero of our last campaign, Prince Peter Ivanovich Bagration!" and again his blue eyes grew moist.
  • At that toast, the count took out his handkerchief and, covering his face, wept outright.
  • Pierre absolutely disbelieved both the princess' hints and the letter, but he feared now to look at Dolokhov, who was sitting opposite him.
  • Involuntarily recalling his wife's past and her relations with Dolokhov, Pierre saw clearly that what was said in the letter might be true, or might at least seem to be true had it not referred to his wife.
  • Pierre recalled how Helene had smilingly expressed disapproval of Dolokhov's living at their house, and how cynically Dolokhov had praised his wife's beauty to him and from that time till they came to Moscow had not left them for a day.
  • That expression was often on Dolokhov's face when looking at him.
  • Rostov was talking merrily to his two friends, one of whom was a dashing hussar and the other a notorious duelist and rake, and every now and then he glanced ironically at Pierre, whose preoccupied, absent-minded, and massive figure was a very noticeable one at the dinner.
  • Rostov looked inimically at Pierre, first because Pierre appeared to his hussar eyes as a rich civilian, the husband of a beauty, and in a word--an old woman; and secondly because Pierre in his preoccupation and absent-mindedness had not recognized Rostov and had not responded to his greeting.
  • "What are you about?" shouted Rostov, looking at him in an ecstasy of exasperation.
  • Pierre, with downcast eyes, drank out of his glass without looking at Dolokhov or answering him.
  • Pierre went home, but Rostov with Dolokhov and Denisov stayed on at the club till late, listening to the gypsies and other singers.
  • "Well then, till tomorrow at Sokolniki," said Dolokhov, as he took leave of Rostov in the club porch.
  • But go with the firm intention of killing your man as quickly and surely as possible, and then all will be right, as our bear huntsman at Kostroma used to tell me.
  • Next day, at eight in the morning, Pierre and Nesvitski drove to the Sokolniki forest and found Dolokhov, Denisov, and Rostov already there.
  • But just at moments when such thoughts occurred to him, he would ask in a particularly calm and absent-minded way, which inspired the respect of the onlookers, Will it be long?
  • "I should not be doing my duty, Count," he said in timid tones, "and should not justify your confidence and the honor you have done me in choosing me for your second, if at this grave, this very grave, moment I did not tell you the whole truth.
  • The antagonists stood forty paces apart at the farther edge of the clearing.
  • It was thawing and misty; at forty paces' distance nothing could be seen.
  • Take your pistols, and at the word three begin to advance.
  • "So I can fire when I like!" said Pierre, and at the word "three," he went quickly forward, missing the trodden path and stepping into the deep snow.
  • He held the pistol in his right hand at arm's length, apparently afraid of shooting himself with it.
  • Not at all expecting so loud a report, Pierre shuddered at the sound and then, smiling at his own sensations, stood still.
  • "Plea..." began Dolokhov, but could not at first pronounce the word.
  • Dolokhov lowered his head to the snow, greedily bit at it, again raised his head, adjusted himself, drew in his legs and sat up, seeking a firm center of gravity.
  • At the same instant they heard a report and Dolokhov's angry cry.
  • And he vividly recalled that moment after supper at Prince Vasili's, when he spoke those words he had found so difficult to utter: "I love you."
  • He remembered his honeymoon and blushed at the recollection.
  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.
  • "The countess told me to inquire whether your excellency was at home," said the valet.
  • But feeling this to be senseless and impossible, he again glanced timidly at her.
  • She did not sit down but looked at him with a contemptuous smile, waiting for the valet to go.
  • "Hm... Hm...!" growled Pierre, frowning without looking at her, and not moving a muscle.
  • Pierre wished to say something, looked at her with eyes whose strange expression she did not understand, and lay down again.
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • God knows what he would have done at that moment had Helene not fled from the room.
  • The gazettes from which the old prince first heard of the defeat at Austerlitz stated, as usual very briefly and vaguely, that after brilliant engagements the Russians had had to retreat and had made their withdrawal in perfect order.
  • "Your son," wrote Kutuzov, "fell before my eyes, a standard in his hand and at the head of a regiment--he fell as a hero, worthy of his father and his fatherland.
  • When Princess Mary went to him at the usual hour he was working at his lathe and, as usual, did not look round at her.
  • It was evident that her eyes did not see Princess Mary but were looking within... into herself... at something joyful and mysterious taking place within her.
  • She looked at Princess Mary, then sat thinking for a while with that expression of attention to something within her that is only seen in pregnant women, and suddenly began to cry.
  • "Nothing," answered Princess Mary, looking firmly with her radiant eyes at her sister-in-law.
  • "Mary Bogdanovna, I think it's beginning!" said Princess Mary looking at the midwife with wide-open eyes of alarm.
  • (In accordance with Lise's and Prince Andrew's wishes they had sent in good time to Moscow for a doctor and were expecting him at any moment.)
  • Some women passing with quiet steps in and out of the bedroom glanced at the princess and turned away.
  • Only when footsteps or voices were heard did they look at one another, the princess anxious and inquiring, the nurse encouraging.
  • After a while he re-entered it as if to snuff the candles, and, seeing the prince was lying on the sofa, looked at him, noticed his perturbed face, shook his head, and going up to him silently kissed him on the shoulder and left the room without snuffing the candles or saying why he had entered.
  • As she was crossing the anteroom she saw through the window a carriage with lanterns, standing at the entrance.
  • "No it can't be, that would be too extraordinary," and at the very moment she thought this, the face and figure of Prince Andrew, in a fur cloak the deep collar of which covered with snow, appeared on the landing where the footman stood with the candle.
  • "You did not get my letter?" he asked, and not waiting for a reply-- which he would not have received, for the princess was unable to speak-- he turned back, rapidly mounted the stairs again with the doctor who had entered the hall after him (they had met at the last post station), and again embraced his sister.
  • Prince Andrew entered and paused facing her at the foot of the sofa on which she was lying.
  • She looked at him inquiringly and with childlike reproach.
  • She was not surprised at his having come; she did not realize that he had come.
  • They began talking in whispers, but their talk broke off at every moment.
  • He looked up joyfully at the baby when the nurse brought it to him and nodded approval when she told him that the wax with the baby's hair had not sunk in the font but had floated.
  • At that time in the Rostovs' house there prevailed an amorous atmosphere characteristic of homes where there are very young and very charming girls.
  • Dolokhov often dined at the Rostovs', never missed a performance at which they were present, and went to Iogel's balls for young people which the Rostovs always attended.
  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.
  • But he was not as much at ease with Sonya and Dolokhov as before and was less frequently at home.
  • He spent the greater part of his time away from home, at dinners, parties, and balls.
  • On the third day after Christmas Nicholas dined at home, a thing he had rarely done of late.
  • "Where would I not go at the countess' command!" said Denisov, who at the Rostovs' had jocularly assumed the role of Natasha's knight.
  • "Perhaps," coldly and angrily replied Dolokhov, glancing at Sonya, and, scowling, he gave Nicholas just such a look as he had given Pierre at the club dinner.
  • Little as Nicholas had occupied himself with Sonya of late, something seemed to give way within him at this news.
  • "Now you don't know that at all!" said Nicholas.
  • Natasha no less proud of her first long dress and of being at a real ball was even happier.
  • Whatever person she happened to look at she was in love with for that moment.
  • Nicholas and Denisov were walking up and down, looking with kindly patronage at the dancers.
  • "This is not at all the thing," he said.
  • She saw that everybody was looking at her and waiting.
  • He glided silently on one foot half across the room, and seeming not to notice the chairs was dashing straight at them, when suddenly, clinking his spurs and spreading out his legs, he stopped short on his heels, stood so a second, stamped on the spot clanking his spurs, whirled rapidly round, and, striking his left heel against his right, flew round again in a circle.
  • When at last, smartly whirling his partner round in front of her chair, he drew up with a click of his spurs and bowed to her, Natasha did not even make him a curtsy.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • He was at once shown to the best room, which Dolokhov had taken for that evening.
  • Some twenty men were gathered round a table at which Dolokhov sat between two candles.
  • Rostov had not seen him since his proposal and Sonya's refusal and felt uncomfortable at the thought of how they would meet.
  • "I called once or twice at your house," said Rostov, reddening.
  • Rostov recalled at that moment a strange conversation he had once had with Dolokhov.
  • Rostov felt ill at ease.
  • Rostov sat down by his side and at first did not play.
  • Dolokhov kept glancing at him.
  • "Leave it," said Dolokhov, though he did not seem to be even looking at Rostov, "you'll win it back all the sooner.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • At that moment his home life, jokes with Petya, talks with Sonya, duets with Natasha, piquet with his father, and even his comfortable bed in the house on the Povarskaya rose before him with such vividness, clearness, and charm that it seemed as if it were all a lost and unappreciated bliss, long past.
  • "Still, don't ruin yourself!" said Dolokhov with a side glance at Rostov as he continued to deal.
  • Rostov, leaning his head on both hands, sat at the table which was scrawled over with figures, wet with spilled wine, and littered with cards.
  • Oh, how pleasant it was at home!...
  • And at the same time he said in a cheerful voice:
  • Oh, how Rostov detested at that moment those hands with their short reddish fingers and hairy wrists, which held him in their power....
  • "I say, Rostov," said Dolokhov clearly, smiling and looking Nicholas straight in the eyes, "you know the saying, 'Lucky in love, unlucky at cards.'
  • At home, they had not yet gone to bed.
  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
  • "Is Papa at home?" he asked.
  • Nicholas went to her, kissed her hand, and sitting down silently at her table began to watch her hands arranging the cards.
  • The countess glanced at her silent son.
  • Sonya was sitting at the clavichord, playing the prelude to Denisov's favorite barcarolle.
  • Denisov was looking at her with enraptured eyes.
  • He continued to pace the room, looking gloomily at Denisov and the girls and avoiding their eyes.
  • She noticed at once that something had happened to him.
  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
  • "And what is she so pleased about?" thought Nicholas, looking at his sister.
  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.
  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.
  • "Well--had a good time?" said the old count, smiling gaily and proudly at his son.
  • I will tell him myself, and you'll listen at the door, and Natasha ran across the drawing room to the dancing hall, where Denisov was sitting on the same chair by the clavichord with his face in his hands.
  • He jumped up at the sound of her light step.
  • At this instant, they heard the quick rustle of the countess' dress.
  • He looked at the countess, and seeing her severe face said: "Well, good-by, Countess," and kissing her hand, he left the room with quick resolute strides, without looking at Natasha.
  • After Denisov's departure, Rostov spent another fortnight in Moscow, without going out of the house, waiting for the money his father could not at once raise, and he spent most of his time in the girls' room.
  • He filled the girls' albums with verses and music, and having at last sent Dolokhov the whole forty-three thousand rubles and received his receipt, he left at the end of November, without taking leave of any of his acquaintances, to overtake his regiment which was already in Poland.
  • At the Torzhok post station, either there were no horses or the postmaster would not supply them.
  • Without changing his careless attitude, Pierre looked at them over his spectacles unable to understand what they wanted or how they could go on living without having solved the problems that so absorbed him.
  • There was no answer to any of these questions, except one, and that not a logical answer and not at all a reply to them.
  • "I have hundreds of rubles I don't know what to do with, and she stands in her tattered cloak looking timidly at me," he thought.
  • With a pair of felt boots on his thin bony legs, and keeping on a worn, nankeen-covered, sheepskin coat, the traveler sat down on the sofa, leaned back his big head with its broad temples and close-cropped hair, and looked at Bezukhov.
  • Pierre looked at him.
  • All at once the stranger closed the book, putting in a marker, and again, leaning with his arms on the back of the sofa, sat in his former position with his eyes shut.
  • Pierre looked silently and inquiringly at him over his spectacles.
  • Oh no, not at all!
  • And again, glancing at the stranger's hands, he looked more closely at the ring, with its skull--a masonic sign.
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • Look then at thy inner self with the eyes of the spirit, and ask thyself whether thou art content with thyself.
  • Look at your life, my dear sir.
  • Pierre looked at that aged, stern, motionless, almost lifeless face and moved his lips without uttering a sound.
  • "How about the horses?" he asked, without looking at Pierre.
  • "Can he really be going away leaving me alone without having told me all, and without promising to help me?" thought Pierre, rising with downcast head; and he began to pace the room, glancing occasionally at the Mason.
  • My carriage is at your service.
  • "When you hear a knock at the door, you will uncover your eyes," added Willarski.
  • Loud knocks were heard at the door.
  • He was not at all surprised by what he saw.
  • "For what have you come hither?" asked the newcomer, turning in Pierre's direction at a slight rustle made by the latter.
  • "Very well," said Smolyaninov, and went on at once: "Have you any idea of the means by which our holy Order will help you to reach your aim?" said he quietly and quickly.
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • He was conducted from that room along passages that turned backwards and forwards and was at last brought to the doors of the Lodge.
  • The bandage was taken off his eyes and, by the faint light of the burning spirit, Pierre, as in a dream, saw several men standing before him, wearing aprons like the Rhetor's and holding swords in their hands pointed at his breast.
  • But the swords were drawn back from him and he was at once blindfolded again.
  • Pierre gradually began to recover himself and looked about at the room and at the people in it.
  • On his right sat the Italian abbe whom Pierre had met at Anna Pavlovna's two years before.
  • Two of the brothers led Pierre up to the altar, placed his feet at right angles, and bade him lie down, saying that he must prostrate himself at the Gates of the Temple.
  • Aren't they laughing at me?
  • Pierre glanced at the serious faces of those around, remembered all he had already gone through, and realized that he could not stop halfway.
  • The second pair of man's gloves he was to wear at the meetings, and finally of the third, a pair of women's gloves, he said: Dear brother, these woman's gloves are intended for you too.
  • Then a place was assigned to Pierre, he was shown the signs of the Lodge, told the password, and at last was permitted to sit down.
  • The meeting was at an end, and on reaching home Pierre felt as if he had returned from a long journey on which he had spent dozens of years, had become completely changed, and had quite left behind his former habits and way of life.
  • On the previous evening at the Lodge, he had heard that a rumor of his duel had reached the Emperor and that it would be wiser for him to leave Petersburg.
  • Let us write her a letter at once, and she'll come here and all will be explained, or else, my dear boy, let me tell you it's quite likely you'll have to suffer for it.
  • But before Prince Vasili had finished his playful speech, Pierre, without looking at him, and with a kind of fury that made him like his father, muttered in a whisper:
  • "Go!" he repeated, amazed at himself and glad to see the look of confusion and fear that showed itself on Prince Vasili's face.
  • The duel between Pierre and Dolokhov was hushed up and, in spite of the Emperor's severity regarding duels at that time, neither the principals nor their seconds suffered for it.
  • I said so even at the time when everybody was in raptures about him, when he had just returned from abroad, and when, if you remember, he posed as a sort of Marat at one of my soirees.
  • To be in Anna Pavlovna's drawing room he considered an important step up in the service, and he at once understood his role, letting his hostess make use of whatever interest he had to offer.
  • Anna Pavlovna waited for him to go on, but as he seemed quite decided to say no more she began to tell of how at Potsdam the impious Bonaparte had stolen the sword of Frederick the Great.
  • "Your joke is too bad, it's witty but unjust," said Anna Pavlovna, shaking her little shriveled finger at him.
  • Princess Mary had ceased taking lessons in mathematics from her father, and when the old prince was at home went to his study with the wet nurse and little Prince Nicholas (as his grandfather called him).
  • Prince Andrew remained at Bald Hills as usual during his father's absence.
  • But he scowled at her angrily though also with suffering in his eyes, and stooped glass in hand over the infant.
  • Bennigsen seems to have obtained a complete victory over Buonaparte at Eylau.
  • I can't make out what the commander at Korchevo--a certain Khandrikov--is up to; till now the additional men and provisions have not arrived.
  • Gallop off to him at once and say I'll have his head off if everything is not here in a week.
  • Yes, yes, he's always poking fun at me....
  • "Since the day of our brilliant success at Austerlitz," wrote Bilibin, "as you know, my dear prince, I never leave headquarters.
  • The Prussian generals pride themselves on being polite to the French and lay down their arms at the first demand.
  • The head of the garrison at Glogau, with ten thousand men, asks the King of Prussia what he is to do if he is summoned to surrender....
  • Then he bursts into one of his wild furies and rages at everyone and everything, seizes the letters, opens them, and reads those from the Emperor addressed to others.
  • I myself will remain in hospital at Ostrolenka till I recover.
  • So energetically do we pursue this aim that after crossing an unfordable river we burn the bridges to separate ourselves from our enemy, who at the moment is not Bonaparte but Buxhowden.
  • At last our enemy, Buxhowden, catches us and attacks.
  • But as it turns out, just at that moment a third enemy rises before us--namely the Orthodox Russian soldiers, loudly demanding bread, meat, biscuits, fodder, and whatnot!
  • At first Prince Andrew read with his eyes only, but after a while, in spite of himself (although he knew how far it was safe to trust Bilibin), what he had read began to interest him more and more.
  • At last he saw him: the rosy boy had tossed about till he lay across the bed with his head lower than the pillow, and was smacking his lips in his sleep and breathing evenly.
  • He stood over him, gazing at his head and at the little arms and legs which showed under the blanket.
  • He did not look round, but still gazing at the infant's face listened to his regular breathing.
  • Prince Andrew looked at his sister.
  • But he felt that this did not forward matters at all.
  • He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.
  • He was pleased at the gratitude he received, but felt abashed at receiving it.
  • It was at the end of a village that stretched along the highroad in the midst of a young copse in which were a few fir trees.
  • He quickly entered the small reception room with its still-unplastered wooden walls redolent of pine, and would have gone farther, but Anton ran ahead on tiptoe and knocked at a door.
  • Pierre embraced him and lifting his spectacles kissed his friend on the cheek and looked at him closely.
  • Pierre said nothing; he looked fixedly at his friend with surprise.
  • They put questions and gave brief replies about things they knew ought to be talked over at length.
  • At last the conversation gradually settled on some of the topics at first lightly touched on: their past life, plans for the future, Pierre's journeys and occupations, the war, and so on.
  • At last the conversation gradually settled on some of the topics at first lightly touched on: their past life, plans for the future, Pierre's journeys and occupations, the war, and so on.
  • "My plans?" he said, as if astonished at the word.
  • Pierre felt uncomfortable and even depressed in his friend's company and at last became silent.
  • However, this is not at all interesting.
  • At dinner, conversation turned on Pierre's marriage.
  • Prince Andrew looked silently at Pierre with an ironic smile.
  • And he looked at Pierre with a mocking, challenging expression.
  • I had such moments myself not long ago, in Moscow and when traveling, but at such times I collapsed so that I don't live at all--everything seems hateful to me... myself most of all.
  • And I won't--not even if Bonaparte were here at Smolensk threatening Bald Hills--even then I wouldn't serve in the Russian army!
  • Prince Andrew, glancing at Pierre, broke the silence now and then with remarks which showed that he was in a good temper.
  • Prince Andrew, leaning his arms on the raft railing, gazed silently at the flooding waters glittering in the setting sun.
  • If I see, clearly see, that ladder leading from plant to man, why should I suppose it breaks off at me and does not go farther and farther?
  • It was getting dusk when Prince Andrew and Pierre drove up to the front entrance of the house at Bald Hills.
  • As they approached the house, Prince Andrew with a smile drew Pierre's attention to a commotion going on at the back porch.
  • Two women ran out after them, and all four, looking round at the carriage, ran in dismay up the steps of the back porch.
  • She looked at him with her beautiful radiant eyes and seemed to say, "I like you very much, but please don't laugh at my people."
  • "Really?" said Pierre, gazing over his spectacles with curiosity and seriousness (for which Princess Mary was specially grateful to him) into Ivanushka's face, who, seeing that she was being spoken about, looked round at them all with crafty eyes.
  • The old woman, lowering her eyes but casting side glances at the newcomers, had turned her cup upside down and placed a nibbled bit of sugar beside it, and sat quietly in her armchair, though hoping to be offered another cup of tea.
  • Ivanushka, sipping out of her saucer, looked with sly womanish eyes from under her brows at the young men.
  • She evidently felt frightened and ashamed to have accepted charity in a house where such things could be said, and was at the same time sorry to have now to forgo the charity of this house.
  • Pelageya stopped doubtfully, but in Pierre's face there was such a look of sincere penitence, and Prince Andrew glanced so meekly now at her and now at Pierre, that she was gradually reassured.
  • Princess Mary looked at him silently and smiled affectionately.
  • Perhaps I'll come and sit with you at supper.
  • With the stern old prince and the gentle, timid Princess Mary, though he had scarcely known them, Pierre at once felt like an old friend.
  • Our army, after repeated retreats and advances and battles at Pultusk and Preussisch-Eylau, was concentrated near Bartenstein.
  • Denisov patted him on the shoulder and began rapidly pacing the room without looking at Rostov, as was his way at moments of deep feeling.
  • In April the troops were enlivened by news of the Emperor's arrival, but Rostov had no chance of being present at the review he held at Bartenstein, as the Pavlograds were at the outposts far beyond that place.
  • At one end of the trench, steps were cut out and these formed the entrance and vestibule.
  • The trench itself was the room, in which the lucky ones, such as the squadron commander, had a board, lying on piles at the end opposite the entrance, to serve as a table.
  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
  • Go! he shouted at the officers.
  • Alarmed at Denisov's condition, Rostov suggested that he should undress, drink some water, and send for the doctor.
  • I enter, and at the table... who do you think?
  • But at noon the adjutant of the regiment came into Rostov's and Denisov's dugout with a grave and serious face and regretfully showed them a paper addressed to Major Denisov from the regimental commander in which inquiries were made about yesterday's occurrence.
  • Every day, letters of inquiry and notices from the court arrived, and on the first of May, Denisov was ordered to hand the squadron over to the next in seniority and appear before the staff of his division to explain his violence at the commissariat office.
  • Perhaps at another time Denisov would not have left the regiment for so slight a wound, but now he took advantage of it to excuse himself from appearing at the staff and went into hospital.
  • Prussian doctors have been invited here, but our allies don't like it at all.
  • He was wounded at Molliten.
  • Glancing in at the door, Rostov saw that the sick and wounded were lying on the floor on straw and overcoats.
  • He had not at all expected such a sight.
  • "Good day, your honor!" he shouted, rolling his eyes at Rostov and evidently mistaking him for one of the hospital authorities.
  • The man's neighbor on one side whispered something to him, pointing at Rostov, who noticed that the old man wanted to speak to him.
  • Rostov looked at the young soldier and a cold chill ran down his back.
  • I'll send someone at once.
  • He shall be taken away--taken away at once, said the assistant hurriedly.
  • Rostov looked at him, trying to remember where he had seen him before.
  • Tushin, Tushin, don't you remember, who gave you a lift at Schon Grabern?
  • What struck him was that Denisov did not seem glad to see him, and smiled at him unnaturally.
  • On Rostov's inquiry as to how the matter stood, he at once produced from under his pillow a paper he had received from the commission and the rough draft of his answer to it.
  • "Yes, wait a bit," said Denisov, glancing round at the officers, and taking his papers from under his pillow he went to the window, where he had an inkpot, and sat down to write.
  • Boris Drubetskoy had asked the important personage on whom he was in attendance, to include him in the suite appointed for the stay at Tilsit.
  • Boris looked at his general inquiringly and immediately saw that he was being tested.
  • Boris was among the few present at the Niemen on the day the two Emperors met.
  • At the time of the meeting at Tilsit he asked the names of those who had come with Napoleon and about the uniforms they wore, and listened attentively to words spoken by important personages.
  • At the time of the meeting at Tilsit he asked the names of those who had come with Napoleon and about the uniforms they wore, and listened attentively to words spoken by important personages.
  • At the moment the Emperors went into the pavilion he looked at his watch, and did not forget to look at it again when Alexander came out.
  • At the moment the Emperors went into the pavilion he looked at his watch, and did not forget to look at it again when Alexander came out.
  • Zhilinski, a Pole brought up in Paris, was rich, and passionately fond of the French, and almost every day of the stay at Tilsit, French officers of the Guard and from French headquarters were dining and lunching with him and Boris.
  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.
  • As soon as he noticed a French officer, who thrust his head out of the door, that warlike feeling of hostility which he always experienced at the sight of the enemy suddenly seized him.
  • He stopped at the threshold and asked in Russian whether Drubetskoy lived there.
  • I've come at a bad time I think.
  • * "In a minute I shall be at your disposal."
  • His eyes, looking serenely and steadily at Rostov, seemed to be veiled by something, as if screened by blue spectacles of conventionality.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • Rostov looked frowningly at the Frenchmen, bowed reluctantly, and remained silent.
  • "Oh, no, not at all," said Boris.
  • At that moment Zhilinski's voice was heard calling Boris.
  • The Emperors were to be present at that banquet.
  • Rostov felt so ill at ease and uncomfortable with Boris that, when the latter looked in after supper, he pretended to be asleep, and early next morning went away, avoiding Boris.
  • In his civilian clothes and a round hat, he wandered about the town, staring at the French and their uniforms and at the streets and houses where the Russian and French Emperors were staying.
  • "I may see him at any moment," thought Rostov.
  • And even if they did arrest me for being here, what would it matter? thought he, looking at an officer who was entering the house the Emperor occupied.
  • I will fall at his feet and beseech him.
  • On hearing this indifferent voice, Rostov grew frightened at what he was doing; the thought of meeting the Emperor at any moment was so fascinating and consequently so alarming that he was ready to run away, but the official who had questioned him opened the door, and Rostov entered.
  • The general bowed his head respectfully, and the monarch mounted and rode down the street at a gallop.
  • As the Tsar rode up to one flank of the battalions, which presented arms, another group of horsemen galloped up to the opposite flank, and at the head of them Rostov recognized Napoleon.
  • He came at a gallop, wearing a small hat, a blue uniform open over a white vest, and the St. Andrew ribbon over his shoulder.
  • It struck him as a surprise that Alexander treated Bonaparte as an equal and that the latter was quite at ease with the Tsar, as if such relations with an Emperor were an everyday matter to him.
  • Lazarev stopped, casting a sidelong look at his colonel in alarm.
  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.
  • The Preobrazhensk battalion, breaking rank, mingled with the French Guards and sat down at the tables prepared for them.
  • Rostov stood at that corner for a long time, watching the feast from a distance.
  • But besides considerations of foreign policy, the attention of Russian society was at that time keenly directed on the internal changes that were being undertaken in all the departments of government.
  • A trained midwife was engaged for Bogucharovo at his expense, and a priest was paid to teach reading and writing to the children of the peasants and household serfs.
  • Prince Andrew spent half his time at Bald Hills with his father and his son, who was still in the care of nurses.
  • Warmed by the spring sunshine he sat in the caleche looking at the new grass, the first leaves on the birches, and the first puffs of white spring clouds floating across the clear blue sky.
  • At the edge of the road stood an oak.
  • Look at those cramped dead firs, ever the same, and at me too, sticking out my broken and barked fingers just where they have grown, whether from my back or my sides: as they have grown so I stand, and I do not believe in your hopes and your lies.
  • As he passed through the forest Prince Andrew turned several times to look at that oak, as if expecting something from it.
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • Prince Andrew, depressed and preoccupied with the business about which he had to speak to the Marshal, was driving up the avenue in the grounds of the Rostovs' house at Otradnoe.
  • The girl was shouting something but, seeing that he was a stranger, ran back laughing without looking at him.
  • In 1809 Count Ilya Rostov was living at Otradnoe just as he had done in former years, that is, entertaining almost the whole province with hunts, theatricals, dinners, and music.
  • During the dull day, in the course of which he was entertained by his elderly hosts and by the more important of the visitors (the old count's house was crowded on account of an approaching name day), Prince Andrew repeatedly glanced at Natasha, gay and laughing among the younger members of the company, and asked himself each time, What is she thinking about?
  • Farther back beyond the dark trees a roof glittered with dew, to the right was a leafy tree with brilliantly white trunk and branches, and above it shone the moon, nearly at its full, in a pale, almost starless, spring sky.
  • From time to time he heard a soft rustle and at times a sigh.
  • In his soul there suddenly arose such an unexpected turmoil of youthful thoughts and hopes, contrary to the whole tenor of his life, that unable to explain his condition to himself he lay down and fell asleep at once.
  • "But where is it?" he again wondered, gazing at the left side of the road, and without recognizing it he looked with admiration at the very oak he sought.
  • "Yes, it is the same oak," thought Prince Andrew, and all at once he was seized by an unreasoning springtime feeling of joy and renewal.
  • No, life is not over at thirty-one!
  • After that journey to Ryazan he found the country dull; his former pursuits no longer interested him, and often when sitting alone in his study he got up, went to the mirror, and gazed a long time at his own face.
  • Then he would turn away to the portrait of his dead Lise, who with hair curled a la grecque looked tenderly and gaily at him out of the gilt frame.
  • And if anyone came into his room at such moments he was particularly cold, stern, and above all unpleasantly logical.
  • "My dear," Princess Mary entering at such a moment would say, "little Nicholas can't go out today, it's very cold."
  • "If it were hot," Prince Andrew would reply at such times very dryly to his sister, "he could go out in his smock, but as it is cold he must wear warm clothes, which were designed for that purpose.
  • At such moments Princess Mary would think how intellectual work dries men up.
  • It was the time when the youthful Speranski was at the zenith of his fame and his reforms were being pushed forward with the greatest energy.
  • That same August the Emperor was thrown from his caleche, injured his leg, and remained three weeks at Peterhof, receiving Speranski every day and no one else.
  • Soon after his arrival Prince Andrew, as a gentleman of the chamber, presented himself at court and at a levee.
  • On the appointed day Prince Andrew entered Count Arakcheev's waiting room at nine in the morning.
  • One general (an important personage), evidently feeling offended at having to wait so long, sat crossing and uncrossing his legs and smiling contemptuously to himself.
  • After this Prince Andrew was conducted to the door and the officer on duty said in a whisper, "To the right, at the window."
  • Prince Andrew entered a plain tidy room and saw at the table a man of forty with a long waist, a long closely cropped head, deep wrinkles, scowling brows above dull greenish-hazel eyes and an overhanging red nose.
  • The day after his interview with Count Arakcheev, Prince Andrew spent the evening at Count Kochubey's.
  • Kochubey shook his head smilingly, as if surprised at Bolkonski's simplicity.
  • "Afraid of being late..." said the old man, looking at Kochubey.
  • Yes, that's a difficulty, as education is not at all general, but...
  • This was Speranski, Secretary of State, reporter to the Emperor and his companion at Erfurt, where he had more than once met and talked with Napoleon.
  • He spoke slowly, with assurance that he would be listened to, and he looked only at the person with whom he was conversing.
  • He paused at the full stop.
  • As he had done on their first meeting at Kochubey's, Speranski produced a strong impression on Prince Andrew on the Wednesday, when he received him tête-à-tête at his own house and talked to him long and confidentially.
  • This first long conversation with Speranski only strengthened in Prince Andrew the feeling he had experienced toward him at their first meeting.
  • Amid the turmoil of his activities and distractions, however, Pierre at the end of a year began to feel that the more firmly he tried to rest upon it, the more masonic ground on which he stood gave way under him.
  • Under the masonic aprons and insignia he saw the uniforms and decorations at which they aimed in ordinary life.
  • A solemn meeting of the lodge of the second degree was convened, at which Pierre promised to communicate to the Petersburg Brothers what he had to deliver to them from the highest leaders of their order.
  • At that time, when everything was plunged in darkness, preaching alone was of course sufficient.
  • At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.
  • For three days after the delivery of his speech at the lodge he lay on a sofa at home receiving no one and going nowhere.
  • At the end of the letter she informed him that in a few days she would return to Petersburg from abroad.
  • At the same time his mother-in-law, Prince Vasili's wife, sent to him imploring him to come if only for a few minutes to discuss a most important matter.
  • From morning till late at night, except when he eats his very plain food, he is working at science.
  • Joseph Alexeevich, having remained silent and thoughtful for a good while, told me his view of the matter, which at once lit up for me my whole past and the future path I should follow.
  • My mother-in-law came to me in tears and said that Helene was here and that she implored me to hear her; that she was innocent and unhappy at my desertion, and much more.
  • At that time, as always happens, the highest society that met at court and at the grand balls was divided into several circles, each with its own particular tone.
  • At that time, as always happens, the highest society that met at court and at the grand balls was divided into several circles, each with its own particular tone.
  • At these parties his feelings were like those of a conjuror who always expects his trick to be found out at any moment.
  • At these parties his feelings were like those of a conjuror who always expects his trick to be found out at any moment.
  • Got up at eight, read the Scriptures, then went to my duties.
  • At the time I gave him no answer.
  • My God, I cannot get on with him at all.
  • But he looked at me with vexation and jumped up, breaking off his remarks.
  • I seemed to know at once that the process of regeneration had already taken place in him, and I rushed to meet him.
  • I looked at him, still holding him in my arms, and saw that his face was young, but that he had no hair on his head and his features were quite changed.
  • And looking at those drawings I dreamed I felt that I was doing wrong, but could not tear myself away from them.
  • Among the men who very soon became frequent visitors at the Rostovs' house in Petersburg were Boris, Pierre whom the count had met in the street and dragged home with him, and Berg who spent whole days at the Rostovs' and paid the eldest daughter, Countess Vera, the attentions a young man pays when he intends to propose.
  • Berg's proposal was at first received with a perplexity that was not flattering to him.
  • After the first feeling of perplexity aroused in the parents by Berg's proposal, the holiday tone of joyousness usual at such times took possession of the family, but the rejoicing was external and insincere.
  • He did not know at all how much he had, what his debts amounted to, or what dowry he could give Vera.
  • At one time the count thought of giving her the Ryazan estate or of selling a forest, at another time of borrowing money on a note of hand.
  • At one time the count thought of giving her the Ryazan estate or of selling a forest, at another time of borrowing money on a note of hand.
  • But Berg, smiling pleasantly, explained that if he did not know for certain how much Vera would have and did not receive at least part of the dowry in advance, he would have to break matters off.
  • "Or at least twenty thousand, Count," he added, "and then a note of hand for only sixty thousand."
  • Boris kissed Natasha's hand and said that he was astonished at the change in her.
  • He felt the weight of that resolute and affectionate scrutiny and glanced at her occasionally.
  • This Natasha noticed at once.
  • All this time Natasha sat silent, glancing up at him from under her brows.
  • The same inquisitive, challenging, and rather mocking eyes still looked at him.
  • Boris made up his mind to avoid meeting Natasha, but despite that resolution he called again a few days later and began calling often and spending whole days at the Rostovs'.
  • Natasha jumped on it, sank into the feather bed, rolled over to the wall, and began snuggling up the bedclothes as she settled down, raising her knees to her chin, kicking out and laughing almost inaudibly, now covering herself up head and all, and now peeping at her mother.
  • These visits of Natasha's at night before the count returned from his club were one of the greatest pleasures of both mother, and daughter.
  • At your age I was married.
  • As she said this the countess looked round at her daughter.
  • Natasha was lying looking steadily straight before her at one of the mahogany sphinxes carved on the corners of the bedstead, so that the countess only saw her daughter's face in profile.
  • Speak! said she, turning to her mother, who was tenderly gazing at her daughter and in that contemplation seemed to have forgotten all she had wished to say.
  • Natasha smiled and looked at her mother.
  • "Sonya?" she thought, glancing at that curled-up, sleeping little kitten with her enormous plait of hair.
  • Police were stationed at the brightly lit entrance which was carpeted with red baize, and not only gendarmes but dozens of police officers and even the police master himself stood at the porch.
  • From the carriages emerged men wearing uniforms, stars, and ribbons, while ladies in satin and ermine cautiously descended the carriage steps which were let down for them with a clatter, and then walked hurriedly and noiselessly over the baize at the entrance.
  • Marya Ignatevna Peronskaya, a thin and shallow maid of honor at the court of the Dowager Empress, who was a friend and relation of the countess and piloted the provincial Rostovs in Petersburg high society, was to accompany them to the ball.
  • She had got up at eight that morning and had been in a fever of excitement and activity all day.
  • "That's not the way, that's not the way, Sonya!" cried Natasha turning her head and clutching with both hands at her hair which the maid who was dressing it had not time to release.
  • They had decided to be at the ball by half past ten, and Natasha had still to get dressed and they had to call at the Taurida Gardens.
  • "Say what you like," exclaimed Sonya, in a despairing voice as she looked at Natasha, "say what you like, it's still too long."
  • "Really, madam, it is not at all too long," said Mavra, crawling on her knees after her young lady.
  • At that moment, with soft steps, the countess came in shyly, in her cap and velvet gown.
  • At a quarter past ten they at last got into their carriages and started.
  • At a quarter past ten they at last got into their carriages and started.
  • But they had still to call at the Taurida Gardens.
  • They praised her taste and toilet, and at eleven o'clock, careful of their coiffures and dresses, they settled themselves in their carriages and drove off.
  • She understood all that awaited her only when, after stepping over the red baize at the entrance, she entered the hall, took off her fur cloak, and, beside Sonya and in front of her mother, mounted the brightly illuminated stairs between the flowers.
  • Only then did she remember how she must behave at a ball, and tried to assume the majestic air she considered indispensable for a girl on such an occasion.
  • But, fortunately for her, she felt her eyes growing misty, she saw nothing clearly, her pulse beat a hundred to the minute, and the blood throbbed at her heart.
  • She looked at her and gave her alone a special smile in addition to her usual smile as hostess.
  • Looking at her she may have recalled the golden, irrecoverable days of her own girlhood and her own first ball.
  • In the ballroom guests stood crowding at the entrance doors awaiting the Emperor.
  • Peronskaya was pointing out to the countess the most important people at the ball.
  • That gray-haired man, she said, indicating an old man with a profusion of silver-gray curly hair, who was surrounded by ladies laughing at something he said.
  • "That is Bezukhova's brother, Anatole Kuragin," she said, indicating a handsome officer of the Horse Guards who passed by them with head erect, looking at something over the heads of the ladies.
  • Pierre, swaying his stout body, advanced, making way through the crowd and nodding to right and left as casually and good-naturedly as if he were passing through a crowd at a fair.
  • He had promised to be at the ball and introduce partners to her.
  • Natasha at once recognized the shorter and younger man in the white uniform: it was Bolkonski, who seemed to her to have grown much younger, happier, and better-looking.
  • You remember, he stayed a night with us at Otradnoe.
  • Then the crowd hastily retired from the drawing-room door, at which the Emperor reappeared talking to the hostess.
  • They do not even seem to see me, or if they do they look as if they were saying, 'Ah, she's not the one I'm after, so it's not worth looking at her!'
  • The count was at the other end of the room.
  • The handsome Anatole was smilingly talking to a partner on his arm and looked at Natasha as one looks at a wall.
  • This family gathering seemed humiliating to Natasha--as if there were nowhere else for the family to talk but here at the ball.
  • She did not listen to or look at Vera, who was telling her something about her own green dress.
  • At last the Emperor stopped beside his last partner (he had danced with three) and the music ceased.
  • She smilingly raised her hand and laid it on his shoulder without looking at him.
  • Natasha gazed at them and was ready to cry because it was not she who was dancing that first turn of the waltz.
  • "Excuse me!" he added, turning to the baron, "we will finish this conversation elsewhere--at a ball one must dance."
  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.
  • She was at that height of bliss when one becomes completely kind and good and does not believe in the possibility of evil, unhappiness, or sorrow.
  • At that ball Pierre for the first time felt humiliated by the position his wife occupied in court circles.
  • Hardly had he got rid of his hat before he ran into Prince Andrew's room with a preoccupied air and at once began talking.
  • A very simple thought occurred to him: What does it matter to me or to Bitski what the Emperor was pleased to say at the Council?
  • He was going to dine that evening at Speranski's, "with only a few friends," as the host had said when inviting him.
  • At the appointed hour, however, he entered the modest house Speranski owned in the Taurida Gardens.
  • The whole company were standing between two windows at a small table laid with hors-d'oeuvres.
  • Speranski, wearing a gray swallow-tail coat with a star on the breast, and evidently still the same waistcoat and high white stock he had worn at the meeting of the Council of State, stood at the table with a beaming countenance.
  • Prince Andrew looked at the laughing Speranski with astonishment, regret, and disillusionment.
  • At dinner the conversation did not cease for a moment and seemed to consist of the contents of a book of funny anecdotes.
  • Speranski related how at the Council that morning a deaf dignitary, when asked his opinion, replied that he thought so too.
  • The men remained at table over their port--English fashion.
  • Having sat some time at table, Speranski corked a bottle of wine and, remarking, "Nowadays good wine rides in a carriage and pair," passed it to the servant and got up.
  • He remembered how carefully and at what length everything relating to form and procedure was discussed at those meetings, and how sedulously and promptly all that related to the gist of the business was evaded.
  • Next day Prince Andrew called at a few houses he had not visited before, and among them at the Rostovs' with whom he had renewed acquaintance at the ball.
  • After dinner Natasha, at Prince Andrew's request, went to the clavichord and began singing.
  • He looked at Natasha as she sang, and something new and joyful stirred in his soul.
  • He felt happy and at the same time sad.
  • He smiled, looking at her, and said he liked her singing as he liked everything she did.
  • Having lit his candle he sat up in bed, then got up, then lay down again not at all troubled by his sleeplessness: his soul was as fresh and joyful as if he had stepped out of a stuffy room into God's own fresh air.
  • I am at your service.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • Contrary to his habit of being late, Pierre on that day arrived at the Bergs' house, not at ten but at fifteen minutes to eight.
  • "Yes," answered Vera, "I don't at all want that.
  • Husband and wife glanced at one another, both smiling with self-satisfaction, and each mentally claiming the honor of this visit.
  • Vera, having decided in her own mind that Pierre ought to be entertained with conversation about the French embassy, at once began accordingly.
  • Berg and Vera could not repress their smiles of satisfaction at the sight of all this movement in their drawing room, at the sound of the disconnected talk, the rustling of dresses, and the bowing and scraping.
  • The old people sat with the old, the young with the young, and the hostess at the tea table, on which stood exactly the same kind of cakes in a silver cake basket as the Panins had at their party.
  • At the card table he happened to be directly facing Natasha, and was struck by a curious change that had come over her since the ball.
  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.
  • She was sitting by her sister at the tea table, and reluctantly, without looking at him, made some reply to Boris who sat down beside her.
  • After playing out a whole suit and to his partner's delight taking five tricks, Pierre, hearing greetings and the steps of someone who had entered the room while he was picking up his tricks, glanced again at Natasha.
  • She, having raised her head, was looking up at him, flushed and evidently trying to master her rapid breathing.
  • You are so discerning, Prince, and understand people's characters so well at a glance.
  • (alluding to a map of love much in vogue at that time).
  • But at that moment Berg came to Pierre and began insisting that he should take part in an argument between the general and the colonel on the affairs in Spain.
  • Everything was similar: the ladies' subtle talk, the cards, the general raising his voice at the card table, and the samovar and the tea cakes; only one thing was lacking that he had always seen at the evening parties he wished to imitate.
  • The countess looked with sad and sternly serious eyes at Prince Andrew when he talked to Natasha and timidly started some artificial conversation about trifles as soon as he looked her way.
  • It seemed to Natasha that even at the time she first saw Prince Andrew at Otradnoe she had fallen in love with him.
  • And it had to happen that we should meet at that ball.
  • At that very time Prince Andrew was sitting with Pierre and telling him of his love for Natasha and his firm resolve to make her his wife.
  • That day Countess Helene had a reception at her house.
  • At the same time the feeling he had noticed between his protegee Natasha and Prince Andrew accentuated his gloom by the contrast between his own position and his friend's.
  • He tried equally to avoid thinking about his wife, and about Natasha and Prince Andrew; and again everything seemed to him insignificant in comparison with eternity; again the question: for what? presented itself; and he forced himself to work day and night at masonic labors, hoping to drive away the evil spirit that threatened him.
  • Toward midnight, after he had left the countess' apartments, he was sitting upstairs in a shabby dressing gown, copying out the original transaction of the Scottish lodge of Freemasons at a table in his low room cloudy with tobacco smoke, when someone came in.
  • And I, you see, am hard at it.
  • He pointed to his manuscript book with that air of escaping from the ills of life with which unhappy people look at their work.
  • Prince Andrew, with a beaming, ecstatic expression of renewed life on his face, paused in front of Pierre and, not noticing his sad look, smiled at him with the egotism of joy.
  • At last I live, but I can't live without her!
  • It is not at all the same feeling that I knew in the past.
  • "Yes, yes," Pierre assented, looking at his friend with a touched and sad expression in his eyes.
  • Natasha had no desire to go out anywhere and wandered from room to room like a shadow, idle and listless.
  • It seemed to her that everybody knew about her disappointment and was laughing at her and pitying her.
  • And I don't at all want to get married.
  • She listened joyfully (as though she had not expected it) to the charm of the notes reverberating, filling the whole empty ballroom, and slowly dying away; and all at once she felt cheerful.
  • But however much they left her in peace she could not now be at peace, and immediately felt this.
  • In the hall the porch door opened, and someone asked, "At home?" and then footsteps were heard.
  • Natasha was looking at the mirror, but did not see herself.
  • I only got back last night," he said glancing at Natasha; "I want to have a talk with you, Countess," he added after a moment's pause.
  • "I am at your disposal," she murmured.
  • Again he glanced at her, and that glance convinced her that she was not mistaken.
  • Yes, at once, that very instant, her fate would be decided.
  • Natasha glanced with frightened imploring eyes at Prince Andrew and at her mother and went out.
  • "Your offer..." she began at last sedately.
  • Natasha was sitting on the bed, pale and dry eyed, and was gazing at the icons and whispering something as she rapidly crossed herself.
  • He looked at her and was struck by the serious impassioned expression of her face.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • When Prince Andrew spoke (he could tell a story very well), Natasha listened to him with pride; when she spoke she noticed with fear and joy that he gazed attentively and scrutinizingly at her.
  • He is trying to discover something by looking at me!
  • Soon after Prince Andrew had gone, Princess Mary wrote to her friend Julie Karagina in Petersburg, whom she had dreamed (as all girls dream) of marrying to her brother, and who was at that time in mourning for her own brother, killed in Turkey.
  • Then, at the moment of our loss, these thoughts could not occur to me; I should then have dismissed them with horror, but now they are very clear and certain.
  • But I am running on too long and am at the end of my second sheet.
  • If the doctors did not keep me here at the spas I should be back in Russia, but as it is I have to postpone my return for three months.
  • But repressed vexation at his son's poor-spirited behavior found expression in his treatment of his daughter.
  • When Theodosia had gone to sleep Princess Mary thought about this for a long time, and at last made up her mind that, strange as it might seem, she must go on a pilgrimage.
  • Fallen man has retained a love of idleness, but the curse weighs on the race not only because we have to seek our bread in the sweat of our brows, but because our moral nature is such that we cannot be both idle and at ease.
  • The right thing now was, if not to retire from the service, at any rate to go home on leave.
  • His hussar comrades--not only those of his own regiment, but the whole brigade--gave Rostov a dinner to which the subscription was fifteen rubles a head, and at which there were two bands and two choirs of singers.
  • At the last post station before Otradnoe he gave the driver a three-ruble tip, and on arriving he ran breathlessly, like a boy, up the steps of his home.
  • As for Natasha, for a long while Nicholas wondered and laughed whenever he looked at her.
  • "You're not the same at all," he said.
  • I feel at peace and settled.
  • Not at all as before.
  • "You don't at all understand," she said.
  • Her brother often wondered as he looked at her.
  • She did not seem at all like a girl in love and parted from her affianced husband.
  • After reaching home Nicholas was at first serious and even dull.
  • Then with no less fear and delight they saw how the young count, red in the face and with bloodshot eyes, dragged Mitenka out by the scruff of the neck and applied his foot and knee to his behind with great agility at convenient moments between the words, shouting, Be off!
  • (This shrubbery was a well-known haven of refuge for culprits at Otradnoe.
  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.
  • But they were carried forward--and you did not look at the other page.
  • All that day the hounds remained at home.
  • The earth in the kitchen garden looked wet and black and glistened like poppy seed and at a short distance merged into the dull, moist veil of mist.
  • He doffed his Circassian cap to his master and looked at him scornfully.
  • "What orders, your excellency?" said the huntsman in his deep bass, deep as a proto-deacon's and hoarse with hallooing--and two flashing black eyes gazed from under his brows at his master, who was silent.
  • "I sent Uvarka at dawn to listen," his bass boomed out after a minute's pause.
  • Petya ran in at the same time.
  • It seemed to Daniel irksome and improper to be in a room at all, but to have anything to do with a young lady seemed to him impossible.
  • In an hour's time the whole hunting party was at the porch.
  • He had a look at all the details of the hunt, sent a pack of hounds and huntsmen on ahead to find the quarry, mounted his chestnut Donets, and whistling to his own leash of borzois, set off across the threshing ground to a field leading to the Otradnoe wood.
  • Take the covert at once, for my Girchik says the Ilagins are at Korniki with their hounds.
  • Petya, who was laughing, whipped and pulled at his horse.
  • "Uncle" looked round disapprovingly at Petya and Natasha.
  • "In the first place, Trunila is not a 'dog,' but a harrier," thought Nicholas, and looked sternly at his sister, trying to make her feel the distance that ought to separate them at that moment.
  • The thin, hollow-cheeked Chekmar, having got everything ready, kept glancing at his master with whom he had lived on the best of terms for thirty years, and understanding the mood he was in expected a pleasant chat.
  • "Well, Nastasya Ivanovna!" whispered the count, winking at him.
  • "And you're surprised at the way she rides, Simon, eh?" said the count.
  • "To search far," he said, turning back the skirt of his coat to get at his snuffbox.
  • He bent down his head and listened, shaking a warning finger at his master.
  • The count and Simon were looking at him.
  • The count turned and saw on his right Mitka staring at him with eyes starting out of his head, raising his cap and pointing before him to the other side.
  • The count and Simon galloped out of the wood and saw on their left a wolf which, softly swaying from side to side, was coming at a quiet lope farther to the left to the very place where they were standing.
  • The angry borzois whined and getting free of the leash rushed past the horses' feet at the wolf.
  • At the same instant, with a cry like a wail, first one hound, then another, and then another, sprang helter-skelter from the wood opposite and the whole pack rushed across the field toward the very spot where the wolf had disappeared.
  • "Blast you!" he shouted, holding up his whip threateningly at the count.
  • Nicholas Rostov meanwhile remained at his post, waiting for the wolf.
  • By the way the hunt approached and receded, by the cries of the dogs whose notes were familiar to him, by the way the voices of the huntsmen approached, receded, and rose, he realized what was happening at the copse.
  • He prayed with that passionate and shamefaced feeling with which men pray at moments of great excitement arising from trivial causes.
  • Everywhere, at cards and in war, I am always unlucky.
  • "No, it can't be!" thought Rostov, taking a deep breath, as a man does at the coming of something long hoped for.
  • Rostov, holding his breath, looked round at the borzois.
  • Old Karay had turned his head and was angrily searching for fleas, baring his yellow teeth and snapping at his hind legs.
  • The reddish Lyubim rushed forward from behind Milka, sprang impetuously at the wolf, and seized it by its hindquarters, but immediately jumped aside in terror.
  • The wolf crouched, gnashed her teeth, and again rose and bounded forward, followed at the distance of a couple of feet by all the borzois, who did not get any closer to her.
  • But, coming toward him, he saw hounds and a huntsman galloping almost straight at the wolf.
  • A long, yellowish young borzoi, one Nicholas did not know, from another leash, rushed impetuously at the wolf from in front and almost knocked her over.
  • But the wolf jumped up more quickly than anyone could have expected and, gnashing her teeth, flew at the yellowish borzoi, which, with a piercing yelp, fell with its head on the ground, bleeding from a gash in its side.
  • Already, at the beginning of this chase, Daniel, hearing the ulyulyuing, had rushed out from the wood.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • The huntsmen assembled with their booty and their stories, and all came to look at the wolf, which, with her broad-browed head hanging down and the bitten stick between her jaws, gazed with great glassy eyes at this crowd of dogs and men surrounding her.
  • When she was touched, she jerked her bound legs and looked wildly yet simply at everybody.
  • At midday they put the hounds into a ravine thickly overgrown with young trees.
  • He saw the whips in their red caps galloping along the edge of the ravine, he even saw the hounds, and was expecting a fox to show itself at any moment on the ryefield opposite.
  • Nicholas sent the man to call Natasha and Petya to him, and rode at a footpace to the place where the whips were getting the hounds together.
  • While still at a distance he took off his cap and tried to speak respectfully, but he was pale and breathless and his face was angry.
  • He snatches at the fox!
  • "Uncle," Rostov, and Ilagin kept stealthily glancing at one another's dogs, trying not to be observed by their companions and searching uneasily for rivals to their own borzois.
  • And considering it polite to return the young count's compliment, Ilagin looked at his borzois and picked out Milka who attracted his attention by her breadth.
  • "And suppose they outdo my Milka at once!" he thought as he rode with "Uncle" and Ilagin toward the hare.
  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
  • When he jumped up he did not run at once, but pricked his ears listening to the shouting and trampling that resounded from all sides at once.
  • At the very moment when she would have seized her prey, the hare moved and darted along the balk between the winter rye and the stubble.
  • That's it, come on! said he, panting and looking wrathfully around as if he were abusing someone, as if they were all his enemies and had insulted him, and only now had he at last succeeded in justifying himself.
  • "Once she had missed it and turned it away, any mongrel could take it," Ilagin was saying at the same time, breathless from his gallop and his excitement.
  • At the same moment Natasha, without drawing breath, screamed joyously, ecstatically, and so piercingly that it set everyone's ear tingling.
  • For a long time they continued to look at red Rugay who, his arched back spattered with mud and clanking the ring of his leash, walked along just behind "Uncle's" horse with the serene air of a conqueror.
  • And if you put up at my house that will be better still.
  • A score of women serfs, old and young, as well as children, popped out from the back entrance to have a look at the hunters who were arriving.
  • "Uncle" dismounted at the porch of his little wooden house which stood in the midst of an overgrown garden and, after a glance at his retainers, shouted authoritatively that the superfluous ones should take themselves off and that all necessary preparations should be made to receive the guests and the visitors.
  • The house, with its bare, unplastered log walls, was not overclean--it did not seem that those living in it aimed at keeping it spotless--but neither was it noticeably neglected.
  • "Uncle" asked his visitors to sit down and make themselves at home, and then went out of the room.
  • Petya, leaning on his elbow, fell asleep at once.
  • They looked at one another (now that the hunt was over and they were in the house, Nicholas no longer considered it necessary to show his manly superiority over his sister), Natasha gave him a wink, and neither refrained long from bursting into a peal of ringing laughter even before they had a pretext ready to account for it.
  • And Natasha felt that this costume, the very one she had regarded with surprise and amusement at Otradnoe, was just the right thing and not at all worse than a swallow-tail or frock coat.
  • "Uncle" too was in high spirits and far from being offended by the brother's and sister's laughter (it could never enter his head that they might be laughing at his way of life) he himself joined in the merriment.
  • When she had finished, she stepped aside and stopped at the door with a smile on her face.
  • The door at the end of the passage led to the huntsmen's room, as they called the room for the hunt servants.
  • Just as "Uncle's" pickled mushrooms, honey, and cherry brandy had seemed to her the best in the world, so also that song, at that moment, seemed to her the acme of musical delight.
  • "More, please, more!" cried Natasha at the door as soon as the balalayka ceased.
  • Without looking at anyone, "Uncle" blew the dust off it and, tapping the case with his bony fingers, tuned the guitar and settled himself in his armchair.
  • He took the guitar a little above the fingerboard, arching his left elbow with a somewhat theatrical gesture, and, with a wink at Anisya Fedorovna, struck a single chord, pure and sonorous, and then quietly, smoothly, and confidently began playing in very slow time, not My Lady, but the well-known song: Came a maiden down the street.
  • "Uncle" continued to play correctly, carefully, with energetic firmness, looking with a changed and inspired expression at the spot where Anisya Fedorovna had just stood.
  • She asked "Uncle" for his guitar and at once found the chords of the song.
  • Such were Dimmler the musician and his wife, Vogel the dancing master and his family, Belova, an old maiden lady, an inmate of the house, and many others such as Petya's tutors, the girls' former governess, and other people who simply found it preferable and more advantageous to live in the count's house than at home.
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • At other times she praised Julie to him and advised him to go to Moscow during the holidays to amuse himself.
  • Though she blamed herself for it, she could not refrain from grumbling at and worrying Sonya, often pulling her up without reason, addressing her stiffly as "my dear," and using the formal "you" instead of the intimate "thou" in speaking to her.
  • Nicholas was spending the last of his leave at home.
  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.
  • Sonya sat in the drawing room at the round table, copying a design for embroidery.
  • Nastasya Ivanovna the buffoon sat with a sad face at the window with two old ladies.
  • Natasha came into the room, went up to Sonya, glanced at what she was doing, and then went up to her mother and stood without speaking.
  • The countess lifted her head and looked attentively at her daughter.
  • Don't look at me, Mamma!
  • There an old maidservant was grumbling at a young girl who stood panting, having just run in through the cold from the serfs' quarters.
  • On her way past the butler's pantry she told them to set a samovar, though it was not at all the time for tea.
  • "Oh dear, what a young lady!" said Foka, pretending to frown at Natasha.
  • Two governesses were sitting with the Vogels at a table, on which were plates of raisins, walnuts, and almonds.
  • Natasha glanced at her and at the crack in the pantry door, and it seemed to her that she remembered the light falling through that crack once before and Sonya passing with a glass in her hand.
  • She sat awhile, wondering what the meaning of it all having happened before could be, and without solving this problem, or at all regretting not having done so, she again passed in fancy to the time when she was with him and he was looking at her with a lover's eyes.
  • All the domestic circle, tutors, governesses, and guests, were already at the tea table.
  • She sat down at the table and listened to the conversation between the elders and Nicholas, who had also come to the table.
  • He was gray, you remember, and had white teeth, and stood and looked at us...
  • While they were talking a maid thrust her head in at the other door of the sitting room.
  • "Do you know," said Natasha in a whisper, moving closer to Nicholas and Sonya, "that when one goes on and on recalling memories, one at last begins to remember what happened before one was in the world..."
  • "Mamma, I don't at all want to," replied Natasha, but all the same she rose.
  • None of them, not even the middle-aged Dimmler, wanted to break off their conversation and quit that corner in the sitting room, but Natasha got up and Nicholas sat down at the clavichord.
  • "Ah, Countess," he said at last, "that's a European talent, she has nothing to learn--what softness, tenderness, and strength...."
  • "Idiot!" she screamed at her brother and, running to a chair, threw herself on it, sobbing so violently that she could not stop for a long time.
  • The mummers (some of the house serfs) dressed up as bears, Turks, innkeepers, and ladies--frightening and funny--bringing in with them the cold from outside and a feeling of gaiety, crowded, at first timidly, into the anteroom, then hiding behind one another they pushed into the ballroom where, shyly at first and then more and more merrily and heartily, they started singing, dancing, and playing Christmas games.
  • The countess, when she had identified them and laughed at their costumes, went into the drawing room.
  • I'll dress up at once and go with them.
  • It was so light that he could see the moonlight reflected from the metal harness disks and from the eyes of the horses, who looked round in alarm at the noisy party under the shadow of the porch roof.
  • At first they drove at a steady trot along the narrow road.
  • At first they drove at a steady trot along the narrow road.
  • Nicholas glanced round at Sonya, and bent down to see her face closer.
  • "That used to be Sonya," thought he, and looked at her closer and smiled.
  • When they came out onto the beaten highroad--polished by sleigh runners and cut up by rough-shod hoofs, the marks of which were visible in the moonlight--the horses began to tug at the reins of their own accord and increased their pace.
  • The near side horse, arching his head and breaking into a short canter, tugged at his traces.
  • They were quietly dropping melted wax into snow and looking at the shadows the wax figures would throw on the wall, when they heard the steps and voices of new arrivals in the vestibule.
  • I can't look at him... different voices were saying.
  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.
  • Look at Sasha! she said.
  • Whether they were playing the ring and string game or the ruble game or talking as now, Nicholas did not leave Sonya's side, and gazed at her with quite new eyes.
  • May I go at once?
  • She threw this over her head and shoulders and glanced at Nicholas.
  • The light was so strong and the snow sparkled with so many stars that one did not wish to look up at the sky and the real stars were unnoticed.
  • On the way back Nicholas drove at a steady pace instead of racing and kept peering by that fantastic all-transforming light into Sonya's face and searching beneath the eyebrows and mustache for his former and his present Sonya from whom he had resolved never to be parted again.
  • He looked and recognizing in her both the old and the new Sonya, and being reminded by the smell of burnt cork of the sensation of her kiss, inhaled the frosty air with a full breast and, looking at the ground flying beneath him and at the sparkling sky, felt himself again in fairyland.
  • I nearly stormed at Mamma.
  • When they reached home and had told their mother how they had spent the evening at the Melyukovs', the girls went to their bedroom.
  • She sat a long time looking at the receding line of candles reflected in the glasses and expecting (from tales she had heard) to see a coffin, or him, Prince Andrew, in that last dim, indistinctly outlined square.
  • At first there was nothing, then I saw him lying down.
  • Natasha began, and without replying to Sonya's words of comfort she got into bed, and long after her candle was out lay open-eyed and motionless, gazing at the moonlight through the frosty windowpanes.
  • Coldly, without looking at her son, she sent for her husband and, when he came, tried briefly and coldly to inform him of the facts, in her son's presence, but unable to restrain herself she burst into tears of vexation and left the room.
  • He first implored her to forgive him and Sonya and consent to their marriage, then he threatened that if she molested Sonya he would at once marry her secretly.
  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time....
  • Firmly resolved, after putting his affairs in order in the regiment, to retire from the army and return and marry Sonya, Nicholas, serious, sorrowful, and at variance with his parents, but, as it seemed to him, passionately in love, left at the beginning of January to rejoin his regiment.
  • Sonya was unhappy at the separation from Nicholas and still more so on account of the hostile tone the countess could not help adopting toward her.
  • So the countess remained in the country, and the count, taking Sonya and Natasha with him, went to Moscow at the end of January.
  • In Moscow he felt at peace, at home, warm and dirty as in an old dressing gown.
  • There was never a dinner or soiree at the club without him.
  • At balls he danced if a partner was needed.
  • Had he not at one time longed with all his heart to establish a republic in Russia; then himself to be a Napoleon; then to be a philosopher; and then a strategist and the conqueror of Napoleon?
  • He was only quite at ease when having poured several glasses of wine mechanically into his large mouth he felt a pleasant warmth in his body, an amiability toward all his fellows, and a readiness to respond superficially to every idea without probing it deeply.
  • At the beginning of winter Prince Nicholas Bolkonski and his daughter moved to Moscow.
  • She saw the coldness and malevolence with which the old prince received and dismissed the young men, possible suitors, who sometimes appeared at their house.
  • Next day the prince did not say a word to his daughter, but she noticed that at dinner he gave orders that Mademoiselle Bourienne should be served first.
  • After dinner, when the footman handed coffee and from habit began with the princess, the prince suddenly grew furious, threw his stick at Philip, and instantly gave instructions to have him conscripted for the army.
  • At such moments something like a pride of sacrifice gathered in her soul.
  • "He is old and feeble, and I dare to condemn him!" she thought at such moments, with a feeling of revulsion against herself.
  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.
  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.
  • Metivier, shrugging his shoulders, went up to Mademoiselle Bourienne who at the sound of shouting had run in from an adjoining room.
  • But he could not restrain himself and with the virulence of which only one who loves is capable, evidently suffering himself, he shook his fists at her and screamed:
  • At two o'clock the six chosen guests assembled for dinner.
  • Incidents were related evidently confirming the opinion that everything was going from bad to worse, but whether telling a story or giving an opinion the speaker always stopped, or was stopped, at the point beyond which his criticism might touch the sovereign himself.
  • Prince Bolkonski glanced at the young man as if about to say something in reply, but changed his mind, evidently considering him too young.
  • Pierre looked at Rostopchin with naive astonishment, not understanding why he should be disturbed by the bad composition of the Note.
  • Did you hear of the last event at the review in Petersburg?
  • At the next review, they say, the Emperor did not once deign to address him.
  • He was here; they admitted him in spite of my request that they should let no one in, he went on, glancing angrily at his daughter.
  • Look at our youths, look at our ladies!
  • And they themselves sit there nearly naked, like the signboards at our Public Baths if I may say so.
  • At present he is hesitating whom to lay siege to-- you or Mademoiselle Julie Karagina.
  • I really don't know what sort of girl she is; I can't analyze her at all.
  • When they had last met on the old prince's name day, she had answered at random all his attempts to talk sentimentally, evidently not listening to what he was saying.
  • In addition to the formal evening and dinner parties, a large company, chiefly of men, gathered there every day, supping at midnight and staying till three in the morning.
  • Meeting at large gatherings Julie and Boris looked on one another as the only souls who understood one another in a world of indifferent people.
  • Boris says his soul finds repose at your house.
  • He laughed blandly at her naive diplomacy but listened to what she had to say, and sometimes questioned her carefully about the Penza and Nizhegorod estates.
  • He spent every day and whole days at the Karagins', and every day on thinking the matter over told himself that he would propose tomorrow.
  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.
  • He glanced at her to make sure that he might go on.
  • At the end of January old Count Rostov went to Moscow with Natasha and Sonya.
  • Marya Dmitrievna, with her spectacles hanging down on her nose and her head flung back, stood in the hall doorway looking with a stern, grim face at the new arrivals.
  • But we'll speak of that later on, she added, glancing at Sonya with a look that showed she did not want to speak of it in her presence.
  • Next morning Marya Dmitrievna took the young ladies to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God and to Madame Suppert-Roguet, who was so afraid of Marya Dmitrievna that she always let her have costumes at a loss merely to get rid of her.
  • The count did not set out cheerfully on this visit, at heart he felt afraid.
  • He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men.
  • At last an old, cross looking footman came and announced to the Rostovs that the prince was not receiving, but that the princess begged them to walk up.
  • She had decided to receive them, but feared lest the prince might at any moment indulge in some freak, as he seemed much upset by the Rostovs' visit.
  • The princess told the count that she would be delighted, and only begged him to stay longer at Anna Semenovna's, and he departed.
  • God is my witness, I didn't know-" he repeated, stressing the word "God" so unnaturally and so unpleasantly that Princess Mary stood with downcast eyes not daring to look either at her father or at Natasha.
  • Natasha and Princess Mary looked at one another in silence, and the longer they did so without saying what they wanted to say, the greater grew their antipathy to one another.
  • When the count returned, Natasha was impolitely pleased and hastened to get away: at that moment she hated the stiff, elderly princess, who could place her in such an embarrassing position and had spent half an hour with her without once mentioning Prince Andrew.
  • Natasha glanced at her ironically without knowing why.
  • Marya Dmitrievna, who knew how the prince had received the Rostovs, pretended not to notice how upset Natasha was and jested resolutely and loudly at table with the count and the other guests.
  • I would not be silly and afraid of things, I would simply embrace him, cling to him, and make him look at me with those searching inquiring eyes with which he has so often looked at me, and then I would make him laugh as he used to laugh.
  • "And how can Sonya love Nicholas so calmly and quietly and wait so long and so patiently?" thought she, looking at Sonya, who also came in quite ready, with a fan in her hand.
  • A lady entering the next box shot a glance of feminine envy at Natasha.
  • Look at our Anna Mikhaylovna--what a headdress she has on!
  • One can see at once that they're engaged....
  • He looked at the Rostovs from under his brows and said something, smiling, to his betrothed.
  • Oh, better not think of it--not till he comes back! she told herself, and began looking at the faces, some strange and some familiar, in the stalls.
  • Natasha involuntarily gazed at that neck, those shoulders, and pearls and coiffure, and admired the beauty of the shoulders and the pearls.
  • "Yes, he meant to look in," answered Helene, and glanced attentively at Natasha.
  • Natasha too began to look at it.
  • The floor of the stage consisted of smooth boards, at the sides was some painted cardboard representing trees, and at the back was a cloth stretched over boards.
  • She knew what it was all meant to represent, but it was so pretentiously false and unnatural that she first felt ashamed for the actors and then amused at them.
  • At a moment when all was quiet before the commencement of a song, a door leading to the stalls on the side nearest the Rostovs' box creaked, and the steps of a belated arrival were heard.
  • This was Anatole Kuragin whom she had seen and noticed long ago at the ball in Petersburg.
  • Having looked at Natasha he approached his sister, laid his well gloved hand on the edge of her box, nodded to her, and leaning forward asked a question, with a motion toward Natasha.
  • He winked at him gaily, smiled, and rested his foot against the orchestra screen.
  • The scantily clad Helene smiled at everyone in the same way, and Natasha gave Boris a similar smile.
  • During the whole of that entr'acte Kuragin stood with Dolokhov in front of the orchestra partition, looking at the Rostovs' box.
  • Anatole went up to him and began speaking to him, looking at and indicating the Rostovs' box.
  • Almost smiling, he gazed straight into her eyes with such an enraptured caressing look that it seemed strange to be so near him, to look at him like that, to be so sure he admired her, and not to be acquainted with him.
  • They did not drag her away at once, but sang with her for a long time and then at last dragged her off, and behind the scenes something metallic was struck three times and everyone knelt down and sang a prayer.
  • During this act every time Natasha looked toward the stalls she saw Anatole Kuragin with an arm thrown across the back of his chair, staring at her.
  • Natasha turned her pretty little head toward the elegant young officer and smiled at him over her bare shoulder.
  • Kuragin asked her opinion of the performance and told her how at a previous performance Semenova had fallen down on the stage.
  • We shall all meet at the Karagins'!
  • When she was not looking at him she felt that he was looking at her shoulders, and she involuntarily caught his eye so that he should look into hers rather than this.
  • During one of these moments of awkward silence when Anatole's prominent eyes were gazing calmly and fixedly at her, Natasha, to break the silence, asked him how he liked Moscow.
  • But now I like it very much indeed, he said, looking at her significantly.
  • He was looking at her with glittering eyes, smiling tenderly.
  • Only after she had reached home was Natasha able clearly to think over what had happened to her, and suddenly remembering Prince Andrew she was horrified, and at tea to which all had sat down after the opera, she gave a loud exclamation, flushed, and ran out of the room.
  • Only to the old countess at night in bed could Natasha have told all she was feeling.
  • I have done nothing, I didn't lead him on at all.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • Anatole consented and went to Moscow, where he put up at Pierre's house.
  • Pierre received him unwillingly at first, but got used to him after a while, sometimes even accompanied him on his carousals, and gave him money under the guise of loans.
  • He had never missed a carousal at Danilov's or other Moscow revelers', drank whole nights through, outvying everyone else, and was at all the balls and parties of the best society.
  • There was talk of his intrigues with some of the ladies, and he flirted with a few of them at the balls.
  • At that time while with his regiment in Poland, a Polish landowner of small means had forced him to marry his daughter.
  • He believed this so firmly that others, looking at him, were persuaded of it too and did not refuse him either a leading place in society or money, which he borrowed from anyone and everyone and evidently would not repay.
  • He was not a gambler, at any rate he did not care about winning.
  • More than once he had vexed his father by spoiling his own career, and he laughed at distinctions of all kinds.
  • Dolokhov, who needed Anatole Kuragin's name, position, and connections as a bait to draw rich young men into his gambling set, made use of him and amused himself at his expense without letting the other feel it.
  • At supper after the opera he described to Dolokhov with the air of a connoisseur the attractions of her arms, shoulders, feet, and hair and expressed his intention of making love to her.
  • "You know, I adore little girls, they lose their heads at once," pursued Anatole.
  • On Sunday morning Marya Dmitrievna invited her visitors to Mass at her parish church--the Church of the Assumption built over the graves of victims of the plague.
  • At her table there were extra dishes at dinner, and the servants had vodka and roast goose or suckling pig.
  • At her table there were extra dishes at dinner, and the servants had vodka and roast goose or suckling pig.
  • She looked at Natasha's dresses and praised them, as well as a new dress of her own made of "metallic gauze," which she had received from Paris, and advised Natasha to have one like it.
  • And why not enjoy myself? thought Natasha, gazing at Helene with wide-open, wondering eyes.
  • Anatole was at the door, evidently on the lookout for the Rostovs.
  • Natasha looked at the fat actress, but neither saw nor heard nor understood anything of what went on before her.
  • "I don't think so when I look at you!" said Anatole, following Natasha.
  • He said this at a moment when she alone could hear him.
  • Natasha without saying anything stepped up to her father and looked at him with surprised inquiring eyes.
  • During the ecossaise, which she also danced with him, Anatole said nothing when they happened to be by themselves, but merely gazed at her.
  • She glanced at him.
  • Burning lips were pressed to hers, and at the same instant she felt herself released, and Helene's footsteps and the rustle of her dress were heard in the room.
  • Natasha looked round at her, and then, red and trembling, threw a frightened look of inquiry at Anatole and moved toward the door.
  • Natasha kept looking uneasily at everybody with wide-open eyes, as if wishing to intercept every glance directed toward her, and tried to appear the same as usual.
  • If the old man came round it would be all the better to visit him in Moscow or at Bald Hills later on; and if not, the wedding, against his wishes, could only be arranged at Otradnoe.
  • Princess Mary wrote that she was in despair at the misunderstanding that had occurred between them.
  • After reading the letter Natasha sat down at the writing table to answer it.
  • She recalled her love for Prince Andrew in all its former strength, and at the same time felt that she loved Kuragin.
  • She vividly pictured herself as Prince Andrew's wife, and the scenes of happiness with him she had so often repeated in her imagination, and at the same time, aglow with excitement, recalled every detail of yesterday's interview with Anatole.
  • Natasha, pleading a headache, remained at home.
  • As she read she glanced at the sleeping Natasha, trying to find in her face an explanation of what she was reading, but did not find it.
  • And with the decision and tenderness that often come at the moment of awakening, she embraced her friend, but noticing Sonya's look of embarrassment, her own face expressed confusion and suspicion.
  • Sonya stared open-eyed at Natasha, unable to believe her ears.
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with wide-open eyes as if she could not grasp the question.
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with astonishment.
  • Natasha repeated with a smile of pity at her friend's lack of comprehension.
  • At that moment this all seemed quite easy, simple, and clear to Natasha.
  • On the day the count left, Sonya and Natasha were invited to a big dinner party at the Karagins', and Marya Dmitrievna took them there.
  • At that party Natasha again met Anatole, and Sonya noticed that she spoke to him, trying not to be overheard, and that all through dinner she was more agitated than ever.
  • With the same expression of agitated surprise and guilt she went about the house, taking up now one occupation, now another, and at once abandoning them.
  • Sonya began watching her friend still more attentively and noticed that at dinner and all that evening Natasha was in a strange and unnatural state.
  • She answered questions at random, began sentences she did not finish, and laughed at everything.
  • After tea Sonya noticed a housemaid at Natasha's door timidly waiting to let her pass.
  • Sonya knocked at her door.
  • Natasha had promised to come out to Kuragin at the back porch at ten that evening.
  • At Kamenka a relay of horses was to wait which would take them to the Warsaw highroad, and from there they would hasten abroad with post horses.
  • Two witnesses for the mock marriage--Khvostikov, a retired petty official whom Dolokhov made use of in his gambling transactions, and Makarin, a retired hussar, a kindly, weak fellow who had an unbounded affection for Kuragin--were sitting at tea in Dolokhov's front room.
  • In his large study, the walls of which were hung to the ceiling with Persian rugs, bearskins, and weapons, sat Dolokhov in a traveling cloak and high boots, at an open desk on which lay an abacus and some bundles of paper money.
  • Anatole returned and looked at Dolokhov, trying to give him his attention and evidently submitting to him involuntarily.
  • Will they let it stop at that?
  • "Go to the devil!" cried Anatole and, clutching his hair, left the room, but returned at once and dropped into an armchair in front of Dolokhov with his feet turned under him.
  • He glanced at his watch.
  • More than once when Anatole's regiment was stationed at Tver he had taken him from Tver in the evening, brought him to Moscow by daybreak, and driven him back again the next night.
  • But he liked them; liked that mad driving at twelve miles an hour, liked upsetting a driver or running down a pedestrian, and flying at full gallop through the Moscow streets.
  • The driver's eyes sparkled at the sight of the wine.
  • Anatole looked at his watch.
  • We'll start at once.
  • "Do you know, one Christmas I drove from Tver," said Anatole, smilingly at the recollection and turning to Makarin who gazed rapturously at him with wide-open eyes.
  • Why, she'll rush out more dead than alive just in the things she is wearing; if you delay at all there'll be tears and 'Papa' and 'Mamma,' and she's frozen in a minute and must go back--but you wrap the fur cloak round her first thing and carry her to the sleigh.
  • After taking a turn along the Podnovinski Boulevard, Balaga began to rein in, and turning back drew up at the crossing of the old Konyusheny Street.
  • Dolokhov, after Anatole entered, had remained at the wicket gate and was struggling with the yard porter who was trying to lock it.
  • Why have you interfered at all?
  • Who asked you to? shouted Natasha, raising herself on the sofa and looking malignantly at Marya Dmitrievna.
  • With compressed and parched lips and dry fixed eyes, she sat at the window, uneasily watching the people who drove past and hurriedly glancing round at anyone who entered the room.
  • When the count came to see her she turned anxiously round at the sound of a man's footstep, and then her face resumed its cold and malevolent expression.
  • When he opened the ballroom door Pierre saw Natasha sitting at the window, with a thin, pale, and spiteful face.
  • She glanced round at him, frowned, and left the room with an expression of cold dignity.
  • Then at least she won't go on expecting him.
  • Natasha looked from one to the other as a hunted and wounded animal looks at the approaching dogs and sportsmen.
  • Pierre did not stay for dinner, but left the room and went away at once.
  • He drove through the town seeking Anatole Kuragin, at the thought of whom now the blood rushed to his heart and he felt a difficulty in breathing.
  • He was not at the ice hills, nor at the gypsies', nor at Komoneno's.
  • Pierre without greeting his wife whom he had not seen since his return-- at that moment she was more repulsive to him than ever--entered the drawing room and seeing Anatole went up to him.
  • Anatole glanced round at his sister and rose submissively, ready to follow Pierre.
  • Having entered his study Pierre closed the door and addressed Anatole without looking at him.
  • He took a heavy paperweight and lifted it threateningly, but at once put it back in its place.
  • Anatole glanced at him and immediately thrust his hand into his pocket and drew out his pocketbook.
  • Anatole sat at a table frowning and biting his lips.
  • Pierre paused and looked at Anatole no longer with an angry but with a questioning look.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • Pierre glanced at him with amazement, unable to understand what he wanted.
  • You could at least take back your words.
  • Pierre involuntarily glanced at the loose button.
  • Pierre dined at the club that day and heard on all sides gossip about the attempted abduction of Rostova.
  • She sighed, looking toward the door of the room where Prince Andrew was, evidently intending to express her sympathy with his sorrow, but Pierre saw by her face that she was glad both at what had happened and at the way her brother had taken the news of Natasha's faithlessness.
  • Princess Mary looked at him with astonishment.
  • He paused at the sight of Pierre.
  • "Posterity will do him justice," he concluded, and at once turned to Pierre.
  • Prince Andrew, as if trying to remember whether he had something more to say, or waiting to see if Pierre would say anything, looked fixedly at him.
  • At dinner the talk turned on the war, the approach of which was becoming evident.
  • Natasha was in bed, the count at the club, and Pierre, after giving the letters to Sonya, went to Marya Dmitrievna who was interested to know how Prince Andrew had taken the news.
  • Natasha was standing in the middle of the drawing room, emaciated, with a pale set face, but not at all shamefaced as Pierre expected to find her.
  • When he appeared at the door she grew flurried, evidently undecided whether to go to meet him or to wait till he came up.
  • Pierre sniffed as he looked at her, but did not speak.
  • Natasha was evidently dismayed at the thought of what he might think she had meant.
  • Pierre did not know how to refer to Anatole and flushed at the thought of him--"did you love that bad man?"
  • But I don't know, don't know at all....
  • But when he said it he was amazed at his own words.
  • For the first time for many days Natasha wept tears of gratitude and tenderness, and glancing at Pierre she went out of the room.
  • At the entrance to the Arbat Square an immense expanse of dark starry sky presented itself to his eyes.
  • Millions of men perpetrated against one another such innumerable crimes, frauds, treacheries, thefts, forgeries, issues of false money, burglaries, incendiarisms, and murders as in whole centuries are not recorded in the annals of all the law courts of the world, but which those who committed them did not at the time regard as being crimes.
  • At each of these towns thousands of people met him with excitement and enthusiasm.
  • Early in the morning of the twelfth of June he came out of his tent, which was pitched that day on the steep left bank of the Niemen, and looked through a spyglass at the streams of his troops pouring out of the Vilkavisski forest and flowing over the three bridges thrown across the river.
  • On the faces of all was one common expression of joy at the commencement of the long-expected campaign and of rapture and devotion to the man in the gray coat who was standing on the hill.
  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.
  • The aide-de-camp replied that probably the Emperor would not be displeased at this excess of zeal.
  • They tried to make their way forward to the opposite bank and, though there was a ford one third of a mile away, were proud that they were swimming and drowning in this river under the eyes of the man who sat on the log and was not even looking at what they were doing.
  • The very day that Napoleon issued the order to cross the Niemen, and his vanguard, driving off the Cossacks, crossed the Russian frontier, Alexander spent the evening at the entertainment given by his aides-de- camp at Bennigsen's country house.
  • At midnight dancing was still going on.
  • Boris, coolly looking at Helene's dazzling bare shoulders which emerged from a dark, gold-embroidered, gauze gown, talked to her of old acquaintances and at the same time, unaware of it himself and unnoticed by others, never for an instant ceased to observe the Emperor who was in the same room.
  • Having finished speaking to her, the Emperor looked inquiringly at Balashev and, evidently understanding that he only acted thus because there were important reasons for so doing, nodded slightly to the lady and turned to him.
  • Arakcheev looked at the Emperor from under his brow and, sniffing with his red nose, stepped forward from the crowd as if expecting the Emperor to address him.
  • The unexpected news of the French having crossed the Niemen was particularly startling after a month of unfulfilled expectations, and at a ball.
  • In fact, the ambassador, as he himself has declared, was never authorized to make that demand, and as soon as I was informed of it I let him know how much I disapproved of it and ordered him to remain at his post.
  • At two in the morning of the fourteenth of June, the Emperor, having sent for Balashev and read him his letter to Napoleon, ordered him to take it and hand it personally to the French Emperor.
  • Having set off in the small hours of the fourteenth, accompanied by a bugler and two Cossacks, Balashev reached the French outposts at the village of Rykonty, on the Russian side of the Niemen, by dawn.
  • Balashev did not do so at once, but continued to advance along the road at a walking pace.
  • The noncommissioned officer began talking with his comrades about regimental matters without looking at the Russian general.
  • The Russian Cossacks and bugler and the French hussars looked silently at one another from time to time.
  • They rode through the village of Rykonty, past tethered French hussar horses, past sentinels and men who saluted their colonel and stared with curiosity at a Russian uniform, and came out at the other end of the village.
  • This man rode toward Balashev at a gallop, his plumes flowing and his gems and gold lace glittering in the bright June sunshine.
  • On seeing the Russian general he threw back his head, with its long hair curling to his shoulders, in a majestically royal manner, and looked inquiringly at the French colonel.
  • "Your Majesty," replied Balashev, "my master, the Emperor, does not desire war and as Your Majesty sees..." said Balashev, using the words Your Majesty at every opportunity, with the affectation unavoidable in frequently addressing one to whom the title was still a novelty.
  • But instead of that, at the next village the sentinels of Davout's infantry corps detained him as the pickets of the vanguard had done, and an adjutant of the corps commander, who was fetched, conducted him into the village to Marshal Davout.
  • For the same reason they are always hard at work and in a hurry.
  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.
  • "You are perfectly at liberty to treat me with respect or not," protested Balashev, "but permit me to observe that I have the honor to be adjutant general to His Majesty...."
  • Davout glanced at him silently and plainly derived pleasure from the signs of agitation and confusion which appeared on Balashev's face.
  • That day he dined with the marshal, at the same board on the barrels.
  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.
  • Though Balashev was used to imperial pomp, he was amazed at the luxury and magnificence of Napoleon's court.
  • The Comte de Turenne showed him into a big reception room where many generals, gentlemen-in-waiting, and Polish magnates--several of whom Balashev had seen at the court of the Emperor of Russia--were waiting.
  • He entered briskly, with a jerk at every step and his head slightly thrown back.
  • It was plain that Balashev's personality did not interest him at all.
  • When Napoleon, having finished speaking, looked inquiringly at the Russian envoy, Balashev began a speech he had prepared long before: Sire!
  • "So now you want me to retire beyond the Niemen--only the Niemen?" repeated Napoleon, looking straight at Balashev.
  • The whole purport of his remarks now was evidently to exalt himself and insult Alexander--just what he had least desired at the commencement of the interview.
  • He looked compassionately at Balashev, and as soon as the latter tried to make some rejoinder hastily interrupted him.
  • Balashev stood with downcast eyes, looking at the movements of Napoleon's stout legs and trying to avoid meeting his eyes.
  • Napoleon was silent, still looking derisively at him and evidently not listening to him.
  • When Balashev had ended, Napoleon again took out his snuffbox, sniffed at it, and stamped his foot twice on the floor as a signal.
  • Bessieres, Caulaincourt, and Berthier were present at that dinner.
  • This reply of Balashev's, which hinted at the recent defeats of the French in Spain, was much appreciated when he related it at Alexander's court, but it was not much appreciated at Napoleon's dinner, where it passed unnoticed.
  • "If there is a point we don't see it, or it is not at all witty," their expressions seemed to say.
  • So little was his rejoinder appreciated that Napoleon did not notice it at all and naively asked Balashev through what towns the direct road from there to Moscow passed.
  • To have one's ear pulled by the Emperor was considered the greatest honor and mark of favor at the French court.
  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • Before joining the Western Army which was then, in May, encamped at Drissa, Prince Andrew visited Bald Hills which was directly on his way, being only two miles off the Smolensk highroad.
  • During his stay at Bald Hills all the family dined together, but they were ill at ease and Prince Andrew felt that he was a visitor for whose sake an exception was being made and that his presence made them all feel awkward.
  • Does he think me a scoundrel, or an old fool who, without any reason, keeps his own daughter at a distance and attaches this Frenchwoman to himself?
  • If there is any misunderstanding and discord between you and Mary, I can't blame her for it at all.
  • Prince Andrew wished to leave at once, but Princess Mary persuaded him to stay another day.
  • He sought in himself either remorse for having angered his father or regret at leaving home for the first time in his life on bad terms with him, and was horrified to find neither.
  • She looked a little above Prince Andrew's head with the confident, accustomed look with which one looks at the place where a familiar portrait hangs.
  • "Then it must be so!" thought Prince Andrew as he drove out of the avenue from the house at Bald Hills.
  • I want to meet that man whom I despise, so as to give him a chance to kill and laugh at me!
  • Prince Andrew reached the general headquarters of the army at the end of June.
  • The first army, with which was the Emperor, occupied the fortified camp at Drissa; the second army was retreating, trying to effect a junction with the first one from which it was said to be cut off by large French forces.
  • Bennigsen was a landlord in the Vilna province who appeared to be doing the honors of the district, but was in reality a good general, useful as an adviser and ready at hand to replace Barclay.
  • At that time a famous joke of Ermolov's was being circulated, that as a great favor he had petitioned the Emperor to make him a German.
  • They insisted on the retention of the camp at Drissa, according to Pfuel's plan, but on changing the movements of the other armies.
  • Of a fourth opinion the most conspicuous representative was the Tsarevich, who could not forget his disillusionment at Austerlitz, where he had ridden out at the head of the Guards, in his casque and cavalry uniform as to a review, expecting to crush the French gallantly; but unexpectedly finding himself in the front line had narrowly escaped amid the general confusion.
  • It will at any rate be understood all the sooner that things cannot go on like this.
  • The eighth and largest group, which in its enormous numbers was to the others as ninety-nine to one, consisted of men who desired neither peace nor war, neither an advance nor a defensive camp at the Drissa or anywhere else, neither Barclay nor the Emperor, neither Pfuel nor Bennigsen, but only the one most essential thing--as much advantage and pleasure for themselves as possible.
  • In the troubled waters of conflicting and intersecting intrigues that eddied about the Emperor's headquarters, it was possible to succeed in many ways unthinkable at other times.
  • A man who simply wished to retain his lucrative post would today agree with Pfuel, tomorrow with his opponent, and the day after, merely to avoid responsibility or to please the Emperor, would declare that he had no opinion at all on the matter.
  • Another who wished to gain some advantage would attract the Emperor's attention by loudly advocating the very thing the Emperor had hinted at the day before, and would dispute and shout at the council, beating his breast and challenging those who did not agree with him to duels, thereby proving that he was prepared to sacrifice himself for the common good.
  • A third, in the absence of opponents, between two councils would simply solicit a special gratuity for his faithful services, well knowing that at that moment people would be too busy to refuse him.
  • From among all these parties, just at the time Prince Andrew reached the army, another, a ninth party, was being formed and was beginning to raise its voice.
  • Just at the time Prince Andrew was living unoccupied at Drissa, Shishkov, the Secretary of State and one of the chief representatives of this party, wrote a letter to the Emperor which Arakcheev and Balashev agreed to sign.
  • Chernyshev was sitting at a window in the first room with a French novel in his hand.
  • Prince Andrew had an opportunity of getting a good look at him, for Pfuel arrived soon after himself and, in passing through to the drawing room, stopped a minute to speak to Chernyshev.
  • At first sight, Pfuel, in his ill-made uniform of a Russian general, which fitted him badly like a fancy costume, seemed familiar to Prince Andrew, though he saw him now for the first time.
  • One could see that he wished to pass through the rooms as quickly as possible, finish with the bows and greetings, and sit down to business in front of a map, where he would feel at home.
  • He passed into the next room, and the deep, querulous sounds of his voice were at once heard from there.
  • But Pfuel, like a man heated in a fight who strikes those on his own side, shouted angrily at his own supporter, Wolzogen:
  • Of all those present, evidently he alone was not seeking anything for himself, nursed no hatred against anyone, and only desired that the plan, formed on a theory arrived at by years of toil, should be carried out.
  • From the tone in which the courtiers addressed him and the way Paulucci had allowed himself to speak of him to the Emperor, but above all from a certain desperation in Pfuel's own expressions, it was clear that the others knew, and Pfuel himself felt, that his fall was at hand.
  • Prince Andrew, listening to this polyglot talk and to these surmises, plans, refutations, and shouts, felt nothing but amazement at what they were saying.
  • Armfeldt says our army is cut in half, and Paulucci says we have got the French army between two fires; Michaud says that the worthlessness of the Drissa camp lies in having the river behind it, and Pfuel says that is what constitutes its strength; Toll proposes one plan, Armfeldt another, and they are all good and all bad, and the advantages of any suggestions can be seen only at the moment of trial.
  • Is a man a genius who can order bread to be brought up at the right time and say who is to go to the right and who to the left?
  • At the review next day the Emperor asked Prince Andrew where he would like to serve, and Prince Andrew lost his standing in court circles forever by not asking to remain attached to the sovereign's person, but for permission to serve in the army.
  • But now, at the commencement of the campaign, I should feel dishonored, not only in my comrades' eyes but in my own, if I preferred my own happiness to my love and duty to the Fatherland.
  • Each step of the retreat was accompanied by a complicated interplay of interests, arguments, and passions at headquarters.
  • Rostov remembered Sventsyani, because on the first day of their arrival at that small town he changed his sergeant major and was unable to manage all the drunken men of his squadron who, unknown to him, had appropriated five barrels of old beer.
  • And the officer gave them details of the Saltanov battle, which he had heard at the staff.
  • Rostov, smoking his pipe and turning his head about as the water trickled down his neck, listened inattentively, with an occasional glance at Ilyin, who was pressing close to him.
  • Since the campaigns of Austerlitz and of 1807 Rostov knew by experience that men always lie when describing military exploits, as he himself had done when recounting them; besides that, he had experience enough to know that nothing happens in war at all as we can imagine or relate it.
  • Rostov looked at him in silence.
  • We can at least get dry there, and Mary Hendrikhovna's there.
  • At Rostov's suggestion it was agreed that whoever became "King" should have the right to kiss Mary Hendrikhovna's hand, and that the "Booby" should go to refill and reheat the samovar for the doctor when the latter awoke.
  • Seeing his gloomy face as he frowned at his wife, the officers grew still merrier, and some of them could not refrain from laughter, for which they hurriedly sought plausible pretexts.
  • He glanced with pity at the excited face of Ilyin, who talked much and in great agitation.
  • At these sounds, long unheard, Rostov's spirits rose, as at the strains of the merriest music.
  • At these sounds, long unheard, Rostov's spirits rose, as at the strains of the merriest music.
  • He could already see how these men, who looked so small at the foot of the hill, jostled and overtook one another, waving their arms and their sabers in the air.
  • Rostov gazed at what was happening before him as at a hunt.
  • He felt instinctively that if the hussars struck at the French dragoons now, the latter could not withstand them, but if a charge was to be made it must be done now, at that very moment, or it would be too late.
  • He touched his horse, gave the word of command, and immediately, hearing behind him the tramp of the horses of his deployed squadron, rode at full trot downhill toward the dragoons.
  • The dragoons were now close at hand.
  • That Frenchman, by his uniform an officer, was going at a gallop, crouching on his gray horse and urging it on with his saber.
  • In another moment Rostov's horse dashed its breast against the hindquarters of the officer's horse, almost knocking it over, and at the same instant Rostov, without knowing why, raised his saber and struck the Frenchman with it.
  • His eyes, screwed up with fear as if he every moment expected another blow, gazed up at Rostov with shrinking terror.
  • His pale and mud-stained face--fair and young, with a dimple in the chin and light-blue eyes--was not an enemy's face at all suited to a battlefield, but a most ordinary, homelike face.
  • Something vague and confused, which he could not at all account for, had come over him with the capture of that officer and the blow he had dealt him.
  • Rostov saw the prisoners being led away and galloped after them to have a look at his Frenchman with the dimple on his chin.
  • I can't make it out at all.
  • After the affair at Ostrovna he was brought into notice, received command of an hussar battalion, and when a brave officer was needed he was chosen.
  • A child knocks itself and runs at once to the arms of its mother or nurse to have the aching spot rubbed or kissed, and it feels better when this is done.
  • The doctors were of use to Natasha because they kissed and rubbed her bump, assuring her that it would soon pass if only the coachman went to the chemist's in the Arbat and got a powder and some pills in a pretty box for a ruble and seventy kopeks, and if she took those powders in boiled water at intervals of precisely two hours, neither more nor less.
  • "You'll never get well like that," she would say, forgetting her grief in her vexation, "if you won't obey the doctor and take your medicine at the right time!
  • Even to Natasha herself it was pleasant to see that so many sacrifices were being made for her sake, and to know that she had to take medicine at certain hours, though she declared that no medicine would cure her and that it was all nonsense.
  • The doctor came every day, felt her pulse, looked at her tongue, and regardless of her grief-stricken face joked with her.
  • She said and felt at that time that no man was more to her than Nastasya Ivanovna, the buffoon.
  • The previous autumn, the hunting, "Uncle," and the Christmas holidays spent with Nicholas at Otradnoe were what she recalled oftenest and most painfully.
  • Her presentiment at the time had not deceived her--that that state of freedom and readiness for any enjoyment would not return again.
  • She kept away from everyone in the house and felt at ease only with her brother Petya.
  • After those involuntary words--that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love--uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.
  • On her way home at an early hour when she met no one but bricklayers going to work or men sweeping the street, and everybody within the houses was still asleep, Natasha experienced a feeling new to her, a sense of the possibility of correcting her faults, the possibility of a new, clean life, and of happiness.
  • The countess, with a cheerful expression on her face, looked down at her nails and spat a little for luck as she returned to the drawing room.
  • That Sunday, the Rostovs went to Mass at the Razumovskis' private chapel as usual.
  • Even at ten o'clock, when the Rostovs got out of their carriage at the chapel, the sultry air, the shouts of hawkers, the light and gay summer clothes of the crowd, the dusty leaves of the trees on the boulevard, the sounds of the band and the white trousers of a battalion marching to parade, the rattling of wheels on the cobblestones, and the brilliant, hot sunshine were all full of that summer languor, that content and discontent with the present, which is most strongly felt on a bright, hot day in town.
  • All the Moscow notabilities, all the Rostovs' acquaintances, were at the Razumovskis' chapel, for, as if expecting something to happen, many wealthy families who usually left town for their country estates had not gone away that summer.
  • As Natasha, at her mother's side, passed through the crowd behind a liveried footman who cleared the way for them, she heard a young man speaking about her in too loud a whisper.
  • It always seemed to her that everyone who looked at her was thinking only of what had happened to her.
  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.
  • She included among her enemies the creditors and all who had business dealings with her father, and always at the thought of enemies and those who hated her she remembered Anatole who had done her so much harm--and though he did not hate her she gladly prayed for him as for an enemy.
  • Only at prayer did she feel able to think clearly and calmly of Prince Andrew and Anatole, as men for whom her feelings were as nothing compared with her awe and devotion to God.
  • Take me, take me! prayed Natasha, with impatient emotion in her heart, not crossing herself but letting her slender arms hang down as if expecting some invisible power at any moment to take her and deliver her from herself, from her regrets, desires, remorse, hopes, and sins.
  • The countess looked round several times at her daughter's softened face and shining eyes and prayed God to help her.
  • Everybody followed his example and they looked at one another in surprise.
  • From the day when Pierre, after leaving the Rostovs' with Natasha's grateful look fresh in his mind, had gazed at the comet that seemed to be fixed in the sky and felt that something new was appearing on his own horizon--from that day the problem of the vanity and uselessness of all earthly things, that had incessantly tormented him, no longer presented itself.
  • She smiled at me yesterday and asked me to come again, and I love her, and no one will ever know it.
  • Pierre still went into society, drank as much and led the same idle and dissipated life, because besides the hours he spent at the Rostovs' there were other hours he had to spend somehow, and the habits and acquaintances he had made in Moscow formed a current that bore him along irresistibly.
  • In the morning, when he went to call at Rostopchin's he met there a courier fresh from the army, an acquaintance of his own, who often danced at Moscow balls.
  • He knew that when his master was at the Rostovs' he stayed till midnight.
  • He opened the door softly and saw her, in the lilac dress she had worn at church, walking about the room singing.
  • "I want to try to sing again," she said, adding as if by way of excuse, "it is, at least, something to do."
  • She spoke rapidly and did not notice how Pierre flushed at her words.
  • Natasha entered with a softened and agitated expression of face and sat down looking silently at Pierre.
  • He looked at the count.
  • The count listened with closed eyes, heaving abrupt sighs at certain passages.
  • Natasha sat erect, gazing with a searching look now at her father and now at Pierre.
  • The countess shook her head disapprovingly and angrily at every solemn expression in the manifesto.
  • "What a darling our Papa is!" she cried, kissing him, and she again looked at Pierre with the unconscious coquetry that had returned to her with her better spirits.
  • Everything seems funny to you, but this isn't at all a joke....
  • At this moment, Petya, to whom nobody was paying any attention, came up to his father with a very flushed face and said in his breaking voice that was now deep and now shrill:
  • Be quiet, I tell you! cried the count, with a glance at his wife, who had turned pale and was staring fixedly at her son.
  • Natasha's unwontedly brilliant eyes, continually glancing at him with a more than cordial look, had reduced him to this condition.
  • They looked at each other with dismayed and embarrassed faces.
  • Next day the Emperor arrived in Moscow, and several of the Rostovs' domestic serfs begged permission to go to have a look at him.
  • Petya wiped his perspiring face with his hands and pulled up the damp collar which he had arranged so well at home to seem like a man's.
  • When he came to himself, a man of clerical appearance with a tuft of gray hair at the back of his head and wearing a shabby blue cassock--probably a church clerk and chanter--was holding him under the arm with one hand while warding off the pressure of the crowd with the other.
  • All these conversations, especially the joking with the girls, were such as might have had a particular charm for Petya at his age, but they did not interest him now.
  • The firing was still proceeding when officers, generals, and gentlemen-in-waiting came running out of the cathedral, and after them others in a more leisurely manner: caps were again raised, and those who had run to look at the cannon ran back again.
  • At last four men in uniforms and sashes emerged from the cathedral doors.
  • Several people in the crowd rushed at the coachman.
  • Petya's eyes grew bloodshot, and still more excited by the danger of being crushed, he rushed at the biscuits.
  • He sprang forward and upset an old woman who was catching at a biscuit; the old woman did not consider herself defeated though she was lying on the ground--she grabbed at some biscuits but her hand did not reach them.
  • Happy as Petya was, he felt sad at having to go home knowing that all the enjoyment of that day was over.
  • The chief magnates sat on high- backed chairs at a large table under the portrait of the Emperor, but most of the gentry were strolling about the room.
  • On all these faces, as on the faces of the crowd Petya had seen in the Square, there was a striking contradiction: the general expectation of a solemn event, and at the same time the everyday interests in a boston card party, Peter the cook, Zinaida Dmitrievna's health, and so on.
  • With a sudden expression of malevolence on his aged face, Adraksin shouted at Pierre:
  • Count Rostov at the back of the crowd was expressing approval; several persons, briskly turning a shoulder to the orator at the end of a phrase, said:
  • Many voices shouted and talked at the same time, so that Count Rostov had not time to signify his approval of them all, and the group increased, dispersed, re-formed, and then moved with a hum of talk into the largest hall and to the big table.
  • The crowd drew up to the large table, at which sat gray-haired or bald seventy-year-old magnates, uniformed and besashed almost all of whom Pierre had seen in their own homes with their buffoons, or playing boston at the clubs.
  • One of the old men nearest to him looked round, but his attention was immediately diverted by an exclamation at the other side of the table.
  • At that moment Count Rostopchin with his protruding chin and alert eyes, wearing the uniform of a general with sash over his shoulder, entered the room, stepping briskly to the front of the crowd of gentry.
  • A conference took place confined to the magnates sitting at the table.
  • Having heard that Count Mamonov was furnishing a regiment, Bezukhov at once informed Rostopchin that he would give a thousand men and their maintenance.
  • The assembled nobles all took off their uniforms and settled down again in their homes and clubs, and not without some groans gave orders to their stewards about the enrollment, feeling amazed themselves at what they had done.
  • In historical works on the year 1812 French writers are very fond of saying that Napoleon felt the danger of extending his line, that he sought a battle and that his marshals advised him to stop at Smolensk, and of making similar statements to show that the danger of the campaign was even then understood.
  • But all these hints at what happened, both from the French side and the Russian, are advanced only because they fit in with the event.
  • At the very beginning of the war our armies were divided, and our sole aim was to unite them, though uniting the armies was no advantage if we meant to retire and lure the enemy into the depths of the country.
  • So thought the Emperor, and the Russian commanders and people were still more provoked at the thought that our forces were retreating into the depths of the country.
  • In August he was at Smolensk and thought only of how to advance farther, though as we now see that advance was evidently ruinous to him.
  • The armies were divided at the commencement of the campaign.
  • The Tsarevich hinted at treachery and demanded a general engagement.
  • At Smolensk the armies at last reunited, much as Bagration disliked it.
  • At Smolensk the armies at last reunited, much as Bagration disliked it.
  • It was necessary to fight an unexpected battle at Smolensk to save our lines of communication.
  • Napoleon advanced farther and we retired, thus arriving at the very result which caused his destruction.
  • At the end of the week the prince reappeared and resumed his former way of life, devoting himself with special activity to building operations and the arrangement of the gardens and completely breaking off his relations with Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • She feared for her brother who was in it, was horrified by and amazed at the strange cruelty that impels men to kill one another, but she did not understand the significance of this war, which seemed to her like all previous wars.
  • To this letter the old prince had replied affectionately, and from that time had kept the Frenchwoman at a distance.
  • In this letter Prince Andrew pointed out to his father the danger of staying at Bald Hills, so near the theater of war and on the army's direct line of march, and advised him to move to Moscow.
  • At dinner that day, on Dessalles' mentioning that the French were said to have already entered Vitebsk, the old prince remembered his son's letter.
  • These he put down beside him--not letting anyone read them at dinner.
  • When she had done so Princess Mary looked inquiringly at her father.
  • Dessalles looked in amazement at the prince, who was talking of the Niemen when the enemy was already at the Dnieper, but Princess Mary, forgetting the geographical position of the Niemen, thought that what her father was saying was correct.
  • Yes, he writes that the French were beaten at... at... what river is it?
  • When Michael Ivanovich returned to the study with the letter, the old prince, with spectacles on and a shade over his eyes, was sitting at his open bureau with screened candles, holding a paper in his outstretched hand, and in a somewhat dramatic attitude was reading his manuscript-- his "Remarks" as he termed it--which was to be transmitted to the Emperor after his death.
  • He paced up and down for a while and glanced at his notes.
  • The prince again went to his bureau, glanced into it, fingered his papers, closed the bureau again, and sat down at the table to write to the governor.
  • He went about looking at every corner.
  • "Well, at last I've finished, now I'll rest," thought the prince, and let Tikhon undress him.
  • Frowning with vexation at the effort necessary to divest himself of his coat and trousers, the prince undressed, sat down heavily on the bed, and appeared to be meditating as he looked contemptuously at his withered yellow legs.
  • Tikhon, what did we talk about at dinner?
  • The French at Vitebsk, in four days' march they may be at Smolensk; perhaps are already there!
  • He recalled all the words spoken at that first meeting with Potemkin.
  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.
  • The prince allowed no one at Bald Hills to drive with ringing bells; but on a long journey Alpatych liked to have them.
  • Women's fuss! muttered Alpatych to himself and started on his journey, looking round at the fields of yellow rye and the still- green, thickly growing oats, and at other quite black fields just being plowed a second time.
  • As he went along he looked with pleasure at the year's splendid crop of corn, scrutinized the strips of ryefield which here and there were already being reaped, made his calculations as to the sowing and the harvest, and asked himself whether he had not forgotten any of the prince's orders.
  • Having baited the horses twice on the way, he arrived at the town toward evening on the fourth of August.
  • At eight o'clock the booming of cannon was added to the sound of musketry.
  • Many people were hurrying through the streets and there were many soldiers, but cabs were still driving about, tradesmen stood at their shops, and service was being held in the churches as usual.
  • In the offices and shops and at the post office everyone was talking about the army and about the enemy who was already attacking the town, everybody was asking what should be done, and all were trying to calm one another.
  • At the porch he met two of the landed gentry, one of whom he knew.
  • In the waiting room were tradesmen, women, and officials, looking silently at one another.
  • Loaded carts stood at the house next to Ferapontov's and women were wailing and lamenting as they said good-by.
  • Alpatych entered the innyard at a quicker pace than usual and went straight to the shed where his horses and trap were.
  • At these words Alpatych nodded as if in approval, and not wishing to hear more went to the door of the room opposite the innkeeper's, where he had left his purchases.
  • "You brute, you murderer!" screamed a thin, pale woman who, with a baby in her arms and her kerchief torn from her head, burst through the door at that moment and down the steps into the yard.
  • Alpatych, without answering or looking at his host, sorted his packages and asked how much he owed.
  • Selivanov, now, did a good stroke last Thursday-- sold flour to the army at nine rubles a sack.
  • The people did not at once realize the meaning of this bombardment.
  • At first the noise of the falling bombs and shells only aroused curiosity.
  • Ferapontov's wife, who till then had not ceased wailing under the shed, became quiet and with the baby in her arms went to the gate, listening to the sounds and looking in silence at the people.
  • The innkeeper stood at the gate.
  • "What are you staring at?" he shouted to the cook, who in her red skirt, with sleeves rolled up, swinging her bare elbows, had stepped to the corner to listen to what was being said.
  • At that moment the pitiful wailing of women was heard from different sides, the frightened baby began to cry, and people crowded silently with pale faces round the cook.
  • On seeing the soldiers he was about to shout at them, but suddenly stopped and, clutching at his hair, burst into sobs and laughter:
  • The flames now died down and were lost in the black smoke, now suddenly flared up again brightly, lighting up with strange distinctness the faces of the people crowding at the crossroads.
  • Seeing that his trap would not be able to move on for some time, Alpatych got down and turned into the side street to look at the fire.
  • Prince Andrew in his riding cloak, mounted on a black horse, was looking at Alpatych from the back of the crowd.
  • At that moment the flames flared up and showed his young master's pale worn face.
  • Let me know at once when you will start.
  • Prince Andrew looked at him and without replying went on speaking to Alpatych.
  • Only at night and in the forests while the dew lasted was there any freshness.
  • But on the road, the highroad along which the troops marched, there was no such freshness even at night or when the road passed through the forest; the dew was imperceptible on the sandy dust churned up more than six inches deep.
  • The artillery and baggage wagons moved noiselessly through the deep dust that rose to the very hubs of the wheels, and the infantry sank ankle-deep in that soft, choking, hot dust that never cooled even at night.
  • No one at the stone entrance gates of the drive and the door stood open.
  • An old peasant whom Prince Andrew in his childhood had often seen at the gate was sitting on a green garden seat, plaiting a bast shoe.
  • The shutters were all closed, except at one window which was open.
  • Alpatych, having sent his family away, was alone at Bald Hills and was sitting indoors reading the Lives of the Saints.
  • Then, vexed at his own weakness, he turned away and began to report on the position of affairs.
  • Alpatych turned his face to Prince Andrew, looked at him, and suddenly with a solemn gesture raised his arm.
  • Gently disengaging himself, the prince spurred his horse and rode down the avenue at a gallop.
  • He could not resist looking at them once more.
  • But not far from Bald Hills he again came out on the road and overtook his regiment at its halting place by the dam of a small pond.
  • He longed to get into that water, however dirty it might be, and he glanced round at the pool from whence came sounds of shrieks and laughter.
  • The officer, Timokhin, with his red little nose, standing on the dam wiping himself with a towel, felt confused at seeing the prince, but made up his mind to address him nevertheless.
  • "Flesh, bodies, cannon fodder!" he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.
  • On the seventh of August Prince Bagration wrote as follows from his quarters at Mikhaylovna on the Smolensk road:
  • With fifteen thousand men I held the enemy at bay for thirty-five hours and beat him; but he would not hold out even for fourteen hours.
  • What are we scared at and of whom are we afraid?
  • In the French circle of Helene and Rumyantsev the reports of the cruelty of the enemy and of the war were contradicted and all Napoleon's attempts at conciliation were discussed.
  • In Helene's circle the war in general was regarded as a series of formal demonstrations which would very soon end in peace, and the view prevailed expressed by Bilibin--who now in Petersburg was quite at home in Helene's house, which every clever man was obliged to visit--that not by gunpowder but by those who invented it would matters be settled.
  • One of the visitors, usually spoken of as "a man of great merit," having described how he had that day seen Kutuzov, the newly chosen chief of the Petersburg militia, presiding over the enrollment of recruits at the Treasury, cautiously ventured to suggest that Kutuzov would be the man to satisfy all requirements.
  • "I have talked and talked at the Assembly of the Nobility," Prince Vasili interrupted, "but they did not listen to me.
  • But he retrieved his mistake at once.
  • Now, is it suitable that Count Kutuzov, the oldest general in Russia, should preside at that tribunal?
  • How could they make a man commander-in-chief who cannot mount a horse, who drops asleep at a council, and has the very worst morals!
  • A good reputation he made for himself at Bucharest!
  • He can't see at all!
  • On the ninth of August Prince Vasili at Anna Pavlovna's again met the "man of great merit."
  • All dissensions are at an end!
  • At last we have a man! said he, glancing sternly and significantly round at everyone in the drawing room.
  • At last we have a man! said he, glancing sternly and significantly round at everyone in the drawing room.
  • Understanding at once to whom she alluded, Prince Vasili said in a whisper:
  • As soon as he said this both Prince Vasili and Anna Pavlovna turned away from him and glanced sadly at one another with a sigh at his naivete.
  • A good chessplayer having lost a game is sincerely convinced that his loss resulted from a mistake he made and looks for that mistake in the opening, but forgets that at each stage of the game there were similar mistakes and that none of his moves were perfect.
  • He found the Cossacks, inquired for the regiment operating with Platov's detachment and by evening found his master, Nicholas Rostov, quartered at Yankovo.
  • He ordered the militiamen to be called up from the villages and armed, and wrote a letter to the commander-in- chief informing him that he had resolved to remain at Bald Hills to the last extremity and to defend it, leaving to the commander-in-chief's discretion to take measures or not for the defense of Bald Hills, where one of Russia's oldest generals would be captured or killed, and he announced to his household that he would remain at Bald Hills.
  • She knew it was a proof that in the depth of his soul he was glad she was remaining at home and had not gone away.
  • His caleche was already at the door.
  • It was becoming more and more dangerous to remain at Bald Hills, and next day they moved the prince to Bogucharovo, the doctor accompanying him.
  • For three weeks the old prince lay stricken by paralysis in the new house Prince Andrew had built at Bogucharovo, ever in the same state, getting neither better nor worse.
  • She assumed an attitude of prayer, looked at the icons, repeated the words of a prayer, but she could not pray.
  • Several times she listened at the door, and it seemed to her that his mutterings were louder than usual and that they turned him over oftener.
  • She knew that her going in during the night at an unusual hour would irritate him.
  • Princess Mary stopped at the porch, still horrified by her spiritual baseness and trying to arrange her thoughts before going to her father.
  • Princess Mary's heart beat so violently at this news that she grew pale and leaned against the wall to keep from falling.
  • She looked at him in dismay trying to guess what he wanted of her.
  • Then his lips and tongue moved, sounds came, and he began to speak, gazing timidly and imploringly at her, evidently afraid that she might not understand.
  • Straining all her faculties Princess Mary looked at him.
  • So at least it seemed to Princess Mary.
  • He glanced at her with timid surprise.
  • He's with the army, Father, at Smolensk.
  • Princess Mary could no longer restrain herself and wept while she gazed at his face.
  • Then he again opened his eyes and said something none of them could understand for a long time, till at last Tikhon understood and repeated it.
  • I wished to be at peace....
  • She returned to the garden and sat down on the grass at the foot of the slope by the pond, where no one could see her.
  • You must be prepared for everything, said the Marshal, meeting her at the house door.
  • The old prince used to approve of them for their endurance at work when they came to Bald Hills to help with the harvest or to dig ponds, and ditches, but he disliked them for their boorishness.
  • But such undercurrents still existed among the people and gathered new forces ready to manifest themselves just as strangely, unexpectedly, and at the same time simply, naturally, and forcibly.
  • On the fifteenth, the day of the old prince's death, the Marshal had insisted on Princess Mary's leaving at once, as it was becoming dangerous.
  • Dron was one of those physically and mentally vigorous peasants who grow big beards as soon as they are of age and go on unchanged till they are sixty or seventy, without a gray hair or the loss of a tooth, as straight and strong at sixty as at thirty.
  • Though the peasants paid quitrent, Alpatych thought no difficulty would be made about complying with this order, for there were two hundred and thirty households at work in Bogucharovo and the peasants were well to do.
  • Alpatych looked intently at Dron and frowned.
  • Alpatych repeated, withdrawing his hand from his bosom and solemnly pointing to the floor at Dron's feet.
  • "I can see through you and three yards into the ground under you," he continued, gazing at the floor in front of Dron.
  • Dron was disconcerted, glanced furtively at Alpatych and again lowered his eyes.
  • The sun had reached the other side of the house, and its slanting rays shone into the open window, lighting up the room and part of the morocco cushion at which Princess Mary was looking.
  • The princess looked up at her.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne at once began crying again and kissed that hand, speaking of the princess' sorrow and making herself a partner in it.
  • The princess heard her, not heeding her words but occasionally looking up at her and listening to the sound of her voice.
  • Princess Mary looked at her companion without understanding what she was talking about.
  • The demands of life, which had seemed to her annihilated by her father's death, all at once rose before her with a new, previously unknown force and took possession of her.
  • Alpatych was not at home, he had gone to the police.
  • The old valet Tikhon, with sunken, emaciated face that bore the stamp of inconsolable grief, replied: "Yes, Princess" to all Princess Mary's questions and hardly refrained from sobbing as he looked at her.
  • At length Dron, the village Elder, entered the room and with a deep bow to Princess Mary came to a halt by the doorpost.
  • "Dronushka," she said, regarding as a sure friend this Dronushka who always used to bring a special kind of gingerbread from his visit to the fair at Vyazma every year and smilingly offer it to her, "Dronushka, now since our misfortune..." she began, but could not go on.
  • He looked askance at Princess Mary and said: "There are no horses; I told Yakov Alpatych so."
  • To Princess Mary it was strange that now, at a moment when such sorrow was filling her soul, there could be rich people and poor, and the rich could refrain from helping the poor.
  • Dron looked intently at the princess while she was speaking.
  • An hour later Dunyasha came to tell the princess that Dron had come, and all the peasants had assembled at the barn by the princess' order and wished to have word with their mistress.
  • I will offer them monthly rations and housing at our Moscow estate.
  • So many different eyes, old and young, were fixed on her, and there were so many different faces, that she could not distinguish any of them and, feeling that she must speak to them all at once, did not know how to do it.
  • All eyes were gazing at her with one and the same expression.
  • "We are all very thankful for your bounty, but it won't do for us to take the landlord's grain," said a voice at the back of the crowd.
  • No one replied and Princess Mary, looking round at the crowd, found that every eye she met now was immediately dropped.
  • With mournful pleasure she now lingered over these images, repelling with horror only the last one, the picture of his death, which she felt she could not contemplate even in imagination at this still and mystic hour of night.
  • She vividly recalled the moment when he had his first stroke and was being dragged along by his armpits through the garden at Bald Hills, muttering something with his helpless tongue, twitching his gray eyebrows and looking uneasily and timidly at her.
  • And she recalled in all its detail the night at Bald Hills before he had the last stroke, when with a foreboding of disaster she had remained at home against his will.
  • And not the face she had known ever since she could remember and had always seen at a distance, but the timid, feeble face she had seen for the first time quite closely, with all its wrinkles and details, when she stooped near to his mouth to catch what he said.
  • With wide-open eyes she gazed at the moonlight and the shadows, expecting every moment to see his dead face, and she felt that the silence brooding over the house and within it held her fast.
  • For the last three days Bogucharovo had lain between the two hostile armies, so that it was as easy for the Russian rearguard to get to it as for the French vanguard; Rostov, as a careful squadron commander, wished to take such provisions as remained at Bogucharovo before the French could get them.
  • On the way to Bogucharovo, a princely estate with a dwelling house and farm where they hoped to find many domestic serfs and pretty girls, they questioned Lavrushka about Napoleon and laughed at his stories, and raced one another to try Ilyin's horse.
  • They rode at a footpace to the barn, where a large crowd of peasants was standing.
  • Some of the men bared their heads, others stared at the new arrivals without doffing their caps.
  • At that moment, on the road leading from the big house, two women and a man in a white hat were seen coming toward the officers.
  • Following Dunyasha, Alpatych advanced to Rostov, having bared his head while still at a distance.
  • Forgive us for Christ's sake, eh? said the peasants, smiling joyfully at him.
  • Rostov looked at the tipsy peasants and smiled.
  • "No, there's not much to be amused at here," said Rostov, and rode on a little way.
  • At the moment when Rostov and Ilyin were galloping along the road, Princess Mary, despite the dissuasions of Alpatych, her nurse, and the maids, had given orders to harness and intended to start, but when the cavalrymen were espied they were taken for Frenchmen, the coachman ran away, and the women in the house began to wail.
  • What gentleness and nobility there are in her features and expression! thought he as he looked at her and listened to her timid story.
  • She turned away, and then, as if fearing he might take her words as meant to move him to pity, looked at him with an apprehensive glance of inquiry.
  • Princess Mary noticed this and glanced gratefully at him with that radiant look which caused the plainness of her face to be forgotten.
  • But on glancing at Rostov's face Ilyin stopped short.
  • Rostov glanced angrily at Ilyin and without replying strode off with rapid steps to the village.
  • Alpatych at a gliding trot, only just managing not to run, kept up with him with difficulty.
  • He said the peasants were obdurate and that at the present moment it would be imprudent to "overresist" them without an armed force, and would it not be better first to send for the military?
  • Karp shouted at him.
  • "We don't riot, we're following the orders," declared Karp, and at that moment several voices began speaking together.
  • Be off to your houses at once, and don't let one of your voices be heard!
  • "All our stupidity, Yakov Alpatych," came the answers, and the crowd began at once to disperse through the village.
  • "Aye, when I look at you!..." said one of them to Karp.
  • "Yes, they worked all day and didn't play!" remarked the tall, round- faced peasant gravely, pointing with a significant wink at the dictionaries that were on the top.
  • At the inn at Yankovo he respectfully took leave of her, for the first time permitting himself to kiss her hand.
  • At the inn at Yankovo he respectfully took leave of her, for the first time permitting himself to kiss her hand.
  • On the rest of the way to Moscow, though the princess' position was not a cheerful one, Dunyasha, who went with her in the carriage, more than once noticed that her mistress leaned out of the window and smiled at something with an expression of mingled joy and sorrow.
  • It was at those moments that Dunyasha noticed her smiling as she looked out of the carriage window.
  • To remember her gave him pleasure, and when his comrades, hearing of his adventure at Bogucharovo, rallied him on having gone to look for hay and having picked up one of the wealthiest heiresses in Russia, he grew angry.
  • Prince Andrew arrived at Tsarevo-Zaymishche on the very day and at the very hour that Kutuzov was reviewing the troops for the first time.
  • He stopped in the village at the priest's house in front of which stood the commander-in-chief's carriage, and he sat down on the bench at the gate awaiting his Serene Highness, as everyone now called Kutuzov.
  • The lieutenant colonel of hussars smiled beneath his mustache at the orderly's tone, dismounted, gave his horse to a dispatch runner, and approached Bolkonski with a slight bow.
  • He smiled at the recollection of that time and of his love for Natasha, and passed at once to what now interested him passionately and exclusively.
  • This was a plan of campaign he had devised while serving at the outposts during the retreat.
  • He's coming! shouted a Cossack standing at the gate.
  • He pulled himself together, looked round, screwing up his eyes, glanced at Prince Andrew, and, evidently not recognizing him, moved with his waddling gait to the porch.
  • "Whew... whew... whew!" he whistled, and again glanced at Prince Andrew.
  • Kutuzov looked at him with eyes wide open with dismay and then took off his cap and crossed himself:
  • But at that moment Denisov, no more intimidated by his superiors than by the enemy, came with jingling spurs up the steps of the porch, despite the angry whispers of the adjutants who tried to stop him.
  • Kutuzov, his hands still pressed on the seat, glanced at him glumly.
  • All right, all right, friend, stay here at the staff and tomorrow we'll have a talk.
  • I'll look at them here, said he.
  • Her husband has welcomed his Serene Highness with the cross at the church, and she intends to welcome him in the house....
  • At those words Kutuzov looked round.
  • He was listening to the general's report-- which consisted chiefly of a criticism of the position at Tsarevo- Zaymishche--as he had listened to Denisov, and seven years previously had listened to the discussion at the Austerlitz council of war.
  • He looked at the paper again.
  • Prince Andrew told Kutuzov all he knew of his father's death, and what he had seen at Bald Hills when he passed through it.
  • Kutuzov glanced inquiringly at him.
  • I remember you at Austerlitz....
  • I remember, yes, I remember you with the standard! said Kutuzov, and a flush of pleasure suffused Prince Andrew's face at this recollection.
  • I missed you at Bucharest, but I needed someone to send.
  • In the corner room at the club, members gathered to read these broadsheets, and some liked the way Karpushka jeered at the French, saying: They will swell up with Russian cabbage, burst with our buckwheat porridge, and choke themselves with cabbage soup.
  • It was said that Mamonov's regiment would cost him eight hundred thousand rubles, and that Bezukhov had spent even more on his, but that the best thing about Bezukhov's action was that he himself was going to don a uniform and ride at the head of his regiment without charging anything for the show.
  • Speak of the sun and you see its rays! and she smiled amiably at Pierre.
  • "No," said Pierre, with a laughing glance at his big, stout body.
  • I met them the day before yesterday at the Arkharovs'.
  • The second broadsheet stated that our headquarters were at Vyazma, that Count Wittgenstein had defeated the French, but that as many of the inhabitants of Moscow wished to be armed, weapons were ready for them at the arsenal: sabers, pistols, and muskets which could be had at a low price.
  • He had not decided what it should mean when he heard the voice of the eldest princess at the door asking whether she might come in.
  • At this rate they will soon begin beating us.
  • But I will, I'll give the order at once.
  • The princess was apparently vexed at not having anyone to be angry with.
  • On reaching home Pierre gave orders to Evstafey--his head coachman who knew everything, could do anything, and was known to all Moscow--that he would leave that night for the army at Mozhaysk, and that his saddle horses should be sent there.
  • At dawn next day Pierre was approaching Mozhaysk.
  • Every house in Mozhaysk had soldiers quartered in it, and at the hostel where Pierre was met by his groom and coachman there was no room to be had.
  • It was a feeling akin to what he had felt at the Sloboda Palace during the Emperor's visit--a sense of the necessity of undertaking something and sacrificing something.
  • In giving and accepting battle at Borodino, Kutuzov acted involuntarily and irrationally.
  • The Russian army, they say, in its retreat from Smolensk sought out for itself the best position for a general engagement and found such a position at Borodino.
  • The Russians, they say, fortified this position in advance on the left of the highroad (from Moscow to Smolensk) and almost at a right angle to it, from Borodino to Utitsa, at the very place where the battle was fought.
  • Not only did the Russians not fortify the position on the field of Borodino to the left of, and at a right angle to, the highroad (that is, the position on which the battle took place), but never till the twenty- fifth of August, 1812, did they think that a battle might be fought there.
  • And why were all efforts exhausted and six thousand men sacrificed to defend it till late at night on the twenty-fourth?
  • To anyone who looks at the field of Borodino without thinking of how the battle was actually fought, this position, protected by the river Kolocha, presents itself as obvious for an army whose object was to prevent an enemy from advancing along the Smolensk road to Moscow.
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • At the descent of the high steep hill, down which a winding road led out of the town past the cathedral on the right, where a service was being held and the bells were ringing, Pierre got out of his vehicle and proceeded on foot.
  • Almost all of them stared with naive, childlike curiosity at Pierre's white hat and green swallow-tail coat.
  • Pierre's coachman shouted angrily at the convoy of wounded to keep to one side of the road.
  • One of the wounded, an old soldier with a bandaged arm who was following the cart on foot, caught hold of it with his sound hand and turned to look at Pierre.
  • He was looking now at the cavalry regiment that had met the convoy of wounded, now at the cart by which he was standing, in which two wounded men were sitting and one was lying.
  • This soldier was looking at the cathedral and crossing himself.
  • The soldier with the swollen cheek looked angrily at the cavalry singers.
  • He kept looking to either side of the road for familiar faces, but only saw everywhere the unfamiliar faces of various military men of different branches of the service, who all looked with astonishment at his white hat and green tail coat.
  • Having gone nearly three miles he at last met an acquaintance and eagerly addressed him.
  • Out of an army of a hundred thousand we must expect at least twenty thousand wounded, and we haven't stretchers, or bunks, or dressers, or doctors enough for six thousand.
  • Yet from among these men twenty thousand are doomed to die, and they wonder at my hat!
  • When he had ascended the hill and reached the little village street, he saw for the first time peasant militiamen in their white shirts and with crosses on their caps, who, talking and laughing loudly, animated and perspiring, were at work on a huge knoll overgrown with grass to the right of the road.
  • On seeing these peasants, who were evidently still amused by the novelty of their position as soldiers, Pierre once more thought of the wounded men at Mozhaysk and understood what the soldier had meant when he said: "They want the whole nation to fall on them."
  • "I must ask someone who knows," he thought, and addressed an officer who was looking with curiosity at his huge unmilitary figure.
  • There's our center, at Borodino, just there, and he pointed to the village in front of them with the white church.
  • Yesterday our left flank was there at Shevardino, you see, where the oak is, but now we have withdrawn our left wing--now it is over there, do you see that village and the smoke?
  • An elderly sergeant who had approached the officer while he was giving these explanations had waited in silence for him to finish speaking, but at this point, evidently not liking the officer's remark, interrupted him.
  • "Oh, those damned fellows!" muttered the officer who followed him, holding his nose as he ran past the men at work.
  • Standing among the crowd of peasants, Pierre recognized several acquaintances among these notables, but did not look at them--his whole attention was absorbed in watching the serious expression on the faces of the crowd of soldiers and militiamen who were all gazing eagerly at the icon.
  • Pierre recognized him at once by his peculiar figure, which distinguished him from everybody else.
  • Despite the presence of the commander-in-chief, who attracted the attention of all the superior officers, the militiamen and soldiers continued their prayers without looking at him.
  • At last he rose, kissed the icon as a child does with naively pouting lips, and again bowed till he touched the ground with his hand.
  • He explained his wish to be present at the battle and to see the position.
  • It is not at all what Count Bennigsen intended.
  • You see... but Boris did not finish, for at that moment Kaysarov, Kutuzov's adjutant, came up to Pierre.
  • Though Kutuzov had dismissed all unnecessary men from the staff, Boris had contrived to remain at headquarters after the changes.
  • Kutuzov repeated, his laughing eye narrowing more and more as he looked at Pierre.
  • My quarters are at your service.
  • From Gorki, Bennigsen descended the highroad to the bridge which, when they had looked at it from the hill, the officer had pointed out as being the center of our position and where rows of fragrant new-mown hay lay by the riverside.
  • The officers said that either Napoleon or Murat was there, and they all gazed eagerly at this little group of horsemen.
  • Pierre also looked at them, trying to guess which of the scarcely discernible figures was Napoleon.
  • At last those mounted men rode away from the mound and disappeared.
  • In the middle of the wood a brown hare with white feet sprang out and, scared by the tramp of the many horses, grew so confused that it leaped along the road in front of them for some time, arousing general attention and laughter, and only when several voices shouted at it did it dart to one side and disappear in the thicket.
  • Here, at the extreme left flank, Bennigsen talked a great deal and with much heat, and, as it seemed to Pierre, gave orders of great military importance.
  • Narrow and burdensome and useless to anyone as his life now seemed to him, Prince Andrew on the eve of battle felt agitated and irritable as he had done seven years before at Austerlitz.
  • He looked at the row of birches shining in the sunshine, with their motionless green and yellow foliage and white bark.
  • As he said this his eyes and face expressed more than coldness--they expressed hostility, which Pierre noticed at once.
  • He had approached the shed full of animation, but on seeing Prince Andrew's face he felt constrained and ill at ease.
  • Have they reached Moscow at last? he asked seriously.
  • The officers gazed with surprise at Pierre's huge stout figure and listened to his talk of Moscow and the position of our army, round which he had ridden.
  • "Oh!" said Pierre, looking over his spectacles in perplexity at Prince Andrew.
  • At Smolensk too he judged correctly that the French might outflank us, as they had larger forces.
  • Pierre looked at him in surprise.
  • Prince Andrew glanced at Timokhin, who looked at his commander in alarm and bewilderment.
  • Why did we lose the battle at Austerlitz?
  • "At such a moment?" said Pierre reproachfully.
  • At such a moment!
  • And if you like I will tell you that whatever happens and whatever muddles those at the top may make, we shall win tomorrow's battle.
  • In that 'extend' were my father, son, and sister, at Bald Hills.
  • "Yes, yes," muttered Pierre, looking with shining eyes at Prince Andrew.
  • As it is we have played at war--that's what's vile!
  • We play at magnanimity and all that stuff.
  • Such magnanimity and sensibility are like the magnanimity and sensibility of a lady who faints when she sees a calf being killed: she is so kindhearted that she can't look at blood, but enjoys eating the calf served up with sauce.
  • War is not courtesy but the most horrible thing in life; and we ought to understand that and not play at war.
  • How does God above look at them and hear them? exclaimed Prince Andrew in a shrill, piercing voice.
  • Pierre replied, looking at Prince Andrew with frightened, compassionate eyes.
  • Fabvier, not entering the tent, remained at the entrance talking to some generals of his acquaintance.
  • Napoleon, frowning, looked at him from under his brows.
  • Napoleon noticed at once what they were about and guessed that they were not ready.
  • "Sire, I expected nothing less than to find you at the gates of Moscow," replied de Beausset.
  • "Ha, what's this?" asked Napoleon, noticing that all the courtiers were looking at something concealed under a cloth.
  • With courtly adroitness de Beausset half turned and without turning his back to the Emperor retired two steps, twitching off the cloth at the same time, and said:
  • A very pretty curly-headed boy with a look of the Christ in the Sistine Madonna was depicted playing at stick and ball.
  • With the natural capacity of an Italian for changing the expression of his face at will, he drew nearer to the portrait and assumed a look of pensive tenderness.
  • His eyes grew dim, he moved forward, glanced round at a chair (which seemed to place itself under him), and sat down on it before the portrait.
  • At a single gesture from him everyone went out on tiptoe, leaving the great man to himself and his emotion.
  • Behave as you did at Austerlitz, Friedland, Vitebsk, and Smolensk.
  • At dawn the two new batteries established during the night on the plain occupied by the Prince d'Eckmuhl will open fire on the opposing batteries of the enemy.
  • At the same time the commander of the artillery of the 1st Corps, General Pernetti, with thirty cannon of Campan's division and all the howitzers of Dessaix's and Friant's divisions, will move forward, open fire, and overwhelm with shellfire the enemy's battery, against which will operate:
  • General Sorbier must be ready at the first order to advance with all the howitzers of the Guard's artillery against either one or other of the entrenchments.
  • At the battle of Borodino Napoleon shot at no one and killed no one.
  • At the battle of Borodino Napoleon shot at no one and killed no one.
  • The French soldiers went to kill and be killed at the battle of Borodino not because of Napoleon's orders but by their own volition.
  • The whole army--French, Italian, German, Polish, and Dutch--hungry, ragged, and weary of the campaign, felt at the sight of an army blocking their road to Moscow that the wine was drawn and must be drunk.
  • The dispositions cited above are not at all worse, but are even better, than previous dispositions by which he had won victories.
  • He was so much interested in that task that he was unable to sleep, and in spite of his cold which had grown worse from the dampness of the evening, he went into the large division of the tent at three o'clock in the morning, loudly blowing his nose.
  • Napoleon looked at him.
  • "Do you remember, sire, what you did me the honor to say at Smolensk?" continued Rapp.
  • Napoleon took a lozenge, put it in his mouth, and glanced at his watch.
  • "I have neither taste nor smell," he remarked, sniffing at his glass.
  • Corvisart gave me these lozenges but they don't help at all.
  • It is the art of being stronger than the enemy at a given moment.
  • Do you remember at Braunau he commanded an army for three weeks and did not once mount a horse to inspect his entrenchments....
  • He looked at his watch.
  • Napoleon walked about in front of his tent, looked at the fires and listened to these sounds, and as he was passing a tall guardsman in a shaggy cap, who was standing sentinel before his tent and had drawn himself up like a black pillar at sight of the Emperor, Napoleon stopped in front of him.
  • At half-past five Napoleon rode to the village of Shevardino.
  • Your excellency! he kept repeating pertinaciously while he shook Pierre by the shoulder without looking at him, having apparently lost hope of getting him to wake up.
  • An adjutant accompanied by a Cossack passed by at a sharp trot.
  • Telling the groom to follow him with the horses, Pierre went down the street to the knoll from which he had looked at the field of battle the day before.
  • Mounting the steps to the knoll Pierre looked at the scene before him, spellbound by beauty.
  • Nearer at hand glittered golden cornfields interspersed with copses.
  • He turned to look at Kutuzov and his suite, to compare his impressions with those of others.
  • They were all looking at the field of battle as he was, and, as it seemed to him, with the same feelings.
  • They all gazed with the same dissatisfied and inquiring expression at this stout man in a white hat, who for some unknown reason threatened to trample them under his horse's hoofs.
  • "Why ride into the middle of the battalion?" one of them shouted at him.
  • "Why's that fellow in front of the line?" shouted somebody at him again.
  • The adjutant looked angrily at him, evidently also intending to shout at him, but on recognizing him he nodded.
  • His horse lagged behind the adjutant's and jolted him at every step.
  • The adjutant looked at Pierre as if puzzled what to do with him now.
  • Having reached the knoll, Pierre sat down at one end of a trench surrounding the battery and gazed at what was going on around him with an unconsciously happy smile.
  • In contrast with the dread felt by the infantrymen placed in support, here in the battery where a small number of men busy at their work were separated from the rest by a trench, everyone experienced a common and as it were family feeling of animation.
  • The soldiers looked askance at him with surprise and even alarm as they went past him.
  • The soldiers shook their heads disapprovingly as they looked at Pierre.
  • "Mind your own business," an old sergeant shouted at them.
  • "Now then, you foxes!" said another, laughing at some militiamen who, stooping low, entered the battery to carry away the wounded man.
  • "There, lads... oh, oh!" they mimicked the peasants, "they don't like it at all!"
  • Pierre did not look out at the battlefield and was not concerned to know what was happening there; he was entirely absorbed in watching this fire which burned ever more brightly and which he felt was flaming up in the same way in his own soul.
  • Once or twice he was shouted at for being in the way.
  • A cannon ball struck the very end of the earth work by which he was standing, crumbling down the earth; a black ball flashed before his eyes and at the same instant plumped into something.
  • The sergeant ran up to the officer and in a frightened whisper informed him (as a butler at dinner informs his master that there is no more of some wine asked for) that there were no more charges.
  • At the same instant he was dazzled by a great flash of flame, and immediately a deafening roar, crackling, and whistling made his ears tingle.
  • For some seconds they gazed with frightened eyes at one another's unfamiliar faces and both were perplexed at what they had done and what they were to do next.
  • The young officer still sat in the same way, bent double, in a pool of blood at the edge of the earth wall.
  • Through the smoke glimpses could be caught of something black--probably men--and at times the glint of bayonets.
  • The sun had risen brightly and its slanting rays struck straight into Napoleon's face as, shading his eyes with his hand, he looked at the fleches.
  • The smoke spread out before them, and at times it looked as if the smoke were moving, at times as if the troops moved.
  • Occasionally he stopped, listened to the firing, and gazed intently at the battlefield.
  • But not only was it impossible to make out what was happening from where he was standing down below, or from the knoll above on which some of his generals had taken their stand, but even from the fleches themselves--in which by this time there were now Russian and now French soldiers, alternately or together, dead, wounded, alive, frightened, or maddened-- even at those fleches themselves it was impossible to make out what was taking place.
  • All their rushing and galloping at one another did little harm, the harm of disablement and death was caused by the balls and bullets that flew over the fields on which these men were floundering about.
  • "Reinforcements?" said Napoleon in a tone of stern surprise, looking at the adjutant--a handsome lad with long black curls arranged like Murat's own--as though he did not understand his words.
  • In the midst of this conversation, which was beginning to interest Napoleon, Berthier's eyes turned to look at a general with a suite, who was galloping toward the knoll on a lathering horse.
  • "Now then, what do you want?" asked Napoleon in the tone of a man irritated at being continually disturbed.
  • From all sides adjutants continued to arrive at a gallop and as if by agreement all said the same thing.
  • Despite news of the capture of the fleches, Napoleon saw that this was not the same, not at all the same, as what had happened in his former battles.
  • Napoleon rode up the high ground at Semenovsk, and through the smoke saw ranks of men in uniforms of a color unfamiliar to him.
  • Ney and Berthier, standing near Napoleon, exchanged looks and smiled contemptuously at this general's senseless offer.
  • "At eight hundred leagues from France, I will not have my Guard destroyed!" he said, and turning his horse rode back to Shevardino.
  • Kutuzov made a grimace and sent an order to Dokhturov to take over the command of the first army, and a request to the duke--whom he said he could not spare at such an important moment--to return to him.
  • Adjutant General Wolzogen, the man who when riding past Prince Andrew had said, "the war should be extended widely," and whom Bagration so detested, rode up while Kutuzov was at dinner.
  • Kutuzov was chewing a piece of roast chicken with difficulty and glanced at Wolzogen with eyes that brightened under their puckering lids.
  • This was Raevski, who had spent the whole day at the most important part of the field of Borodino.
  • Kutuzov, without looking at Wolzogen, gave directions for the order to be written out which the former commander-in-chief, to avoid personal responsibility, very judiciously wished to receive.
  • The tales passing from mouth to mouth at different ends of the army did not even resemble what Kutuzov had said, but the sense of his words spread everywhere because what he said was not the outcome of cunning calculations, but of a feeling that lay in the commander-in-chief's soul as in that of every Russian.
  • At times, as if to allow them a respite, a quarter of an hour passed during which the cannon balls and shells all flew overhead, but sometimes several men were torn from the regiment in a minute and the slain were continually being dragged away and the wounded carried off.
  • Hey, look at the trace horse!...
  • Prince Andrew, pale and gloomy like everyone in the regiment, paced up and down from the border of one patch to another, at the edge of the meadow beside an oatfield, with head bowed and arms behind his back.
  • He listened with weary ears to the ever-recurring sounds, distinguishing the whistle of flying projectiles from the booming of the reports, glanced at the tiresomely familiar faces of the men of the first battalion, and waited.
  • He stopped and looked at the ranks.
  • Again he glanced at the ranks.
  • He thought this, and at the same time remembered that people were looking at him.
  • At one and the same moment came the sound of an explosion, a whistle of splinters as from a breaking window frame, a suffocating smell of powder, and Prince Andrew started to one side, raising his arm, and fell on his chest.
  • Prince Andrew opened his eyes and looked up at the speaker from the stretcher into which his head had sunk deep and again his eyelids drooped.
  • The dressing station consisted of three tents with flaps turned back, pitched at the edge of a birch wood.
  • Like all the others near the speaker, Prince Andrew looked at him with shining eyes and experienced a sense of comfort.
  • He glanced at Prince Andrew's face and quickly turned away.
  • He now remembered the connection that existed between himself and this man who was dimly gazing at him through tears that filled his swollen eyes.
  • At that moment he did not desire Moscow, or victory, or glory (what need had he for any more glory?).
  • At the dressing stations the grass and earth were soaked with blood for a space of some three acres around.
  • The cannon balls flew just as swiftly and cruelly from both sides, crushing human bodies, and that terrible work which was not done by the will of a man but at the will of Him who governs men and worlds continued.
  • At the beginning of the battle they stood blocking the way to Moscow and they still did so at the end of the battle as at the beginning.
  • At the beginning of the battle they stood blocking the way to Moscow and they still did so at the end of the battle as at the beginning.
  • It was not Napoleon alone who had experienced that nightmare feeling of the mighty arm being stricken powerless, but all the generals and soldiers of his army whether they had taken part in the battle or not, after all their experience of previous battles--when after one tenth of such efforts the enemy had fled--experienced a similar feeling of terror before an enemy who, after losing HALF his men, stood as threateningly at the end as at the beginning of the battle.
  • Not that sort of victory which is defined by the capture of pieces of material fastened to sticks, called standards, and of the ground on which the troops had stood and were standing, but a moral victory that convinces the enemy of the moral superiority of his opponent and of his own impotence was gained by the Russians at Borodino.
  • Whenever I look at my watch and its hands point to ten, I hear the bells of the neighboring church; but because the bells begin to ring when the hands of the clock reach ten, I have no right to assume that the movement of the bells is caused by the position of the hands of the watch.
  • At Borodino a collision took place.
  • It was impossible not to retreat a day's march, and then in the same way it was impossible not to retreat another and a third day's march, and at last, on the first of September when the army drew near Moscow--despite the strength of the feeling that had arisen in all ranks--the force of circumstances compelled it to retire beyond Moscow.
  • Why did he not retire at once by the Kaluga road, abandoning Moscow? and so on.
  • The activity of a commander-in-chief does not at all resemble the activity we imagine to ourselves when we sit at ease in our studies examining some campaign on the map, with a certain number of troops on this and that side in a certain known locality, and begin our plans from some given moment.
  • Moment by moment the event is imperceptibly shaping itself, and at every moment of this continuous, uninterrupted shaping of events the commander-in-chief is in the midst of a most complex play of intrigues, worries, contingencies, authorities, projects, counsels, threats, and deceptions and is continually obliged to reply to innumerable questions addressed to him, which constantly conflict with one another.
  • But a commander in chief, especially at a difficult moment, has always before him not one proposal but dozens simultaneously.
  • An order must be given him at once, that instant.
  • At Drissa and at Smolensk and most palpably of all on the twenty-fourth of August at Shevardino and on the twenty- sixth at Borodino, and each day and hour and minute of the retreat from Borodino to Fili.
  • At Drissa and at Smolensk and most palpably of all on the twenty-fourth of August at Shevardino and on the twenty- sixth at Borodino, and each day and hour and minute of the retreat from Borodino to Fili.
  • He was convinced that he alone could maintain command of the army in these difficult circumstances, and that in all the world he alone could encounter the invincible Napoleon without fear, and he was horrified at the thought of the order he had to issue.
  • Malasha looked down from the oven with shy delight at the faces, uniforms, and decorations of the generals, who one after another came into the room and sat down on the broad benches in the corner under the icons.
  • He sat, sunk deep in a folding armchair, and continually cleared his throat and pulled at the collar of his coat which, though it was unbuttoned, still seemed to pinch his neck.
  • Raevski, twitching forward the black hair on his temples as was his habit, glanced now at Kutuzov and now at the door with a look of impatience.
  • All eyes were gazing at him.
  • Malasha too looked at "Granddad."
  • Admitting the view of Barclay and others that a defensive battle at Fili was impossible, but imbued with Russian patriotism and the love of Moscow, he proposed to move troops from the right to the left flank during the night and attack the French right flank the following day.
  • They all looked at him.
  • At that very time, in circumstances even more important than retreating without a battle, namely the evacuation and burning of Moscow, Rostopchin, who is usually represented as being the instigator of that event, acted in an altogether different manner from Kutuzov.
  • Those who had quitted Moscow already in July and at the beginning of August showed that they expected this.
  • All that was done around her and to her at this time, all the attention devoted to her by so many clever men and expressed in such pleasant, refined ways, and the state of dove-like purity she was now in (she wore only white dresses and white ribbons all that time) gave her pleasure, but her pleasure did not cause her for a moment to forget her aim.
  • The scent of flowers came in at the window.
  • The director of her conscience was astounded at having the case presented to him thus with the simplicity of Columbus' egg.
  • He was delighted at the unexpected rapidity of his pupil's progress, but could not abandon the edifice of argument he had laboriously constructed.
  • The question was no longer whether this was possible, but only which was the better match and how the matter would be regarded at court.
  • She would like to be married to all three at the same time, thought he.
  • But tell me, how will your husband look at the matter?
  • Pierre lay leaning on his elbow for a long time, gazing at the shadows that moved past him in the darkness.
  • As he sat bending greedily over it, helping himself to large spoonfuls and chewing one after another, his face was lit up by the fire and the soldiers looked at him in silence.
  • Pierre went on with the soldiers, quite forgetting that his inn was at the bottom of the hill and that he had already passed it.
  • There was not a room to be had at the inn, they were all occupied.
  • The whole courtyard was permeated by a strong peaceful smell of stable yards, delightful to Pierre at that moment.
  • And the memory of the dinner at the English Club when he had challenged Dolokhov flashed through Pierre's mind, and then he remembered his benefactor at Torzhok.
  • It was taking place at the English Club and someone near and dear to him sat at the end of the table.
  • But though they were kindly they did not look at Pierre and did not know him.
  • Wishing to speak and to attract their attention, he got up, but at that moment his legs grew cold and bare.
  • He glanced at the dirty innyard in the middle of which soldiers were watering their lean horses at the pump while carts were passing out of the gate.
  • There were wounded in the yards, at the windows of the houses, and the streets were crowded with them.
  • He asks you to come to him at once on a very important matter.
  • Count Rostopchin had only that morning returned to town from his summer villa at Sokolniki.
  • "Oh, so that is Vereshchagin!" said Pierre, looking at the firm, calm face of the old man and seeking any indication of his being a traitor.
  • "Not at all," rejoined the adjutant in dismay.
  • "If he is accused of circulating Napoleon's proclamation it is not proved that he did so," said Pierre without looking at Rostopchin, "and Vereshchagin..."
  • Rostopchin shouted at Pierre louder than before, frowning suddenly.
  • And I will knock the nonsense out of anybody"-- but probably realizing that he was shouting at Bezukhov who so far was not guilty of anything, he added, taking Pierre's hand in a friendly manner, "We are on the eve of a public disaster and I haven't time to be polite to everybody who has business with me.
  • When left alone at last he opened and read his wife's letter.
  • They, the soldiers at the battery, Prince Andrew killed... that old man...
  • The thought that both her sons were at the war, had both gone from under her wing, that today or tomorrow either or both of them might be killed like the three sons of one of her acquaintances, struck her that summer for the first time with cruel clearness.
  • The countess did not sleep at night, or when she did fall asleep dreamed that she saw her sons lying dead.
  • After many consultations and conversations, the count at last devised means to tranquillize her.
  • Though Petya would remain in the service, this transfer would give the countess the consolation of seeing at least one of her sons under her wing, and she hoped to arrange matters for her Petya so as not to let him go again, but always get him appointed to places where he could not possibly take part in a battle.
  • At the end of August the Rostovs received another letter from Nicholas.
  • Every day thousands of men wounded at Borodino were brought in by the Dorogomilov gate and taken to various parts of Moscow, and thousands of carts conveyed the inhabitants and their possessions out by the other gates.
  • The head of the family, Count Ilya Rostov, continually drove about the city collecting the current rumors from all sides and gave superficial and hasty orders at home about the preparations for their departure.
  • "I was never pleased at Bolkonski's engagement to Natasha," said the countess, "but I always wanted Nicholas to marry the princess, and had a presentiment that it would happen.
  • Above all, they were gay because there was a war near Moscow, there would be fighting at the town gates, arms were being given out, everybody was escaping--going away somewhere, and in general something extraordinary was happening, and that is always exciting, especially to the young.
  • Petya was not at home, he had gone to visit a friend with whom he meant to obtain a transfer from the militia to the active army.
  • At first she found it amusing to give away dresses and ribbons to the maids, but when that was done and what was left had still to be packed, she found it dull.
  • The housekeeper, the old nurse, the cooks, coachmen, maids, footmen, postilions, and scullions stood at the gate, staring at the wounded.
  • Natasha glanced with frightened eyes at the face of the wounded officer and at once went to meet the major.
  • The cart in which the officer lay was turned into the Rostovs' yard, and dozens of carts with wounded men began at the invitation of the townsfolk to turn into the yards and to draw up at the entrances of the houses in Povarskaya Street.
  • At dinner Petya having returned home told them the news he had heard.
  • The countess looked with timid horror at her son's eager, excited face as he said this.
  • She had taken a cab and driven home by a side street and the cabman had told her that the people were breaking open the barrels at the drink store, having received orders to do so.
  • At first her intervention in the business of packing was received skeptically.
  • She turned everything out and began quickly repacking, deciding that the inferior Russian carpets and unnecessary crockery should not be taken at all.
  • She at once set to work afresh and they now trusted her completely.
  • That night another wounded man was driven down the Povarskaya, and Mavra Kuzminichna, who was standing at the gate, had him brought into the Rostovs' yard.
  • The carriages were at the front porch.
  • The major-domo stood at the porch talking to an elderly orderly and to a pale young officer with a bandaged arm.
  • "Well, Vasilich, is everything ready?" asked the count, and stroking his bald head he looked good-naturedly at the officer and the orderly and nodded to them.
  • We can harness at once, your excellency.
  • In the yard, at the gates, at the window of the wings, wounded officers and their orderlies were to be seen.
  • They were all looking at the count and moving toward the porch.
  • Look at the Lopukhins opposite, they cleared out everything two days ago.
  • He looked attentively at the carts in the yard and while going up to the porch took out a clean pocket handkerchief and tied a knot in it.
  • "Health, at a time like this?" said the count.
  • I tell you, Papa" (he smote himself on the breast as a general he had heard speaking had done, but Berg did it a trifle late for he should have struck his breast at the words "Russian army"), "I tell you frankly that we, the commanders, far from having to urge the men on or anything of that kind, could hardly restrain those... those... yes, those exploits of antique valor," he went on rapidly.
  • General Barclay de Tolly risked his life everywhere at the head of the troops, I can assure you.
  • "Altogether such heroism as was displayed by the Russian warriors cannot be imagined or adequately praised!" said Berg, glancing round at Natasha, and as if anxious to conciliate her, replying to her intent look with a smile.
  • One misses Mitenka at such times.
  • At that moment Berg drew out his handkerchief as if to blow his nose and, seeing the knot in it, pondered, shaking his head sadly and significantly.
  • (At the mention of the chiffonier and dressing table Berg involuntarily changed his tone to one of pleasure at his admirable domestic arrangements.)
  • (At the mention of the chiffonier and dressing table Berg involuntarily changed his tone to one of pleasure at his admirable domestic arrangements.)
  • Berg and the countess looked at her, perplexed and frightened.
  • The count stood still at the window and listened.
  • The countess glanced at her daughter, saw her face full of shame for her mother, saw her agitation, and understood why her husband did not turn to look at her now, and she glanced round quite disconcerted.
  • Am I hindering anyone? she said, not surrendering at once.
  • The count nodded affirmatively, and Natasha, at the rapid pace at which she used to run when playing at tag, ran through the ballroom to the anteroom and downstairs into the yard.
  • When they understood that order the servants set to work at this new task with pleasure and zeal.
  • The whole household, as if to atone for not having done it sooner, set eagerly to work at the new task of placing the wounded in the carts.
  • We must keep at least one cart.
  • Before two o'clock in the afternoon the Rostovs' four carriages, packed full and with the horses harnessed, stood at the front door.
  • With the help of a maid she was arranging a seat for the countess in the huge high coach that stood at the entrance.
  • At that moment this news had only one significance for both of them.
  • Natasha looked at her inquiringly.
  • Then the count embraced Mavra Kuzminichna and Vasilich, who were to remain in Moscow, and while they caught at his hand and kissed his shoulder he patted their backs lightly with some vaguely affectionate and comforting words.
  • Efim, the old coachman, who was the only one the countess trusted to drive her, sat perched up high on the box and did not so much as glance round at what was going on behind him.
  • The postilion started the horses, the off pole horse tugged at his collar, the high springs creaked, and the body of the coach swayed.
  • Rarely had Natasha experienced so joyful a feeling as now, sitting in the carriage beside the countess and gazing at the slowly receding walls of forsaken, agitated Moscow.
  • Occasionally she leaned out of the carriage window and looked back and then forward at the long train of wounded in front of them.
  • Almost at the head of the line she could see the raised hood of Prince Andrew's caleche.
  • She did not know who was in it, but each time she looked at the procession her eyes sought that caleche.
  • But the coachman could not stop, for from the Meshchanski Street came more carts and carriages, and the Rostovs were being shouted at to move on and not block the way.
  • That old man noticed a face thrust out of the carriage window gazing at them, and respectfully touching Pierre's elbow said something to him and pointed to the carriage.
  • Pierre, evidently engrossed in thought, could not at first understand him.
  • At length when he had understood and looked in the direction the old man indicated, he recognized Natasha, and following his first impulse stepped instantly and rapidly toward the coach.
  • Pierre glanced absently at Natasha and was about to say something, but the countess interrupted him.
  • You were at the battle, we heard.
  • Natasha continued to lean out of the window for a long time, beaming at him with her kindly, slightly quizzical, happy smile.
  • He felt that everything was now at an end, all was in confusion and crumbling to pieces, that nobody was right or wrong, the future held nothing, and there was no escape from this position.
  • The hall porter was standing at the front door.
  • When he felt he was being looked at he behaved like an ostrich which hides its head in a bush in order not to be seen: he hung his head and quickening his pace went down the street.
  • The man told him that arms were being distributed today at the Kremlin and that tomorrow everyone would be sent out beyond the Three Hills gates and a great battle would be fought there.
  • Gerasim, that sallow beardless old man Pierre had seen at Torzhok five years before with Joseph Bazdeev, came out in answer to his knock.
  • "At home?" asked Pierre.
  • He sat down at the dusty writing table, and, having laid the manuscripts before him, opened them out, closed them, finally pushed them away, and resting his head on his hand sank into meditation.
  • More than two hours passed and Gerasim took the liberty of making a slight noise at the door to attract his attention, but Pierre did not hear him.
  • "Look here," he added, taking Gerasim by a button of his coat and looking down at the old man with moist, shining, and ecstatic eyes, "I say, do you know that there is going to be a battle tomorrow?"
  • Makar Alexeevich came twice that evening shuffling along in his galoshes as far as the door and stopped and looked ingratiatingly at Pierre.
  • It was when Pierre (wearing the coachman's coat which Gerasim had procured for him and had disinfected by steam) was on his way with the old man to buy the pistol at the Sukharev market that he met the Rostovs.
  • Kutuzov's order to retreat through Moscow to the Ryazan road was issued at night on the first of September.
  • The first troops started at once, and during the night they marched slowly and steadily without hurry.
  • At daybreak, however, those nearing the town at the Dorogomilov bridge saw ahead of them masses of soldiers crowding and hurrying across the bridge, ascending on the opposite side and blocking the streets and alleys, while endless masses of troops were bearing down on them from behind, and an unreasoning hurry and alarm overcame them.
  • At daybreak, however, those nearing the town at the Dorogomilov bridge saw ahead of them masses of soldiers crowding and hurrying across the bridge, ascending on the opposite side and blocking the streets and alleys, while endless masses of troops were bearing down on them from behind, and an unreasoning hurry and alarm overcame them.
  • At that very time, at ten in the morning of the second of September, Napoleon was standing among his troops on the Poklonny Hill looking at the panorama spread out before him.
  • At that very time, at ten in the morning of the second of September, Napoleon was standing among his troops on the Poklonny Hill looking at the panorama spread out before him.
  • At ten in the morning of the second of September this weather still held.
  • Here it is then at last, that famous city.
  • "A town captured by the enemy is like a maid who has lost her honor," thought he (he had said so to Tuchkov at Smolensk).
  • From that point of view he gazed at the Oriental beauty he had not seen before.
  • He had the assurance of winning the contest.
  • Here is this capital at my feet.
  • "Here she is, the reward for all those fainthearted men," he reflected, glancing at those near him and at the troops who were approaching and forming up.
  • A general with a brilliant suite galloped off at once to fetch the boyars.
  • In his imagination he appointed days for assemblies at the palace of the Tsars, at which Russian notables and his own would mingle.
  • Meanwhile an agitated consultation was being carried on in whispers among his generals and marshals at the rear of his suite.
  • Faster and faster, vying with one another, they moved at the double or at a trot, vanishing amid the clouds of dust they raised and making the air ring with a deafening roar of mingling shouts.
  • When with due circumspection Napoleon was informed that Moscow was empty, he looked angrily at his informant, turned away, and silently continued to walk to and fro.
  • The Russian troops were passing through Moscow from two o'clock at night till two in the afternoon and bore away with them the wounded and the last of the inhabitants who were leaving.
  • The greatest crush during the movement of the troops took place at the Stone, Moskva, and Yauza bridges.
  • Crowds of the kind seen at cheap sales filled all the passages and alleys of the Bazaar.
  • Two officers, one with a scarf over his uniform and mounted on a lean, dark-gray horse, the other in an overcoat and on foot, stood at the corner of Ilyinka Street, talking.
  • The general orders them all to be driven out at once, without fail.
  • I'll fetch a piece of cloth at once for such an honorable gentleman, or even two pieces with pleasure.
  • The officer pounced on the soldiers who were in the shops, but at that moment fearful screams reached them from the huge crowd on the Moskva bridge and the officer ran out into the square.
  • The cart was loaded high, and at the very top, beside a child's chair with its legs in the air, sat a peasant woman uttering piercing and desperate shrieks.
  • "Only fancy!" answered Ignat, surprised at the broadening grin on his face in the mirror.
  • Someone stopped at the gate, and the latch rattled as someone tried to open it.
  • Went away yesterday at vespertime, said Mavra Kuzminichna cordially.
  • Swaying his head and smiling as if amused at himself, the officer ran almost at a trot through the deserted streets toward the Yauza bridge to overtake his regiment.
  • The publican was fighting one of the smiths at the door, and when the workmen came out the smith, wrenching himself free from the tavern keeper, fell face downward on the pavement.
  • At that moment the first smith got up and, scratching his bruised face to make it bleed, shouted in a tearful voice: Police!
  • At the corner of the Moroseyka, opposite a large house with closed shutters and bearing a bootmaker's signboard, stood a score of thin, worn-out, gloomy-faced bootmakers, wearing overalls and long tattered coats.
  • When the crowd collected round him he seemed confused, but at the demand of the tall lad who had pushed his way up to him, he began in a rather tremulous voice to read the sheet from the beginning.
  • The superintendent of police, who had gone that morning by Count Rostopchin's orders to burn the barges and had in connection with that matter acquired a large sum of money which was at that moment in his pocket, on seeing a crowd bearing down upon him told his coachman to stop.
  • The crowd halted, pressing around those who had heard what the superintendent had said, and looking at the departing trap.
  • The superintendent of police turned round at that moment with a scared look, said something to his coachman, and his horses increased their speed.
  • When later on in his memoirs Count Rostopchin explained his actions at this time, he repeatedly says that he was then actuated by two important considerations: to maintain tranquillity in Moscow and expedite the departure of the inhabitants.
  • Rostopchin, though he had patriotic sentiments, was a sanguine and impulsive man who had always moved in the highest administrative circles and had no understanding at all of the people he supposed himself to be guiding.
  • In reply to an inquiry about the convicts in the prison, Count Rostopchin shouted angrily at the governor:
  • The superintendent of police, whom the crowd had stopped, went in to see him at the same time as an adjutant who informed the count that the horses were harnessed.
  • He stood by the balcony door looking at the crowd.
  • "Here is that mob, the dregs of the people," he thought as he gazed at the crowd: "this rabble they have roused by their folly!
  • He is waiting at the porch, said the adjutant.
  • At the count's first words he raised it slowly and looked up at him as if wishing to say something or at least to meet his eye.
  • At the count's first words he raised it slowly and looked up at him as if wishing to say something or at least to meet his eye.
  • But Rostopchin did not look at him.
  • He alone of all the Russians has disgraced the Russian name, he has caused Moscow to perish, said Rostopchin in a sharp, even voice, but suddenly he glanced down at Vereshchagin who continued to stand in the same submissive attitude.
  • And one of the soldiers, his face all at once distorted with fury, struck Vereshchagin on the head with the blunt side of his saber.
  • Some beat and tore at Vereshchagin, others at the tall youth.
  • Aren't they afraid of sinning?... said the same mob now, looking with pained distress at the dead body with its long, thin, half-severed neck and its livid face stained with blood and dust.
  • At the moment when Vereshchagin fell and the crowd closed in with savage yells and swayed about him, Rostopchin suddenly turned pale and, instead of going to the back entrance where his carriage awaited him, went with hurried steps and bent head, not knowing where and why, along the passage leading to the rooms on the ground floor.
  • At the back entrance stood his caleche.
  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.
  • I could not let him go unpunished and so I have killed two birds with one stone: to appease the mob I gave them a victim and at the same time punished a miscreant.
  • Only at the end of it, in front of the almshouse and the lunatic asylum, could be seen some people in white and others like them walking singly across the field shouting and gesticulating.
  • Troops were still crowding at the Yauza bridge.
  • Kutuzov looked at Rostopchin as if, not grasping what was said to him, he was trying to read something peculiar written at that moment on the face of the man addressing him.
  • They all stared in timid bewilderment at the strange, long-haired commander dressed up in feathers and gold.
  • One of the Russians understood what was asked and several voices at once began answering the interpreter.
  • "Good!" said Murat and, turning to one of the gentlemen in his suite, ordered four light guns to be moved forward to fire at the gates.
  • The guns emerged at a trot from the column following Murat and advanced up the Arbat.
  • Several French officers superintended the placing of the guns and looked at the Kremlin through field glasses.
  • He grasped a musket and took aim at the French.
  • Two men in peasant coats ran away at the foot of the wall, toward the Znamenka.
  • As a hungry herd of cattle keeps well together when crossing a barren field, but gets out of hand and at once disperses uncontrollably as soon as it reaches rich pastures, so did the army disperse all over the wealthy city.
  • Pierre had first experienced this strange and fascinating feeling at the Sloboda Palace, when he had suddenly felt that wealth, power, and life--all that men so painstakingly acquire and guard--if it has any worth has so only by reason of the joy with which it can all be renounced.
  • Moreover, at this moment Pierre was supported in his design and prevented from renouncing it by what he had already done in that direction.
  • On seeing Pierre he grew confused at first, but noticing embarrassment on Pierre's face immediately grew bold and, staggering on his thin legs, advanced into the middle of the room.
  • Pierre, coming out into the corridor, looked with pity and repulsion at the half-crazy old man.
  • Gerasim gazed at the officer with an alarmed and inquiring look.
  • Still smiling, the French officer spread out his hands before Gerasim's nose, intimating that he did not understand him either, and moved, limping, to the door at which Pierre was standing.
  • Hearing the yell the officer turned round, and at the same moment Pierre threw himself on the drunkard.
  • Just when Pierre snatched at and struck up the pistol Makar Alexeevich at last got his fingers on the trigger, there was a deafening report, and all were enveloped in a cloud of smoke.
  • For a few seconds he looked at him in silence.
  • "A Frenchman or a Russian prince incognito," said the officer, looking at Pierre's fine though dirty linen and at the ring on his finger.
  • I am quite at your service.
  • Here is one I got at Wagram" (he touched his side) "and a second at Smolensk"--he showed a scar on his cheek--"and this leg which as you see does not want to march, I got that on the seventh at the great battle of la Moskowa.
  • I was at it three times--sure as I sit here.
  • The captain was so naively and good-humoredly gay, so real, and so pleased with himself that Pierre almost winked back as he looked merrily at him.
  • The captain looked at Pierre.
  • I don't know what, that... and having uttered this compliment, he again gazed at him in silence.
  • The Frenchman looked at his guilty face and smiled.
  • He really was suffering at that moment.
  • Painful as that was it was not that which tormented Pierre at the moment.
  • His eyes shone and his mustache twitched as if he were smiling to himself at some amusing thought.
  • Pierre looked at him in silence.
  • "Onterkoff," said the captain and looked at Pierre for some seconds with laughing eyes.
  • The captain looked at Pierre by the candlelight and was evidently struck by the troubled expression on his companion's face.
  • The captain gazed intently at him as he had done when he learned that "shelter" was Unterkunft in German, and his face suddenly brightened.
  • "Oh, women, women!" and the captain, looking with glistening eyes at Pierre, began talking of love and of his love affairs.
  • Thus the captain touchingly recounted the story of his love for a fascinating marquise of thirty-five and at the same time for a charming, innocent child of seventeen, daughter of the bewitching marquise.
  • Having repeated these words the captain wiped his eyes and gave himself a shake, as if driving away the weakness which assailed him at this touching recollection.
  • Listening to the story of the struggle between love and duty, Pierre saw before his eyes every minutest detail of his last meeting with the object of his love at the Sukharev water tower.
  • At the time of that meeting it had not produced an effect upon him--he had not even once recalled it.
  • Urged on by Ramballe's questions he also told what he had at first concealed--his own position and even his name.
  • When it was late at night they went out together into the street.
  • At the gate stood Gerasim, the cook, and two Frenchmen.
  • They were looking at the glow seen in the town.
  • Gazing at the high starry sky, at the moon, at the comet, and at the glow from the fire, Pierre experienced a joyful emotion.
  • The Rostov party spent the night at Mytishchi, fourteen miles from Moscow.
  • At ten o'clock that evening the Rostov family and the wounded traveling with them were all distributed in the yards and huts of that large village.
  • She moved simply to be farther away from the wounded man.
  • No one replied to this remark and for some time they all gazed silently at the spreading flames of the second fire in the distance.
  • Old Daniel Terentich, the count's valet (as he was called), came up to the group and shouted at Mishka.
  • What are you staring at, you good-for-nothing?...
  • But Natasha looked at her as if not understanding what was said to her and again fixed her eyes on the corner of the stove.
  • I'll lie down at once, said Natasha.
  • I'll lie down at once, said Natasha, and began hurriedly undressing, tugging at the tapes of her petticoat.
  • But in the yard there was a light from the fire at Little Mytishchi a mile and a half away, and through the night came the noise of people shouting at a tavern Mamonov's Cossacks had set up across the street, and the adjutant's unceasing moans could still be heard.
  • He drank it eagerly, looking with feverish eyes at the door in front of him as if trying to understand and remember something.
  • The doctor and valet lifted the cloak with which he was covered and, making wry faces at the noisome smell of mortifying flesh that came from the wound, began examining that dreadful place.
  • The first time Prince Andrew understood where he was and what was the matter with him and remembered being wounded and how was when he asked to be carried into the hut after his caleche had stopped at Mytishchi.
  • At the same time he felt that above his face, above the very middle of it, some strange airy structure was being erected out of slender needles or splinters, to the sound of this whispered music.
  • "Forgive me!" she whispered, raising her head and glancing at him.
  • Those eyes, filled with happy tears, gazed at him timidly, compassionately, and with joyous love.
  • At that moment a maid sent by the countess, who had noticed her daughter's absence, knocked at the door.
  • At that moment a maid sent by the countess, who had noticed her daughter's absence, knocked at the door.
  • The conflagration, at which he had looked with so much indifference the evening before, had greatly increased during the night.
  • Both the Russians and the French looked at Pierre with surprise.
  • Besides his height and stoutness, and the strange morose look of suffering in his face and whole figure, the Russians stared at Pierre because they could not make out to what class he could belong.
  • The French followed him with astonishment in their eyes chiefly because Pierre, unlike all the other Russians who gazed at the French with fear and curiosity, paid no attention to them.
  • At the gate of one house three Frenchmen, who were explaining something to some Russians who did not understand them, stopped Pierre asking if he did not know French.
  • In another side street a sentinel standing beside a green caisson shouted at him, but only when the shout was threateningly repeated and he heard the click of the man's musket as he raised it did Pierre understand that he had to pass on the other side of the street.
  • Two girls of about ten and twelve, dressed in dirty short frocks and cloaks, were staring at their mother with a look of stupefaction on their pale frightened faces.
  • A dirty, barefooted maid was sitting on a trunk, and, having undone her pale-colored plait, was pulling it straight and sniffing at her singed hair.
  • As soon as she saw Pierre, the woman almost threw herself at his feet.
  • My benefactor, set my heart at ease....
  • Ooh! lamented Aniska, who at the sight of the fire felt that she too must give expression to her feelings.
  • It had a peculiarly strong effect on him because at the sight of the fire he felt himself suddenly freed from the ideas that had weighed him down.
  • There! shouted the Frenchman at the window, pointing to the garden at the back of the house.
  • Having run through different yards and side streets, Pierre got back with his little burden to the Gruzinski garden at the corner of the Povarskoy.
  • Glowing with the heat and from running, he felt at that moment more strongly than ever the sense of youth, animation, and determination that had come on him when he ran to save the child.
  • He glanced at her occasionally with a slight smile.
  • She was sitting on some bundles a little behind the old woman, and looked from under her long lashes with motionless, large, almond-shaped eyes at the ground before her.
  • Her face struck Pierre and, hurrying along by the fence, he turned several times to look at her.
  • He was looking at the Armenian family and at two French soldiers who had gone up to them.
  • The little barefooted Frenchman in the blue coat went up to the Armenians and, saying something, immediately seized the old man by his legs and the old man at once began pulling off his boots.
  • "Give her back to them, give her back!" he almost shouted, putting the child, who began screaming, on the ground, and again looking at the Frenchman and the Armenian family.
  • While Pierre was running the few steps that separated him from the Frenchman, the tall marauder in the frieze gown was already tearing from her neck the necklace the young Armenian was wearing, and the young woman, clutching at her neck, screamed piercingly.
  • He rushed at the barefooted Frenchman and, before the latter had time to draw his sword, knocked him off his feet and hammered him with his fists.
  • Shouts of approval were heard from the crowd around, and at the same moment a mounted patrol of French uhlans appeared from round the corner.
  • The uhlans came up at a trot to Pierre and the Frenchman and surrounded them.
  • All right, you can tell all about it at the court-martial.
  • "Do you speak French?" the officer asked again, keeping at a distance from Pierre.
  • A little man in Russian civilian clothes rode out from the ranks, and by his clothes and manner of speaking Pierre at once knew him to be a French salesman from one of the Moscow shops.
  • "He does not look like a common man," said the interpreter, after a searching look at Pierre.
  • His elation increased at the sight of the little girl he had saved.
  • In Petersburg at that time a complicated struggle was being carried on with greater heat than ever in the highest circles, between the parties of Rumyantsev, the French, Marya Fedorovna, the Tsarevich, and others, drowned as usual by the buzzing of the court drones.
  • At Anna Pavlovna's on the twenty-sixth of August, the very day of the battle of Borodino, there was a soiree, the chief feature of which was to be the reading of a letter from His Lordship the Bishop when sending the Emperor an icon of the Venerable Sergius.
  • (He used to read at the Empress'.)
  • This reading, as was always the case at Anna Pavlovna's soirees, had a political significance.
  • They all knew very well that the enchanting countess' illness arose from an inconvenience resulting from marrying two husbands at the same time, and that the Italian's cure consisted in removing such inconvenience; but in Anna Pavlovna's presence no one dared to think of this or even appear to know it.
  • Oh, she is certainly the most charming woman in the world, she went on, with a smile at her own enthusiasm.
  • Everybody looked at him, understanding what he meant.
  • During his diplomatic career he had more than once noticed that such utterances were received as very witty, and at every opportunity he uttered in that way the first words that entered his head.
  • Prince Vasili sternly declaimed, looking round at his audience as if to inquire whether anyone had anything to say to the contrary.
  • And at once, without leaving the church, thanks were rendered to the Creator for His help and for the victory.
  • The Emperor at once received this messenger in his study at the palace on Stone Island.
  • The Emperor listened in silence, not looking at Michaud.
  • I left it all in flames, replied Michaud in a decided tone, but glancing at the Emperor he was frightened by what he had done.
  • You set me at ease, Colonel.
  • When he heard these words and saw the expression of firm resolution in the Emperor's eyes, Michaud--quoique etranger, russe de coeur et d'ame-- at that solemn moment felt himself enraptured by all that he had heard (as he used afterwards to say), and gave expression to his own feelings and those of the Russian people whose representative he considered himself to be, in the following words:
  • "Sire!" said he, "Your Majesty is at this moment signing the glory of the nation and the salvation of Europe!"
  • Most of the people at that time paid no attention to the general progress of events but were guided only by their private interests, and they were the very people whose activities at that period were most useful.
  • In Petersburg and in the provinces at a distance from Moscow, ladies, and gentlemen in militia uniforms, wept for Russia and its ancient capital and talked of self-sacrifice and so on; but in the army which retired beyond Moscow there was little talk or thought of Moscow, and when they caught sight of its burned ruins no one swore to be avenged on the French, but they thought about their next pay, their next quarters, of Matreshka the vivandiere, and like matters.
  • He indicated the stud farms at which Nicholas might procure horses, recommended to him a horse dealer in the town and a landowner fourteen miles out of town who had the best horses, and promised to assist him in every way.
  • We are at home on Thursdays--today is Thursday, so please come and see us quite informally, said the governor, taking leave of him.
  • Immediately on leaving the governor's, Nicholas hired post horses and, taking his squadron quartermaster with him, drove at a gallop to the landowner, fourteen miles away, who had the stud.
  • When he had changed, poured water over his head, and scented himself, Nicholas arrived at the governor's rather late, but with the phrase "better late than never" on his lips.
  • The society gathered together at the governor's was the best in Voronezh.
  • There were a great many ladies and some of Nicholas' Moscow acquaintances, but there were no men who could at all vie with the cavalier of St. George, the hussar remount officer, the good-natured and well-bred Count Rostov.
  • As soon as Nicholas entered in his hussar uniform, diffusing around him a fragrance of perfume and wine, and had uttered the words "better late than never" and heard them repeated several times by others, people clustered around him; all eyes turned on him, and he felt at once that he had entered into his proper position in the province--that of a universal favorite: a very pleasant position, and intoxicatingly so after his long privations.
  • Nicholas was himself rather surprised at the way he danced that evening.
  • Her eyes" (Nicholas looked at his partner) "are blue, her mouth coral and ivory; her figure" (he glanced at her shoulders) "like Diana's...."
  • "Anna Ignatyevna wants to see you, Nicholas," said she, pronouncing the name so that Nicholas at once understood that Anna Ignatyevna was a very important person.
  • She looked at him and, screwing up her eyes sternly, continued to upbraid the general who had won from her.
  • And she is not at all so plain, either.
  • "Not at all," replied Nicholas as if offended at the idea.
  • My dear boy, what a way to look at it!
  • But you don't suppose I'm going to get you married at once?
  • On reaching Moscow after her meeting with Rostov, Princess Mary had found her nephew there with his tutor, and a letter from Prince Andrew giving her instructions how to get to her Aunt Malvintseva at Voronezh.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne, who was in the drawing room, looked at Princess Mary in bewildered surprise.
  • Nicholas blushed and was confused when people spoke to him about the princess (as she did when he was mentioned) and even when he thought of her, but in her presence he felt quite at ease, and said not at all what he had prepared, but what, quite appropriately, occurred to him at the moment.
  • He took the boy on his knee, played with him, and looked round at Princess Mary.
  • For this purpose she arranged a meeting between the young people at the bishop's house before Mass.
  • But he also knew (or rather felt at the bottom of his heart) that by resigning himself now to the force of circumstances and to those who were guiding him, he was not only doing nothing wrong, but was doing something very important--more important than anything he had ever done in his life.
  • But he never thought about her as he had thought of all the young ladies without exception whom he had met in society, nor as he had for a long time, and at one time rapturously, thought about Sonya.
  • He had pictured each of those young ladies as almost all honest-hearted young men do, that is, as a possible wife, adapting her in his imagination to all the conditions of married life: a white dressing gown, his wife at the tea table, his wife's carriage, little ones, Mamma and Papa, their relations to her, and so on--and these pictures of the future had given him pleasure.
  • A few days before his departure a special thanksgiving, at which Nicholas was present, was held in the cathedral for the Russian victory.
  • Nicholas looked at her face with surprise.
  • The princess looked at him, not grasping what he was saying, but cheered by the expression of regretful sympathy on his face.
  • "And I have known so many cases of a splinter wound" (the Gazette said it was a shell) "either proving fatal at once or being very slight," continued Nicholas.
  • "Oh, that would be so dread..." she began and, prevented by agitation from finishing, she bent her head with a movement as graceful as everything she did in his presence and, looking up at him gratefully, went out, following her aunt.
  • That evening Nicholas did not go out, but stayed at home to settle some accounts with the horse dealers.
  • His having encountered her in such exceptional circumstances, and his mother having at one time mentioned her to him as a good match, had drawn his particular attention to her.
  • I shall not be at peace till you promise me this.
  • At the Troitsa monastery the Rostovs first broke their journey for a whole day.
  • Natasha opened it cautiously and glanced into the room, Sonya standing beside her at the half-open door.
  • You remember when I looked in the mirror for you... at Otradnoe at Christmas?
  • I saw him lying on a bed," said she, making a gesture with her hand and a lifted finger at each detail, "and that he had his eyes closed and was covered just with a pink quilt, and that his hands were folded," she concluded, convincing herself that the details she had just seen were exactly what she had seen in the mirror.
  • She not only remembered what she had then said--that he turned to look at her and smiled and was covered with something red--but was firmly convinced that she had then seen and said that he was covered with a pink quilt and that his eyes were closed.
  • "Oh, I don't know, it is all so strange," replied Sonya, clutching at her head.
  • A few minutes later Prince Andrew rang and Natasha went to him, but Sonya, feeling unusually excited and touched, remained at the window thinking about the strangeness of what had occurred.
  • Pierre felt sad at hearing them making fun of him.
  • He did not then realize the significance of the burning of Moscow, and looked at the fires with horror.
  • Glancing indolently and indifferently at all the prisoners, he ordered the officer in charge to have them decently dressed and tidied up before taking them to the marshal.
  • Pierre gazed at the ruins and did not recognize districts he had known well.
  • He was conducted through a glass gallery, an anteroom, and a hall, which were familiar to him, into a long low study at the door of which stood an adjutant.
  • Looking at his cold face, as he sat like a stern schoolmaster who was prepared to wait awhile for an answer, Pierre felt that every instant of delay might cost him his life; but he did not know what to say.
  • He did not venture to repeat what he had said at his first examination, yet to disclose his rank and position was dangerous and embarrassing.
  • But before he had decided what to do, Davout raised his head, pushed his spectacles back on his forehead, screwed up his eyes, and looked intently at him.
  • Davout looked up and gazed intently at him.
  • For some seconds they looked at one another, and that look saved Pierre.
  • At that moment an immense number of things passed dimly through both their minds, and they realized that they were both children of humanity and were brothers.
  • But at that moment an adjutant entered and reported something to Davout.
  • Davout brightened up at the news the adjutant brought, and began buttoning up his uniform.
  • The only thought in his mind at that time was: who was it that had really sentenced him to death?
  • It was not Davout, who had looked at him in so human a way.
  • Pierre looked round at his fellow prisoners and scrutinized them.
  • Pierre heard the French consulting whether to shoot them separately or two at a time.
  • Then two pairs of Frenchmen approached the criminals and at the officer's command took the two convicts who stood first in the row.
  • The convicts stopped when they reached the post and, while sacks were being brought, looked dumbly around as a wounded beast looks at an approaching huntsman.
  • With ever-growing horror, and no sense of joy or relief, he gazed at what was taking place.
  • The moment they laid hands on him he sprang aside in terror and clutched at Pierre.
  • His curiosity and agitation, like that of the whole crowd, reached the highest pitch at this fifth murder.
  • One of the soldiers, evidently suffering, shouted gruffly and angrily at Pierre to go back.
  • Pierre was taken back to his place, and the rows of troops on both sides of the post made a half turn and went past it at a measured pace.
  • Pierre gazed now with dazed eyes at these sharpshooters who ran in couples out of the circle.
  • This one, a young soldier, his face deadly pale, his shako pushed back, and his musket resting on the ground, still stood near the pit at the spot from which he had fired.
  • He looked at them without understanding who they were, why they were there, or what they wanted of him.
  • He looked at their faces and figures, but they all seemed to him equally meaningless.
  • Then they led him away somewhere, and at last he found himself in a corner of the shed among men who were laughing and talking on all sides.
  • This man was doing something to his legs in the darkness, and though Pierre could not see his face he felt that the man continually glanced at him.
  • Having unwound the string that tied the band on one leg, he carefully coiled it up and immediately set to work on the other leg, glancing up at Pierre.
  • Pierre heard the same kind voice saying at the other end of the shed.
  • And the soldier, pushing away a little dog that was jumping up at him, returned to his place and sat down.
  • No, I went to look at the fire, and they arrested me there, and tried me as an incendiary.
  • We had no idea, never guessed at all.
  • "Well, my dear fellow, I was still living at home," he began.
  • The yard full of cattle, the women at home, two brothers away earning wages, and only Michael the youngest, at home.
  • Our luck is like water in a dragnet: you pull at it and it bulges, but when you've drawn it out it's empty!
  • Now you've curled up and got warm, you daughter of a bitch! said Karataev, touching the dog that lay at his feet, and again turning over he fell asleep immediately.
  • When Pierre saw his neighbor next morning at dawn the first impression of him, as of something round, was fully confirmed: Platon's whole figure--in a French overcoat girdled with a cord, a soldier's cap, and bast shoes--was round.
  • He was always busy, and only at night allowed himself conversation--of which he was fond--and songs.
  • He did not sing like a trained singer who knows he is listened to, but like the birds, evidently giving vent to the sounds in the same way that one stretches oneself or walks about to get rid of stiffness, and the sounds were always high-pitched, mournful, delicate, and almost feminine, and his face at such times was very serious.
  • He loved his dog, his comrades, the French, and Pierre who was his neighbor, but Pierre felt that in spite of Karataev's affectionate tenderness for him (by which he unconsciously gave Pierre's spiritual life its due) he would not have grieved for a moment at parting from him.
  • When Princess Mary heard from Nicholas that her brother was with the Rostovs at Yaroslavl she at once prepared to go there, in spite of her aunt's efforts to dissuade her--and not merely to go herself but to take her nephew with her.
  • During this difficult journey Mademoiselle Bourienne, Dessalles, and Princess Mary's servants were astonished at her energy and firmness of spirit.
  • She had become convinced of it at her last interview with Nicholas, when he had come to tell her that her brother was with the Rostovs.
  • That feeling was so strong at the moment of leaving Voronezh that those who saw her off, as they looked at her careworn, despairing face, felt sure she would fall ill on the journey.
  • "I have found out everything, your excellency: the Rostovs are staying at the merchant Bronnikov's house, in the Square not far from here, right above the Volga," said the courier.
  • Princess Mary looked at him with frightened inquiry, not understanding why he did not reply to what she chiefly wanted to know: how was her brother?
  • What "still the same" might mean Princess Mary did not ask, but with an unnoticed glance at little seven-year-old Nicholas, who was sitting in front of her looking with pleasure at the town, she bowed her head and did not raise it again till the heavy coach, rumbling, shaking and swaying, came to a stop.
  • In spite of her one desire to see her brother as soon as possible, and her vexation that at the moment when all she wanted was to see him they should be trying to entertain her and pretending to admire her nephew, the princess noticed all that was going on around her and felt the necessity of submitting, for a time, to this new order of things which she had entered.
  • She turned away and was about to ask the countess again how to go to him, when light, impetuous, and seemingly buoyant steps were heard at the door.
  • The princess looked round and saw Natasha coming in, almost running-- that Natasha whom she had liked so little at their meeting in Moscow long since.
  • As soon as Natasha, sitting at the head of Prince Andrew's bed, heard of Princess Mary's arrival, she softly left his room and hastened to her with those swift steps that had sounded buoyant to Princess Mary.
  • It was plain that at that moment there was in Natasha's heart no thought of herself or of her own relations with Prince Andrew.
  • Natasha was gazing at her, but seemed afraid and in doubt whether to say all she knew or not; she seemed to feel that before those luminous eyes which penetrated into the very depths of her heart, it was impossible not to tell the whole truth which she saw.
  • Hard as she had tried to prepare herself, and now tried to remain tranquil, she knew that she would be unable to look at him without tears.
  • His eyes gazed at them as they entered.
  • "How are you now?" said Princess Mary, herself surprised at what she was saying.
  • "Why talk of me?" she said quietly and glanced at Natasha.
  • When little Nicholas was brought into Prince Andrew's room he looked at his father with frightened eyes, but did not cry, because no one else was crying.
  • He looked at her attentively.
  • "Nothing. You mustn't cry here," he said, looking at her with the same cold expression.
  • When Princess Mary began to cry, he understood that she was crying at the thought that little Nicholas would be left without a father.
  • He had felt it for the first time when the shell spun like a top before him, and he looked at the fallow field, the bushes, and the sky, and knew that he was face to face with death.
  • Recalling the moment at the ambulance station when he had seen Kuragin, he could not now regain the feeling he then had, but was tormented by the question whether Kuragin was alive.
  • He looked at her without moving and saw that she wanted to draw a deep breath after stooping, but refrained from doing so and breathed cautiously.
  • At the Troitsa monastery they had spoken of the past, and he had told her that if he lived he would always thank God for his wound which had brought them together again, but after that they never spoke of the future.
  • "Can it or can it not be?" he now thought as he looked at her and listened to the light click of the steel needles.
  • Natasha felt happy and agitated, but at once remembered that this would not do and that he had to be quiet.
  • Twice she turned and looked at him, and her eyes met his beaming at her.
  • But at the instant he died, Prince Andrew remembered that he was asleep, and at the very instant he died, having made an effort, he awoke.
  • And all at once it grew light in his soul and the veil that had till then concealed the unknown was lifted from his spiritual vision.
  • He did not answer and looked at her strangely, not understanding.
  • Natasha went up, looked at the dead eyes, and hastened to close them.
  • And without considering the multiplicity and complexity of the conditions any one of which taken separately may seem to be the cause, he snatches at the first approximation to a cause that seems to him intelligible and says: "This is the cause!"
  • If the position of the Russian army really began to improve from the time of that march, it does not at all follow that the march was the cause of it.
  • If the Russian army at Krasnaya Pakhra had given battle as Bennigsen and Barclay advised?
  • What would have happened if on approaching Tarutino, Napoleon had attacked the Russians with but a tenth of the energy he had shown when he attacked them at Smolensk?
  • At the council at Fili the prevailing thought in the minds of the Russian commanders was the one naturally suggesting itself, namely, a direct retreat by the Nizhni road.
  • At the council at Fili the prevailing thought in the minds of the Russian commanders was the one naturally suggesting itself, namely, a direct retreat by the Nizhni road.
  • Having crossed over, by a forced march, to the Tula road beyond the Pakhra, the Russian commanders intended to remain at Podolsk and had no thought of the Tarutino position; but innumerable circumstances and the reappearance of French troops who had for a time lost touch with the Russians, and projects of giving battle, and above all the abundance of provisions in Kaluga province, obliged our army to turn still more to the south and to cross from the Tula to the Kaluga road and go to Tarutino, which was between the roads along which those supplies lay.
  • At Tarutino Kutuzov received what was almost a reprimand from the Emperor for having moved his army along the Ryazan road, and the Emperor's letter indicated to him the very position he had already occupied near Kaluga.
  • The beast wounded at Borodino was lying where the fleeing hunter had left him; but whether he was still alive, whether he was strong and merely lying low, the hunter did not know.
  • During the month that the French troops were pillaging in Moscow and the Russian troops were quietly encamped at Tarutino, a change had taken place in the relative strength of the two armies--both in spirit and in number--as a result of which the superiority had passed to the Russian side.
  • Though the condition and numbers of the French army were unknown to the Russians, as soon as that change occurred the need of attacking at once showed itself by countless signs.
  • And at once, as a clock begins to strike and chime as soon as the minute hand has completed a full circle, this change was shown by an increased activity, whirring, and chiming in the higher spheres.
  • On the contrary, he is probably pursuing you with detachments, or at most with an army corps much weaker than the army entrusted to you.
  • A young officer of the Horse Guards, Kutuzov's orderly, pleased at the importance of the mission entrusted to him, went to Ermolov's quarters.
  • The officer snatched a little food at a comrade's, and rode again to the vanguard to find Miloradovich.
  • "Why, there, over at Echkino," said a Cossack officer, pointing to a country house in the far distance.
  • While still at a distance he heard as he rode the merry sounds of a soldier's dance song proceeding from the house.
  • These sounds made his spirits rise, but at the same time he was afraid that he would be blamed for not having executed sooner the important order entrusted to him.
  • Kutuzov looked at them searchingly, stopped his carriage, and inquired what regiment they belonged to.
  • Some columns, supposing they had reached their destination, halted, piled arms, and settled down on the cold ground, but the majority marched all night and arrived at places where they evidently should not have been.
  • Only Count Orlov-Denisov with his Cossacks (the least important detachment of all) got to his appointed place at the right time.
  • This detachment halted at the outskirts of a forest, on the path leading from the village of Stromilova to Dmitrovsk.
  • They disappeared into the forest, and Count Orlov-Denisov, having seen Grekov off, returned, shivering from the freshness of the early dawn and excited by what he had undertaken on his own responsibility, and began looking at the enemy camp, now just visible in the deceptive light of dawn and the dying campfires.
  • "Oh, it is really too late," said Count Orlov, looking at the camp.
  • "They can still be called back," said one of his suite, who like Count Orlov felt distrustful of the adventure when he looked at the enemy's camp.
  • "Fetch them back, fetch them back!" said Count Orlov with sudden determination, looking at his watch.
  • Adjutants and generals galloped about, shouted, grew angry, quarreled, said they had come quite wrong and were late, gave vent to a little abuse, and at last gave it all up and went forward, simply to get somewhere.
  • Toll, who in this battle played the part of Weyrother at Austerlitz, galloped assiduously from place to place, finding everything upside down everywhere.
  • "He's having a little fun at my expense," said Ermolov softly, nudging with his knee Raevski who was at his side.
  • Kutuzov did not reply, but when they reported to him that Murat's troops were in retreat he ordered an advance, though at every hundred paces he halted for three quarters of an hour.
  • But if the aim of the battle was what actually resulted and what all the Russians of that day desired--to drive the French out of Russia and destroy their army--it is quite clear that the battle of Tarutino, just because of its incongruities, was exactly what was wanted at that stage of the campaign.
  • His activity at that time was no less astounding than it was in Egypt, in Italy, in Austria, and in Prussia.
  • We have paid for the right to look at the matter plainly and simply, and we will not abandon that right.
  • (2) Such supplies will be bought from them at such prices as seller and buyer may agree on, and if a seller is unable to obtain a fair price he will be free to take his goods back to his village and no one may hinder him under any pretense.
  • (3) Sunday and Wednesday of each week are appointed as the chief market days and to that end a sufficient number of troops will be stationed along the highroads on Tuesdays and Saturdays at such distances from the town as to protect the carts.
  • Lay your respect and confidence at his feet and do not delay to unite with us!
  • The theaters set up in the Kremlin and in Posnyakov's house were closed again at once because the actors and actresses were robbed.
  • The news of that battle of Tarutino, unexpectedly received by Napoleon at a review, evoked in him a desire to punish the Russians (Thiers says), and he issued the order for departure which the whole army was demanding.
  • He gazed at the caleches and carriages in which soldiers were riding and remarked that it was a very good thing, as those vehicles could be used to carry provisions, the sick, and the wounded.
  • Very often a wounded animal, hearing a rustle, rushes straight at the hunter's gun, runs forward and back again, and hastens its own end.
  • This little dog lived in their shed, sleeping beside Karataev at night; it sometimes made excursions into the town but always returned again.
  • Every time he looked at his bare feet a smile of animated self-satisfaction flitted across his face.
  • On everything--far and near--lay the magic crystal glitter seen only at that time of autumn.
  • He was evidently afraid the prisoners looking on would laugh at him, and thrust his head into the shirt hurriedly.
  • The Frenchman, having pushed his head and hands through, without raising his eyes, looked down at the shirt and examined the seams.
  • The Frenchman looked at the linen, considered for a moment, then looked inquiringly at Pierre and, as if Pierre's look had told him something, suddenly blushed and shouted in a squeaky voice:
  • "There, look at that," said Karataev, swaying his head.
  • Karataev smiled thoughtfully and was silent awhile looking at the pieces.
  • And just at this time he obtained the tranquillity and ease of mind he had formerly striven in vain to reach.
  • He had long sought in different ways that tranquillity of mind, that inner harmony which had so impressed him in the soldiers at the battle of Borodino.
  • Those dreadful moments he had lived through at the executions had as it were forever washed away from his imagination and memory the agitating thoughts and feelings that had formerly seemed so important.
  • At seven in the morning a French convoy in marching trim, wearing shakos and carrying muskets, knapsacks, and enormous sacks, stood in front of the sheds, and animated French talk mingled with curses sounded all along the lines.
  • His eyes, prominent from the emaciation of his face, gazed inquiringly at his comrades who were paying no attention to him, and he moaned regularly and quietly.
  • It was evidently not so much his sufferings that caused him to moan (he had dysentery) as his fear and grief at being left alone.
  • But even as he spoke he began to doubt whether this was the corporal he knew or a stranger, so unlike himself did the corporal seem at that moment.
  • The corporal frowned at Pierre's words and, uttering some meaningless oaths, slammed the door.
  • He did not again go to the sick man, nor turn to look at him, but stood frowning by the door of the hut.
  • "Pass on, pass on!" the captain reiterated, frowning sternly, and looking at the prisoners who thronged past him.
  • "Pass on, pass on!" he continued without looking at Pierre.
  • They looked at him and at his shoes mistrustfully, as at an alien.
  • Isn't the road wide enough? said he, turning to a man behind him who was not pushing him at all.
  • Thirty thousand devils!... the convoy guards began cursing and the French soldiers, with fresh virulence, drove away with their swords the crowd of prisoners who were gazing at the dead man.
  • At the bridge they all halted, waiting for those in front to get across.
  • They advanced the few hundred paces that separated the bridge from the Kaluga road, taking more than an hour to do so, and came out upon the square where the streets of the Transmoskva ward and the Kaluga road converge, and the prisoners jammed close together had to stand for some hours at that crossway.
  • Just look at the crowds!...
  • Again, as at the church in Khamovniki, a wave of general curiosity bore all the prisoners forward onto the road, and Pierre, thanks to his stature, saw over the heads of the others what so attracted their curiosity.
  • It seemed that all these men, now that they had stopped amid fields in the chill dusk of the autumn evening, experienced one and the same feeling of unpleasant awakening from the hurry and eagerness to push on that had seized them at the start.
  • During this halt the escort treated the prisoners even worse than they had done at the start.
  • A man got up and came to see what this queer big fellow was laughing at all by himself.
  • Pierre glanced up at the sky and the twinkling stars in its faraway depths.
  • Generals on the staff, excited by the memory of the easy victory at Tarutino, urged Kutuzov to carry out Dorokhov's suggestion.
  • At Austerlitz he remained last at the Augezd dam, rallying the regiments, saving what was possible when all were flying and perishing and not a single general was left in the rear guard.
  • At Austerlitz he remained last at the Augezd dam, rallying the regiments, saving what was possible when all were flying and perishing and not a single general was left in the rear guard.
  • In Smolensk, at the Malakhov Gate, he had hardly dozed off in a paroxysm of fever before he was awakened by the bombardment of the town--and Smolensk held out all day long.
  • At that time Dokhturov had under his command, besides Dorokhov's detachment, the two small guerrilla detachments of Figner and Seslavin.
  • Having changed horses twice and galloped twenty miles in an hour and a half over a sticky, muddy road, Bolkhovitinov reached Litashevka after one o'clock at night.
  • Dismounting at a cottage on whose wattle fence hung a signboard, GENERAL STAFF, and throwing down his reins, he entered a dark passage.
  • Napoleon is at Forminsk, said Bolkhovitinov, unable to see in the dark who was speaking but guessing by the voice that it was not Konovnitsyn.
  • My orders are to give it at once to the general on duty.
  • And in fact the head in the nightcap was lifted at once.
  • From whom? he asked immediately but without hurry, blinking at the light.
  • Konovnitsyn had understood at once that the news brought was of great importance and that no time must be lost.
  • Kutuzov like all old people did not sleep much at night.
  • He often fell asleep unexpectedly in the daytime, but at night, lying on his bed without undressing, he generally remained awake thinking.
  • Since Bennigsen, who corresponded with the Emperor and had more influence than anyone else on the staff, had begun to avoid him, Kutuzov was more at ease as to the possibility of himself and his troops being obliged to take part in useless aggressive movements.
  • The undecided question as to whether the wound inflicted at Borodino was mortal or not had hung over Kutuzov's head for a whole month.
  • He tried to say something, but his face suddenly puckered and wrinkled; he waved his arm at Toll and turned to the opposite side of the room, to the corner darkened by the icons that hung there.
  • So it came about that at the council at Malo-Yaroslavets, when the generals pretending to confer together expressed various opinions, all mouths were closed by the opinion uttered by the simple-minded soldier Mouton who, speaking last, said what they all felt: that the one thing needful was to get away as quickly as possible; and no one, not even Napoleon, could say anything against that truth which they all recognized.
  • But though they all realized that it was necessary to get away, there still remained a feeling of shame at admitting that they must flee.
  • The day after the council at Malo-Yaroslavets Napoleon rode out early in the morning amid the lines of his army with his suite of marshals and an escort, on the pretext of inspecting the army and the scene of the previous and of the impending battle.
  • Here as at Tarutino they went after plunder, leaving the men.
  • To be able to go a thousand miles he must imagine that something good awaits him at the end of those thousand miles.
  • But drawing from his aged wisdom what they could understand, he told them of the golden bridge, and they laughed at and slandered him, flinging themselves on, rending and exulting over the dying beast.
  • An army gains a victory, and at once the rights of the conquering nation have increased to the detriment of the defeated.
  • An army has suffered defeat, and at once a people loses its rights in proportion to the severity of the reverse, and if its army suffers a complete defeat the nation is quite subjugated.
  • The victories of the French at Jena and Auerstadt destroy the independent existence of Prussia.
  • To strain the facts to fit the rules of history: to say that the field of battle at Borodino remained in the hands of the Russians, or that after Moscow there were other battles that destroyed Napoleon's army, is impossible.
  • The burning of towns and villages, the retreats after battles, the blow dealt at Borodino and the renewed retreat, the burning of Moscow, the capture of marauders, the seizure of transports, and the guerrilla war were all departures from the rules.
  • That rule says that an attacker should concentrate his forces in order to be stronger than his opponent at the moment of conflict.
  • Its first period had passed: when the partisans themselves, amazed at their own boldness, feared every minute to be surrounded and captured by the French, and hid in the forests without unsaddling, hardly daring to dismount and always expecting to be pursued.
  • Now only the commanders of detachments with staffs, and moving according to rules at a distance from the French, still regarded many things as impossible.
  • On October 22, Denisov (who was one of the irregulars) was with his group at the height of the guerrilla enthusiasm.
  • It was necessary to let the French reach Shamshevo quietly without alarming them and then, after joining Dolokhov who was to come that evening to a consultation at a watchman's hut in the forest less than a mile from Shamshevo, to surprise the French at dawn, falling like an avalanche on their heads from two sides, and rout and capture them all at one blow.
  • Beyond Shamshevo, Dolokhov was to observe the road in the same way, to find out at what distance there were other French troops.
  • At times a sort of mist descended, and then suddenly heavy slanting rain came down.
  • The men sat huddled up trying not to stir, so as to warm the water that had trickled to their bodies and not admit the fresh cold water that was leaking in under their seats, their knees, and at the back of their necks.
  • In front, at a weary gallop and using his leather whip, rode an officer, disheveled and drenched, whose trousers had worked up to above his knees.
  • "Will there be any orders, your honor?" he asked Denisov, holding his hand at the salute and resuming the game of adjutant and general for which he had prepared himself, "or shall I remain with your honor?"
  • To weturn at once? asked Denisov.
  • Denisov himself intended going with the esaul and Petya to the edge of the forest where it reached out to Shamshevo, to have a look at the part of the French bivouac they were to attack next day.
  • Their un- Russian shouting at their horses which were straining uphill with the carts, and their calls to one another, could be clearly heard.
  • The boy, thrusting his cold hands into his pockets and lifting his eyebrows, looked at Denisov in affright, but in spite of an evident desire to say all he knew gave confused answers, merely assenting to everything Denisov asked him.
  • Petya, rapidly turning his head, looked now at the drummer boy, now at Denisov, now at the esaul, and now at the French in the village and along the road, trying not to miss anything of importance.
  • And at the signal shot...
  • The French were evidently firing and shouting at him.
  • "Oh, yes," said Petya, nodding at the first words Denisov uttered as if he understood it all, though he really did not understand anything of it.
  • When Denisov had come to Pokrovsk at the beginning of his operations and had as usual summoned the village elder and asked him what he knew about the French, the elder, as though shielding himself, had replied, as all village elders did, that he had neither seen nor heard anything of them.
  • Tikhon, who at first did rough work, laying campfires, fetching water, flaying dead horses, and so on, soon showed a great liking and aptitude for partisan warfare.
  • At night he would go out for booty and always brought back French clothing and weapons, and when told to would bring in French captives also.
  • Tikhon with equal accuracy would split logs with blows at arm's length, or holding the head of the ax would cut thin little pegs or carve spoons.
  • Once a Frenchman Tikhon was trying to capture fired a pistol at him and shot him in the fleshy part of the back.
  • He lifted his head high and gazed at Denisov as if repressing a laugh.
  • "You see, I took him first thing at dawn," Tikhon continued, spreading out his flat feet with outturned toes in their bast shoes.
  • They rushed at me with their little swords.
  • 'Shout loud at them,' he says, 'and you'll take them all,' Tikhon concluded, looking cheerfully and resolutely into Denisov's eyes.
  • Tikhon followed behind and Petya heard the Cossacks laughing with him and at him, about some pair of boots he had thrown into the bushes.
  • He looked round at the captive drummer boy and felt a pang in his heart.
  • Denisov at once cheered up and, calling Petya to him, said: "Well, tell me about yourself."
  • He was highly delighted with what he saw and experienced in the army, but at the same time it always seemed to him that the really heroic exploits were being performed just where he did not happen to be.
  • Before they had ridden to the outskirts of the forest Petya had considered he must carry out his instructions strictly and return at once.
  • Petya took off his wet clothes, gave them to be dried, and at once began helping the officers to fix up the dinner table.
  • "Well, never mind!" and immediately, blushing and looking anxiously at the officers to see if they appeared ironical, he said:
  • Petya was standing at the door when Denisov said this.
  • When the boy had entered the hut, Petya sat down at a distance from him, considering it beneath his dignity to pay attention to him.
  • He was clean-shaven and wore a Guardsman's padded coat with an Order of St. George at his buttonhole and a plain forage cap set straight on his head.
  • "There's no need for you to go at all," said Denisov, addressing Dolokhov, "and as for him, I won't let him go on any account."
  • Yes, yes, certainly! cried Petya, blushing almost to tears and glancing at Denisov.
  • On reaching the bottom, Dolokhov told the Cossacks accompanying him to await him there and rode on at a quick trot along the road to the bridge.
  • "Don't talk Russian," said Dolokhov in a hurried whisper, and at that very moment they heard through the darkness the challenge: "Qui vive?" * and the click of a musket.
  • Dolokhov reined in his horse and advanced at a walk.
  • And without waiting for an answer from the sentinel, who had stepped aside, Dolokhov rode up the incline at a walk.
  • Something was boiling in a small cauldron at the edge of the fire and a soldier in a peaked cap and blue overcoat, lit up by the fire, was kneeling beside it stirring its contents with a ramrod.
  • "Oh, he's a hard nut to crack," said one of the officers who was sitting in the shadow at the other side of the fire.
  • Both fell silent, peering out through the darkness at the sound of Dolokhov's and Petya's steps as they advanced to the fire leading their horses.
  • None of them knew anything, and Petya thought the officers were beginning to look at him and Dolokhov with hostility and suspicion.
  • Dolokhov was a long time mounting his horse which would not stand still, then he rode out of the yard at a footpace.
  • At one spot he stopped and listened.
  • Tell Denisov, 'at the first shot at daybreak,' said Dolokhov and was about to ride away, but Petya seized hold of him.
  • The Cossack bent forward from under the wagon to get a closer look at Petya.
  • He looked up at the sky.
  • And at first from afar he heard men's voices and then women's.
  • Petya did not know how long this lasted: he enjoyed himself all the time, wondered at his enjoyment and regretted that there was no one to share it.
  • His horse by habit made as if to nip his leg, but Petya leaped quickly into the saddle unconscious of his own weight and, turning to look at the hussars starting in the darkness behind him, rode up to Denisov.
  • He turned to glance at him.
  • At the first sound of trampling hoofs and shouting, Petya lashed his horse and loosening his rein galloped forward, not heeding Denisov who shouted at him.
  • At the first sound of trampling hoofs and shouting, Petya lashed his horse and loosening his rein galloped forward, not heeding Denisov who shouted at him.
  • It seemed to Petya that at the moment the shot was fired it suddenly became as bright as noon.
  • The French were making a stand there behind a wattle fence in a garden thickly overgrown with bushes and were firing at the Cossacks who crowded at the gateway.
  • And the Cossacks looked round in surprise at the sound, like the yelp of a dog, with which Denisov turned away, walked to the wattle fence, and seized hold of it.
  • At Dorogobuzh while the soldiers of the convoy, after locking the prisoners in a stable, had gone off to pillage their own stores, several of the soldier prisoners tunneled under the wall and ran away, but were recaptured by the French and shot.
  • When he did so and heard the subdued moaning with which Karataev generally lay down at the halting places, and when he smelled the odor emanating from him which was now stronger than before, Pierre moved farther away and did not think about him.
  • (The horseflesh was appetizing and nourishing, the saltpeter flavor of the gunpowder they used instead of salt was even pleasant; there was no great cold, it was always warm walking in the daytime, and at night there were the campfires; the lice that devoured him warmed his body.)
  • The one thing that was at first hard to bear was his feet.
  • After the second day's march Pierre, having examined his feet by the campfire, thought it would be impossible to walk on them; but when everybody got up he went along, limping, and, when he had warmed up, walked without feeling the pain, though at night his feet were more terrible to look at than before.
  • However, he did not look at them now, but thought of other things.
  • At midday on the twenty-second of October Pierre was going uphill along the muddy, slippery road, looking at his feet and at the roughness of the way.
  • At midday on the twenty-second of October Pierre was going uphill along the muddy, slippery road, looking at his feet and at the roughness of the way.
  • Occasionally he glanced at the familiar crowd around him and then again at his feet.
  • The blue-gray bandy legged dog ran merrily along the side of the road, sometimes in proof of its agility and self-satisfaction lifting one hind leg and hopping along on three, and then again going on all four and rushing to bark at the crows that sat on the carrion.
  • At their yesterday's halting place, feeling chilly by a dying campfire, Pierre had got up and gone to the next one, which was burning better.
  • When Pierre reached the fire and heard Platon's voice enfeebled by illness, and saw his pathetic face brightly lit up by the blaze, he felt a painful prick at his heart.
  • His feeling of pity for this man frightened him and he wished to go away, but there was no other fire, and Pierre sat down, trying not to look at Platon.
  • "And so, brother" (it was at this point that Pierre came up), "ten years or more passed by.
  • So he comes up to the old man like this, and falls down at his feet!
  • From all sides came shouts of command, and from the left came smartly dressed cavalrymen on good horses, passing the prisoners at a trot.
  • The expression on all faces showed the tension people feel at the approach of those in authority.
  • Karataev looked at Pierre with his kindly round eyes now filled with tears, evidently wishing him to come near that he might say something to him.
  • Karataev was still sitting at the side of the road under the birch tree and two Frenchmen were talking over his head.
  • They both looked pale, and in the expression on their faces--one of them glanced timidly at Pierre-- there was something resembling what he had seen on the face of the young soldier at the execution.
  • Pierre looked at the soldier and remembered that, two days before, that man had burned his shirt while drying it at the fire and how they had laughed at him.
  • The stores, the prisoners, and the marshal's baggage train stopped at the village of Shamshevo.
  • He again slept as he had done at Mozhaysk after the battle of Borodino.
  • And twisting the ramrod he looked gloomily at Pierre, who turned away and gazed into the darkness.
  • Dolokhov stood at the gate of the ruined house, letting a crowd of disarmed Frenchmen pass by.
  • In such a state of affairs, whatever your ultimate plans may be, the interest of Your Majesty's service demands that the army should be rallied at Smolensk and should first of all be freed from ineffectives, such as dismounted cavalry, unnecessary baggage, and artillery material that is no longer in proportion to the present forces.
  • Many have died these last days on the road or at the bivouacs.
  • At first while they were still moving along the Kaluga road, Napoleon's armies made their presence known, but later when they reached the Smolensk road they ran holding the clapper of their bell tight--and often thinking they were escaping ran right into the Russians.
  • The Russian army, expecting Napoleon to take the road to the right beyond the Dnieper--which was the only reasonable thing for him to do-- themselves turned to the right and came out onto the highroad at Krasnoe.
  • Ney, who had had a corps of ten thousand men, reached Napoleon at Orsha with only one thousand men left, having abandoned all the rest and all his cannon, and having crossed the Dnieper at night by stealth at a wooded spot.
  • At the Berezina they again became disorganized, many were drowned and many surrendered, but those who got across the river fled farther.
  • How was it that the Russian army, which when numerically weaker than the French had given battle at Borodino, did not achieve its purpose when it had surrounded the French on three sides and when its aim was to capture them?
  • But even if we admitted that Kutuzov, Chichagov, and others were the cause of the Russian failures, it is still incomprehensible why, the position of the Russian army being what it was at Krasnoe and at the Berezina (in both cases we had superior forces), the French army with its marshals, kings, and Emperor was not captured, if that was what the Russians aimed at.
  • The explanation of this strange fact given by Russian military historians (to the effect that Kutuzov hindered an attack) is unfounded, for we know that he could not restrain the troops from attacking at Vyazma and Tarutino.
  • Why was the Russian army--which with inferior forces had withstood the enemy in full strength at Borodino--defeated at Krasnoe and the Berezina by the disorganized crowds of the French when it was numerically superior?
  • It was impossible first because--as experience shows that a three-mile movement of columns on a battlefield never coincides with the plans--the probability of Chichagov, Kutuzov, and Wittgenstein effecting a junction on time at an appointed place was so remote as to be tantamount to impossibility, as in fact thought Kutuzov, who when he received the plan remarked that diversions planned over great distances do not yield the desired results.
  • After she felt herself deserted by Princes Mary and alone in her grief, Natasha spent most of the time in her room by herself, sitting huddled up feet and all in the corner of the sofa, tearing and twisting something with her slender nervous fingers and gazing intently and fixedly at whatever her eyes chanced to fall on.
  • She felt all the time as if she might at any moment penetrate that on which--with a terrible questioning too great for her strength--her spiritual gaze was fixed.
  • And he looked searchingly at her.
  • She recalled his long sad and severe look at those words and understood the meaning of the rebuke and despair in that protracted gaze.
  • But at the instant when it seemed that the incomprehensible was revealing itself to her a loud rattle of the door handle struck painfully on her ears.
  • "Come to your Papa at once, please!" said she with a strange, excited look.
  • She went in with rapid steps, pausing at the door for an instant as if struggling with herself, and then ran to her mother.
  • Then she turned toward her daughter's face which was wincing with pain and gazed long at it.
  • Natasha looked at her with eyes full of tears and in her look there was nothing but love and an entreaty for forgiveness.
  • At the end of January Princess Mary left for Moscow, and the count insisted on Natasha's going with her to consult the doctors.
  • Only by following at some distance could one cut across the zigzag path of the French.
  • Kutuzov merely shrugged his shoulders when one after another they presented projects of maneuvers to be made with those soldiers-- ill-shod, insufficiently clad, and half starved--who within a month and without fighting a battle had dwindled to half their number, and who at the best if the flight continued would have to go a greater distance than they had already traversed, before they reached the frontier.
  • So it was at Krasnoe, where they expected to find one of the three French columns and stumbled instead on Napoleon himself with sixteen thousand men.
  • Despite all Kutuzov's efforts to avoid that ruinous encounter and to preserve his troops, the massacre of the broken mob of French soldiers by worn-out Russians continued at Krasnoe for three days.
  • And in a history recently written by order of the Highest Authorities it is said that Kutuzov was a cunning court liar, frightened of the name of Napoleon, and that by his blunders at Krasnoe and the Berezina he deprived the Russian army of the glory of complete victory over the French. *
  • The character of Kutuzov and reflections on the unsatisfactory results of the battles at Krasnoe, by Bogdanovich.
  • This procrastinator Kutuzov, whose motto was "Patience and Time," this enemy of decisive action, gave battle at Borodino, investing the preparations for it with unparalleled solemnity.
  • All along the road groups of French prisoners captured that day (there were seven thousand of them) were crowding to warm themselves at campfires.
  • He screwed up his eyes with a dissatisfied look as he gazed attentively and fixedly at these prisoners, who presented a specially wretched appearance.
  • There was something horrible and bestial in the fleeting glance they threw at the riders and in the malevolent expression with which, after a glance at Kutuzov, the soldier with the sores immediately turned away and went on with what he was doing.
  • Kutuzov looked long and intently at these two soldiers.
  • At another spot he noticed a Russian soldier laughingly patting a Frenchman on the shoulder, saying something to him in a friendly manner, and Kutuzov with the same expression on his face again swayed his head.
  • Thousands of eyes were looking at him from all sides awaiting a word from him.
  • He looked attentively around at the circle of officers, recognizing several of them.
  • "You see, brothers..." said he when the shouts had ceased... and all at once his voice and the expression of his face changed.
  • It is hard for you, but still you are at home while they--you see what they have come to, said he, pointing to the prisoners.
  • And flourishing his whip he rode off at a gallop for the first time during the whole campaign, and left the broken ranks of the soldiers laughing joyfully and shouting "Hurrah!"
  • An infantry regiment which had left Tarutino three thousand strong but now numbered only nine hundred was one of the first to arrive that night at its halting place--a village on the highroad.
  • The lower stakes cracked more and more and at last the wall fell, and with it the men who had been pushing it.
  • At the end of the third verse as the last note died away, twenty voices roared out at once: Oo-oo-oo-oo!
  • At the end of the third verse as the last note died away, twenty voices roared out at once: Oo-oo-oo-oo!
  • They split up the wood, pressed it down on the fire, blew at it with their mouths, and fanned it with the skirts of their greatcoats, making the flames hiss and crackle.
  • "Well, you know," said the sharp-nosed man they called Jackdaw in a squeaky and unsteady voice, raising himself at the other side of the fire, "a plump man gets thin, but for a thin one it's death.
  • "But they don't understand our talk at all," said the dancer with a puzzled smile.
  • And do you know, Daddy, the day before yesterday we ran at them and, my word, they didn't let us get near before they just threw down their muskets and went on their knees.
  • You're a first-class liar, Kiselev, when I come to look at you!
  • Look at the stars.
  • You would think the women had spread out their linen, said one of the men, gazing with admiration at the Milky Way.
  • "Hark at them roaring there in the Fifth Company!" said one of the soldiers, "and what a lot of them there are!"
  • The fifth company was bivouacking at the very edge of the forest.
  • Ramballe refused food and resting his head on his elbow lay silent beside the campfire, looking at the Russian soldiers with red and vacant eyes.
  • The older men, who thought it undignified to amuse themselves with such nonsense, continued to lie at the opposite side of the fire, but one would occasionally raise himself on an elbow and glance at Morel with a smile.
  • The stars, as if knowing that no one was looking at them, began to disport themselves in the dark sky: now flaring up, now vanishing, now trembling, they were busy whispering something gladsome and mysterious to one another.
  • The French crowd fled at a continually increasing speed and all its energy was directed to reaching its goal.
  • This was shown not so much by the arrangements it made for crossing as by what took place at the bridges.
  • Now having come to the army, he informed Kutuzov of the Emperor's displeasure at the poor success of our forces and the slowness of their advance.
  • Contrary to the Emperor's wish Kutuzov detained the greater part of the army at Vilna.
  • When alone with the field marshal the Emperor expressed his dissatisfaction at the slowness of the pursuit and at the mistakes made at Krasnoe and the Berezina, and informed him of his intentions for a future campaign abroad.
  • The Emperor's displeasure with Kutuzov was specially increased at Vilna by the fact that Kutuzov evidently could not or would not understand the importance of the coming campaign.
  • That same day he had learned that Prince Andrew, after surviving the battle of Borodino for more than a month had recently died in the Rostovs' house at Yaroslavl, and Denisov who told him this news also mentioned Helene's death, supposing that Pierre had heard of it long before.
  • All this at the time seemed merely strange to Pierre: he felt he could not grasp its significance.
  • A joyous feeling of freedom--that complete inalienable freedom natural to man which he had first experienced at the first halt outside Moscow-- filled Pierre's soul during his convalescence.
  • And this very absence of an aim gave him the complete, joyous sense of freedom which constituted his happiness at this time.
  • But even then, at moments of weakness as he had accounted them, his mind had penetrated to those distances and he had there seen the same pettiness, worldliness, and senselessness.
  • In external ways Pierre had hardly changed at all.
  • The difference between his former and present self was that formerly when he did not grasp what lay before him or was said to him, he had puckered his forehead painfully as if vainly seeking to distinguish something at a distance.
  • At the same time that he refused the colonel's demand he made up his mind that he must have recourse to artifice when leaving Orel, to induce the Italian officer to accept some money of which he was evidently in need.
  • They abused the police and bribed them, made out estimates at ten times their value for government stores that had perished in the fire, and demanded relief.
  • He had heard that the Rostovs were at Kostroma but the thought of Natasha seldom occurred to him.
  • "This must be one of her companions," he thought, glancing at the lady in the black dress.
  • "Yes," she said, looking at his altered face after he had kissed her hand, "so this is how we meet again.
  • He spoke of you even at the very last, she went on, turning her eyes from Pierre to her companion with a shyness that surprised him for an instant.
  • Again the princess glanced round at her companion with even more uneasiness in her manner and was about to add something, but Pierre interrupted her.
  • All I know I heard at second hand from others.
  • He glanced once at the companion's face, saw her attentive and kindly gaze fixed on him, and, as often happens when one is talking, felt somehow that this companion in the black dress was a good, kind, excellent creature who would not hinder his conversing freely with Princess Mary.
  • Pierre looked again at the companion's pale, delicate face with its black eyes and peculiar mouth, and something near to him, long forgotten and more than sweet, looked at him from those attentive eyes.
  • But at that moment Princess Mary said, "Natasha!"
  • But as soon as he tried to continue the conversation he had begun with Princess Mary he again glanced at Natasha, and a still-deeper flush suffused his face and a still-stronger agitation of mingled joy and fear seized his soul.
  • Pierre had failed to notice Natasha because he did not at all expect to see her there, but he had failed to recognize her because the change in her since he last saw her was immense.
  • Natasha looked at him, and by way of answer to his words her eyes widened and lit up.
  • Natasha without waiting for Princess Mary to finish again looked inquiringly at Pierre.
  • Pierre's confusion had now almost vanished, but at the same time he felt that his freedom had also completely gone.
  • What a happy thing that he saw you again, he added, suddenly turning to Natasha and looking at her with eyes full of tears.
  • And he... he... he said he was wishing for it at the very moment I entered the room....
  • Pierre gazed at the door through which she had disappeared and did not understand why he suddenly felt all alone in the world.
  • At that moment of emotional tenderness young Nicholas' face, which resembled his father's, affected Pierre so much that when he had kissed the boy he got up quickly, took out his handkerchief, and went to the window.
  • Pierre unfolded his cold table napkin and, resolving to break the silence, looked at Natasha and at Princess Mary.
  • We were not an exemplary couple," he added quickly, glancing at Natasha and noticing on her face curiosity as to how he would speak of his wife, "but her death shocked me terribly.
  • Pierre suddenly flushed crimson and for a long time tried not to look at Natasha.
  • Supper was over, and Pierre who at first declined to speak about his captivity was gradually led on to do so.
  • I guessed it then when we met at the Sukharev tower, do you remember?
  • Natasha continued to look at him intently with bright, attentive, and animated eyes, as if trying to understand something more which he had perhaps left untold.
  • Pierre in shamefaced and happy confusion glanced occasionally at her, and tried to think what to say next to introduce a fresh subject.
  • "People speak of misfortunes and sufferings," remarked Pierre, "but if at this moment I were asked: 'Would you rather be what you were before you were taken prisoner, or go through all this again?' then for heaven's sake let me again have captivity and horseflesh!
  • Pierre looked intently at her.
  • She smiled at Pierre through her tears.
  • He was thinking of Prince Andrew, of Natasha, and of their love, at one moment jealous of her past, then reproaching himself for that feeling.
  • I heard about that affair of hers at the time.
  • But what a kind, pleasant face and how he smiles as he looks at me.
  • The cabmen he met and their passengers, the carpenters cutting the timber for new houses with axes, the women hawkers, and the shopkeepers, all looked at him with cheerful beaming eyes that seemed to say: Ah, there he is!
  • "Well," he went on with an evident effort at self-control and coherence.
  • I cannot propose to her at present, but the thought that perhaps she might someday be my wife and that I may be missing that possibility... that possibility... is terrible.
  • You are right that to speak to her of love at present...
  • No, it can't be, he told himself at every look, gesture, and word that filled his soul with joy.
  • There was nothing in Pierre's soul now at all like what had troubled it during his courtship of Helene.
  • At times everybody seemed to him to be occupied with one thing only--his future happiness.
  • Prince Vasili, who having obtained a new post and some fresh decorations was particularly proud at this time, seemed to him a pathetic, kindly old man much to be pitied.
  • All the views he formed of men and circumstances at this time remained true for him always.
  • The change that took place in Natasha at first surprised Princess Mary; but when she understood its meaning it grieved her.
  • I wanted to listen at the door, but I knew you would tell me.
  • The historical figures at the head of armies, who formerly reflected the movement of the masses by ordering wars, campaigns, and battles, now reflected the restless movement by political and diplomatic combinations, laws, and treaties.
  • Even if they do not know for what purpose they are fattened, they will at least know that all that happened to the ram did not happen accidentally, and will no longer need the conceptions of chance or genius.
  • He had no plan, he was afraid of everything, but the parties snatched at him and demanded his participation.
  • The strength of the justification of the man who stands at the head of the movement grows with the increased size of the group.
  • There is no step, no crime or petty fraud he commits, which in the mouths of those around him is not at once represented as a great deed.
  • But suddenly instead of those chances and that genius which hitherto had so consistently led him by an uninterrupted series of successes to the predestined goal, an innumerable sequence of inverse chances occur--from the cold in his head at Borodino to the sparks which set Moscow on fire, and the frosts--and instead of genius, stupidity and immeasurable baseness become evident.
  • What was needed for him who, overshadowing others, stood at the head of that movement from east to west?
  • But as soon as the necessity for a general European war presented itself he appeared in his place at the given moment and, uniting the nations of Europe, led them to the goal.
  • He at once resigned his commission, and without waiting for it to be accepted took leave of absence and went to Moscow.
  • Natasha and Pierre were living in Petersburg at the time and had no clear idea of Nicholas' circumstances.
  • He tried to avoid his old acquaintances with their commiseration and offensive offers of assistance; he avoided all distraction and recreation, and even at home did nothing but play cards with his mother, pace silently up and down the room, and smoke one pipe after another.
  • At the beginning of winter Princess Mary came to Moscow.
  • But instead of being greeted with pleasure as she had expected, at his first glance at her his face assumed a cold, stiff, proud expression she had not seen on it before.
  • You would at least be seeing somebody, and I think it must be dull for you only seeing us.
  • Not at all, Mamma.
  • Her first glance at Nicholas' face told her that he had only come to fulfill the demands of politeness, and she firmly resolved to maintain the tone in which he addressed her.
  • With Mademoiselle Bourienne's help the princess had maintained the conversation very well, but at the very last moment, just when he rose, she was so tired of talking of what did not interest her, and her mind was so full of the question why she alone was granted so little happiness in life, that in a fit of absent-mindedness she sat still, her luminous eyes gazing fixedly before her, not noticing that he had risen.
  • Nicholas glanced at her and, wishing to appear not to notice her abstraction, made some remark to Mademoiselle Bourienne and then again looked at the princess.
  • They both sat silent, with an occasional glance at one another.
  • But this is not at all an interesting or cheerful subject.
  • And remembering his former tenderness, and looking now at his kind, sorrowful face, she suddenly understood the cause of his coldness.
  • At first he watched the serfs, trying to understand their aims and what they considered good and bad, and only pretended to direct them and give orders while in reality learning from them their methods, their manner of speech, and their judgment of what was good and bad.
  • "Such an insolent scoundrel!" he cried, growing hot again at the mere recollection of him.
  • He understood what she was weeping about, but could not in his heart at once agree with her that what he had regarded from childhood as quite an everyday event was wrong.
  • "Nicholas, when did you break your cameo?" she asked to change the subject, looking at his finger on which he wore a ring with a cameo of Laocoon's head.
  • "You should go, go away at once, if you don't feel strong enough to control yourself," she would reply sadly, trying to comfort her husband.
  • Natasha had been staying at her brother's with her husband and children since early autumn.
  • Having taken precautions against the general drunkenness to be expected on the morrow because it was a great saint's day, he returned to dinner, and without having time for a private talk with his wife sat down at the long table laid for twenty persons, at which the whole household had assembled.
  • At that table were his mother, his mother's old lady companion Belova, his wife, their three children with their governess and tutor, his wife's nephew with his tutor, Sonya, Denisov, Natasha, her three children, their governess, and old Michael Ivanovich, the late prince's architect, who was living on in retirement at Bald Hills.
  • At that table were his mother, his mother's old lady companion Belova, his wife, their three children with their governess and tutor, his wife's nephew with his tutor, Sonya, Denisov, Natasha, her three children, their governess, and old Michael Ivanovich, the late prince's architect, who was living on in retirement at Bald Hills.
  • Countess Mary sat at the other end of the table.
  • Thanks to Denisov the conversation at table soon became general and lively, and she did not talk to her husband.
  • She looked down at her expanded figure and in the glass at her pale, sallow, emaciated face in which her eyes now looked larger than ever.
  • The children were playing at "going to Moscow" in a carriage made of chairs and invited her to go with them.
  • And at that moment little Andrew shouted from outside the door: Papa!
  • At that moment they heard the sound of the door pulley and footsteps in the hall and anteroom, as if someone had arrived.
  • It's time you two were parted, she added, looking smilingly at the little girl who clung to her father.
  • At the rare moments when the old fire did kindle in her handsome, fully developed body she was even more attractive than in former days.
  • All who had known Natasha before her marriage wondered at the change in her as at something extraordinary.
  • To make up for this, at home Pierre had the right to regulate his life and that of the whole family exactly as he chose.
  • At home Natasha placed herself in the position of a slave to her husband, and the whole household went on tiptoe when he was occupied--that is, was reading or writing in his study.
  • And she deduced the essentials of his wishes quite correctly, and having once arrived at them clung to them tenaciously.
  • He looked at Natasha with sorrow and surprise as at a bad likeness of a person once dear.
  • She was nursing her boy when the sound of Pierre's sleigh was heard at the front door, and the old nurse--knowing how to please her mistress-- entered the room inaudibly but hurriedly and with a beaming face.
  • The baby again opened his eyes and looked at her.
  • But at the door she stopped as if her conscience reproached her for having in her joy left the child too soon, and she glanced round.
  • Petya was at death's door.
  • The storm was long since over and there was bright, joyous sunshine on Natasha's face as she gazed tenderly at her husband and child.
  • At that moment Nicholas and Countess Mary came in.
  • "How sweet!" said Countess Mary, looking at and playing with the baby.
  • "I don't and can't," replied Nicholas, looking coldly at the baby.
  • As in every large household, there were at Bald Hills several perfectly distinct worlds which merged into one harmonious whole, though each retained its own peculiarities and made concessions to the others.
  • The countess had long wished for such a box, but as she did not want to cry just then she glanced indifferently at the portrait and gave her attention chiefly to the box for cards.
  • All the grown-up members of the family were assembled near the round tea table at which Sonya presided beside the samovar.
  • At tea all sat in their accustomed places: Nicholas beside the stove at a small table where his tea was handed to him; Milka, the old gray borzoi bitch (daughter of the first Milka), with a quite gray face and large black eyes that seemed more prominent than ever, lay on the armchair beside him; Denisov, whose curly hair, mustache, and whiskers had turned half gray, sat beside countess Mary with his general's tunic unbuttoned; Pierre sat between his wife and the old countess.
  • At tea all sat in their accustomed places: Nicholas beside the stove at a small table where his tea was handed to him; Milka, the old gray borzoi bitch (daughter of the first Milka), with a quite gray face and large black eyes that seemed more prominent than ever, lay on the armchair beside him; Denisov, whose curly hair, mustache, and whiskers had turned half gray, sat beside countess Mary with his general's tunic unbuttoned; Pierre sat between his wife and the old countess.
  • I used to meet him at Mary Antonovna's," said the countess in an offended tone; and still more offended that they all remained silent, she went on: "Nowadays everyone finds fault.
  • "You know," he added, stopping at the door, "why I'm especially fond of that music?
  • "Come, Anna Makarovna," Pierre's voice was heard saying, "come here into the middle of the room and at the word of command, 'One, two,' and when I say 'three'... You stand here, and you in my arms--well now!
  • This meant two stockings, which by a secret process known only to herself Anna Makarovna used to knit at the same time on the same needles, and which, when they were ready, she always triumphantly drew, one out of the other, in the children's presence.
  • Countess Mary glanced at him and turned to Pierre.
  • "Like my father?" asked the boy, flushing crimson and looking up at Pierre with bright, ecstatic eyes.
  • Nicholas and Denisov rose, asked for their pipes, smoked, went to fetch more tea from Sonya--who sat weary but resolute at the samovar--and questioned Pierre.
  • "Always the same thing," said Pierre, looking round at his listeners.
  • The men went into the study and little Nicholas Bolkonski followed them unnoticed by his uncle and sat down at the writing table in a shady corner by the window.
  • He seeks only for peace, and only these people sans foi ni loi * can give it him--people who recklessly hack at and strangle everything--Magnitski, Arakcheev, and tutti quanti....
  • At that moment Nicholas noticed the presence of his nephew.
  • Natasha, who had come in during the conversation, looked joyfully at her husband.
  • The boy with the thin neck stretching out from the turn-down collar-- whom everyone had forgotten--gazed at Pierre with even greater and more rapturous joy.
  • It is not at all what you suppose; but that is what the German Tugendbund was, and what I am proposing.
  • The conversation at supper was not about politics or societies, but turned on the subject Nicholas liked best--recollections of 1812.
  • Nicholas looked into the radiant eyes that were gazing at him, and continued to turn over the pages and read.
  • Mitya was naughty at table.
  • He had none, but looked so unhappily and greedily at the others while they were eating!
  • Nicholas put down the book and looked at his wife.
  • Perhaps it need not be done so pedantically, thought Nicholas, or even done at all, but this untiring, continual spiritual effort of which the sole aim was the children's moral welfare delighted him.
  • This evening he listened to Pierre in a sort of trance, and fancy--as we were going in to supper I looked and he had broken everything on my table to bits, and he told me of it himself at once!
  • A fine lad, a fine lad! repeated Nicholas, who at heart was not fond of Nicholas Bolkonski but was always anxious to recognize that he was a fine lad.
  • Is it for my own pleasure that I am at the farm or in the office from morning to night?
  • But she had to force herself to attend, for what he was saying did not interest her at all.
  • She looked at him and did not think, but felt, about something different.
  • Countess Mary's soul always strove toward the infinite, the eternal, and the absolute, and could therefore never be at peace.
  • Nicholas gazed at her.
  • You won't escape!--from that moment this conversation began, contrary to all the laws of logic and contrary to them because quite different subjects were talked about at one and the same time.
  • In saying this Natasha was sincere in acknowledging Mary's superiority, but at the same time by saying it she made a demand on Pierre that he should, all the same, prefer her to Mary and to all other women, and that now, especially after having seen many women in Petersburg, he should tell her so afresh.
  • Natasha looked intently at him and went on:
  • Pierre was not at all surprised at this question.
  • "What nonsense it is," Natasha suddenly exclaimed, "about honeymoons, and that the greatest happiness is at first!
  • While you were talking in the study I was looking at you, Natasha began, evidently anxious to disperse the cloud that had come over them.
  • Then suddenly turning to one another at the same time they both began to speak.
  • At that moment it seemed to him that he was chosen to give a new direction to the whole of Russian society and to the whole world.
  • Little Nicholas turned to look at Pierre but Pierre was no longer there.
  • At the basis of the works of all the modern historians from Gibbon to Buckle, despite their seeming disagreements and the apparent novelty of their outlooks, lie those two old, unavoidable assumptions.
  • Moreover, certain men wrote some books at that time.
  • At the end of the eighteenth century there were a couple of dozen men in Paris who began to talk about all men being free and equal.
  • This caused people all over France to begin to slash at and drown one another.
  • At that time there was in France a man of genius--Napoleon.
  • But the Allied monarchs were angry at this and went to fight the French once more.
  • Not only does it occur at every step, but the universal historians' accounts are all made up of a chain of such contradictions.
  • This conception is the one handle by means of which the material of history, as at present expounded, can be dealt with, and anyone who breaks that handle off, as Buckle did, without finding some other method of treating historical material, merely deprives himself of the one possible way of dealing with it.
  • Why was Napoleon III a criminal when he was taken prisoner at Boulogne, and why, later on, were those criminals whom he arrested?
  • History proves this at every turn.
  • Is the ferment of the peoples of the west at the end of the eighteenth century and their drive eastward explained by the activity of Louis XIV, XV, and XVI, their mistresses and ministers, and by the lives of Napoleon, Rousseau, Diderot, Beaumarchais, and others?
  • Is the movement of the peoples at the time of the Crusades explained by the life and activity of the Godfreys and the Louis-es and their ladies?
  • Whatever happens and whoever may stand at the head of affairs, the theory can always say that such and such a person took the lead because the collective will was transferred to him.
  • Wherever the ship may go, the rush of water which neither directs nor increases its movement foams ahead of it, and at a distance seems to us not merely to move of itself but to govern the ship's movement also.
  • Arriving at this conclusion we can reply directly and positively to these two essential questions of history:
  • The presence of the problem of man's free will, though unexpressed, is felt at every step of history.
  • A sinking man who clutches at another and drowns him; or a hungry mother exhausted by feeding her baby, who steals some food; or a man trained to discipline who on duty at the word of command kills a defenseless man-- seem less guilty, that is, less free and more subject to the law of necessity, to one who knows the circumstances in which these people were placed, and more free to one who does not know that the man was himself drowning, that the mother was hungry, that the soldier was in the ranks, and so on.
  • When we do not at all understand the cause of an action, whether a crime, a good action, or even one that is simply nonmoral, we ascribe a greater amount of freedom to it.
  • For if I examine an action committed a second ago I must still recognize it as not being free, for it is irrevocably linked to the moment at which it was committed.
  • I lift it, but ask myself: could I have abstained from lifting my arm at the moment that has already passed?
  • But I am not now abstaining from doing so at the first moment when I asked the question.
  • The moment in which the first movement was made is irrevocable, and at that moment I could make only one movement, and whatever movement I made would be the only one.
  • And since I could make only one movement at that single moment of time, it could not have been any other.
  • But even if--imagining a man quite exempt from all influences, examining only his momentary action in the present, unevoked by any cause--we were to admit so infinitely small a remainder of inevitability as equaled zero, we should even then not have arrived at the conception of complete freedom in man, for a being uninfluenced by the external world, standing outside of time and independent of cause, is no longer a man.
  • In the second case, if freedom were possible without inevitability we should have arrived at unconditioned freedom beyond space, time, and cause, which by the fact of its being unconditioned and unlimited would be nothing, or mere content without form.
  • Rice Time is child-friendly, but beer and wine is served at the restaurant.
  • Rice Time specializes in BBQ (called bulgogi) at your table, and the tofu soup is always on special.
  • Sit outside during the day, or enjoy live entertainment at night.
  • The restaurant is open seven days a week, serving food until it closes at 3 a.m.
  • Louis, MO 63104(314) 776-7292www.hodaks.com Joey B's on the Landing This restaurant at Laclede's Landing is within walking distance of Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park and the Gateway Arch.
  • Louis, MO 63139(314) 781-1135www.cunetto.com Hodak's Restaurant & Bar After a meal at Hodak's, sign up for a Benton Park walking tour to burn off the calories you've just consumed.
  • So if you're going for dinner, it's best to get there when doors reopen at 5 p.m.
  • Blueberry Hill After hitting some balls at Metcalfe Park, keep the games going with a round of darts at Blueberry Hill.
  • Blueberry Hill After hitting some balls at Metcalfe Park, keep the games going with a round of darts at Blueberry Hill.
  • Louis would be complete without toasted ravioli on the Hill or thin-crust pizza at a corner pub---all washed down with a cold glass of beer.
  • Honey Take-Out Restaurant As the name suggests, this is a take-out establishment, though you can eat in at this small Chinese restaurant.
  • Established in 1985, this family-owned eatery serves classic American cuisine at reasonable prices.
  • If you're up early for a hike or trekking adventure, choose breakfast items from the Power Breakfast menu served at 7 a.m.
  • The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College4207 Walnut St.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19104(215) 823-6222 The Italian Trattoria at The Restaurant School For an experience a bit out of the ordinary, and a bargain to boot, pay a visit to the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College in the heart of University City.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19104(215) 823-6222 The Italian Trattoria at The Restaurant School For an experience a bit out of the ordinary, and a bargain to boot, pay a visit to the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College in the heart of University City.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19104(215) 895-3490www.pizzarusticaonline.com Penne Restaurant & Wine Bar At the Hilton Inn at Penn near the U Penn campus and the Annenberg center you'll find one of newest additions to the Italian dining scene in Philly.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19104(215) 895-3490www.pizzarusticaonline.com Penne Restaurant & Wine Bar At the Hilton Inn at Penn near the U Penn campus and the Annenberg center you'll find one of newest additions to the Italian dining scene in Philly.
  • Pizza Rustica Restaurant & Bar Pizza Rustica may not grab you with its name alone, but one look at the menu and a whiff of smoke from the hardwood-fired oven should do the trick.
  • Trail systems there like Arapaho Glacier and Arapaho Lakes range from easy to difficult, with several at altitudes of more than 14,000 feet.
  • Finish it with a cup of coffee and then relax with a book at the nearby Barnes & Noble.
  • Seattle, WA 98115(206) 525-7747www.casaditaliaseattle.com Piatti Restaurant Situated in University Village at the southern tip of Ravenna, Piatti is just one block from the scenic Burke-Gilman trail.
  • Business hours for the Big Easy Creole Cafe start at 11 a.m. and last until the last customer standing is finished all week except Sundays.
  • Enjoy happy hour every day starting at 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., and live music on Friday nights.
  • Playing the green on Capitol Hill's Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, stomping through the bamboo Wilderness Forest or browsing the newest products at Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World store in Prattville, Alabama, can work up a big appetite.
  • Kids have their own area at the "Kids Bar," where they can watch cartoons as they chow down.
  • Diners at the Brazilian Bull use a painted cylinder to control how much meat arrives at the table: green means more meat, please; red means enough for now; and the cylinder on the side means done for the night.
  • Diners at the Brazilian Bull use a painted cylinder to control how much meat arrives at the table: green means more meat, please; red means enough for now; and the cylinder on the side means done for the night.
  • Lexington, MA 02420(781) 861-9990greatharvestcatering.com Palio's Italian Grille Fine dining, Italian style, is at its peak at this restaurant that prides itself in serving seasonal fresh ingredients in traditional dishes.
  • Lexington, MA 02420(781) 861-9990greatharvestcatering.com Palio's Italian Grille Fine dining, Italian style, is at its peak at this restaurant that prides itself in serving seasonal fresh ingredients in traditional dishes.
  • At lunchtime or dinner, appetizers include a hummus plate, super lump crab cake and a freshly homemade soup of the day.
  • Nourish Celebrate sustainability when you dine at Nourish.
  • Hike the Battle Road Trail at Minute Man National Historic Park.
  • Pulaski, NY 13142 (315) 509-4281riverhouserestaurant.net Eddy's Place Stop at Eddy's Place, a restaurant located on Rome Road.
  • RiverHouse Restaurant Enjoy dining along the Salmon River at the RiverHouse Restaurant.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts enjoy fly fishing in the Salmon River, jogging along Lake Ontario or beach camping at the Brennan Beach RV Resort.
  • El Portal includes fine dining at the René at Tlaquepaque where you can enjoy a classic French-influenced menu with a Southwestern flavor.
  • El Portal includes fine dining at the René at Tlaquepaque where you can enjoy a classic French-influenced menu with a Southwestern flavor.
  • The hotels are also located nearby many recreational areas and natural environments like the Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino National Forest, Heritage Square and the Arboretum at Flagstaff.
  • Music at night ranges from jazz to reggae, and the perfect view of Great South Bay offers a backdrop to your experience.
  • The Island Mermaid With sunny seaside dining during the day and dinner and dancing at night, the Island Mermaid in the nearby village of Ocean Beach offers brunch, lunch, dinner and a full sushi menu.
  • Stamford, Connecticut 06901(203) 359-4747‎www.kotobukijapaneserestaurant.com La Bretagne La Bretagne specializes in fine French cuisine served at both lunch and dinner.
  • Stamford, Connecticut 06902(203) 325-3773‎www.eclissestamford.com Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant A full Japanese menu, as well as a sushi bar, await you at Kotobuki, which serves both lunch and dinner.
  • Relaxing or Dancing at Plummers Tavern Named after elusive J.
  • Scotty's Beachside BBQ4-1546 Kuhio HighwayKapaa, HI 96746(808) 823-8480scottysbbq.com Resources The Hukilau Lanai restaurant at Kauai Coast Resort at the Beachboy Website Information
  • Scotty's Beachside BBQ4-1546 Kuhio HighwayKapaa, HI 96746(808) 823-8480scottysbbq.com Resources The Hukilau Lanai restaurant at Kauai Coast Resort at the Beachboy Website Information
  • Since the restaurant is located at a beach resort, it is a good choice for hungry people who have just finished exploring the beach.
  • Live entertainment is usually found at the restaurant during dinner hours, and patrons can choose from an extensive wine list.
  • Kapaa also has plenty of good restaurant choices for visitors to the islands, including amazing restaurants at the resorts and elsewhere.
  • Some restaurants close at 4 p.m., so it may not be a top dinner choice.
  • Dakota Steakhouse Restaurant225 West Main StreetAvon, CT 06001(860) 677-4311steakseafood.com/dak/ Toshi Japanese Restaurant Taste the flavors of authentic Japanese cuisine when you dine at the Toshi Japanese Restaurant.
  • Some of the tables have built in grills, for those who enjoy cooking their barbecue at table.
  • Cafe Loup105 W 13th StNew York, NY 10011(212) 255-4746cafeloupnyc.com Do Hwa Run by a mother and daughter team, this home-style Korean restaurant offers delicious food at reasonable prices, in a sleek, modern atmosphere.
  • Here you'll find well-prepared French comfort food at moderate prices.
  • Bar Pitti used to be affiliated with the fancier restaurant next door, which serves some of the same dishes at higher prices.
  • Bar Pitti At first glance, this simple Italian spot with its crowded sidewalk cafe seating area, looks more suited to people watching than eating.
  • Perfect for those dining on a budget, Yesterdays serves everything from buffalo wings to escargot at a reasonable price.
  • There is no better way to end the day than a scrumptious meal at one of Warwick's many restaurants.
  • Order tacos, tamales, chips at the counter and stock up on delicious sauces to compliment your meal.
  • Autentica is located at 5507 NE 30th Ave.www.autenticaportland.com Nuestra Cocina Eat at Nuestra Cocina for a tasty Mexican meal full of juicy meats and sauces, with service from some of the friendliest waitstaffers in town.
  • Autentica is located at 5507 NE 30th Ave.www.autenticaportland.com Nuestra Cocina Eat at Nuestra Cocina for a tasty Mexican meal full of juicy meats and sauces, with service from some of the friendliest waitstaffers in town.
  • Sullivan's Steakhouse The extensive menu at Sullivan's Steakhouse in Anchorage, Alaska is sure to draw in a crowd.
  • There's no better way to end an action-packed day than dinner at one of Anchorage's many steakhouses.
  • The atmosphere consists of a large rectangular bar is at the entrance, gleaming in brass and dark wood, and a dining room that is brightly lit with well used wood floors and brass nameplates at each seat that frequent diners have claimed.
  • The atmosphere consists of a large rectangular bar is at the entrance, gleaming in brass and dark wood, and a dining room that is brightly lit with well used wood floors and brass nameplates at each seat that frequent diners have claimed.
  • The menu includes everything that is to be expected at a steakhouse: creamed spinach, appetizers of fresh, ripe tomatoes and onions, and fried shoestring potatoes and onions.
  • Unlike more prestigious steakhouses, dining at Maury's Tiny Cove won't break the bank.
  • Steaks served at the Precinct are hand-chosen and aged to near perfection.
  • The mouth-watering meals served at many of the steakhouses in Ohio's city of seven hills will make the already adventurous day one to remember.
  • After a day of hiking at Cincinnati's Eden Park where visitors can enjoy spectacular views of the Ohio River or even ice skate on Mirror Lake in the winter, why not end the evening with a meal at one of Cincinnati's many steak restaurants.
  • After a day of hiking at Cincinnati's Eden Park where visitors can enjoy spectacular views of the Ohio River or even ice skate on Mirror Lake in the winter, why not end the evening with a meal at one of Cincinnati's many steak restaurants.
  • At this family owned and operated restaurant, prices are reasonable, as most dishes are under $12.
  • Word to the wise, though: Stone Soup only takes cash, so leave your plastic at home.
  • Choose from a vegetable shepherd's pie, several Indian dishes, a turkey melt, or just load up on the greens at the salad bar.
  • From maple-glazed tofu to squash soup and home-made bread, vegan and vegetarian food options at Stone Soup are flavorful and intriguing.
  • In addition to the chicken and lamb common at most Indian restaurants, the Angithi's extensive menu features also offer goat and seafood dishes.
  • The menu at the Taj is extensive and features a good variety of vegetarian options.
  • Interested customers can even learn how to make their own sushi at Superb Sushi's classes that teach you how to make a three-course mini meal.
  • A separate lunch menu price allows you to sample the meal at a lower price.
  • Brazil Grill1996 Park Street # AHartford, Connecticut 06106Tel: (860) 523-5477brazilgrillhartford.com O'Porto Restaurant O'Porto is a fine dining establishment that has changed the way many people look at Portuguese cuisine.
  • Have yours at one of these hotels with banquet room space.
  • The setting is casual--all meals are ordered and picked up at the counter.
  • The servers come and join you at your table and crack smart jokes about your order, but it's all in good fun and part of its charm.
  • Chicago, IL 60657(773) 327-7800harrycaraystavern.com Ed Debevic's At this '50s-style diner, while families dine on malts, burgers and fries, be prepared for a different kind of service.
  • Harry Caray's plans to open a second tavern at Navy Pier in December 2009 with the same menu and outdoor patio for guests to enjoy the sights while they eat.
  • From exploring Navy Pier to attending a sporting event at Wrigley Field, there are family-friendly restaurants along both, allowing you to enjoy the weather and the attractions.
  • For outdoor enthusiasts, the city offers jogging paths throughout its public gardens and bird-watching at the downtown Metro Park.
  • It provides care, supervision and encouragement to young people who do not have that kind of support at home.
  • Racing fans will enjoy the National Trail Raceway and Scioto Downs, while golfers have many course choices, including the Longaberger Club and the Safari Golf Club at the Columbus Zoo.
  • Stumps Supper Club Southern with a retro vibe is what you will find at Stumps Supper Club.
  • At the mouth of the Ybor Channel is Channelside Bay Plaza, a destination for shopping, entertainment and dining galore.
  • Stamford, CT 06902(203) 325-8736myrnas.com Jordan's Pizza and Restaurant At Jordan's Pizza and Restaurant you can find ravioli, gnocchi, chicken fingers, Greek combos, salads and wraps.
  • The "Mini-Vinnies" menu for children 10 and under includes chicken tenders with fries or spaghetti with meatballs, butter or marinara sauce at an incredibly low price.
  • The wine list at Koozinas features several local selections from the Heron Hill Vineyards.
  • Larger groups sit around these tables, or couples may enjoy a more intimate dinner at a smaller table on the side.
  • Benihana benihana.com/ Arirang Hibachi Steakhouse & Sushi Bar Known for its flaming volcano, this restaurant chain provides entertainment and delicious food at 12 hibachi tables.
  • One hundred and fifteen acres of hiking and cycling trails, along with fishing and kayaking opportunities are available at this outdoor attraction year-round.
  • As of November 2009, nightly Jacuzzi room rates started at about $110, and standard guest rooms cost around $70 per night.
  • As of November 2009, nightly Jacuzzi room rates started at about $100; standard guest rooms cost around $80 per night.
  • As of November 2009, nightly Jacuzzi room rates started at about $110, while standard guest rooms cost around $70 per night.
  • Each one-bedroom cottage has four impeccably decorated rooms, and residents have access to the AAA four-diamond-rated inn and spa at Mirbeau.
  • Canandaigua Lake State Marine Park is at the northern end of the lake and has a boat launch, fishing, picnic tables and power boats.
  • The clubhouse, located at the intersection of East Main Street and Church Street, features a pool table and full-service bar along with a dance floor and facilities for a DJ.
  • Much like a traditional nightclub, the bar at the Cherokee Lanes offers patrons more than 21 years old drink specials throughout the night as well as a limited menu featuring bar food favorites such as pizza and French fries.
  • The city's location at the beginnings of the foothills of the north Georgia mountains grants locals a beautiful view of the natural surroundings.
  • Contemporary Southwestern cuisine highlights the menu at La Plazuela Restaurant.
  • Nature lovers appreciate the area's natural wonders, where scenic vistas await at the nearby Sangre de Cristo Mountains or Hermit's Peak.
  • Other rumors name her as a prostitute from the 1920s who went missing while working at the hotel.
  • If you are more adventurous, be sure not to miss dining at one of the area's haunted restaurants for a meal you may never forget.
  • The menu at the Queen of Sheba is filled with not only entrees, but many appetizers, vegetarian dishes, desserts and a selection of red, white and Ethiopian wines.
  • A standard room at the Wynn is approximately 640 square feet but select suites measure more than 3,000 square feet.
  • The smallest rooms at the Venetian are still a spacious 650 square feet with a 130 square foot bathroom.
  • Guests at the Bellagio can enjoy the five-pool courtyard with a Mediterranean theme, where private cabanas and poolside massages are available.
  • When you're not enjoying Blauvelt's outdoor culture, take your tastebuds on their own adventure at one of Blauvelt's restaurants.
  • Hemlock Cannon Beach, Oregon 97110(503) 436-2439www.driftwoodcannonbeach.com Newmans at 988 Newmans at 988 serves classic French and Italian cuisine with an emphasis on food from the Piedmont and Genoa regions of Italy.
  • Hemlock Cannon Beach, Oregon 97110(503) 436-2439www.driftwoodcannonbeach.com Newmans at 988 Newmans at 988 serves classic French and Italian cuisine with an emphasis on food from the Piedmont and Genoa regions of Italy.
  • New York, NY 10019(212) 765-2929http://www.meenoodleshopnyc.com Sassy's Sliders NYC At Sassy's Sliders NYC discover for yourself that the Upper East Side is not all about money.
  • El Malecon Restaurant4141 BroadwayNew York, NY 10033(212) 927-3812http://64.129.209.22/customers/malecon/ Mee Noodle Shop Escape the frenetic pace of midtown and a grab a table at the popular Mee Noodle Shop.
  • Appetizers include soup made of mushrooms harvested at nearby Kennett Square, stock, cream and cognac.
  • Permanently at dock on the Delaware River at Penn's Landing, Moshulu's heyday as a trading ship is far behind, but its rank as a fine restaurant has gained it AAA four-diamond rating.
  • Permanently at dock on the Delaware River at Penn's Landing, Moshulu's heyday as a trading ship is far behind, but its rank as a fine restaurant has gained it AAA four-diamond rating.
  • Moshulu The romance of the high seas is evoked at this grand tall ship converted into a fine dining restaurant.
  • Whatever activities couples decide to enjoy, they should also make time to dine at one of these romantic restaurants.
  • They can also take a self-guided walking tour along the Delaware River, by Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell; linger at Love Park in Center City, or head to the northern suburbs for a swift hike or mountain bike ride through Pennypack Park.
  • Pizza is available only at lunchtime, and appetizers such as the Italian minestrone and cold antipasto are only offered on the dinner menu.
  • Buffalo, New York 14213(718) 882-5539marcosbuffalo.com Cecelia's Ristorante & Martini Bar Cecelia is the name of the first special listed on the menu at Cecelia's Ristorante.
  • Carmine's Italiano4715 Transit RoadWilliamsville, New York 14221(716) 632-2318carminestogo.com Marco's Fine Italian Dining Diners at Marcos can begin their meal with antipasto such as calamari, fava beans, spinach bread or toasted ravioli.
  • La Dolce Vita Caffe & Bistro A variety of entrees, including pastas, are served at La Dolce Vita.
  • Pasta is included on every menu, but a variety of other main dishes and some interesting appetizers are also readily available at these establishments.
  • For guests staying at the inn, lodging packages are offered and include skiing, canoeing and mountain biking.
  • It is located at Intervale Scenic Vista Outlook in close proximity to cross-country skiing.
  • If you want the gourmet experience at a family-dining price, try the plate of the day for around $10.
  • Open seven days a week until 2 a.m., Jade Harbor is the ideal place to go for great food at almost any hour.
  • When you need a break from your activities, stop in Canton at one of these restaurants and enjoy a well-deserved meal.
  • Reservations are recommended for this popular restaurant, which opens nightly at 5 p.m.
  • Webb's Captain's Table Whether you choose a table in the main dining room at Webb's Captain Table or on the open deck upstairs, you will have gorgeous views of Chautauqua Lake.
  • Reservations are encouraged at Fogo De Chao Churrascaria and prices are typically around $38.50 for dinner.
  • A fire pit is used to cook the Brazilian meats to perfection while guests enjoy the unique dining experience offered at Fogo De Chao.
  • All of the authentic Brazilian meats at Boi Na Braza are artistically skewered and roasted with the freshest of herbs and spices.
  • This quaint little Brazilian restaurant offers delectable cuisine and a cozy atmosphere at an affordable price.
  • On the corner of Taft and Buckley Road in Liverpool, The Atrium serves gourmet, made-from-scratch meals with fresh and wholesome ingredients make meals at the Atrium special.
  • Dress attire is required in the evenings at this restaurant.
  • In addition to the many steak and seafood offerings on the menu, live entertainment, full bar and sunset viewing areas are also offered at this Florida restaurant.
  • Gourmet dishes including seafood and Asian cuisine are available at this Florida establishment.
  • Bradenton, Florida 34207(941) 727-2789 Mattison's Riverside Mattison's Riverside offers fine dining at multiple locations in the "Sunshine State." Dress attire is required at this restaurant, which also features live music Thursday through Saturday.
  • Bradenton, Florida 34207(941) 727-2789 Mattison's Riverside Mattison's Riverside offers fine dining at multiple locations in the "Sunshine State." Dress attire is required at this restaurant, which also features live music Thursday through Saturday.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19102 (215) 567-1000lebecfin.com Lacroix at the Rittenhouse When Lacroix at the luxurious Rittenhouse Hotel opened in 2003, it was lauded by "Esquire" magazine as the best new restaurant in the country.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19102 (215) 567-1000lebecfin.com Lacroix at the Rittenhouse When Lacroix at the luxurious Rittenhouse Hotel opened in 2003, it was lauded by "Esquire" magazine as the best new restaurant in the country.
  • The experience of Le Bec-Fin does not stop at the main course.
  • Appetizers begin at $3.25, and entree meals begin at $9.95, as of 2009.
  • Appetizers begin at $3.25, and entree meals begin at $9.95, as of 2009.
  • Entrees begin with chicken fried rice at $10.95 as of 2009.
  • Appetizers begin at $5 with egg rolls, and entrees start at $11, as of 2009.
  • Appetizers begin at $5 with egg rolls, and entrees start at $11, as of 2009.
  • Dress at Sullivan's varies from the little black dress to dressed-up jeans.
  • The crowd at Morton's The Steakhouse in Indianapolis dresses in trendy upscale casual attire.
  • Dress runs the gamut from professional to cocktail attire, and the price (2009) starts at about $30 for the entrees, served ala carte.
  • Indianapolis, IN 46225(317) 635-0636www.stelmos.com Ruth's Chris The downtown Indianapolis location of the New Orleans-based steakhouse features a dark, upscale modern decor and a lively bar scene at the entrance.
  • Previous guests who posted reviews at Urban Spoon were overwhelmingly pleased with their experience--94 percent of people said they liked it.
  • Chicago, IL 60659(773) 338-2929indiangardendevon.com Udupi Palace Vegetarians rejoice at Udupi Palace, an aptly named eatery that has played host to Indian heads of state--quite an endorsement.
  • Indian Garden "Sensory overload" is the order of the day at Indian Garden, a safe bet for those who seldom stray from basic fare like tikka masala and vindaloo, and also for those who do.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner, with dinner entree prices starting at $12 in 2009.
  • The restaurant is open daily for dinner and entree prices start at $12.
  • As of 2009, Chandlers Steakhouse serves dinner seven days a week and entree prices start at $26.
  • Spend some time at Sunset Park Campground, which includes swimming, boating, fishing, a playground and even hay rides, and then check out one of the great restaurants in the Auburn area.
  • Sit on the deck enjoying a cocktail as you watch the boats pass by and enjoy a great meal at Pelican's Nest.
  • Rochester, New York(585) 271-8920californiarollin.com Cheeseburger Cheeseburger For some good American fare, nothing beats a cheeseburger at Cheeseburger Cheeseburger.
  • California Rollin' is the perfect stop after a long day at the beach.
  • Dominic's at the Lake Dine on large portions of authentic Italian dishes at this popular Italian restaurant.
  • Dominic's at the Lake Dine on large portions of authentic Italian dishes at this popular Italian restaurant.
  • Affordable, absolutely authentic, Cantina Brazil does not offer the skewered variety of meats, lamb and poultry found at the all-you-can-eat restaurants.
  • You can play pool or bowl at the club, but make sure you check the dress code.
  • On-site dining options include Orchids at Palm Court, a fine dining restaurant with a seasonal menu, The Grille at Palm Court, which serves American cuisine for both breakfast and lunch, and PC Express, which serves on the go breakfasts.
  • On-site dining options include Orchids at Palm Court, a fine dining restaurant with a seasonal menu, The Grille at Palm Court, which serves American cuisine for both breakfast and lunch, and PC Express, which serves on the go breakfasts.
  • Brooklyn NY 11235(718) 891-1177theatlanticgrill.com/index.php?p=home Tatiana Restaurant and Nightclub When the weather is right, you can ask for outdoor seating and revel in the view offered at the Tatiana Restaurant and Nightclub.
  • Boats may dock at the restaurant free.458 Forest Beach RoadAnnapolis, MD 21401(410) 757-1311cantlers.com
  • Annapolis, MD 21401(410) 263-3382 Cantler's Riverside Inn It would be hard to imagine dining in Annapolis without crabs on the menu and at Cantler's, you won't forget the sea creatures.
  • Annapolis, MD 21403(410) 268-7166chart-house.com O'Leary's Seafood Fine dining in an artistic setting is found at O'Leary's Seafood, where diners can view abstract paintings while enjoying gourmet ocean catches.
  • Memphis, TN 38104(901) 274-2556Tsunamimemphis.com Pei Wei Asian Diner Authentic food is served at Pei Wei Asian Diner, along with a kids Wei menu that is for kids 12 years and under and includes lo mein (white rice and chicken).
  • ESeattle, WA 98102(206) 325-0877 toscanapizzeria.com Assiaggo Enjoy Northern Italian cuisine at Assiaggo, which serves both lunch and dinner with pastas, pizza, chicken and meat dishes.
  • Seattle, WA 98122(206) 323-7200billsoffbroadway.com/# Toscana Pizzeria Enjoy casual hand-made pizzas and calzones at Toscana Pizza.
  • Seattle, WA 98102(206) 621-7941machiavellis.com Bill's off Broadway Enjoy both dinner and a show at Bill's off Broadway.
  • Serafina Carbo-load before the next day's hike at Serafina, which provides diners a Tuscan landscape and a wide selection of Italian specialties.
  • Burgers, salads, sandwiches and fish all appear on the menu at Famous Dave's.
  • An extensive wine list ensures a perfect pairing with your entree.64 Lakeside DriveBemus Point, New York 14712(716) 386-2181 harenhounds.com/ See-Zurh House/Shaggy's Get two restaurants in one when you dine at the See-Zurh House/Shaggy's.
  • The Italian Fisherman An amazing water setting provides ambiance as you dine at The Italian Fisherman.
  • For lighter dining, the adjacent Tasting Room opens daily at 11:30 a.m.
  • Alexandria, Virginia 22314(703) 842-2796morrisonhouse.com BRABO by Robert Weidmaier Savor Belgian cuisine with a fresh regional American flair at this Old Town Alexandria restaurant.
  • Take in a more formal dining experience at the Chef's Tasting Table, where a five- or nine-course fixed-price menu features sustainably grown meat entrees and seasonal vegetables, some from the chef's own garden.
  • Whether you spend your day sightseeing in the nation's capital, exploring the countryside or browsing the city's shops and historic district, save time to dine at top restaurants in Alexandria.
  • Chuck's Steak House Have yourself a hearty meal at Chuck's, where the tables are packed with regulars.
  • The service at the Shore House Café is overly friendly and fast.
  • The grungy, nautical décor makes anyone feel at home, regardless of the time of day.
  • All the other dishes are set at great prices as well.
  • With so many outdoor activities available, Orange County restaurateurs know there are hungry people at all hours.
  • The cuisine at Taormina is inspired by the authentic flavors of the seaside Sicilian village after which the restaurant is named.
  • As of 2009, entree prices start at $19.95, and the restaurant is open daily for dinner from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Matteo's Italian Restaurant Matteo's Italian Restaurant is in the heart of Waikiki in Marine Surf Hotel at the corner of Seaside and Kuhio streets.
  • When you visit Oahu, chances are you will stay at one of the many resorts and hotels around the famous Waikiki Beach in Honolulu.
  • A children's menu is also available.1 Kinderhook StreetChatham, NY 12037(518) 392-7711chathamblueplate.net/ O's Eatery. an American Diner Dine in classic northeastern style at O's Eatery, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner.
  • The Chatham House Dine in the atmosphere of a 19th century tavern at the Chatham House.
  • Logan's Roadhouse2119 Gunbarrell Road Chattanooga, TN 37421 (423) 499-4339 logansroadhouse.com Longhorn Steakhouse Authentic western fare is served at the Longhorn Steakhouse, where meats are cut and served to your request.
  • Wines are available by the glass and bottle.5621 Brainerd RoadChattanooga, TN 37411(423) 892-0404yourichiban.com/ Logan's Roadhouse Enjoy western-style entertainment while enjoying a mesquite-grilled steak at Logan's Roadhouse.
  • There are a variety of hotels around the Arena at Gwinnett Center that offer deluxe accommodations and a wealth of amenities.
  • The Arena at Gwinnett Center is in the northern suburbs of Atlanta in Duluth, Georgia.
  • Applebees and Bob Evans are both located at the Main Street intersection with the Thomas E.
  • Main Street For those who enjoy the convenience of dining at a familiar institution, Applebee's, Domino's and Bob Evans restaurants have locations within the town limits of Dunkirk.
  • The Pub at the End of the Universe The Pub at the End of the Universe is special, and no one seems to know why.
  • The Pub at the End of the Universe The Pub at the End of the Universe is special, and no one seems to know why.
  • Lunch at the Deli on the Dock where Mamma's Mussels, the catch-of-the-day sandwich and gourmet burgers satisfy active vacationers on the lake.
  • EastDunkirk, NY 14048(716) 336-8350clariondunkirk.com The Italian Fisherman Enjoy al fresco dining at this Chautauqua Lake shore restaurant.
  • Whether you are open water kayaking in Dunkirk Harbor or bird watching at Point Gratiot Park, a meal at the marina's Windjammer's Lakeview Restaurant is nearby and flavorful.
  • Whether you are open water kayaking in Dunkirk Harbor or bird watching at Point Gratiot Park, a meal at the marina's Windjammer's Lakeview Restaurant is nearby and flavorful.
  • Have a drink at the bar in this restored historical building, and then retire to the dining room with its stained glass windows and warm woodwork.
  • Fenton Grill Paddle the Chadakoin River water trail, fish lower Chautauqua Lake or hike along the lake shore, then settle in for a relaxing evening at Fenton Grill.
  • The restaurant offers dining at the bar, in the sidewalk cafe or the main dining room.
  • The restaurant offer menus for a snack at the bar and for brunch, lunch, dinner and special occasions as well as carrying an extensive selection of fine Italian wines.
  • Co.230 Ninth Avenue at 24th Street(212) 243-1105 Borgo Antico Borgo Antico focuses on revisited Italian cuisine prepared by Chef Ivan Beacco, who prepares his dishes with fresh ingredients.
  • The Hawaiian sunshine makes every day a perfect day for hiking the nearby mountains or surfing and swimming at Waikiki Beach.
  • Due to its central location theater-goers can easily dine at the Arista.
  • ChurrascosRiver Oaks Location 2055 Westheimer (at Shepherd)Houston, TX 77098 (713) 527.8300cordua.comChurrascosWestchase Location 9705 Westheimer (at Gessner)Houston, TX 77042(713) 952.1988 cordua.com Pappas Bros.
  • ChurrascosRiver Oaks Location 2055 Westheimer (at Shepherd)Houston, TX 77098 (713) 527.8300cordua.comChurrascosWestchase Location 9705 Westheimer (at Gessner)Houston, TX 77042(713) 952.1988 cordua.com Pappas Bros.
  • Diners are welcomed by gold and bronzed-colored drapery, and seating areas draped with Latin-American fabrics at either of the two Houston locations.
  • When you dine at Mark's try the Copper River salmon or Kobe beef osso buco.
  • Nectar French Asian Cuisine opens Monday through Friday at 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 5 p.m.
  • Nectar French Asian Cuisine opens Monday through Friday at 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 5 p.m.
  • Come during the Happy Hour, where you can purchase for less than $2 bar fare, such as steamed mussels or 1/2 pound cheeseburger while sitting at the bar.
  • Locations:3191 US Highway 1Trenton, NJ 08648(609) 896-03603191 US Route OneLawrenceville,NJ 08648(609) 896-0360joescrabshack.com Bonefish Grill With its relaxed, family-friendly atmosphere, Bonefish Grill offers great seafood meals at affordable options.
  • Enjoy delicious, homestyle Italian dishes and authentic Italian atmosphere, plus an extensive wine list at this Chambersburg favorite.
  • Diners can also choose from a large selection of salads and antipasti at this casual restaurant.
  • New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1903(732) 296-9463catherinelombardi.com Surf and Italian Turf An Italian restaurant with an emphasis on seafood, dinners at Fresco can have the best of both worlds.
  • Get Romantic at Scalini Fedeli Formerly a 260-year-old New Jersey farmhouse, Scalini Fedeli lends an aura of romance with its high ceilings and ultra-polished service.
  • You'll find the language spoken in many towns, particularly in Hudson and Essex counties, and at many festivals throughout the state that celebrate Italian festivals and holidays.
  • Banquet facilities are present at the restaurant, and catering is available.
  • From exploring caverns to trying your luck at extreme sports, there is something for everyone in Pennsylvania.
  • Kids will enjoy dishes specifically prepared for young ages at lower rates.
  • Diners will love reasonable prices, and kids can take advantage of meals offered at half the regular price.
  • Children eat for a discounted price at Walter's Café and Bistro, and there is a children's menu with pizza and junior burgers.
  • As all of these activities can work up an appetite, it is wise to eat at some local restaurants.
  • Max's main bar's happy hour is from 5 to 7 p.m. and features beer, wines and appetizers at special prices.
  • After the day's activities, dine on a sumptuous meal at one of the many German restaurants in town.
  • Partake in boating or river rafting at Wills Creek or at the northern branch of the Potomac River.
  • Partake in boating or river rafting at Wills Creek or at the northern branch of the Potomac River.
  • Madera's Restaurante Mexicano & Cantina If you're in the mood for authentic Mexican fare at an affordable price while enjoying Burlington's proximity to Lake Champlain, Madera's is a good bet.
  • Fine antipasti such as Chicken Artichoke Bruschetta, Eggplant Rollantini, soups, panini and a small selection of entrées all round out the menu at Luigi's Italian Restaurant.
  • Nebraska Ave Tampa, FL 33603(813) 234-1000ellasfolkartcafe.com Luigi's Italian Restaurant Pizza and pasta aren't the only things on the menu at this local favorite.
  • Soups, salads, pizza and burgers can all be enjoyed at this Tampa Bay institution.
  • Tampa Bay offers lots to the ambitious outdoor-oriented traveler, from hiking in the Lettuce Lake Park to ice skating at the Tampa Bay Skating Academy.
  • With cooks right at the table, you will be able to see your sushi personally prepared for you -- a good experience all the way around from the food to the preparation.
  • Italy's Best Ristorante Italiano652 Route 70Lakehurst, NJ 08733(732)657-1666www.peteandsalsitalysbest.com Luigi's Restaurant A fresh, contemporary atmosphere surrounds guests at Luigi's Restaurant.
  • There are a wide array of restaurants available at which those seeing the sights of Lakehurst can grab a quick bite to eat.
  • Closed Mondays, the Sorrento begins dinner service at 5:00 p.m. every day except Sunday, which begins at 3:00 p.m.
  • Closed Mondays, the Sorrento begins dinner service at 5:00 p.m. every day except Sunday, which begins at 3:00 p.m.
  • Anaheim, CA 92806(714) 956-0123donerg.com Spinner's Turkish Kebab Quite possibly the best doner kebabs in all of Fountain Valley are served up fresh at Spinner's Turkish Kebab.
  • From doner kebabs and kofta meat to vegetarian shish kebab, everyone will find something worth savoring at this dependable Anaheim establishment.
  • These restaurants all serve delicious Turkish cuisine at a price anyone can afford---on average, less than $10 per person.
  • Thrill-seeking tourists flock to Orange County not just for the theme parks, but also to explore the wilds of Casper's Wilderness Park, to surf the waves on Huntington Beach and to fish at Dana Wharf.
  • At lunch, order off the menu or sample the buffet.
  • Order from a chalkboard menu at the entrance and pay for your meal.
  • This is a great place to stop in for a bite after a day of golfing at Thornton's Jack O' Lantern golf course.
  • In the winter months, snow or ski board at one of the nearby winter destinations, including Loon Mountain, Cannon Mountain Waterville Valley Resort, and Tenney Mountain.
  • At breakfast, choose from straightforward egg dishes like huevos con salchicas (sausage and eggs).
  • At this no-frills, fast food eatery, you scoop your food off cafeteria trays using plastic utensils.
  • Bottles are priced at retail (as the store portion of the establishment offers carryout wine sales), but there is a $12 corkage fee to have the bottle opened in the restaurant.
  • Reservations are a must at this hip locale where you'll encounter world-class service and a tantalizing menu filled with unique recipes.
  • The only complaint that can be levied at this restaurant is that the prices are higher than one might expect for such simple fare.
  • The restaurant experience at Aayashiana is by far the most upscale and refined establishment serving traditional Indian food in the area.
  • Travelers seeking to sample Indian cuisine for the first time, or those more familiar with an Indian diet will be glad to find that many of India's diverse flavors and recipes are available at a number of establishments in the Reading, Pennsylvania, area.
  • Cafe Gyro Basha serves breakfast starting at 7:00 a.m. during the week.
  • Order food the Greek way by custom ordering your plate instead of looking at a menu, if you dare.
  • After a summer day of canoeing, paddle boating or kayaking in Jamesville's Butternut Creek, or following a long day at the Jamesville Beach Disc Golf Course, a relaxing evening and a hearty meal are in order.
  • So, after a day of hiking the trails at one of the nature sanctuaries or touring a historic home, what's a nicer ending than sharing a bottle of wine and small plate of appetizers with friends.
  • Memphis, TN 38104(901) 725-0722 Huey's Midtown This Memphis favorite serves burgers at eight locations around the area.
  • Boulder, CO 80304-1163(303) 440-3500www.chinagourmetmenu.com Sam's Chinese & Vietnamese Restaurant Bring your appetite to an all-you-can-eat lunch buffet at Sam's Chinese & Vietnamese Restaurant.
  • Golden Lotus A special treat awaits you at the Golden Lotus, with a menu featuring authentic Cantonese and Szechwan style cuisine.
  • Paved and unpaved hiking and mountain bike trails into the mountains begin at the city's edge for your convenience.
  • The chefs here will prepare your meals directly at your table.
  • Diners at this restaurant, named after the Japanese city of Kobe that the restaurant's owners say is famous for its tender prime rib, can choose from a range of Japanese steak offerings, sushi and seafood.
  • Murtha's New York Steakhouse4777 Sunrise HighwayBohemia, NY 11716(631) 589-6278murthassteakhouse.com McGuire's If you would enjoy some witty entertainment after visiting the Connetquot River State Park, stop in for a bite to eat at McGuire's.
  • The menu items at this restaurant include clams on a half shell, Buffalo wings and steak.
  • The menu items at Saviano's include classic Italian dishes such as penne, mussel marinara and pizza.
  • Ferraro's Famous opens every day at 11 a.m.; closing hours vary by season.
  • Bradley Beach, NJ 07720(732) 774-8225vicspizza.com Ferraro's Famous Ferraro's Famous Tomato Pie is the specialty at this casual, family-owned Italian restaurant.
  • Vic's Italian Restaurant Authentic Italian food and thin crust pizza are the specialties at Vic's Italian Restaurant.
  • After a day at the beach or in the park, stroll along Main Street and choose one of the many local Italian restaurants.
  • Eating at Qdoba won't hurt your wallet, either, as most meals fall under the $10 line.
  • Whether you prefer golfing at the Rockaway River Country Club or hiking the trails of Tourne County Park, chances are high that you'll have worked up quite an appetite by the end of the day.
  • Hazards Bar and Grill Formerly Yanti's Indonesian Restaurant, the new management of Hazards still serves Indonesian food at the same address and phone number.
  • Indonesian food is hard to come by in this city of 3 million, but--if you are willing to navigate the city--there are a few spots with truly authentic menus at very reasonable prices.
  • Eating at Rangoli will certainly give you an experience outside of the timeworn burger joint.
  • If you find yourself a little hungry after your walk, travel a short ways south and grab a bite to eat at Rangoli.
  • After enjoying the view, travel back into the main part of town to enjoy dinner at Modern Restaurant and Pizzeria.
  • Modern Restaurant and Pizzeria Davenport Park may look a little barren at first glance, but if you wait until the sunset, you will never believe you thought this park was plain.
  • When your stomach starts rumbling, consider stopping in at one of the plentiful restaurants New Rochelle has to offer.
  • The Tides Restaurant 46580 Expedition DriveLexington Park, MD 20653(301) 862-5303 thetidesrestaurant.net Relax and enjoy authentic Mexican food at Cerro Grande Mexican Restaurant.
  • The Tides Restaurant opens Monday through Friday at 11 a.m. and Saturday at 5 p.m.
  • The Tides Restaurant opens Monday through Friday at 11 a.m. and Saturday at 5 p.m.
  • Clarke's Landing Restaurant 24580 Clarke's Landing LaneHollywood, MD 20636(301) 373-8468clrestaurant.com The Tides Restaurant Casual, gourmet dining awaits you at The Tides Restaurant.
  • At the end of the day, relax and indulge yourself at one of Lexington Park's local restaurants.
  • At the end of the day, relax and indulge yourself at one of Lexington Park's local restaurants.
  • Downstairs, Sally O'Brien's Bar offers a full bar menu, a selection of live acts and DJ's, and big crowds. (For that reason, families with children should note the nightclub noise may go on pretty late at night.) Royal Hotel Arklow25 Main St.
  • Consider getting that warm meal at Il Terrazzo Carmine on First Avenue South.
  • If you find yourself out on the water at night, make sure to take a look back toward shore and see the twinkling lights of Seattle at night, which make for an impressive view.
  • If you find yourself out on the water at night, make sure to take a look back toward shore and see the twinkling lights of Seattle at night, which make for an impressive view.
  • There is also a small grocery store at the front of the restaurant where you can take its great food home with you.
  • Moline, Ill. sits at a crossroads of two states, two rivers and many cultures.
  • When it comes to food, the folks at So Long Saloon must know what they are doing, because the Kansas Beef Council honored them with the Best Hamburger and Best Beef Appetizer awards.
  • Manhattan, KS 66502(785) 539-8033rockabellydeli.com So Long Saloon The food and atmosphere at So Long Saloon make it one of the hottest places in town.
  • Order sampler plates to taste the variety of dishes available, if this is your first time at Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine.
  • The Palms at Indian Head This bed and breakfast-style hotel is the only one of its kind you'll find in the Anza-Borrego area.
  • Smoke Chophouse Restaurant & Cigar Emporium Cigar aficionados and steak lovers will want to eat at the Smoke Chophouse Restaurant & Cigar Emporium in the heart of the Englewood Business District.
  • After a busy day, you might enjoy a hike or bird watching in the Flat Brook Nature Center, a round of golf at NYSC Englewood, the town's public golf course, or a game of tennis at the Englewood Field Club.
  • After a busy day, you might enjoy a hike or bird watching in the Flat Brook Nature Center, a round of golf at NYSC Englewood, the town's public golf course, or a game of tennis at the Englewood Field Club.
  • If a day at the shore leaves you in the mood for Chinese food, you have several local options, with both dine-in and takeout options.
  • This setting naturally makes it a prime location for water sports, and you can enjoy anything from a relaxing afternoon of beachcombing to kayaking the Patuxent (rentals are available at the nearby Patuxent Adventure Center).
  • If you are at a loss as to what to order, go for the Picadillo.
  • The service and décor can be a bit lacking at times, but for those seeking spicy Latin food, this is the place to be when in this part of New Jersey.
  • At Guido's, you can also have sandwiches, pasta, burgers, and wraps---all of it tasty and at a reasonable price.
  • At Guido's, you can also have sandwiches, pasta, burgers, and wraps---all of it tasty and at a reasonable price.
  • After an invigorating hike on the Woods Creek Trail or an exhilarating mountain bike run through the Blue Ridge Mountains, satisfy your appetite with delicious food and conversation at a Lexington restaurant.
  • A trip to Lexington, Virginia would not be complete without dining at one of the exquisite restaurants in the area.
  • The prices are a bit higher than what you'd expect to pay at an average burger joint...but then again, these aren't your average burgers.
  • The fries at Bobby's are nothing to scoff at, either---nor, for that matter, are the onion rings.
  • The fries at Bobby's are nothing to scoff at, either---nor, for that matter, are the onion rings.
  • At the tables, you'll find several different sauces with which to spice up your burger.
  • Pricing is moderate, and there is often a buffet at lunchtime for those who'd like to try a little of everything.
  • The restaurant opens at noon, four on weekends, and happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily.
  • Lamb chops, veal shank, schweinebraten, spanferkel (roast suckling pig with dumpling), and leberkäse (veal loaf topped with egg, sauerkraut, and mashed potatoes) are just a few of the uncommon dishes on the menu at Old Heidelberg.
  • Visitors can also enjoy fishing, boating and diving at Candlewood Lake, which is about 25 minutes away.
  • Right near the border, you can sample tasty enchiladas, tacos, burritos, and fresh mild or spicy salsas at affordable prices.
  • Guests may choose be seated in the stately dining room or at a table in the courtyard overlooking the hotel swimming pool.
  • Open to guests, as well as visitors to the area, the Steakhouse at the Inn is an upscale, yet casual, restaurant.
  • Travertine Grill1209 Van Buren AvenueSalton City, CA 92274(760) 394-0040 Calipatria Inn and Suites Steakhouse at the Inn Located just 8 miles from the Salton Sea, Calipatria Inn and Suites hotel operates an upscale steakhouse.
  • While soaking in the natural amenities of the area, guests and residents can also sample tasty meals at some of the areas numerous seafood restaurants, which specialize in local and fresh seafood.
  • Become a VIP Club Member to receive a free entree at The Landmark.
  • PB Diner500 Delsea DriveGlassboro, NJ 08028(856) 881-1579 Resources Make reservations at the Italian Affair.
  • Glassboro, New Jersey, is a small college town that caters to residents and students at Rowan University.
  • Known in southeastern Kansas for well-priced and beautifully cooked steaks since 1938, the family at Jim's in Pittsburg cuts their own steaks.
  • Reservations are recommended at this south central Kansas eatery.
  • During Sumo Hour, patrons can enjoy Shibuya Sliders made with wagyu beef or a variety of sushi rolls available at early bird prices.
  • When at Ozumo, do as locals do and order from the Chef's Original Dishes.
  • Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights are a great time to be at Belloos Martini Bar, when you can sit back, sip a nice cold martini and listen to the best live music in town.
  • Cannon Brewpub1041 BroadwayColumbus, GA 31901(706) 653-2337thecannonbrewpub.com Lil Kims Cove At Lil Kims Cove you will have no trouble finding a cold beer and hot wings.
  • At the Cannon Brewpub, you will always find fine food and tasty beer.
  • You may want to note that the restaurant is closed Monday and Tuesdays and there can be a wait at breakfast and dinner.
  • Make sure to leave room for homemade cheesecake and sorbets at this family-friendly restaurant.
  • Fiorino Ristorante38 Maple StSummit, NJ 07901(908)277-1900fiorinoristorante.com La Pastaria Taste authentic old world Italian cuisine at the lovely La Pastaria.
  • Summit Brick Oven Pizza & Catering21 Union PlSummit, NJ 07901(908)598-0045summitbrickoven.com Fiorino Ristorante Cuisine from Tuscany is served at this Zagat-rated elegant, gourmet restaurant.
  • Casual attire is acceptable at Summit Brick Oven Pizza.
  • Vegetarian, diet dishes and daily specials are available at this casual establishment.
  • After touring Summit's beautiful landscape and quaint township, dine at one of Summit's favorite Italian restaurants.
  • Specialty drinks, martinis, port wine and sparkling wines are featured at the bar.
  • While enjoying an active lifestyle, visitors and residents can also dine at one of the areas several diverse restaurants featuring Latin, German and Italian food.
  • Morris StBath, NY 14810(607) 776-4381ponderosasteakhouses.com Pizza Hut Diners can fill their stomachs with delicious, flavorful pizza at the Bath Pizza Hut.
  • Diners can select from a wide variety of beef, chicken and seafood favorites or fill their plate at the scrumptious buffet.
  • Residents of Bath and visitors alike enjoy gathering with friends and feasting on one of its signature sticky buns at this comfortable and homey restaurant.28 Liberty St.
  • If you are a Bath resident or visitor, consider taking a meal at one of the in-town restaurants.
  • The restaurant at Donauschwaben features traditional German fare, like Sauerbraten, Wienerschnitzel and Spatzle. "Lunch at Lenau Park" is served at very reasonable prices Tuesday to Friday and Sunday.
  • The restaurant at Donauschwaben features traditional German fare, like Sauerbraten, Wienerschnitzel and Spatzle. "Lunch at Lenau Park" is served at very reasonable prices Tuesday to Friday and Sunday.
  • The restaurant at Donauschwaben features traditional German fare, like Sauerbraten, Wienerschnitzel and Spatzle. "Lunch at Lenau Park" is served at very reasonable prices Tuesday to Friday and Sunday.
  • Italian favorites served at Romana's include pizza, seafood fra diavolo, veal, and shrimp scampi, to name a few.
  • Enjoy hiking, cycling, kayaking, canoeing, and other outdoor sports only 10 miles away at Adirondack Park.
  • Tandoori Chef serves lunch buffet Monday through Thursday for $7.95, as of December 2009, while its weekend buffet is priced at $8.95.
  • Seattle, WA 98112(206) 324-2370garlicsauce.com Omar Al-Khyam Restaurant You can find the Omar Al-Khyam Restaurant at the south end of Lake Washington in the Seattle suburb of Renton.
  • Whether jogging around Green Lake, heading up to the Summit at Snoqualmie for some after-work skiing, or cycling along the Burke-Gilman trail, there is no shortage of recreational activities.
  • Ol' West BBQ1316 Route 31 NorthAnnandale, NJ 08801(908) 735-6700olwestbbq31.com Relax at Miller's Tavern A beloved secret among the locals, this casual pub serves up fantastic thin-crust pizza.
  • Get Romantic at Dora's Quaint yet elegant, Dora's Restaurant offers a taste of Italy with modern touches, and perfect for special occasions or taking a first date.
  • Parc Brasserie227 South 18th StreetPhiladelphia, PA 19103(215) 545-2262http://www.parc-restaurant.com/ Creperie Beau Monde This unique establishment is both a restaurant and cabaret and sits at the corner of 6th and Bainbridge Streets.
  • The restaurant is centrally located in Rittenhouse Square at 227 South 18th Street.
  • Le Bec-Fin1523 Walnut StreetPhiladelphia, PA 19102(215) 567-1000http://lebecfin.com/index.asp Parc Brasserie You can pretend to be in Paris at this brasserie/café.
  • It is located at 1523 Walnut Street, in Center City.
  • Stop off for a quick lunch or enjoy a leisurely dinner at one of Philadelphia's fine French restaurants.
  • Begin by viewing some French paintings at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA), a world famous institution.
  • The menu at Skipper's includes fresh seafood, sandwiches and poultry.
  • Afterwards, you can slow down and enjoy a meal at one of Stonington's restaurants.
  • As with the rooms at the other Caeasar's Resorts, guests can choose a room with heart-shaped or 7-foot champagne glass whirlpool.
  • Guests will enjoy complimentary hors d'oeuvres at the resort's Garden Party and a five-course dinner.
  • Engage in water sports, dine at on-site restaurants or work out at the health club.
  • Engage in water sports, dine at on-site restaurants or work out at the health club.
  • Stay at one of three resorts owned by Caesar's for a trip filled with activities, entertainment and sports.
  • The area is also renowned for its outdoor activities, where residents can hike, run, bike, and camp on the beach and at several area parks.
  • Euro Grill A traditional Portuguese restaurant, the Euro Grill features specialty slow-cooked barbecue at affordable prices.
  • Caldwell's natural landscape makes it an ideal place to partake in numerous recreational activities, such as tennis, biking, and hiking at many of the area's trails.
  • Kisco, NY 10549(914) 666-7445pigcafe.com/ Q Restaurant Slow-cooked, smoked-pit barbeque meats reign at this restaurant.
  • Play a round at one of several golf courses available in the area.
  • For excellent live Spanish guitar music and jazz, pull up a chair at the Flamenco Bar with some sangria and prepare yourself to be amazed.
  • Located at the Town Center at Aurora, Helga's Deli is near the crossing of Interstates 70 and 225 on the east side of Denver.14197 E.
  • Located at the Town Center at Aurora, Helga's Deli is near the crossing of Interstates 70 and 225 on the east side of Denver.14197 E.
  • The city is conveniently located at the intersection of Interstates 25 and 70, two of Colorado's major highways, allowing easy access in all directions.
  • Chicken Korma, Chicken Tikka Masala, Lamb Coconut Curry, Lamb Saag, Kerala Fish Curry, Garlic Beef and Shrimp Biryani---all of these and many more are at Mela.
  • After a day spent on the beaches surfing or a hike at the Sebastian Inlet State Recreation Area in Melbourne Beach, Florida, satisfy your hearty appetite for old world food at one of the German restaurants in the area.
  • After a day spent on the beaches surfing or a hike at the Sebastian Inlet State Recreation Area in Melbourne Beach, Florida, satisfy your hearty appetite for old world food at one of the German restaurants in the area.
  • Petersburg, FL 33701(727) 895-5515www.bellabrava.net Gondolier Pizza Pizza lovers can grab a pie to go or enjoy a sit-down dinner at this popular Italian restaurant.
  • Alfano's Restaurant1702 Clearwater Largo RoadClearwater, FL 33756(727) 584-2125www.alfanosrestaurant.com Ponte's Tuscano Grill Enjoy an authentic Italian meal at this elegant restaurant that offers a full menu of rustic Italian favorites.
  • The restaurant is open every day from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and closes at 9 p.m. on weekends.
  • Providing an elegant, yet comfortable, atmosphere, the service at La Cremaillere is impeccable, and its wine list is extensive.
  • Save room for the cheese plate at the end of the meal, served with quince marmalade.
  • Newport Beach, CA 92663(949) 673-010017260 E. 17th StreetTustin, CA 92680(714) 573-1077crabcooker.com Cosmo's Italian Kitchen At Cosmo's you can order up just about any kind of Italian food.
  • Cook Au Vin2256 N Elston AveChicago, IL 60614(773) 489-3141www.cook-au-vin.com Flat Top Grill At the Flat Top grill you can create your own Asian fusion feast.
  • Peaks Island, ME 04108 (207) 766-4400 thepeaksislandhouse.com/rstrnt.html The Maine Deck The Maine Deck restaurant at the Chebeague Inn serves Maine foods with a gourmet flair.
  • Diners can choose from eating at the contemporary bar, in the VIP lounge or in the outdoor eating area where the views of Manhattan are accentuated by a cool breeze off the water.
  • Lunch hours are from 11:30 to 2:30 on weekdays or for dinner starting at 5:30 every night except Sunday when they open at 4:30.
  • Lunch hours are from 11:30 to 2:30 on weekdays or for dinner starting at 5:30 every night except Sunday when they open at 4:30.
  • Whether camping at High Point State Park in Sussex or touring the Rankokus Indian Reservation in Westhampton, visitors to the state can easily find numerous ways to immerse themselves in activities.
  • Union Hall Inn2 Union PlaceJohnstown, NY 12095(518) 762-3210unionhallinnrestaurant.com Romana's Italian Kitchen Traditional Italian cuisine is found at Romana's - pizza, pasta, calzone - plus sandwiches, salads, fried fish and assorted finger foods.
  • From the dining room designed by C&J Katz, to a wine list chosen by award-winning sommelier Cat Silirie, to the menu designed by James Beard Award-Winning Chef Barbara Lynch, the restaurant exudes sophistication at every turn.
  • Emerald Point Restaurant & Marina opens at 4 p.m.
  • Breezy Point Inn620 Jersey AveGreenwood Lake, NY 10925(845) 477-8100breezypointinn.com Emerald Point Restaurant & Marina Relax and enjoy lakeside dining with mountain views year round at Emerald Point Restaurant & Marina.
  • The hours at the Breezy Point Inn are seasonal and subject to change.
  • Jean-Claude Pastries Jean-Claude Pastries delights customers with delicious French desserts and coffee at this charming Greenwood Lake, New York, café.
  • After a day of hiking in the woods, stop in at a local restaurant and indulge in a hearty meal.
  • The gardens at West Point are beautiful and open to the public.
  • The northern border of the park butts up against the United States Military Academy at West Point.
  • After a day at the beach you can walk in to Marcello's in swim trunks and a T-shirt.
  • The Buffalo Chicken Pizza can only be found at Marcello's.
  • Chicago, IL 60654(312) 644-7700www.maggianos.com/locations/detail.asp?unit_id=001.025.0047 Marcello's Located at 645 North Ave., Marcello's Itailan restaurant and pizzeria is just a stone's throw from North Beach.
  • The gardens are located in Mlwaukee County's 625-acre Whitnall Park, and at Eastertime usually feature a spectacular display of magnolias and daffodils.
  • Milwaukee, WI‎ 53202(414) 291-4793kilawatcuisine.com Boerner Botanical Gardens For a truly unique dining experience, book well in advance to get a seat at the annual Boerner Botanical Gardens Easter Brunch.
  • The Steakhouse at San Luis Hotel5222 Seawall Blvd.(800) 445-0090sanluisresort.com/dining-entertainment/the-steakhouse/index.cfm
  • At least, that is the praise given it by "Texas Monthly" and "Galveston Daily News." Wear your nicer casual clothes--no beachwear, tank-tops or hats--but you will enjoy the luxury of leather seating in the mahogany-paneled dining room.
  • However, the atmosphere at Willie G's is completely different: stylish and modern without being highbrow.
  • After your hike, walk a few blocks west of the peak and sit down at Casa Vicente.
  • If you are feeling bold, consider stopping at a Spanish restaurant for an intriguing dining experience.
  • Be sure to stop by its website and print off money-saving coupons before taking your trip to Sakura and get the most bang for your buck at this delightful restaurant.4210 Stelzer RoadColumbus, OH 43219(614) 476-6088sakuraeaston.com
  • The time of its transition varies, depending on the day.3884 Morse RoadColumbus, OH 43219(614) 428-8880kobeohio.com Sakura Diners at Sakura get an authentic taste of Japan in the heart of Ohio.
  • Columbus, OH 43214(614) 785-0366ichibanusa.net Kobe Diners at Kobe can select the setting that is just right for them.
  • At Ichiban, dinner is more than just a meal; it is an event.146 Graceland Blvd.
  • Visitors can feast on Japanese-style cuisine and enjoy a show put on by the highly trained chefs right at their table.
  • The price tag at this restaurants tends to be a bit lower than ones you will find at other Japanese steakhouses.
  • The price tag at this restaurants tends to be a bit lower than ones you will find at other Japanese steakhouses.
  • The restaurant serves entertainment along with quality food as master chefs prepare and serve your meal right at your table, delig